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ANDY WARHOL THE VOGUE YEARS

FASHION FLASHBACK

80S REWIND NEW SEASON EXCESS-ORIES BIG, BOLD & BEAUTIFUL


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MARCH 2017 VOL LXII No 3 Whole No 633, *RECOMMENDED PRICE

ELECTRIC DREAM 160

COVER

Cindy Crawford wears a Christian Dior dress and lingerie. Gigi Burris hat. Make-up from Estée Lauder, starting with Perfectionist Youth-Infusing Makeup SPF 25 in Ivory Beige; on cheeks, Pure Color Envy Sculpting Blush in Lover’s Blush; on eyes, Pure Color Envy Sculpting EyeShadow 5-Color Palette in Defiant Nude and Sumptuous Knockout Defining Lift and Fan Mascara; on brows, Brow Multi-Tasker in Brunette; on lips, Pure Color Envy Sculpting Lipstick in Discreet. Fashion editor: Paul Cavaco Photographer: Emma Summerton Hair: Danilo Make-up: Pati Dubroff Manicure: Marisa Carmichael

60 IN MEMORY OF FRANCA SOZZANI 64 EDITOR’S LETTER 66 VOGUE VOX 68 THIS MONTH ON VOGUE.COM.AU 72 CONTRIBUTORS 74 VOGUE 180° The rapid rise of Rebecca Vallance.

79 NOW WAVE Suddenly the 80s has swung back around. 84 FASHION PREDICTIONS The trends to bookmark from the spring/summer runways for your wardrobe refresh. 86 NATURAL SELECTION Jonathan Saunders is perfectly suited to his role at the helm at Diane von Furstenberg. 88 Jean genie; team play. 42 MARCH 2017

NICOLE BENTLEY

VOGUE MOOD


®

MARCH 2017

LET’S GO CRAZY 204 ACCESSORIES REPORT BEAUTY 97 EXCESS-ORIES Take things up a notch with extravagant add-ons. 102 Flip side; Throwing shapes; Zip code; Hello, kitty. 104 SWING LOW Big earrings are everywhere this season: proceed with caution. 122 PETAL CORE Louis Vuitton’s new high jewellery and watch collections are a blossoming of the house’s codes.

ARTS

128 SING IT LOUD Malian musician, model and political activist Inna Modja lives by her passions. 130 IN THE FRAME Directors Liz Ann Macgregor of the Museum of Contemporary Art and Carriageworks’ Lisa Havilah on the state of the arts. 134 LEAP OF FAITH Dance has the power to break down cultural barriers, writes ballerina Juliet Burnett. 44 MARCH 2017

137 TEXTURE PLAYBold make-up returns in the form of powerful pigments in playful textures, as imagined by renowned French make-up artist Violette. 142 HEY, GIRL This season’s beauty muse embraces everything from the eclectic to the ethereal. 146 PERFECT ALCHEMY Viktor & Rolf’s creative maestros Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren have reinterpreted their chart-topping debut scent with the new Flowerbomb Bloom. 148 CUT LOOSE With rebellious, home-cut hair influencing the runways, Lena Dunham reflects on her own self-styled history – and the power of picking up the shears. 150 BEAUTY BITES 154 KNEES UP The return of leg-baring outfits this season might be bad news for those who dislike the look of their knees, but the good news is that there is a solution.

GEORGINA EGAN STEVEN PAN JAKE TERREY

FLIP SIDE 102


®

MARCH 2017

SISTERHOOD 220

160 ELECTRIC DREAM More is more: stay up all night (and day) in slick shininess and gilded turns. From statement shoulders to a focus on the waist, revel in the decade of excess. 188 SUPERNOVA Decades on from her 90s modelling zenith, Cindy Crawford still has us enthralled. 204 LET’S GO CRAZY Bold, eclectic, magnetic: to the perpetual beat of the 80s, you can take on anything. 224 SOME KIND OF WONDERFUL It’s a Technicolor dream world, all pink and perfectly imperfect pastel. It’s the new pretty, gritty pretty, a fashion reality.

FEATURES

SOME KIND OF WONDERFUL 224 48 MARCH 2017

176 SOLID GOLD As the awards season unfolds in Hollywood, we salute our favourite stars of the year’s best films. 198 LADY DIOR Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first female creative director at Christian Dior, is out to make a statement. 212 GET (BACK) IN THE GROOVE Big, brazen, brash and decadent, the

1980s, it seems, really are back in fashion and sensibility. Enjoy the ride, but this time, let’s not crash. 216 BEFORE POP A look at Andy Warhol’s early career as a commercial illustrator for clients such as Vogue. 220 SISTERHOOD A single mum and her nine daughters star in a compelling new TV series that offers a fresh take on contemporary Indigenous family life. 236 IN FOCUS When not in front of the camera, actor Mirrah Foulkes is expanding her skill set behind the scenes. 242 WHERE TO BUY 243 HOROSCOPES 248 LAST WORD

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VOGUE.COM.AU EDWINA McCANN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF editor@vogue.com.au Deputy Editor and Features Director SOPHIE TEDMANSON features@vogue.com.au Fashion Director CHRISTINE CENTENERA Creative Director at Large ALISON VENESS ART art@vogue.com.au Art Director MANDY ALEX Senior Designers BEC McDIVEN DIJANA SAVOR Junior Designer ARQUETTE COOKE FASHION fashion@vogue.com.au Senior Fashion Editor KATE DARVILL Fashion Editor and Market Director PHILIPPA MORONEY Junior Fashion Editor PETTA CHUA Market Editor MONIQUE SANTOS Fashion Assistant MICHELLE LORETO BOOKINGS bookings@vogue.com.au Photography and Casting Director RIKKI KEENE Bookings Editor DANICA OSLAND FASHION FEATURES vogue@vogue.com.au Fashion Features and Content Strategy Director ZARA WONG Fashion Features and News Editor ALICE BIRRELL BEAUTY beauty@vogue.com.au Beauty Editor REMY RIPPON Health Editor at Large JODY SCOTT Beauty Special Projects RICKY ALLEN COPY copy@vogue.com.au Travel Editor and Copy Editor MARK SARIBAN Deputy Copy Editor and Lifestyle Writer CUSHLA CHAUHAN Arts Writer JANE ALBERT Editorial Coordinator REBECCA SHALALA DIGITAL vogue@vogue.com.au Commercial Digital Editor ERIN WEINGER Associate Digital Editor LILITH HARDIE LUPICA Assistant Digital Editor DANIELLE GAY CONTRIBUTORS ALICE CAVANAGH (Paris) VICTORIA COLLISON (Special Projects Editor) MEG GRAY (Fashion) PIPPA HOLT (London) NATASHA INCHLEY (Fashion) EMMA STRENNER (Beauty) EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION AND RIGHTS Digital Assets and Rights Manager TRUDY BIERNAT National Sales and Strategy Director, Style NICOLE WAUDBY (02) 8045 4661. Heads of Brand Strategy, Style MERRYN DHAMI (02) 9288 1090. JANE SCHOFIELD (02) 8045 4658. NSW Group Sales Manager CHEYNE HALL (02) 8045 4667. NSW Key Account Managers KATE CORBETT (02) 8045 4737. CATHERINE PATRICK (02) 8045 4613. ELISE DE SANTO (02) 8045 4675. Sponsorships & Partnerships Manager HANNAH DAVID-WRIGHT (02) 8045 4986. Commercial Integration Manager KRISTINA KARASSOULIS (02) 9288 1743. Digital Brand Manager ADRIANA HOOPER (02) 8045 4655. NSW Campaign Implementation Manager KATE DWYER (02) 9288 1009. NSW Account Executives, Style TESSA DIXON (02) 8045 4744. CAITLIN PATER (02) 8045 4653. Victoria Sales Director, Style KAREN CLEMENTS (03) 9292 3202. Victoria Head of Sales BETHANY SUTTON (03) 9292 1621. Victoria Group Business Managers NADINE DENISON (03) 9292 3224. SIMONE WERZBERGER (03) 9292 3203. Victoria Campaign Implementation Manager REBECCA RODELL (03) 9292 1951. Queensland Commercial Director, Lifestyle ROSE WEGNER (07) 3666 6903. Classified Advertising REBECCA WHITE 1300 139 305. Asia: KIM KENCHINGTON, Mediaworks Asia. (852) 2882 1106. Advertising Creative Director RICHARD McAULIFFE Advertising Creative Manager EVA CHOWN Advertising Creative Producers JENNY HAYES YASMIN SHIMA Creative Services Senior Art Directors CARYN ISEMANN KRISTYN JENKINS Advertising Copy Editors ANNETTE FARNSWORTH BROOKE LEWIS ROB BADMAN TIFFANY BARAN Production Manager MICHELLE O’BRIEN Advertising Production Coordinator GINA JIANG General Manager, Retail Sales and Circulation BRETT WILLIS Subscriptions Acquisition Manager MELISSA BLADES Subscriptions Retention Manager CRYSTAL EWINS Digital Director JULIAN DELANEY Senior Product Manager CASSANDRA ALLARS Product Manager TINA ISHAK Platform Manager DAVID BERRY Digital Art Director HEIDI BOARDMAN Marketing Director – Lifestyle DIANA KAY Marketing Manager MELISSA MORPHET Brand Manager MAGDALENA ZAJAC Event Marketing Manager BROOKE KING Events Manager DANIELLE ISENBERG Marketing Executive RACHEL CHRISTIAN Sponsorship Manager, Style ELLE RITSON Senior Commercial Manager JOSH MEISNER Chief Executive Officer NICOLE SHEFFIELD Director of Communications SHARYN WHITTEN General Manager, Network Sales, NSW PAUL BLACKBURN Prestige and Lifestyle Director NICK SMITH VOGUE AUSTRALIA magazine is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd (ACN 088 923 906). ISSN 0042-8019. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Limited (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2017 by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Tel: (02) 9288 3000. Postal address: Vogue Australia, NewsLifeMedia, Level 1, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. Email: editvogueaust@vogue.com.au. Melbourne office: HWT Tower, Level 5, 40 City Road, Southbank, Victoria 3006. Tel: (03) 9292 2000. Fax: (03) 9292 3299. Brisbane office: 41 Campbell Street, Bowen Hills, Queensland 4006. Tel: (07) 3666 6910. Fax: (07) 3620 2001. Subscriptions: within Australia, 1300 656 933; overseas: (61 2) 9282 8023. Email: subs@magsonline.com.au. Subscriptions mail: Magsonline, Reply Paid 87050, Sydney, NSW 2001 (no stamp required). Website: www.vogue.com.au. Condé Nast International JONATHAN NEWHOUSE Chairman and Chief Executive NICHOLAS COLERIDGE President Condé Nast Asia Pacific JAMES WOOLHOUSE President JASON MILES Director of Planning

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56 MARCH 2017


VOGUE TRIBUTE

In memory of

Franca Sozzani

PETER LINDBERGH

The fashion world continues to mourn the loss of Franca Sozzani, editor-in-chief of Italian Vogue, who passed away just before Christmas. Born in Mantua, northern Italy, Sozzani began her career as an assistant at Vogue Bambini and quickly rose up the ranks. In 1979 she was named fashion director of Lei magazine, and became editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia in 1988. Among the most influential fashion voices internationally, Vogue Italia is respected and lauded by the fashion elite. In the magazine’s pages, careers are forged and celebrated. Under her stewardship, Vogue Italia had the audacity to throw away the rulebook, covering typically delicate topics such as surgery and racism with intellect and humour. Franca’s recognition as a United Nations goodwill ambassador for the Fashion 4 Development initiative was one of her career highlights. “That’s probably the moment in which I understood, in a very simple way, that I had the power to do something to help other people,” she once told Vogue Australia with genuine modesty. She was also active in initiatives to aid young designers and sat on the judging panel for the Woolmark Prize. In association with her Woolmark partnership, L’Uomo Vogue dedicated an issue to Australia and she visited Sydney three years ago, becoming the first international ambassador of the Australian Fashion Chamber. She famously wore clothes purposely out of season. “I know a lot of people who buy fashion,” she said. “I know, perhaps, only two people who have style.” Sozzani was the most stylish of women, inside and out. As we head to our biannual Vogue editors’ dinner this month in Paris, it will be with heavy hearts knowing that she will not be there with us too. Edwina McCann & the Vogue Australia team

60 MARCH 2017


yslbeauty.com


VOLUPTÉ TINT-IN-BALM INSTANT COLOUR GLOW A KISS OF TINT & CARE JUST ME BUT BETTER

#NOT INNOCENT


editor’s LETTER

suppose, thanks to the film of the same name, much is made of Vogue’s annual September issue, but March is just as significant for us. As a celebration of a new spring/summer international season, it always delights me to see it come together. The issue becomes our team’s expression of the new shapes, colours and ideas for your wardrobes. Like September, we also focus on the new accessories of the season and the trends you need to know. So this March, we encourage you to think about pastels in a new way. They’re thoroughly modern in new silhouettes and fabrics (see page 224). The 80s have been revived, as you’ll read in Alison Veness’s story on page 212. Fashion editor Kate Darvill and photographer Nicole Bentley explore this theme in their “Electric Dream” shoot from page 160, again bringing modernity to it. The sad and untimely death of George Michael last year had me rewatching his wonderful video clip Freedom! ’90 from the album Listen Without Prejudice Vol. 1. While the old cassette player sound system, telephone cord and smoking firmly date it in 1990, the exquisite supermodels look as superb today lipsyncing the lyrics as they did then. Cindy Crawford is unmistakable with her mole and perfectly symmetrical face,

recognisable even upside down in a bathtub. This month we reunited her with stylist Paul Cavaco, who has worked with her many times during that era and since, for our cover shoot. He and photographer Emma Summerton have reimagined her in minimal black, really allowing her beauty to tell the story against a rich backdrop. On the eve of her visit to Australia for Omega, we celebrate her enduring beauty, work ethic, motherhood and success in all areas of her life. As she says, modelling is just what she does, not who she is. She’s so much more than just a beautiful face in a picture, as Zara Wong discovers from page 188. We also feature, from page 216, the upcoming Andy Warhol exhibition – Adman: Warhol Before Pop – at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, which displays some of his incredible early advertising work for Vogue and many other clients. Vogue has such a rich history documenting the most talented, fascinating and influential people of our times, and looking back on Warhol’s brilliance years later makes us proud to work for a masthead that has such a long history publishing the best and most wonderful imagery, be it in photography or illustration. Enjoy the March issue.

Edwina McCann Editor-in-chief

64 MARCH 2017

EMMA SUMMERTON

I

Cindy Crawford in “Supernova”, from page 188, wears a Chanel dress and skirt, from the Chanel boutiques. Gigi Burris hat. Michael Kors belt.


OBJECTS FOR LIFE


vogueVOX In the USA: Condé Nast Chairman Emeritus: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. Chairman: Charles H. Townsend President and Chief Executive Officer: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. Artistic Director: Anna Wintour In other countries: Condé Nast International Chairman and Chief Executive: Jonathan Newhouse President: Nicholas Coleridge Vice Presidents: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert, Elizabeth Schimel Chief Digital Officer: Wolfgang Blau President, Asia-Pacific: James Woolhouse President, New Markets and Editorial Director, Brand Development: Karina Dobrotvorskaya Director of Planning: Jason Miles Director of Acquisitions and Investments: Moritz von Laffert Global President, Condé Nast E-commerce: Franck Zayan Executive Director, Condé Nast Global Development: Jamie Bill

Global fitness powerhouse Kayla Itsines was a hit in our February issue. Kayla has:

10.5 MILLION likes on Facebook

6.2 MILLION fans on Instagram

5 MILLION

posts on her #bbg hashtag

79,000

likes when she Instagrammed this picture

Published under joint venture: Brazil: Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style Russia: Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure Published under licence or copyright cooperation: Australia: Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ Bulgaria: Glamour China: Vogue, Vogue Collections, Self, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design Czech Republic and Slovakia: La Cucina Italiana Hungary: Glamour Iceland: Glamour Korea: Vogue, GQ, Allure, W, GQ Style Middle East: Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall, GQ Bar Dubai Poland: Glamour Portugal: Vogue, GQ Romania: Glamour Russia: Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow South Africa: House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style The Netherlands: Glamour, Vogue Thailand: Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok Turkey: Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, La Cucina Italiana, GQ Style, Glamour Ukraine: Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev Vogue Australia Subscription rate for 12 issues post paid is $82 (within Australia). Copyright © 2017. Published by NewsLifeMedia. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is strictly prohibited. NewsLifeMedia is a licensed user in Australia of the registered trademarks VOGUE, VOGUE LIVING and GQ and has been granted the exclusive right to use those trademarks in relation to magazines published by NewsLifeMedia by the proprietor of the trademarks. Printed in Australia by Offset Alpine Printing. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, tel 1300 650 666.

66 MARCH 2017

JUSTIN RIDLER EMMA SUMMERTON PIERRE TOUSSAINT

HARDER, BETTER, FASTER, STRONGER

The Condé Nast group of brands includes: US Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, Condé Nast Entertainment, The Scene, Pitchfork UK Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica France Vogue, Vogue Hommes International, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, Vogue Travel in France, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style Italy Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Bambini, Glamour, Vogue Sposa, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, Vogue Accessory, La Cucina Italiana, CNLive Germany Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Myself, Wired Spain Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair Japan Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding Taiwan Vogue, GQ Mexico and Latin America Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico and Latin America, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico India Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD


OBJECTS FOR LIFE


vogue.com.au Cindy Crawford

Head to Vogue.com.au for our exclusive Cindy Crawford content and learn all about the iconic supermodel.

Throw back: her best moments off the runway.

Style file: the super’s best looks.

This month …

ALAMY RICHARD AVEDON GETTY IMAGES STEVEN MEISEL INSTAGRAM.COM/CINDYCRAWFORD

Follow Vogue Australia on Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter.

On the streets of New York.

68 MARCH 2017


OBJECTS FOR LIFE


vogue CONTRIBUTORS

RICHARD PARKER

For this issue, New York-based make-up artist Violette Serrat created the awe-inspiring make-up looks for “Texture play”, from page 137, and the 80s-inspired “Let’s go crazy”, from page 204. “I do a lot of beauty stories and I always have fun, but this time was extra fun,” she says on working with Vogue Australia. “I am so excited to show how 80s make-up can totally fit our time now and how very creative make-up can be wearable.” 72 MARCH 2017

ROSS COFFEY SCOTT NEWETT STEVEN PAN

Richard Parker, director of research and development at cult beauty brand Rationale, collaborated with Vogue to achieve a flawless base on the beauty shoot “Let’s go crazy”, starting on page 204. (See a look from the shoot, left.) “There is no greater beauty credential than pristine, luminous skin,” says Parker, whose background as an editorial make-up artist influences his work. “My radar is always attuned to the two important barometers in our industry: medical research and high-end beauty trends.”


Raffia and Tan Calf Hammock Bag, 2017

loewe.com Chadstone Centre, Melbourne


Rebecca Vallance “Passionate” sums her up. Rebecca Vallance is working hard to create a good family, a career and an extraordinary business. By Alison Veness. Styled by Philippa Moroney. Photographed by Hugh Stewart.

74 MARCH 2017

HAIR AND MAKE-UP: MOLLY WARKENTIN FLOWERS FROM MR COOK DETAILS LAST PAGES

vogue180º


S

he is quite unstoppable. Ask any woman who wears Rebecca Vallance and they will tell you that they feel empowered by her clothes, with their light tailoring, gentle structures and glamour. She has perfected this upbeat signature since she started her business in 2011, when she introduced her collection in Paris and was snapped up by Harvey Nichols. Since then she has gone on to show regularly in New York and has recently become a bestseller on Net-A-Porter.com. She likes a calculated risk: in fact, she thrives on it. Every single

step, every button, zip and look has been forged with her team, and despite the many business challenges that face all designers, she is undaunted. She is on a roll. Momentum. Her home in Sydney is a buzzing reflection of all her loves: travel, beautiful things, lush flowers and at the centre of it all her boy, Matthias, who at two years old is gorgeous, funny and inquisitive. She is about to give birth again, at the end of February, and doubtless while she’ll be busy with that, she will also be working on the next collection. Better watch out: she will conquer the world. ■ VOGUE.COM.AU 75


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SAINT LAURENT S/S ’17

TOPSHOP UNIQUE S/S ’17

STYLIST: MONIQUE SANTOS PHOTOGRAPHS: INDIGITAL

T BALENCIAGA S/S ’17

MARNI S/S ’17

KENZO S/S ’17

KENZO S/S ’17

vogueMOOD

Now wave

There have been subtle signs of its resurgence, but suddenly the 80s has swung back around.


ELLERY GLASSES, $199. FROM SPECSAVERS.

BALLY BAG, $3,150. EMPORIO ARMANI BOOTS, $940.

80 MARCH 2017

R, $90.

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GUCCI S/S ’17

simmering. Track to now, and the era is defying its bad reputation. “I say, a bit of bad taste,” the house’s new creative head Anthony Vaccarello declared backstage, seamlessly taking up Slimane’s glamourladen baton. With sexed-up leather and ample flesh framed in sequins, Vaccarello didn’t bother with mystery. Neither did Humberto Leon and Carol Lim at Kenzo, with lacquered apple-red pants, or Rodarte’s Mulleavy sisters, who served up scrunchy leg-of-mutton-sleeved prom dresses. The aspects of the era some might choose to forget were the very same ones designers chose to delve into. Brash colours were feverishly employed by Balenciaga’s Demna Gvasalia in magenta and electric purple Spandex, at Emanuel Ungaro in grass-green party dresses and in Sies Marjan’s assertive left-of-pretty palette in neon and clashing pastels. Elsewhere, the era’s ethos of empowerment was revived. Bulked-up tailoring at Louis Vuitton, Balenciaga and Haider Ackermann were about getting down to business. These are clothes that allow power women, much like Maripol, the creative polymath who styled Blondie and Madonna and went on to become art director of then It brand Fiorucci, to excel today. Shape-wise, the theme continued in jutting one-shouldered dresses and angular silhouettes (Gucci, Saint Laurent) that had Claude Montana-like boisterousness. Skirts are short, stilettos ultra-high and fabrics hyper-glossy. Why now? Social-political tensions are running hot. Powerful looks and the certainty they telegraph can make us feel secure, or at least put some zip in our step; the idea that outer chaos can bring inner self-possession. What it is at its best is a return to fashion for fashion’s sake. “At the beginning, Saint Laurent was girls having fun, breaking the rules,” said Vaccarello. It’s time to invoke that spirit. Alice Birrell

BALENCIAGA S/S ’17

LA

Jane Fonda, left, and Lily Tomlin in 9 to 5, 1980.

9 TO 5 THE KILLER INSTINCT THAT PERMEATED THE CUTTHROAT OFFICES OF THE 1980S IS HERE TO TAKE ON YOUR WARDROBE. THIS IS NOT RAZOR-SHARP OR LASER-THIN TAILORING: INSTEAD IT’S BRAVE AND UP-SIZED. THESE ARE SUITS WITH MUSCLE, SO FLEX THEM. AB


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VOGUE MOOD


Long admired for his print skills and bold use of colour, Jonathan Saunders is perfectly suited to his role at the helm at Diane von Furstenberg. By Alice Cavanagh.

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ossessed with charm, intelligence and an intoxicating sense of humour, Scottish fashion designer Jonathan Saunders has the air of someone who could convince you to wear, or do, just about anything. All of which makes him well suited to his role as chief creative officer of the muchloved, all-American womenswear brand Diane von Furstenberg. Charged with dressing hundreds of thousands of women who flock to “DVF” for flattering, fun and well-priced dress, he is also the first person (and a man to boot) that the brand’s 70-yearold namesake has been happy to hand the reins to. For those who have followed the 39-year-old Glaswegian’s career closely, his appointment last May was not entirely left-offield. Since his fledgling days as a Central Saint Martins graduate on the London fashion scene, he has stood out for his textile prints and off-kilter, arresting colour combinations. In his hands, garments are bold canvases of expression. “The first collection I reviewed of Jonathan’s, in 2004, is still one of my favourites … it showed all his talent for clear, zingy colour and print engineered to flatter,” says Sarah Mower, chief critic at Vogue.com. “That was quite revolutionary in London then … a dull, dark time in fashion and nothing much was happening. Jonathan was the first of the new generation of young colour and print revolutionaries who put London on the map.” Von Furstenberg’s ascendance was not all that dissimilar. The blockbuster success of that iconic wrap dress – a billboard for female confidence and empowerment – lies not only in its flattering silhouette and carefree fit, but in the way she choose to animate it. Alive with pattern and colour, the DVF look seduced generations of woman seeking clothes with character. “I was always fascinated by Diane as a person,” Saunders says of Von Furstenberg. “At Saint Martins, students, especially print designers, would graduate and go away to this wonderful world in New York called DVF, an amazing workshop where people were making textiles all day.” Some 18 years later, here he sits comfortably, dapper in jeans and a Prada blazer, with a glass of red in hand on the sofa in Von Furstenberg’s Left Bank Parisian pad. It’s Paris fashion week, but Von Furstenberg herself is not in town. She’s here in spirit, though: her portrait by Andy Warhol is hanging on the wall. Still, her absence is a clear statement: she has officially passed on the baton. Starting with the new spring/summer ’17 collection, Saunders has made a convincing case for the new DVF look, which begins with a collection of a fresh offering of asymmetrical dresses in a seductive mix of block colour and prints. Lively, contemporary and more luxurious than before, the line stays true to that same DVF sensuality, with dresses dropping off the shoulders and baring the décolletage. “I like the idea of a garment falling on or

off the body, in an effortless manner, just like that original wrap dress,” Saunders says. “If it takes the woman longer than two minutes to get into it, then it’s just not relevant.” “Jonathan has a talent for friendship with women … and that charm and easy understanding of women has been important to his work, too,” Mower says of Saunders’s instinct for knowing what women want to wear. “That he and Diane von Furstenberg have found each other seems a natural to me: marriage made in heaven.” Saunders came to fashion by way of product and textile design. As a teen he was into making things with his hands, furniture, mostly – useful items that wouldn’t be deemed as frivolous by his deeply religious parents. The lure of fashion proved too strong, however, and while at the Glasgow School of Art he made the switch from product design to textiles, eventually moving to London to finish his studies. “I love that fashion relates directly to people and it can be emotional, it can make you feel something,” he says now of the switch. “You can appreciate a piece of furniture from a distance, and you can love it and interact with it, but it’s not as emotional.” After graduation, he clocked up print work for the likes of Alexander McQueen and Phoebe Philo while she was at Chloé, before starting his own line in 2003. Textiles were his first love (something he says he felt trapped by at times), but as the seasons progressed his proposition evolved. “At first print felt very prominent – as if the body was a vehicle for Jonathan’s virtuoso techniques – but gradually the woman became equally tangible; she began to inhabit the clothes and their amazing colour schemes,” agrees Penny Martin, editorin-chief of The Gentlewoman magazine and a confidant of Saunders. Twelve years later, despite ostensible success, Saunders closed shop and was ready to take a break. “I felt very trapped by the cycle of producing collections,” he admits. “With consulting and my own brand, I was doing 12 collections a year and, at that pace, you forget who you are and what you’re doing. It wasn’t a good moment for me.” Time off saw him designing a line of furniture and relishing in the all-round “slower pace”. But then Von Furstenberg and her then CEO, Paolo Riva, came calling. “When I was first approached, my gut feeling was that they didn’t need me because they already had such a strong identity,” Saunders admits. “I was also at a moment in my life when I wanted to slow down, I didn’t necessarily want to go and head up another brand.” Still, they met for a drink in her suite at Claridge’s Hotel, and “before I knew it, my feet were up on the sofa and I found myself saying: ‘We could do this and we could that,’” he says, shaking his head and laughing. “I went in as a consultant and basically never left.” Saunders has since found himself manning a “fiercely loyal team” with the support and means he’s always desired to achieve his ambitions. Without the stress of running the day-to-day operations, as he had previously done, he’s able to tackle the bigger questions. Like, most pressingly, without the brand’s beloved mascot at the helm, who is the DVF woman of today? For that, he’s relying on that very feminine instinct of emotion. “The ethos with which Diane started this brand was effortless clothes with imagination; and there was always an emotional connection between the woman and the clothes. So that is what I ask myself with each design: ‘Is it emotive? How will it make her feel?’” he says, the words turning over in his mind as he says them. “The DVF woman is expressive, she has imagination; she is the person you want to be with because she’s comfortable with herself.” ■

MIGUEL REVERIEGO

“I LIKE THE IDEA OF A GARMENT FALLING ON OR OFF THE BODY”

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Miranda Kerr in designs from her Miranda x Mother denim collaboration.

88 MARCH 2017

A portion of proceeds from the Miranda x Mother collection, which is due out in February, will benefit Sydney’s Royal Hospital for Women Foundation, dedicated to the wellbeing of women and newborns. It is a cause that resonates deeply with Kerr as both a mother to her six-year-old son Flynn and also from firsthand experience. “Flynn was six weeks premature, and without the Humidicrib [an incubator for premature babies] and other technology, I wouldn’t have survived,” says Kerr, who has been an ambassador to the hospital since 2015. “Miranda prepared mood boards and concepts of what she envisioned in the line. We worked together to pick fabrics, washes and fits,” says Becker. “She was very specific with the details and the rises and we went back and forth quite a bit to get it just right.” Kerr also wanted the collection to be versatile and wearable for all occasions: “I see myself taking my son to school with a pair of sneakers in [Funday Flare] bottoms, and being able to go from taking him to school to a work meeting,” she says. And at the heart of every piece in the collection is Kerr’s positive outlook on life, reflected in the affirmations embroidered on each piece, such as “In joy” and “Attitude of gratitude”, which appear screen-printed across white tees and also on the tags and interior waistbands of each garment, all in Kerr’s handwriting. “I want to try and help people look on the bright side of life and to be grateful for what they have and not compare themselves to anyone else,” says the model, who is engaged to Snapchat co-founder and CEO Evan Spiegel. “When you come from that attitude of gratitude, you’re coming from love. That makes me feel good in my life and I wanted to share that with others.” ■

IMAGES COURTESY OF MOTHER DENIM

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have too many pairs of jeans right now,” says Miranda Kerr. “One of my favourite things to do is cull my wardrobe and give pieces away to friends, family and charity.” But this season, the in-demand supermodel has another good reason to make space in her closet: to house her debut capsule collection with Los Angeles-based premium denim line Mother, a late-60s-influenced line (“with a modern twist”, says Kerr), comprised of tops, jeans, shorts, a cut-out jumpsuit and a skirt. “These are the jeans I really want,” she says, gesturing towards her new line hanging on display in a private bungalow at LA’s Chateau Marmont. “They fit me to a tee, because I was the fit model,” she says with a grin, calling attention to her current ensemble: a saffron Maison Margiela blouse, tucked into the high-waisted, cropped dark-washed Audrey jeans from the collaboration, teamed with Chanel flats. This pair, she says, were inspired by her memories of riding horses while growing up. “The jeans I would wear would always be high-waisted, even though the hipster ones were in. They felt more chic,” says Kerr. These personal touches are evident throughout the 12-piece capsule, from the Easy Does It shorts (inspired by her favourite shorts from the 90s) to the hip-grazing Open Your Heart sweatshirt featuring thick cuffs and a high neckline. “I was very specific about the neckline, because I like ones that are tighter, as opposed to looser, or a V-neck,” she explains. Kerr’s decision to team up with the brand was driven by her love of creating – in 2015 she designed her first collection for jewellery brand Swarovski and she founded the Kora Organics skincare line. She was also impressed by Mother’s history of charity-driven partnerships, including one with model Freja Beha Erichsen for humanitarian aid organisation Doctors Without Borders, and another with model Candice Swanepoel for South Africa-based mothers2mothers, which fights paediatric AIDS. The respect was mutual: “We were drawn to Miranda because of her grace and style and her desire to do good and be a positive force in the world,” says Mother designer Tim Kaeding, who co-founded the line with Lela Becker in 2010.


THE FRONT LINE OF SUMMER


VOGUE SPECIAL

Excessories

Take things up a notch with these extravagant add-ons. By Alice Birrell and Zara Wong. Styled by Philippa Moroney and Monique Santos.


VOGUE SPECIAL

WHITE HERE, WHITE NOW

LANVIN S/S ’17

Lashings of colour on a white base strike the right high notes this season.

HOT MESH

Right on schedule, the aughts have made their re-entrance. Cubic zirconia and Glomesh might seem surface level, but their ability to mould to the body make them sinuous and sexy, too.

BULGARI BAGS, $3,380 EACH.

LOEWE S/S ’17

WITCHERY NECKLACE, $90.

FLASH DANCE Dancing shoes needn’t be confined to the subterranean altars of music. Walk them into daylight for that surprise element.

98 MARCH 2017

SWING LOW

Evoke the hard-won talismans of travellers and sages. Spring/summer ’17 is a time to exercise wisdom with a necklace that beams style enlightenment.

GEORGINA EGAN INDIGITAL ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

GIVENCHY S/S ’17

PRADA S/S ’17

ALTUZARRA SHOES, P.O.A.


Up scale

ERDEM S/S ’17

MIU MIU S/S ’17

MARC JACOBS S/S ’17

ANOTHER LEVEL

Wild heights and surreal designs converge in the latest platforms. Radical proportions are for the fearless who cherish expression above all else.


DRESS CIRCLES

ROBERTO CAVALLI S/S ’17

The choker isn’t new news, at least in fashion terms, but the directive now is much more fantastical. Thick and weighted with decorative trimmings sign off both day and night looks.

RALPH LAUREN S/S ’17

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN S/S ’17

VALENTINO S/S ’17

VOGUE SPECIAL

PUNKED

Meet the latest hybrid to spring from fashion’s fabulous wells. Part punk creeper, part soft moccasin, these shoes are for those not wanting to be put into any box.

WILD CARD

Celebrate diversity in the animal kingdom with a fuzzy companion as imagined by Furla. FURLA BAGS, P.O.A.

100 MARCH 2017

GEORGINA EGAN INDIGITAL ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

COACH SHOES, $1,495.


VOGUE SPECIAL

Flip side

The Gabrielle bag by Chanel is all about making it your own: scrunch, grab, twist and go!

WORDS: ZARA WONG STYLIST: MONIQUE SANTOS PHOTOGRAPH: GEORGINA EGAN ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

CHANEL GABRIELLE BAG, $4,975, FROM THE CHANEL BOUTIQUES.


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VOGUE SPECIAL

Throwing shapes Spring/summer ’17 logged new rules, which means bags get reformed and re-proportioned. What to adopt now? Use our chart to navigate the shapes and sizes about to dominate. BU C KET

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BACKPACK

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1. FENDI 2. LOUIS VUITTON 3. FENDI 4. AKRIS 5. VALENTINO 6. LOUIS VUITTON 7. GIORGIO ARMANI 8. LANVIN 9. ALEXANDER WANG 10. HERMÈS 11. MIU MIU 12. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO 13. CÉLINE 14. BALENCIAGA 15. FENDI 16. MAISON MARGIELA 17. CHANEL 18. MARNI 19. VIONNET 20. STELLA MCCARTNEY 21. KENZO 22. ROBERTO CAVALLI 23. CHANEL 24. KENZO 25. ANYA HINDMARCH 26. DOLCE & GABBANA 27. MARNI.

104 MARCH 2017

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VOGUE SPECIAL

HAZY EYES

See the world Fendi s way in the form of spunsugar-coloured glass. The gradated shades make these a retro look back.

FENDI SUNGLASSES, $790 EACH.

IT’S ALL IN THE WRIST Or more accurately, on the wrist, as in Alexander McQueen’s treasureladen limbs.

TRUST KARL LAGERFELD TO CREATE YET ANOTHER HIT BAG. CHANELPHILES NEED TO PUT NAMES DOWN NOW FOR THIS ROBO MINAUDIÈRE.

MCQUEEN S/S ’17

Novel idea

A parade of fetishistic sock boots at Balenciaga revealed creative director Demna Gvasalia’s fluency in colour, mining an off-beat rainbow with wonderfully discordant hues.

106 MARCH 2017

BALENCIAGA S/S ’17

SOLE TRAIN

GEORGINA EGAN INDIGITAL ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

CHANEL BAG, $22,380, FROM THE CHANEL BOUTIQUES.


VOGUE SPECIAL

SAINT LAURENT S/S ’17

MARNI S/S ’17

KENZO S/S ’17

STELLA MCCARTNEY S/S ’17

JOINED AT THE HIP

The latest bag called from the annals of fashions past – and perhaps presumed lost? The bumbag. Functional and street-smart, it lives again in 2017-friendly shapes and materials.

Born-again classic

TAKE A MODERN CLASSIC AND SPRINKLE IT WITH SUMPTUOUS ACCOUTREMENT AND YOU GET LOUIS VUITTON’S REWORK OF THE TWIST BAG. LOUIS VUITTON BAG, $5,150.

SUCH A WAIST

EMANUEL UNGARO BELT, $1,365.

108 MARCH 2017

GEORGINA EGAN INDIGITAL ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

What do a party dress, a white shirt and a tailored blazer have in common? They would all feel brand new again with Emanuel Ungaro’s heart belt cinched around their middles.


Swing low while they’re Instagram magic, you should proceed with caution, writes Zara Wong.

W 110 MARCH 2017

eaving through the market stalls in Paris’s Porte de Clignancourt, a storefront was stacked up high with candy-coloured geometric Yves Saint Laurent studs with matching necklaces, gold Chanel logo pieces and clusters of Miriam Haskell floral bouquet brooches. I caught sight of a pair of gold Christian Lacroix earrings, vivid with red and green stones, shimmying at me across the way. The oversized faux baroque pearls cheerfully tinkled as I held them up to my ears. They managed to give my jet-lagged visage that hard-to-come-by luminosity – earrings that large frame the face and attract the light. Such was their weight that the sales assistant recommended using Blu Tack to keep them on my ears. The sensible pearl studs to the little black dress these were not. Live a little, they whispered to me (and to my bank account, because vintage Lacroix does not come cheap). They immediately relegated my tastefully inconspicuous studs to a sentimental

past – my earring-wearing era started early. Knowing that I would eventually implore my mother to allow me to get my ears pierced, she had an unorthodox approach, cutting straight to the chase and sending me to have it done as a child, before I had time to be aware of how painful it might be. But still being pre-adolescent meant the earrings of choice were tiny hoops or golden ball studs, and miniature stars for nice family dinners out. So grown-up fare of shoulder-sweeping danglers, like a sculptural pair from Marni that ascended up my earlobes, or waspy opaque mint-coloured crystal waterfalls on sale at J.Crew, were a welcome exchange, a hot-key to grown-up glamour. Why wear some daintily pretty floral buttons on your lobes when the universally flattering oversized earrings commanded an admiring double-take, hair flicked over in a side part all the better to show them? They have the power to elevate and make evening-appropriate (under certain circumstances) a T-shirt and jeans pairing, and moonlight as a conversation-starter, too: many a time someone has approached me to admire my exuberant Lawrence Vrba clip-ons or Lucy Folk gold crochet earrings. A quick flick through the spring/summer ’17 runways stacks up the evidence for the strength of big earrings – Dolce & Gabbana, long-time arbiters of more-is-more, regularly show off shoulder-dusters paired with ornate headpieces. And because we’re living in an Instagram age, they’re perfect for the selfie,

PHOTOGRAPHS: GEORGINA EGAN ANGELO PENNETTA STYLIST: SARA MOONVES HAIR: SEBASTIEN RICHARD MAKE-UP: NIAMH QUINN

Adwoa Aboah (left) wears an Alexander McQueen dress and Balenciaga earrings. Grace Elizabeth wears an Erdem dress and Gucci earrings.Left: the author’s vintage Christian Lacroix earrings.


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VOGUE SPECIAL

Z AR TU AL R A S/S ’17

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Sci-fi, sporty and, with their slim cut, feminine: Dior’s boots can do it all. So too can the wearer in a pair of these.

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LANVIN S/S ’17

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Ring leaders

ROKSANDA ILINCIC S/S ’17

GIVENCHY S/S ’17

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the angled-head mirror shot, or uploaded runway details. Hits during the fashion weeks included Delpozo pailette earrings that were so long they grazed the neckline, and romantically crafty trawlers from Rodarte. Even minimalist Jil Sander added a cascade of crystals to models’ lobes. Should glisten and shine not be your thing, Altuzarra’s chic rockabillies sported twisted hoop earrings and Alexander Calder-esque mobiles dangled at Proenza Schouler. Take care, though: when done incorrectly, jewellery size can have an inverse relationship to refinement. Choose earrings that contrast with your hair colour, and layer with other jewellery cautiously. They say that hair up and away from your face and ears is preferred, but rules are meant to be broken. There’s nothing quite like seeing a glimmer of shine in between longer lengths. The one rule to apply is that of balance, so watch the dramatic lipstick and eyes in combination with your earrings of choice – settle on limited focal points. But with fashion’s recent tendency towards the 80s glamour excess, now is ■ the time to invest heavily.


Live Outside The Seasons

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Live Outside The Seasons

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VOGUE SPECIAL

shoe silhouette of the 90s. But this time they come with more attitude. By Emily Sheffield.

116 MARCH 2017

butter-yellow kitten-heel mules; at Prada they’re partnered with confections of sequins, beading and elaborate feather plumage. I could go on (they feature at Loewe, Phillip Lim and Saint Laurent) but you get the message – the kitten heel is back. This time, however, it comes with a dollop of self-referential irony. And the styling is far less prim – yes, it’s an elegant shoe, but we’re pairing it with tracksuit pants and boyfriend sweatshirts. In the late 90s, pavements and catwalks rang to the sound of their delicate clatter. “When I was just starting out in fashion in the mid-90s, a pair of Manolo kitten heels were the ultimate prize,” recalls author and US Vogue writer Plum Sykes. “I wore them nonstop.” Until, that is, a new upstart arrived to crush the kitten – the towering four-inch statement heels, which soon rose to five-inches and beyond – and we had to learn how to walk all over again. Not surprisingly, shoes gratefully crashed back to Earth with fashion trainers and the rise of mannish flats – pool slides and Birkenstocks enjoyed a makeover, and we fell in love with loafers, especially the furry Gucci variety. Somewhere along the way, feminine elegance got lost in our rush to adopt sportswear and masculinity. It’s no wonder we’re now veering back to more simplistic heel connotations. Living in times of political uncertainty drives us back to the sartorially familiar. In this instance, a whole litter of kittens. ■

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y feet are feeling a bit smug right now because they’re cosily encased in Dior’s new kitten heels. Yes, those ones – the ribbed fabric pair with dressmaker’s cream ribbon wrapped around the slingback, logoed with “J’adior”. They caught my eye at Maria Grazia Chiuri’s inaugural collection for the French house and have been on my shopping list ever since. As a whole, these are satisfyingly minimal shoes: the heels have a considered shape, gently sloping from the rim of the sole, while the ribbons add the buzzy detailing. They provide just the right amount of lift to the derrière while not hampering swift movement, and offer a nice respite from towering stilettos (I never wear them), platforms (dangerous and everywhere), fashionable slides (a shoe styled on a Birkenstock has its limits) and fuglies (the clue’s in the name). No wonder we’re falling in love with kittens again. They feel on the go (probably why British Prime Minister Theresa May employs the style as her shoe of choice); they read practical and pretty in equal parts; they don’t hinder the task at hand, whether that’s running the country or running to a fashion show. The Diors aren’t my first successful date with a kitten heel in recent months. During London Fashion Week last September, my jewelled J.W. Anderson kitten heels became famous, appearing on countless fashion sites. Like travelling with a celebrity friend, the shoes were the star attraction; I was merely paid lip service. Kittens have been quietly returning to the catwalks for a couple of seasons now. Demna Gvasalia, creative director of both Vetements and Balenciaga, seems more enamoured than most. Much of Balenciaga’s autumn/winter ’16/’17 shoe collection had kitten heels attached – from hot-pink ankle boots to glossy white pumps. And at Vetements’s spring/summer ’17 show this summer, the opening look was accompanied by a charcoal satin kittenheel slingback, designed in collaboration with Manolo Blahnik. Meanwhile, for Gucci’s resort collection, Alessandro Michele rummaged in the label’s archives, returning with his take on the house’s celebrated bamboo kitten heel. For the latest season, he has attached it to a metallic green slingback, punched with gold spikes – this time, the Gucci kitten comes with claws. And for summer, as well as the delicate Diors, Phoebe Philo at Céline has produced


NSW King Street 02 9299 0372 VIC Emporium 03 9663 1695 • Chapel Street 03 9804 7213 Eastland 03 8658 2350 • Chadstone 03 9569 9517 marimekko.com.au


VOGUE SPECIAL

BET YOU DIDN’T HAVE A SCHOOL BACKPACK IN PATENT LEATHER OR LOGO MANIA-ED. TIME TO GO ALL OUT.

CHANEL S/S ’17

MAISON MARGIELA S/S ’17

BALENCIAGA S/S ’17

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BALLY BACKPACK, $1,495; GUCCI BACKPACK, $4,080; PRADA BACKPACK, $2,370.

SIMONE ROCHA S/S ’17

Carry on

REPORTING IN

MAISON MARGIELA S/S ’17

Old-school tech gets a re-see with John Galliano. Sometimes you need to look back to go forward.

118 MARCH 2017

Twister

HAND IN GLOVE Don’t make it an afterthought: match your mitts to your outfits.


VOGUE SPECIAL

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TO TOP IT OFF

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HERMÈS WHITE SHOES, $2,705, AND BLACK BOOTS, $2,900.

Framed

7

HEY LOOK LIKE CLASSIC DESIGNS, BUT THE BENT METAL HEELS WILL HAVE YOU LOOKING TWICE.

MINI REDEFINED Keep hands free (for champagne, canapés …) on your next night out with Valentino’s miniature shoulder bags.

120 MARCH 2017

GEORGINA EGAN INDIGITAL ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

VALENTINO S/S ’17

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celebrate LOVE

, BRIGHTER, E BEAUTIFUL DIAMONDS S Y D N E Y | M E L B O U R N E | 13 0 0 7 0 0 9 5 0 | G R E G O R YJ E W E L L E R S . C O M . A U


VOGUE SPECIAL

122 MARCH 2017


Petal core

Louis Vuitton’s new high jewellery and watch collections are a blossoming of the house’s codes, and despite appearances, rooted in reality. By Alice Birrell.

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erhaps it’s the stupefying level of humidity, or the merciless sun on a typically airless Singapore day, but there’s a lack of pretence about Louis Vuitton’s Michel Navas. Seated in the sunny uppermost level of the French house’s waterfront store, itself a mini island of luxury jutting into the glassy waters of Marina Bay, the man who founded the house’s watchmaking arm is being open. “When you talk about Louis Vuitton, you think about France, you think about bags and ready-to-wear.” For watchmaking, he says, this is not yet the case. “We are very new in the watchmaking world; since 2002. I want to bring something that is missing in the landscape. We want to develop what clients need, something they cannot find elsewhere.” Like the new high jewellery collection – created once a year for the clients and collectors of the most expensive Louis Vuitton pieces – the latest watch offering is based entirely on the house’s iconic blossom that appears in the Louis Vuitton 1896-born monogram. Wending through the glass show cabinets nearby, the motif crops up everywhere in a strong feminine spin on the flower. Subtle paeans to son of Monsieur Louis Vuitton, Georges Vuitton’s design include three-layered graphic flowers – in unbelievably thin 0.2-millimetre layers of mother of pearl – on the face of the  new tambour watch. A chalcedony necklace has one petal replaced with a gargantuan 43.05-carat blue green beryl teardrop. On a ring, bold mandarin garnet and jet onyx foreground a deconstruction of the blossom’s lines radiating outwards. Speaking with the vice-president of watches and jewellery, Hamdi Chatti, he echoes Navas’s sentiments. “We are a newcomer,” he says. “We have a long tradition and history as a maison, but we are going to surprise the market. We do strong design.” The aim is to engage with a modern client’s needs. “We live today … so we design for women of today.” Both Chatti and Navas emphasise wearing, not just treasuring, the pieces. “A watch has to be useful, something you like. It must be complicated, but simple to use,” says Navas. “I believe that jewellery, including the very high end, should be worn every day,” says Chatti. “If it’s in your safe, you need to crack open the safe.” This doesn’t mean that painstaking work and intricate techniques aren’t applied to each piece’s creation. The house won’t start work on a jewellery piece until they find the best stones. “One customer asked to have earrings made and for more than 18 months we were looking for those stones. We found one, but not two with the same quality, so we will not do it,” says Chatti. Some watch faces are made with equal diligence, taking one person three days to make. These are details hidden by the simple elegance of the finished products. “We believe we need to have perfect quality, perfect craft, very strong design – but at the same time, we like the idea that it’s cool,” says Chatti. So traditional and rarefied yes, but still refreshingly pretence-free. ■ VOGUE.COM.AU 123


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128 MARCH 2017


Sing it loud Musician, model and political activist Inna Modja lives by her passions. By Jane Albert.

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ne of Inna Modja’s fondest memories growing up in Mali was poring over the pages of international fashion magazines. The sixth of seven children, Modja mostly wore hand-me-down clothes, but occasionally her mother would take her to the markets to buy her own fabric, which a local tailor would transform into designs to order. Her love of fashion never left her, and when she moved to Paris aged 19 to study literature and languages at Lille University, she began modelling part-time. But Modja’s driving passion is music. Today she is one of Mali’s most successful contemporary artists, a singer-songwriter whose music celebrates contemporary Malian culture while calling for major political and social reform. Modja’s early years in the Malian capital of Bamako were defined by music. There was always a disc on the record player – Miriam Makeba and Sarah Vaughan were favourites. “When I was really young I loved to read and write poetry, then as a teenager I got more involved in singing and figured that since I loved writing poetry and singing, maybe I should write songs,” Modja says over the phone from Paris. “That’s how it started.” When she moved to Paris, her degree helped her gain confidence as a lyricist and she began writing songs for other artists, and later herself. What had started with traditional Malian music under the guidance of Salif Keita – her first album Every Day is a New World was folk and acoustic – soon morphed into pop and hiphop on the album Love Revolution. Her most recent album, Motel Bamako, is a return to a traditional sound, but with a difference. It combines Malian blues with hiphop and electronica, capturing the essence of her generation. “We travel more, we get to see the world, we have internet now. So the way we do music is not the same way our elders did. It was really important my music sounded like me. I’m a Malian,” says Modja, who still considers Bamako home and returns there when she isn’t touring or recording with her Parisian label. “I wanted to give a new version of Africa and African artists.” She is also a proud feminist and vocal campaigner against female genital mutilation which, according to recent UNICEF figures, affects more than 200 million girls and women. Modja is working with the United Nations on their goal to eliminate this insidious practice by 2030 and last December attended the first American summit on female genital mutilation. “I started sharing my story 11 years ago because a lot of people feel ashamed or scared to talk about it. A lot of my friends didn’t know until I told them that I went through female genital mutilation, and a lot of people think it’s just in small villages. But it happens in big cities, even in Europe, even in America.” This March Modja is in Australia as part of music and dance festival WOMADelaide, and visits Sydney and Melbourne to promote the film Wùlu, Malian-French director Daouda Coulibaly’s political thriller starring Modja, which has screened at film festivals in Toronto, London and Africa. “The director is an amazing person and he’s doing the same kind of thing I’m doing, a new African cinema. We want to show another face of Africa. We often talk about Africa with the problems and poverty and sure, we have that, but we also have art and creativity.” ■ WOMADelaide runs March 10-13. Go to www.womadelaide.com.au. VOGUE.COM.AU 129


In the frame Directors Liz Ann Macgregor of the Museum of Contemporary Art and Carriageworks’ Lisa Havilah discuss the state of the arts with Sophie Tedmanson.

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engage with that work, but where the ecology is starting to get fragile is that for there to be a healthy art sector there has to be strong resilient co-investment from all levels of government as well as the private sector. When some of those platforms start to fall down, or they become inconsistent, then because it is an ecology it starts to fall over and becomes more fragile and less robust.” LH: “We have to make sure that the pathways from education – the beginning of leaving school, into an arts education, into being an emerging artist, through those first opportunities in those artist-run spaces through to a major institution like the MCA or collection opportunities – are not broken. There definitely needs to be more cross-government industry collaborative policy written in terms of how things are supported.” ST: “Tell me about The National – it’s fantastic that the three Sydney institutions (MCA, Carriageworks, AGNSW) have come together for the first time.” LAM: “We wanted to show how collaborative Sydney can be and we genuinely wanted to do something that showcased Australian art across the institutions in different ways.” LH: “It’s a very significant three-year co-investment into Australian art, which is strategic and will have bigger outcomes attached to it.” ST: “It feels like the public perception of contemporary art has changed and is more positive. Would you agree?” LH: “Art is more present in popular culture. I think it has become part of people’s lives in that they will go and see an exhibition or go to an event. I think it’s more integrated into life.” LAM: “I do think curators and galleries have become more open in the work they show. People assume that you go to a contemporary art gallery and you see a certain type of work. In fact, nowadays you’re just as likely to see a beautiful painting as you are to look at a conceptual work that you have no idea what you’re looking at.” ST: “You’re both women successfully leading large institutions in Australia. What is that like?” LAM: “It’s bloody hard.” LH: “I think you get criticised for being ambitious. Your

Sophie Tedmanson: “Where did your passion for art come from?” Lisa Havilah: “Mum was a ceramicist, so I grew up in a combination of a farming-slash-artistic environment. Then I studied painting and creative writing at art school and, with Glenn (husband and curator Glenn Barkley), set up an artist’s space in Wollongong.” Liz Ann Macgregor: “I grew up in Orkney, which is right up in the north islands of Scotland, and there wasn’t a gallery. That’s why I’m interested in how you access contemporary art when you’re not living in a city centre. My parents used to take us to galleries in Glasgow on holidays. My first memory is of an amazing Salvador Dalì painting of Christ on the cross. It was terrifying.” ST: “What is your view of the state of the arts in Australia at the moment in light of government funding changes?” LAM: “The quality of work here is one of the reasons I was interested in coming to run the MCA. Over the past few years there has been increased recognition from overseas as a result of a consistent and strategic approach that is now in serious jeopardy because of the funding changes. At the same time we have been able to set up a partnership with Tate supported by Qantas for the co-acquisition of work to ensure that Australian artists are significantly represented in one of the world’s great collections.” LH: “There is a very strong vibrancy in terms of the quality of the work that is made. There should be more international opportunities to present across the board with music and performing arts. I think there are lots of audiences who want to

Liz Ann Macgregor, left, wears a Marimekko sweater. Carla Zampatti pants. Georg Jensen earrings and brooch. Dinosaur Designs ring. Lisa Havilah wears a Marni top and skirt. Bassike shirt.

STYLIST: PETTA CHUA PHOTOGRAPH: JAKE TERRY HAIR: TAYLOR JAMES REDMAN MAKE-UP: PETER BEARD DETAILS LAST PAGES SHOT ON LOCATION AT MCA, SYDNEY

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Art of the nation

The inaugural survey of contemporary Australian art, The National, celebrates our diverse culture, writes AGNSW’s Dr Michael Brand.

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he Art Gallery of New South Wales has collected “contemporary art” – the art of its time – ever since it was founded in the 1870s. Currently we’re showing the work of 158 living artists in addition to our historical holdings, and the cultural and visual diversity we’re bringing to the gallery is something we’re particularly proud of. This diversity includes a strong representation of women artists from around the globe, and across centuries. The opportunity to celebrate and showcase the work of 49 Australian contemporary artists at three of Sydney’s leading arts organisations as part of The National: New Australian Art 2017 is hugely exciting both for artists and audiences alike. Artists have always been the bellwethers of society. Often the bold thoughts they have are hurled at a world they want to shake up and energise. They offer us new ways of seeing, so art museums need to trust artists to take risks and think bold. There are plenty of big ideas from Australian artists in The National 2017. The exhibition highlights what’s foremost in the minds of Australian artists today and will provide our audiences with an inspiring visual experience as they move across Sydney to the three venues. The National 2017 is a fantastic opportunity for people to see just how our artists are seeing our world across a wide variety of media: from painting, video, sculpture, installation and drawing to performance in various guises. The

work of Bougainville-born Taloi Havini, who lives and works between Melbourne, Sydney, Buka and Bougainville, is a great example of what’s on offer. Her work in The National, on display at AGNSW, utilises a wide variety of media in the service of keeping cultural distinctiveness alive. Her mesmerising video installation Habitat was filmed in her Bougainville homeland. It powerfully asserts a familial connection to land – in this case land compulsorily acquired by the PNG government that in 1969 formed a joint venture with Australian mining company, Conzinc Rio Tinto, to develop the Panguna copper mine. The mine was forced to close in 1989 when a local resistance movement sabotaged its operations. Habitat was created as talk resurfaced of the mine being reopened. Across town at the MCA, our colleagues are showcasing the work of Nell, another Australian woman artist, whose work Where Newcastle meets Maitland (2015) was acquired for the AGNSW collection last year by our Contemporary Collection Benefactors. For the past year Nell has been our neighbour in an Artspace studio in Woolloomooloo and for The National she has created a mixed media commission including With wings being as they are … a collection of spirited beings and objects that occupy a series of traditional Japanese tatami mats. Each alludes to the importance of music – gold-tipped drumsticks and AC/DC’s lightning bolt included!

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND IWANTJA ARTS

ambition can only be read as your own and not your ambition for your institution or for others.” LAM: “I was gobsmacked when I first came here. Being in a room where I was the only one who knew what I was talking about and nobody was listening to me. You have to prove yourself. It is hard enough to get the arts taken seriously and the fact that you’re a woman gives them another excuse … and I’m talking corporates here – newspapers, editors, the kind of people who matter, if you like.” ST: “Has it changed?” LAM: “Yes, it is much better.” LH: “I think it’s because there has been a lot of work done to show how the arts contributes across society and can provide a range of social outcomes that are not just supporting art and artists, but that artists and institutions can contribute to those broader social outcomes. It is changing people’s lives, it can contribute to health and wellbeing and can contribute to social inclusion in very innovative and new ways.” ST: “Do you think you bring something different to the job by being a woman?” LAM: “I do think women are generally more collaborative. We try harder. We may not be any better at it but we certainly are conscious of it because you are so aware of this thing where you get called aggressive when you’re being forthright. I was told by someone very prominent when I came here that the way I was dealing with a particular politician meant I had to pipe down and be less aggressive and be more feminine. And this was from someone who used to scream at me! I was supposed to be more feminine? Excuse me? And it was a woman who gave me the lecture!” LH: “I think it is much harder for women to step up into artistic leadership positions or have the belief that they have the capacity to work in those leadership roles.” ST: “What do you love the most about working in the arts?” LAM: “The people, the artists, the opportunity to do new things. It is a great family-type feeling.” LH: “I love going through the process of an artist having an ambitious big idea and then working with them with a team and delivering that into the public and then the public loving that work and engaging with it. I think it’s incredibly rewarding.” LAM: “As Lisa said before, the social outcomes that come from this – we work with remote indigenous communities … it’s not just about art in galleries, it’s about art engaging with audiences.” LH: “And meaning something.” ■


VOGUE DANCE

answers for the idiosyncrasies of my natural movement and even my physicality came to light and my spirit came to a realisation of its calling. What crystallised then as well was just why this tension existed within me, between conforming to the expectations of the world of ballet and finding my own truth. Reconciling those forces was to be my ongoing challenge. Another question we may come to in life is: “What is my place in the world?” Or for me: “What is my role in this crazy, confusing ballet called life?” My uncle believed that the role of the artist is to be a voice for the people – he was concerned with keeping his art vibrant and relevant. For now, I am determined to carry out this ethos in the world of classical ballet – to open it up and away from its tendency to insularity and more to provocation, for a wider audience. Ballet can be gutsy, powerful and real, but too often it’s not, reduced to fantasy and acrobatics. I dream of the creation of more dance works that tell the Indonesian story, much in the same manner as Australia’s game-changing Bangarra Dance Theatre shares Aboriginal stories. My parents brought us up with an awareness of human rights, though perhaps the more formative factor on our moral code was the very nature of our upbringing in a multicultural, multi-faith family. Some members in my family are Muslim, the majority of us are Christian, however Christianity is a minority faith in Indonesia. My times as a child in Indonesia were obviously coloured by exposure to those influences, but so everyday were they that there was never even the smallest notion of them being a threat. Hijabs are as regular to me as jeans. This to me illustrates the dominant influence of social conditioning when it comes to cultivating prejudice. Among other racial and faithbased prejudices, Islamophobia looms large, and it deeply saddens me to see irrational hatred towards Muslims in Australia. How can people not see that it’s extremism that is to blame for the tragic violence of terrorism, and extremism is not exclusive to any one faith or race? Every anti-Islam comment hits me hard because I love my family, and even though our faiths may be different, we know that at the crux of our religions is a message of peace and of love. Prejudice and hatred have no place in a progressive, harmonised society. One day there may be a ballet about that. As an Indonesian-Australian artist I am in a unique position to be able to bridge the political divide between my countries through the uniting language of dance. Last year I helped initiate West Australian Ballet’s first tour in more than 20 years to Indonesia, and was invited to be a guest artist. Judging from the response of local audiences, these collaborations are key in this bridging journey. I will continue to work closely with local organisations in Indonesia and Australia to realise more opportunities to heal together, before it’s too late. That’s the connecting power of art: to challenge and hopefully change perceptions. I truly believe in it, and it’s for this that I am who I am, and why I am here. ■

Leap Dance has the power to break down cultural barriers, writes ballerina Juliet Burnett.

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question we may come to at some point in our life is: “Why is it that I am who I am?” My mum is Javanese-Indonesian and my dad Anglo-Australian. They raised my younger sister and I in Sydney with regular visits to our vast family in Indonesia. We did a lot of growing up there, immersed in the culture and our family, its influence permeating our home life in Australia too. As a child, home-style Indonesian food, a house swathed in batik, the heady scent of clove in Kretek cigarettes and Indonesian bedtime stories and songs were all a natural part of our upbringing. The questioning came later. One figure in my family who had a great impact on me and helped me find an answer to that question was my late uncle, renowned Indonesian poet, playwright and activist W.S. Rendra. My grandmother, who died in my infancy, was a star dancer of the royal court in Jogjakarta. I, now being the only dancer in the family, was taken under my uncle’s wing to pass on her wisdom: traditional Javanese philosophies and dance and theatre techniques. Over time, I came to realise their value and applied them to my dancing, especially when in 2012 I spent time with a master teacher in my mum’s hometown to learn my grandmother’s art. I marvelled as 134 MARCH 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS: ATO SUPRAPTO COSTUMES: FBUDI

Dancer Juliet Burnett (left and below) in a collaborative photographic project with Indonesian photographer Ato Suprapto, inspired by Megatruh, a work exploring identity and culture.


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HEAVY METALS On a canvas of bare skin, dip-dyed metallic eyes play off against velvet lips.


VOGUE BEAUTY

RODARTE S/S ’ 17

A modern chameleon, this season’s beauty muse embraces everything from the eclectic to the ethereal, while always making a

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Backstage at Fendi.

THERE SHE GLOWS

For spring/summer, make-up artists seemed to reach for anything bordering on sparkly. “You don’t need to be the number-one make-up artist to pull off a ‘V’ of silver on the inner corner of our eyes or your cupid’s bow,” says make-up artist Pat McGrath f the look she created at Versace. “Against bare skin, metallics are modern.” Likewise, one of the most talked-about looks of the season came via make-up artist Peter Philips at Fendi, who went for “glitter lips like she took a bite out of a glitter doughnut”. Yum.

Designers seemed to be casting their minds back to another era, with 18th-century references cropping up at Giambattista Valli and Burberry, which naturally fil red through to the ok. Make friends with ghlighter, swiping it across the high points of the face (cheekbones, forehead, nose and cupid’s bow) to channel the otherworldly skin seen at Alexander McQueen, then call in mascara for a deliberately less-is-more approach. 142 MARCH 2017

LOUIS VUITTON S/S ’ 17

END OF AN ERA

Make-up artists channelled the 80s at Chanel, Altuzarra, Balmain, Louis Vuitton and Topshop. At Kenzo, hairstylists slicked back tresses while make-up artists blurred the lines between blush and shadow, the perfect accompaniment to the season’s shoulder-grazing earrings. “It’s naughty Japanese schoolgirls meet Sailor Moon with an 80s twist,” says make-up artist Lynsey Alexander. Likewise, 80s eyeshadow stole the show at Louis Vuitton, albeit with a theatrical twist.

GIORGIO ARMANI NIGHT LIGHT COLLECTION THE HOLIDAY PALETTE, $188.

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KENZO S/S ’ 17

80S GIRL


MARY KATRANTZOU S/S ’ 17

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO S/S ’ 17

THOM BROWNE S/S ’ 17

HAIDER ACKERMANN S/S ’ 17

COLOUR COMEBACK

From New York to London, Milan to Paris, spring/summer ’17 served up a kaleidoscope of hues. At Haider Ackermann, make-up artist Lynsey Alexander took inspiration from nature, winging out models’ eyes in yellow and white graphics: “It’s birds of paradise on acid … neon pigment and a classic white eye pencil. The yellow is very specific: a bit punk-inspired.” At Salvatore Ferragamo, painterly half-moon swatches were paired with the most trusted accessory to colour: airbrush-effect skin.

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BOYHOOD

HOME STRAIGHT

At Victoria Beckham, hairstylist Guido Palau took to models’ hair with a Ghd (Mica Argañaraz, pictured, usually sports curls), marking a change from natural texture. “For me, polished, glossy hair is such a classic beauty look. It’s both modern and timeless – qualities that are reflected in my collections, too,” says Beckham.

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2. 1.

3.

Backstage at Burberry.

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MODEL CITIZENS

A new crop of fresh faces stole the runway this season. 1. LUNA BIJL: Walking in no less that 31 shows, Bijl is a firm new-season favourite. 2. NOVA ORCHID: Her pixie fringe and unique beauty saw her walk for Chanel and Stella McCartney, among others, this season. 3. MARIANA ZARAGOZA: Newcomer Zaragoza, from Mexico, walked exclusively for Proenza Schouler.

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Embracing a boyish aesthetic isn’t about going barefaced, in fact, it’s more about balance. Concealer to smooth out imperfections and texturiser in hair were on hand at Burberry to give models an effortless beauty. While at Simone Rocha this season, pared-back skin was offset with girlish braided tresses. “I wanted to give hair a girlie feel created through youthful plaits from centre partings, with long hair down the back and then exaggerated loose strands around the front,” says hairstylist James Pecis.


VOGUE BEAUTY

W “WE SAID: ‘HOW CAN WE GIVE FLOWERS A PUNCH AND HOW CAN WE MAKE IT MORE MODERN?’”


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Cut loose With rebellious, home-cut hair influencing the runways, Lena Dunham reflects on her own self-styled history – and the power of picking up the shears.

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will never forget the first time I cut my own bangs: the power, the adrenaline. I was 12 years old, standing in the fluorescent light of my parents’ bathroom with a pair of orange-handled craft scissors, unaware that I was standing on the precipice of self-definition. The sound of the first chop, thick and harsh, was thrilling. I watched my hair pile up in the sink, then looked into the mirror: I had given myself blunt, successive layers that resembled a staircase headed to nowhere. Nothing about the haircut could have been perceived as skilled, fetching or even sane. But I had never felt more alive. The reaction at school the next day wasn’t particularly positive, and I wore a bandanna for the rest of the year. But when I’d come home, I liked to remove it and look at myself, Brooklyn’s own Joan of Arc, freed from the tyranny of the Rachel, of chunky blonde highlights, of the invisible contract my friends and I seemed to have signed promising that our hair would reflect some sense of wanting to be wanted. A series of similar experiments followed: my own pixie cut, so oddly shaped it looked like a 1950s Peter Pan wig; Bettie Page bangs blunt at my ears, topped with some drugstore black dye and a pastel clip meant for an infant. Each episode was met with sighs from my parents and confusion from my peers, but I remained committed to the notion that my hair was just for me, another avenue for radical self-reinterpretation. It’s an idea that is gaining traction in current fashion conversations. Just ask Grace Hartzel. “It’s cool to show your personal style,” the St. Louisborn model says of treating her gamine, Jane Birkin locks as a blank canvas. Hartzel used to dye them a shade of “ugly red” before she hacked her own set of bangs with “cheap scissors” three years ago. “I was feeling really stuck,” the 21-year-old recalls. “My parents were like: ‘Your career is over. You’re done.’” Hedi Slimane disagreed, casting Hartzel as his autumn/winter ’14/’15 exclusive at Saint Laurent and catapulting her – and the exact bangs that sent her parents into paroxysms – into the modelling stratosphere. There is something appealing about good old-fashioned “shampoo advertisement” hair, of course, which I understood briefly when I was 16 via my best friend at summer camp, Joana. Slim and blonde, she had the perfect glossy mane of an Olsen twin back when they were still making movies about catastrophes in Paris. For the next few years, I worked hard – with a flatiron and Sun-In – to be that blonde, that glossy. Then Joana went to art school. When she arrived in September, she still had her

show-pony locks. But by October she had shorn her hair into a mullet even a drag-racing enthusiast in the deepest South wouldn’t understand. The Rod Stewart mayhem on top made way for a stringy waterfall of over-bleached tendrils creeping down her back. Matched with a new wardrobe of Spandex pants and obscure band T-shirts, she was even more of a revelation: powerful, beautiful, a little angry. I, too, dumped a bottle of peroxide on my head shortly thereafter, enlisting Camilla, Oberlin College’s resident stylist, to give me a look that lived somewhere between Lee Krasner and my great aunt Doad. While travelling in Eastern Europe over winter break, I caught sight of myself in a bookstore window in Kraków and thought, with pride, that I looked like someone for whom beauty was intensely personal. “The idea of a ‘home haircut’ is really about taking control,” confirms Palau, who has mastered the art of the transformational, punk-inflected makeover, adding a certain level of “wrongness” to the cuts he dreams up at needle-moving shows, like Alexander Wang, so it looks as if they were self-administered by someone with a strong vision of her own identity. “I never thought we’d see a resurgence of this kind of haircutting, but we are,” he adds. “I think there’s something really empowering about that.” Now, for every Gigi Hadid with her classically sexy lioness’s mane, every Kendall Jenner with her sleek topknot, there’s a Katie Moore with her magenta-turned-surfer-blonde mushroom crop and jagged microfringe; an Adwoa Aboah who keeps her hair as ever-changing as her style. The same woman who looks as though she has whacked at her own bob with a razor is permitted a collaged, floral scarf-print Balenciaga dress. What a world. I still struggle with this dichotomy: I want to feel beautiful in a way people can understand, and yet I want to feel like my own tiny revolution. Every time my hair is blown flat or (God forbid) curled with a small but mighty iron, I lose a piece of myself. It’s taken practice and establishing an almost marital intimacy with my hairstylist Rheanne White for her to understand just the amount of weird I need to feel while also being properly armoured for Hollywood’s roughest moments. But I never want to lose that edge, that sense of experimentation that fuelled my 12-year-old boldness (and the baby bangs of a 90s-era Winona I self-trimmed earlier this year). Besides, as Hartzel assures us: “It’ll grow back. It will always grow back.” ■

ANGELO PENNETTA/TRUNK ARCHIVE

I LOOKED LIKE SOMEONE FOR WHOM BEAUTY WAS INTENSELY PERSONAL

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VOGUE BEAUTY

UV rays may be off-limits, but that’s not to say you shouldn’t light your path in other ways, writes Lilith Hardie Lupica.

PAIR UP TWO IS BETTER THAN ONE, ESPECIALLY IN THE EYES OF THE BEAUTYOBSESSED. POWER UP YOUR REGIMEN WITH THESE DOUBLE-DUTY SPACE- AND TIME-SAVERS.

150 MARCH 2017

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inding the right light means everything in the realm of beauty. A well-lit routine should go beyond the boundaries of skin and deliver a dazzling dose of radiance everywhere. Hair too should feel the warm embrace of a bright regimen: a light-reflecting oil, like Wella’s Luminous Reflective Oil, can add dimension, sans hours spent at the salon. That’s not to say one should overlook the power of make-up. A good highlighter can work wonders for a face feeling two-dimensional – try M.A.C Extra Dimension Skinfinish in Beaming Blush or Stila’s Star Light, Star Bright Highlighting Palette if you’re looking for a range of colour. A well-placed primer – Estée Lauder’s The Illuminator Radiant Perfecting Primer + Finisher is a must – will shine on skin that needs a 3D lift. It’s important to reflect on your needs and go forth, into the light.


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ZONE IN

The world’s Blue Zones are home to some of the longest-living humans, so it makes sense to bottle their secrets. The dietary staples of these communities are some of the key components in Chanel’s Blue Serum, including the green coffee of Costa Rica, the olives of Sardinia, Italy, and Greece’s lentisk. CHANEL BLUE SERUM, $155.

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Backstage at Lanvin.

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VOGUE HEALTH

Knees up The return of leg-baring outfits might be bad news for those who dislike the look of their knees, but there is a solution. By Remy Rippon.

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have never liked my knees,� said a friend while cycling through Sydney’s Centennial Park sporting a pair of P.E Nation leggings that finished, strategically, I later learnt, at mid-calf. She’s no more than sample size and marathon-fit, so I was baffled. “Your knees?� I retorted. “What on Earth could be wrong with your knees?� It was a valid query, considering I couldn’t recall a time I’d ever seen them. Naturally, as temperatures and hemlines soared come summertime, her go-to length was always a midi. Even when a heatwave deemed a steady stream of floaty dresses appropriate for the office, she would instead reach for her favourite Saint Laurent tuxedo trousers. As it turns out, my friend is not alone in her niggling knee concerns. While tuck-shop arms, saddlebags, a troublesome mid-section or a jiggly butt are more common bugbears, ageing knees (defined as sagging skin due to the loss of elastin and collagen) are an area of increasing concern for many women. “If you’ve got saggy knees, you see everyone else’s,� says Christiana O’Regan, clinical director at Melbourne’s Saphira Clinic, who’s seen a rise in women unhappy with the appearance of their knees.

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Poignantly, despite legs being one of the sexiest areas of the body, the knee is purely functional. While shapely calves have a unique allure and thighs are their own drawcard, knees are decidedly unsexy in every way, shape and form. Is it the asymmetric wrinkly folds of skin? Or the uneven skin tone and irregular knobby bits? Perhaps it’s the fact they bear the lifelong impressions of a childhood fall or the first encounter with a disposable razor. Most accurately, they’re little more than the lower-body equivalent of an elbow: susceptible to dryness and simply practical. Proving their function over form, knees are usually the point from which hemlines are measured. At Britain’s annual Royal Ascot race day, revellers are issued a knee-specific dress code: “Dresses and skirts must be modest length, defined as falling just above the knee or longer.� And while knees can be confidently concealed via hemlines, changing trends are often their principal exposer. In season’s past, the midi had its moment (much to the relief of said friend), though judging by the bandage-sized swathes of fabric designers sent down the runway this season, the verdict is clear: the mini is making a triumphant

“IF YOU’VE GOT SAGGY KNEES, /%+Ăˆ) EVERYONE ELSE’S ‌ YEARS AGO, I HAD DREADFUL KNEESâ€?


INDIGITAL EDWARD URRUTIA ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE DETAILS LAST PAGES

return. At Saint Laurent, models’ pins were on full display in barely-there tubes of leather and velvet, while the shortcomings at Isabel Marant came via ruched and ruffled flamingo dresses that hit the mini tipping point: precisely halfway between the patella and the hip. Miuccia Prada took things even further north at Miu Miu with not only A-line mini-skirts but also high-waisted bloomers in a kaleidoscope of 60s fabrics, and in turn decreed that the time is nigh for knees. It’s welcome news if you’re six-foot-two and rival Bambi in the leg stakes, but for anyone not of model proportion, the upsurge of rising hemlines and concerned women has ushered in a wave of solutions. “People think there’s probably nothing much that can be done for knees, but it’s one of the most successful areas for Thermage,” says O’Regan, noting that, like “cankles”, knee concerns don’t discriminate. “Years ago, I had dreadful knees. I wasn’t overweight; it just affects some people and not others.” From her private members’ cosmetic clinic in Melbourne, O’Regan uses Thermage – a non-invasive procedure that deploys radio waves to stimulate collagen in the dermis – to restore volume, tighten and lift the knee and surrounding skin. “Human elastic fibres are like wool fibres: when you heat them, they contract,” she explains. “We treat the area that’s mid-thigh to below the knee, and across the middle of the knee, which contracts the skin up, down and across.” Dr Sabrina Fabi from Cosmetic Laser Dermatology in San Diego, a pioneer in the field of cosmetic dermatology, is currently trialling a never-before-seen treatment for wrinkled and sagging skin above the knees. While it may be some time before it’s readily available in Australia (it’s already being offered in the US), it applies a dual approach of both injectables and microfocused ultrasound, and is yielding promising results in treating the laxity of the skin surrounding the knee. Perhaps this emergence of new technology to address the delicate knee area stems from the fact it’s one of the few areas of the body – like the neck and backs of hands – that can reveal a person’s true age. Just ask Demi Moore. In that scene from Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle, an enigmatic Moore emerged from the ocean, surfboard under arm, to the gasp of cinema audiences for her well-honed physique and, notably, her age-defying knees, which in turn drew unsupported assumptions she’d undergone a knee tweak of sorts. Aside from a trip to the doctor’s office, Australian celebrity trainer and Bodyism founder James Duigan says that, although the knee is one of the more difficult areas to specifically target, certain exercises and equipment can prove beneficial. “As with anything, your body type is your body type, so there’s always going to be only so much you can do to affect the knee area,” he says. Instead, Duigan says focusing your attention away from the knee area to other parts of the lower body can have a significant knock-on effect. “Resistance band work is one of the most effective and cost-friendly ways to ‘knee fix’ in the world. It lifts your butt, creates tone and doesn’t bulk up your legs. It helps activate your gluteal muscles, which play an important role in stabilising the knee.”

Likewise, treating the skin on your knees to the same level of dedication reserved for your complexion, décolletage and backs of hands can go some way to delaying the effects of early-onset knee droop. Up your dosage of alpha hydroxy acids to slough away the build-up of dead skin cells and aid cell turnover. Meanwhile, like other sun-exposed areas of the body, diligent UV-A and UV-B protection of the lower limbs is key. One colleague relies on a liberal application of SPF 50+ sunscreen to her knees daily before she sets foot outdoors. “It’s something I learnt from my mother, who has always had great legs,” she says, her well-preserved lower limbs speaking for themselves. For a more instantaneous effect, look to British make-up artist Charlotte Tilbury, who’s known to lather her eponymous Supermodel Body cream onto the limbs of her celebrity clients – Kate Moss, Cara Delevingne and Naomi Campbell among them – minutes before they glide onto the red carpet in a mini-dress. Like Sally Hansen’s cult product Airbrush Legs, and like a regular foundation for the face, it subtly masks imperfections and evens out overall skin tone via clever light-reflecting particles. I recommend it to my cycling friend and the next time I see her she’s donning a pale pink, lace Zimmermann dress, which just grazes the tops of her kneecaps. It’s by no means Miu Miu short, but she’d be a shoe-in for Royal Ascot. ■

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All hail the 80s. Time to power up. Make a statement. Get in formation. Let’s go, girls.


More is more: stay up all night (and day) in slick shininess and gilded turns. From statement shoulders to a focus on the waist, revel in the decade of excess. Styled by Kate Darvill. Photographed by Nicole Bentley. 160 MARCH 2017


Giorgio Armani jacket, $14,000, dress, $18,000, and earrings, $450. All prices approximate; fashion details last pages.

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Sharon Wauchob dress, $1,510. Christie Nicolaides earrings, $289. By Phillippe Paris for Harlequin Market necklace, $890. Chanel bag, $6,900, from the Chanel boutiques. Christian Louboutin shoes, $1,445, from a selection at David Jones.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Christian Dior top, $1,900. Bordelle bra, $380 from Baby Likes To Pony. Carmen March pants, $2,413. Christie Nicolaides earrings, $269. Ben-Amun necklace, $675, and cuff, $590, from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels. Roberto Cavalli belt, $1,250, from Cosmopolitan Shoes.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Emanuel Ungaro dress, $3,139. Vintage Christian Lacroix earrings, $780, and David Mandel for The Show Must Go On cuff, $900, from Harlequin Market. Off-White shoes, P.O.A.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Gucci dress, $5,350, necklace, $2,350, and shoes, $785. Wolford stockings, $79.


Salvatore Ferragamo dress, P.O.A. Christie Nicolaides earrings, $289. ValĂŠre rosary beads, $299, cruciform necklace, $350, necklace, $240, worn as bracelet, and gold bracelet, $230. Nikki Witt bracelets, from $79. Balmain belt, P.O.A.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Saint Laurent dress, P.O.A.


Bottega Veneta dress, $6,220. Vintage Chanel earrings, $1,750, from Harlequin Market. Kenneth Jay Lane necklace, $720, from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels. Cartier Panthère cuff, $49,400, Panthère ring, $35,800, and hollow Panthère ring, $28,000.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Jason Wu dress, $5,085. Atelier Swarovski earring, $399, bracelet, $248, and ring, $599.


Chanel cardigan, $6,320, from the Chanel boutiques. Preen skirt, P.O.A. CĂŠline earrings, $2,700. Bulgari Serpenti cuff, $50,700, and rings, P.O.A. Christian Louboutin shoes, $1,795.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Kenzo cape, $1,195, and dress, $1,290, from a selection at Myer. Maggie Marilyn pants, $800. Lele Sadoughi earrings, $260, from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels.


NICOLE BENTLEY

Bally jacket, $2,350. Tome skirt, $1,750. Christopher Kane earrings, $325. Vintage Christian Lacroix necklace, $1,400, from Harlequin Market. Roberto Cavalli belt, $1,650, from Cosmopolitan Shoes.


As the awards season unfolds in Hollywood, we salute our favourite stars of the year’s best films. By Lynn Hirschberg. Styled by Edward Enninful. Photographed by Craig McDean.

MICHELLE WILLIAMS FILM: MANCHESTER BY THE SEA “What are they doing to kids? Why does somebody always have to die in an animated children’s movie? The films are all so depressing. There is plenty of time for that. Me and my daughter, we’re done! From now on, only classic romantic comedies and musicals for us. I don’t want to be sad.” Louis Vuitton top, pants and boots.

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JOEL EDGERTON FILM: LOVING

“I was surprised to learn that most Americans didn’t know about the Loving case, how it made interracial marriage legal in this country. The names Mildred and Richard Loving are not on the civil rights time line that is taught in schools. Somehow, this major victory was not as big as a bomb exploding or someone being shot at a lectern. Instead, it was a quiet revolution that deserves a loud conversation.” Burberry T-shirt. Saint Laurent jeans. Lucchese boots. Dior Homme jacket (on chair).

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JEFF BRIDGES FILM: HELL OR HIGH WATER

“I remember doing an interview years ago and being asked if I was one of those actors who takes the part home with me. I answered: ‘No. Not really.’ My wife happened to be in the room, and she started to laugh. Apparently, I had been playing a terrible person – a killer or someone who buries people alive or something – and she definitely noticed. I wasn’t fun to live with.” Boss coat. A.P.C. jeans. The Frye Company boots.


NICOLE KIDMAN FILM: LION

CRAIG MCDEAN

What was your favourite birthday? “When I turned 40, my husband, Keith [Urban], drove me up to the top of this small hill in Bowen, in Queensland, and sat me down. He had put together this huge fireworks display. It was just for the two of us! It was sexy.” What is your pet peeve? “When people say they will do something and they don’t. And I know it’s terribly demanding, but I don’t like it when my husband doesn’t answer his phone. I have to keep calling and calling, and I get anxious. Does that make me high-maintenance?” Chanel sweater, dress, shorts and shoes, from the Chanel boutiques. Bulgari earrings.


RUTH NEGGA FILM: LOVING

“When I auditioned for the part of Mildred Loving, I had to sort of disappear into her character. Usually, I don’t create a costume for an audition, but this time I wore a summer dress. I knew that coming in the door looking like this woman would have an impact. A year later, I learned I got the part. At the premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, I walked up the steps of the Palais in full make-up, and I walked down the steps with mascara dripping. It was such an emotional experience. All I could think was that I needed to blow my nose before it dripped all over my frock.” Prada top and skirt. Fabiana Filippi blouse.


CASEY AFFLECK FILM: MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

“I used to love movies that made me cry, and now all movies seem to make me cry. I don’t like that so much. I have my own things to cry about. I remember being young and sitting on the floor in my father’s apartment watching The Elephant Man on TV. When the Elephant Man did his speech – ‘I am not an animal’ – I started sobbing. That’s a tearjerker. That film made a superstrong impression on me. It set a certain standard in my mind of what was possible.” Louis Vuitton pants. Falke socks. On model: Alexander Wang sweater.

MARION COTTILARD FILM: ALLIED

“It might sound weird, but I always cry at the end of Step Brothers. I’ve seen the movie 10 times, and it still touches me at the end, when Will Ferrell sings. You don’t expect to cry watching that type of comedy, but I always do.” Burberry trenchcoat. Loro Piana sweater. Chopard earrings.

PHOTOGRAPHS: CRAIG MCDEAN HAIR AND GROOMING FOR WARREN BEATTY: NATALIA BRUSCHI

FELICITY JONES FILMS: A MONSTER CALLS AND ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

“Recently, I seem to be doing a lot of dying onscreen. Lizzie, my character in A Monster Calls, has cancer, and I became obsessed with the way someone’s voice changes as their body deteriorates, and how they change the way they hold their body. It became harder and harder to play Lizzie. I don’t think I’m going to die anymore.” Giorgio Armani dress. Djula earrings. Tacori ring.

WARREN BEATTY FILM: RULES DON’T APPLY

“I never knew Howard Hughes, so I’m able to take liberties, to allow my imagination to go to work. I like to quote Henry Ford, who said: ‘History is bunk.’ I like to quote Winston Churchill, who said: ‘History will be kind to me, because I intend to write it myself.’ And, in Rules Don’t Apply, I quote Mr. Hughes himself. He said: ‘Never check an interesting fact.’” Jeffrey Rüdes sweater.


DEV PATEL FILM: LION

“When I was cast in Slumdog Millionaire I was 17. At our first major screening, I walked the red carpet in my school shoes and a terrible suit I found on the high street, in London, with my mum. My co-star, Freida Pinto, was very beautiful, very glamorous, and they said: ‘We can’t have this kid walking the red carpet with her! He’s spoiling the whole picture!’ So they gave me a new suit and fixed me up. It was a bit like Pretty Woman.” Hermès sweater. Frame Denim jeans.


ANNETTE BENING FILM: 20TH CENTURY WOMEN

CRAIG MCDEAN

“I love emojis. I like the thumbs-up. I’m also big on the heart. I really like the woman in the red dress – she appears quite often in my texts. I also use the blue spiral and the namaste. I learned about emojis from my children, and often now, I almost prefer not to use words, just emojis. In the past few days, for instance, I’ve been using that loudspeaker one. It means I’m making noise about something.” Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci dress. Harry Winston earrings. Falke tights. Jimmy Choo shoes.


EMMA STONE FILM: LA LA LAND

“My real name is Emily Stone, but when I started acting, that name was already taken by another actress, so I had to come up with a different one. For a 16-year-old, picking a new name is an interesting prospect, and back then I said: ‘I’m now going to be Riley Stone!’ So, for about six months I was called Riley. I landed a guest spot on Malcolm in the Middle, and one day they were calling: ‘Riley! Riley! Riley! We need you on set, Riley!’ and I had no idea who they were talking to. At that moment, I realised that I just couldn’t be Riley. So I became Emma. But I miss Emily. I would love to get her back.” Sonia Rykiel sweater. Commando briefs.


PHOTOGRAPHS: CRAIG MCDEAN HAIR FOR EMMA STONE: MARA ROSZAK MAKE-UP FOR EMMA STONE: RACHEL GOODWIN

NATALIE PORTMAN FILM: JACKIE

“Playing Jackie Kennedy is scary. I was nervous at first, and I started by doing a lot of research. The transcripts of her interviews with the historian Arthur Schlesinger were really helpful. He taped everything, and you can hear Jackie’s voice. Her intellect and her wit and what she’s bitter about are immediately apparent. At the same time, I was going to costume fittings and make-up tests. When I put on the Jackie wig, the physical and emotional sides came together. The hair itself is so iconic that once you have it right, you can start to see Jackie. I don’t really look like her, but I felt like I was in her skin.” Equipment dress.


MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY FILM: GOLD

“I was attracted to Gold because it reminded me of my dad. He loved shady deals. He’d much rather do a shady deal with fun people than a good deal with a bunch of straightasses. He invested in diamond mines in Ecuador, and there were no fucking diamonds there. It was a scam, but he loved that. That’s the spirit of my character, Kenny Wells.” AG jacket. Current/Elliott T-shirt. Levi’s jeans. John Hardy bracelet (far right). Ann Demeulemeester boots.

AMY ADAMS FILMS: ARRIVAL AND NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

“Tom Ford became my muse on Nocturnal Animals. My character, Susan, was very personal to Tom, and so I based my interpretation on him. Tom would ask on set: ‘Why is Amy using her hands like that?’ And I said: ‘I’m copying you, Tom!’ I used him. I used him up.” Gucci shirt. Djula earrings.

GRETA GERWIG FILMS: MAGGIE’S PLAN , 20TH CENTURY WOMEN AND JACKIE

Do you have a cinematic crush? “I would have to say Melanie Griffith in Working Girl – the first time she meets Harrison Ford at the bar. She’s all done up and she tells him: ‘I’ve got a head for business and a bod for sin.’ And young Harrison Ford … what a dreamboat! But it’s her I truly love. She’s so compelling and funny. She’s sexy without being plastic. I think a lot of people miss seeing women that way.” Proenza Schouler dress. Guidi boots.

MAHERSHALA ALI FILM: MOONLIGHT AND HIDDEN FIGURES

“Juan, my character in Moonlight, dies off-camera. The audience never learns how or why. My father died when I was 20. He lived 3,000 miles away, but we were extremely close. I didn’t miss him right away – it took me three years before I went through my mourning. In Moonlight, it’s the same with Juan: his disappearance lingers in your mind.” Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci tank top. Cartier watch. Tiffany & Co. ring.


ANDREW GARFIELD FILMS: HACKSAW RIDGE AND SILENCE

CRAIG MCDEAN

“The majority of my process in playing a priest in Silence was praying. I’d never really prayed before, and I developed a relationship with a power greater than myself – call it God, call it love, call it what you will. It became very natural to me, and I realised that we’re all praying all the time. There’s that human impulse to worship and to long for a connection to the divine. We all get glimpses of eternity every day. It’s just a question of whether we’re looking up from our iPhones long enough to notice.” Alexander McQueen jacket and pants. A.P.C. shirt. Hair: Orlando Pita Make-up: Peter Philips Manicures: Michelle Saunders Set design: Piers Hanmer Retouching: D-Touch Production: Kyle Heinen and Joey Battaglia for Rosco Production


Decades on from her 90s modelling zenith, Cindy Crawford still has us enthralled. Zara Wong meets the smart, savvy and confident supermodel. Styled by Paul Cavaco. Photographed by Emma Summerton.

Cindy Crawford wears a Bottega Veneta dress, $6,940. Gigi Burris hat, worn throughout, $550. Soludos sandals, $175, worn throughout. All prices approximate; fashion details last pages.

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190 MARCH 2017

EMMA SUMMERTON

Chloé shirt, $1,400. Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci pants, $2,150. Bernardo sandals, $205.


Louis Vuitton dress, P.O.A. Beauty note: Meaningful Beauty Cindy Crawford Glowing Serum.


P

icture this. A 20-year-old Cindy Crawford is at a dinner function in New York. Screenwriter Nora Ephron turns to the young model, eyes her up and down, and asks: “Who are you?” The question throws Crawford. “It wasn’t: ‘What do you do?’ It was more like: ‘Why should I care about you? Justify yourself,’” she remembers. “And in that moment, I thought: ‘I don’t need to justify myself to anybody.’ I love Nora Ephron, but what was I going to say? That I’m a model who has been on the cover of Vogue? That wouldn’t impress her,” she tells me, sitting in the corner booth seat at Soho House in West Hollywood. “So I said: ‘I’m just a girl.’ And I think that answer caught her off guard and got her more interested in me. Modelling is what I do, it’s not who I am. Who are you? It’s a deep question, and at 20 I didn’t even know who I was.” We know how this story ends. Crawford needs no introduction. There’s an urban legend that has Crawford being scouted by accident when a local newspaper photographer snapped her shucking corn during her school holidays. She embodies that fairytale trope of small-town girl finding fame, fortune and now a business based on her name and a movie-worthy photogenic family. We remember that George Michael Freedom! ’90 video clip, that Pepsi ad, House of Style on MTV, and her 22-year ambassadorship with Omega watches, which will bring her to Australia this month. Her beauty was never about looking like a young girl – sweet and cute were not the words for Crawford or, really, for many of the models of her generation. She always looked grown up, and combined with the contemporary predilection for the 90s in fashion, music and culture, Crawford’s image is the ideal for what it means to be a real woman: the beauty, sure, but also an inner cool that comes from a quiet self-confidence rather than arrogance. And since her modelling heyday, her brand “Cindy Crawford” has withstood the test of time and has had a resurgence, entering the discussion of millennials: appearing in a Taylor Swift video clip and being name-checked as an idol by Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid. Reformation, the eco-friendly hipster Los Angeles brand, came out with a sweatshirt emblazoned with her name, a sell-out item that was worn by the likes of Lena Dunham and Karlie Kloss. At an on-stage Q&A promoting her book Becoming (to commemorate her 50th birthday) in San Francisco, an attendee asked her how to encourage gender diversity and reduce gender discrimination in Silicon Valley and other industries. It was a big question and showed, in a strange way, how some people hold her up as a symbol of modern womanhood, someone who has all the answers. “If I knew, I should be running for president,” she deftly replied in jest as the crowd laughed along with her. Being president was a childhood dream of Crawford’s, and although she claims that goal is a distant memory now (“I don’t want to take a pay cut,” she once joked in an interview), she has that air of states(wo)manship about her. There is not much Crawford hasn’t been asked, and there are few photo shoot concepts that are new to her. But she still considers each question carefully, descriptive but precise with her words. She doesn’t beat around the bush and she doesn’t trail off. Her responses go beyond just sound bites, because although most likely guarded from years of fame, she still has that no-nonsense politeness that she attributes to her Midwestern upbringing. She very rarely wavers eye contact and during our interview when I accidentally spill water, she wipes it up before I get the chance.

Many people in the creative industry talk about trusting their gut, but Crawford is the only person I’ve interviewed who speaks to the contrary. “I want to gather all the information and it’s nice when after you do the analytics the answer is the same as your gut, but when they are at odds, I have to choose my fact-gathering.” Before modelling full-time she graduated valedictorian and had commenced studies at the renowned Northwestern University. Supermodel-in-the-making does chemical engineering at a toptier university on an academic scholarship no less – it’s the tale woven deep into the narrative of Cindy Crawford. Her time there included the only instance that she felt like she had been underestimated, “because I didn’t look like the other engineers”. She selected engineering because the probability of a woman winning a scholarship in that field would be higher. “I knew I could get it and my parents wouldn’t have been able to afford that college,” she says pragmatically. “Looking a certain way has had its advantages, it was a whole career for me, but it [university] was the one time I was shocked about being judged in a negative way.” She once turned up to calculus class only to have the professor take one look at her and tell her she had the wrong room. Leaving university early was a difficult decision, says Crawford, because her confidence had derived from being “a straight-A student – it had been my thing”. She delicately describes modelling as a role where “that side of you was not weighted or appreciated as much as other things. But I just applied my brain to my new surroundings and I went straight into being successful in my new field, so I wasn’t leaving one thing hoping something else would be there, because it already was.” Crawford realised that she didn’t need to prove that she was smart in a conventional sense, approaching modelling as a career rather than a lifestyle. “It is like a sport that you can get better at. Even though you get older, you’re like an ageing athlete who knows the game.” As well as giving her a chance to travel the world, it also proved very lucrative for Crawford. Her views on finance were shaped by her parents’ divorce and how her father used money to control her mother in the aftermath. As soon as she could, she helped her mother “so she didn’t have to ask for money from my dad. It taught me to be financially independent and it gave me a great sense of security that I could take care of myself.” Despite what she presents to the outside world, Crawford attests she is shy and quiet. “I was never the one who had to be dragged out of the club at 5am!” On location shoots, she would force herself to go out for team dinners, “because I realised I might miss out on opportunities or making friends, but my temptation would be to not go at all [and have] room service and my book”, she remembers. She overcame that reserve by putting on a brave face and developing a professional persona, letting her emotions follow through. “As a model you’re a 19-year-old girl who walks into a room where everybody is older than you and you’re supposed to bring the magic. You learn to fake it until you make it.” I ask whether she desired another image. “What I really admire about Linda Evangelista is her ability to be a chameleon. Everyone always wanted me to look like a version of Cindy, which in a way is a compliment. Someone asked me if I take risks and I said no, but in writing my book [and thinking back on her life], I realise I take risks in different ways.” She was one of the first models to do exercise videos, an idea that came to her off the back of Jane Fonda’s popularity. ▲

192 MARCH 2017

EMMA SUMMERTON

“I WAS NEVER THE ONE WHO HAD TO BE DRAGGED OUT OF THE CLUB AT 5AM!”


CĂŠline dress, $4,250. Omega watch, $10,450.


Chanel dress, $2,880, and skirt, $25,310, from the Chanel boutiques. Michael Kors belt, worn throughout, $680.


EMMA SUMMERTON

Derek Lam dress, $3,370.

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EMMA SUMMERTON

“Everyone was watching her, but there was nothing for my generation.” Producing it herself, she personally hired the production team and director. Other watershed moments included starring in the Pepsi TV advertisement that took her into homes all over the world, then hosting MTV’s House of Style, which showed off her personality and honed her presentation skills. “It was cable TV, so they had more hours to fill up,” she says modestly. Crawford earned a type of celebrity previously unseen within the fashion world – a supermodel. From her first name alone and her image, it is a term she defines. And in a meta sort of way she is asked to define it regularly – it’s her most frequently asked question. “At first I thought the word ‘supermodel’ was ridiculous. I remember thinking: ‘that is so cheesy, it will never stick.’ I was wrong, and now everyone is a supermodel,” she says with a laugh. “It captured the public’s imagination and suddenly we went beyond the pages of fashion magazines and more into entertainment.” She mentions that starting her skincare line, Meaningful Beauty, was another personal turning point. “That was when I transitioned from being just a model for hire … it is more risky because most models get the big cheque whether it [what they’re promoting] does well or not, so it was scary to not have that guarantee but to participate in the success.” She was 35 years old and taking stock in her own career, which she guessed might have reached its inevitable end. “I thought that I could benefit greatly from the upside, but if it didn’t do well that would be a lesson learnt. And at that age, who knew how much longer my modelling career would go? So I thought it could be a nice end-to-my-career thing to do my own business. I wanted to have more of a voice in the process and I felt like I earnt that.” Crawford has insecurities just like any woman, she points out. “Not that I wish I was less fearful, but I wish I cared less about getting older.” Both her grandmothers are alive and in their 90s. “I’m lucky and I think they are beautiful and I just wish people could look at themselves that same way,” she says. Crawford turned 51 this February and in person she looks magnificent. Walking through Soho House with her – where celebrities are even more commonplace than in the usual LA hangouts – guests gawp and repeatedly turn their heads. There she is, an icon walking by in her tan suede biker jacket and boot-cut denim, looking exactly like how you would expect Cindy Crawford to look: classically all-American, stylish without being a “fashion” fashion girl. “We pick ourselves apart. I don’t want to model that for my daughter [Kaia Gerber]. I think it is hard for all women, but being in fashion and being a model might make it a little bit harder.” She marvels at the Victoria’s Secret models who have had children and seem to be back on the runway in a matter of weeks. Crawford and Stephanie Seymour were among the first of their generation Continued on page 241


Diane von Furstenberg dress, $905. Cartier ring, $3,200. Hair: Danilo Make-up: Pati Dubroff Manicure: Marisa Carmichael


lady dior

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Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first female creative director at Dior, is out to make a statement. By Zara Wong. Photographed by Patrick Demarchelier.

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chic grey headquarters in Paris’s 8th arrondissement. She puts down her teacup and laughs at herself as she moves her arms up and down to mimic a bee flapping its wings. “Bees are good creatures: they work hard, they’re good for flowers and they produce fantastic things – honey,” she says, admiring the insects for their more humble origins beyond those of French regency. And under her governance, the Dior house has produced equally fantastic things that are just as sweet and heavenly: dreamscapes embroidered over sheer skirts and gowns, slick diagonally buttoned day dresses and suits, grasp-and-go handbags. Dior motifs like bows were executed with a looser hand, trimming ankle straps of slingback shoes and straps, ribbons woven with the portmanteau J’adior. Grazia Chiuri’s start at the house coincides with its 70-year anniversary, to be celebrated with a landmark exhibition, The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture, at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV). The display will showcase archival

ne day, when working on her debut collection for Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri set upon the task of inspecting the bees being meticulously embroidered on quilted bustiers and jackets that had been derived from fencing uniforms and breathily diaphanous skirts. Bees had long been a motif at Dior, “but Italian bees do not look like the French bees”, Grazia Chiuri says in her Italian-accented English. “I was born in Rome, so I know about the Barberini bees” – the 17th-century noble family had chosen bees as their heraldic symbol. To the knowing eye, like Grazia Chiuri’s, French bees are larger, with longer, thinner wings, and were the emblem of Napoleon and other French kings of the past; Childeric I’s tomb had been discovered filled with 300 golden bees. “I had to check, as I know very well they’re not the same; they’re different to the French bees, the Napoleon bees,” she explains over a green tea in Dior’s


pieces from all seven of Dior’s previous creative directors, including Yves Saint Laurent, John Galliano and Raf Simons, from the Dior archives as well as the NGV’s own collection. “Each subsequent head designer at Dior has brought their own interpretation to the decades that follow,” says Katie Somerville, senior curator of fashion and textiles at the NGV, who has spent the past three years working on the exhibition, which opens in August. “In the past, my idea about Mr Dior was about the picture,” says Grazia Chiuri, thinking back to iconic fashion photographs of Christian Dior’s New Look design. Images of supremely elegant women (assumed to be French, always French) in skirt shapes made from reams of fabric: billowing gowns or sharply tailored matching sets that accentuated their waspish waists that were more than just about the silhouette, but also captured the common mood of the era. “The picture, the dress, armour, stiff,” she explains, moving her hands about to demonstrate the shapes. “But when I saw the real piece in the archive, it was really soft, really light – I was so surprised. The craftsmanship was unbelievable.” And thus let there be light on Dior with Grazia Chiuri’s longawaited appointment as the house’s first female creative director, who, from that first visit to the archives, has sought to bring in the same sense of airiness and etherealness to the clothes. “So I tried to re-introduce that lightness, because I think now with this style of life, you need something that is light, comfortable, effortless and easy to A statementdress,” she says. As a physical and making T-shirt. literal embodiment of this lightness, she has remained with her newly cropped platinum hair. Change has been afoot. Dior has always been a feminine house; Christian Dior’s iconic New Look silhouette sophisticatedly banked on the womanly figure, with the revealing Margrave dress raising eyebrows during its time with its three bows arranged in a row down from the bust. Time magazine wrote in 1948 that while Christian Dior wasn’t the first designer to drop lengths and round shoulders, “he sensed that the time was exactly ripe to convert these minority manifestations into a powerful mass movement”. David Jones introduced that collection to Sydney that same year, and cemented its history with the house by touring Christian Dior’s final collection around Australia in 1957 and adopting Dior’s houndstooth print in its own branding. Under the 28-year tenure of Marc Bohan, Dior achieved momentum, gaining popularity with late socialite Betsy Bloomingdale and other elegant society women of the time. Bohan also designed the wedding dress of Princess Grace of Monaco’s daughter Caroline. Grazia Chiuri has looked beyond Christian Dior’s pieces in the archives. “When you think about Dior, everyone speaks about

Mr Dior, but honestly I don’t think that’s possible because there were so many other talents,” she says. She considers herself a curator at the house, one whom “has arrived in an incredible house where there are so many talents, and it’s important to show what they did … and then I put in some element that is more close with myself”. The venerable French house has had a complex history with the wearable reality of fashion from the streets. The fashion press of the time ridiculed then-creative director Yves Saint Laurent’s 1960 beatnik collection of turtlenecks, leather jackets and thigh-high boots; the house dismissed him, replacing him with his assistant Bohan. Commenting on his own work, Bohan said: “A couturier’s job is dressing a woman, making her elegant … Our client cannot wear [youthquake fashions] and look beautiful.” Dressed in jeans tucked into over-the-knee black boots, Grazia Chiuri notices that I am as well. “See, I don’t think you can speak about femininity in a way that is close to say, the 50s, so I wanted to describe the new woman,” she says, gesticulating towards our double denims. Her Dior women are dressed in a modern-day armour – appropriated fencing uniforms, tulle dresses with logoed straps and waistbands that mimic the elastic on 90s-style sports bras, made more street with leather biker jackets. She looks to her children, son Nicolo and daughter Rachele, for ideas. “It helps to understand the new generation, and you understand you need to start a dialogue with them,” she says. “The new generation can be challenging, because they want more than a picture. In some ways, they’re an intelligent generation from all the access, so they know more and want more.” For her first Dior show, she kept the runway sparse; there were no Raf Simons florals, and no John Galliano steam train. “I was surprised that people felt to say that I was brave,” she says. “I wasn’t brave about the collection,” she goes on, articulating that it was more relief that the final result had replicated the “dream” that she had in her mind. “I was more brave about moving to Paris. I was brave in my life.” The geographical move away from her home country of Italy is more than just about the physical. After all, as Pierre Bergé said in 1989 in response to the appointment of Gianfranco Ferré at Dior: “I don’t think opening the doors to a foreigner – and an Italian – is respecting the spirit of creativity in France.” As a Roman at a Parisian house, Grazia Chiuri sees it as bringing a French element. “I could introduce a new element because of my Italian point of view; there could be a new twist at the house,” she says. “Italia is more cool, more open to change, more prêt-àporter – French is more traditional, more close with couture.”

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PATRICK DEMARCHELIER INDIGITAL

“FEMINISM, TO ME, MEANS YOU CAN HAVE HIGH HEELS AND LIPSTICK, TOO, IF YOU WANT”


Above: models sharing macarons, from left: Frederikke Sofie wears a Christian Dior sweater, $2,050, lingerie, $1,100, and skirt, $19,500. Grace Hartzel wears a Christian Dior dress, $11,000, lingerie, $1,500, and rings, P.O.A. Imaan Hammam wears a Christian Dior dress, $21,000, lingerie, P.O.A., choker, $460, and bracelet, P.O.A. Ly wears a Christian Dior dress, P.O.A., lingerie, $2,100, ring P.O.A., and sneakers, $1,750. Left: Hartzel wears a Christian Dior jacket, $6,000, tank top, $1,900, lingerie, $1,200, skirt, $4,800, choker, $460, bag, $3,800, and sneakers, $1,250. Right: Montero wears a Christian Dior top, $4,300, lingerie, $1,200, jeans, $1,150, sunglasses, P.O.A., choker, $460, ring, P.O.A., and sandals, P.O.A.


PATRICK DEMARCHELIER GETTY IMAGES

But, she adds warm-heartedly: “We both like food, we both like wine.” Prior to Dior, she was co-creative director at Valentino alongside Pierpaolo Piccioli, a close friend whom had also worked with her at Fendi. “Valentino was more about glamour,” she says. “With Dior there is this idea of happiness, it’s very strong, this joy, this lightness. Christian Dior loved parties; he loved fun. As Christian Dior himself had put it: “Women, with their intuitive instinct, understood that I dreamed not only of making them more beautiful, but happier, too.” Grazia Chiuri lives on her own near Luxembourg Gardens in Paris; her husband and son are in Rome, while her daughter is studying in London. At the moment, she speaks only sparse French. “When you’re young, you don’t consider change – it’s easy,” says the 53-year-old. But she approaches her new stage of her life with renewed optimism. “I accept this new career with the same attitude that is a new start, but in a different age, so you’re a little bit more conscious, you know?” she says. “It’s very exciting, yes, and I really like change – life is about change, everything is about change. So, honestly, A reworking of John I needed it. But at the same Galliano’s slogan time you think: ‘Oh, my J’Adore on elastic bands. God, this is so huge.’” Change and challenges, for her, are healthy. “When you’re young, you don’t think about it when you test yourself,” she explains. “I think that sometimes if you don’t test yourself in the moment, then the moment passes and you don’t have the same energy in the future. I really believe that now I have good energy and that I want to use this energy for something new.” Fendi (LVMH later bought the brand in 2001) and Valentino were also family-run companies, whereas Dior had been part of the Bernard Arnault-headed luxury conglomerate since 1984. “When I started, fashion was another story,” she says. “The designer was also the owner, so I didn’t think it would be a possibility in the future to have the opportunity to be the creative director of a company like this.” On her first day in the Dior offices, she was amazed by its size. “From the outside, you don’t see what is inside Dior, and Dior feels a little distant. But inside it’s a warm family that really supported me,” she says. “I want this new generation to discover what I discovered in this company – that the idea of femininity is to be beautiful but also happy.” Much has been made of her gender in the role of creative director, to the astonishment of Grazia Chiuri. Upon reflection, she has come to terms with its greater significance. “I hope, in some way, to open the door for other girls,” she says. The most explicit manifestation of this realisation in her collection was Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s essay title We Should All Be Feminists written large on a T-shirt, a marked departure from the usual logo-emblazoned T-shirts that were part of the Galliano-era of the late 90s and early 2000s. The book profoundly affected her; while she had grown up in a family that encouraged her to pursue her career and establish her independency, she’s aware of the changing image of feminism

today. Grazia Chiuri tells me her mother had always spoke to her about feminism, but now women don’t speak about it in that same way. “The word feminism is in some ways dangerous now, no? Their opinion,” she says with a shrug, “but feminism, to me, as my mother says, is about equal opportunity.” “And that means you can have high heels and lipstick, too, if you want,” she adds, riffing off Ngozi Adichie’s famous line in the essay: “At some point I was a happy African feminist who does not hate men and who likes to wear lip gloss and high heels for herself and not for men” – illustrating the embedded meaning in gender, in opinion, in tribes. “There’s a stereotype about this word,” says Grazia Chiuri. “Approaching a serious argument in a fun way, like through fashion, could give it more attention.” Being a mother while having a successful and long career has had its difficult times for Grazia Chiuri, but she’s thankful, if amazed, that she never had to make a choice between the two in her life. “You might think you have to choose, but you don’t,” she says. “You can have everything you want if you work in a serious way, but it’s not easy and it’s tiring. Sometimes you think you have to choose, but I have never in my life [had to choose] and that’s the message I want to give.” There is no inner turmoil or tortured artist with Grazia Chiuri. When she was at Valentino, her and Piccioli’s designs were bedecked in colourful planets and musical notes tinkling across gossamer and her touch at Dior has seen similar such gaieties, nodding to symbols of luck and fortune. LVMH is undoubtedly hoping that Grazia Chiuri will also bring some of the same (commercial) magic she brought to Valentino, where, under her and Piccioli, the team produced sell-out accessories and revived the brand. In Christian Dior’s memoirs, he writes: “The most important feature of my life – I would be both ungrateful and untruthful if I failed to acknowledge it immediately – has been my good luck.” A fortune teller had told him as a child: “Women are lucky for you, and through them you will achieve success.” Bees – a Grazia Chiuri favourite, as we know – symbolise industry and wisdom; four-leaf clovers are sewn on like badges on the front of runway looks or more subtly embedded within the pattern of an embroidered gown, Tarot card names in French like La Lune and Le Pendu are swirled on garments like good luck charms. “I try to be happy and lucky in my life, and I’d like others to be lucky as well,” she says. Upon joining Dior, Grazia Chiuri discovered that she not only shared the same birthday as Dior’s high jewellery designer Victoire de Castellane, but also fell under the same star sign as Christian Dior. “Aquarius, which is all about freedom and water – it’s unbelievable,” she says. Though she’s not seriously superstitious, she enjoys horoscopes. “I read it because I like it. It’s playful,” she says in her lilting voice, smiling. “And I like everything playful and happy. And I’d like others to be happy ■ and lucky at the same time, too.” Luck, then, be a lady. VOGUE.COM.AU 203


Bold, eclectic, magnetic. To the perpetual beat of the 80s, she can take on anything. Make-up by Violette. Photographed by Steven Pan.

Against a porcelain canvas and bitten lip, eyes glitter. On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Super Antioxidant Serum, $156; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On eyes: Giorgio Armani Eyes to Kill Solo in 8, $48. On cheeks: Rationale Beautiful Cheeks SPF50, $60. Lydia Courteille earrings, $43,380. All prices approximate; details last pages.

204 MARCH 2017


On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Super Antioxidant Serum, $156; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On eyes: NARS DualIntensity Eyeshadow in Cressida, $41. On cheeks: Rationale Beautiful Cheeks SPF50, $60. Vintage Norma Kamali dress, $990, from New York Vintage. Lydia Courteille earrings, $43,380.

206 MARCH 2017

STEVEN PAN

Throw off heavy metals in azure hues for a decidedly modern interpretation.


Create light and shade through textures – matt and velvety. On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Beautiful Bronze SPF50, $60; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On eyes: Sisley Phyto-Eye Twist in Havana, $55. On lips: Bobbi Brown Creamy Matte Lip Color in Tawny Pink, $46. Balmain jacket, $11,175. Vintage earrings, $345, from New York Vintage.


On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Beautiful Light SPF50, $60; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On eyes: Christian Dior 5 Couleurs Couture Colours & Effects Eyeshadow Palette in Bar, $105. On lips: Christian Dior Rouge Dior Couture Colour Lipstick in Dolce Vita, $52. Christian Dior dress, $4,800. Vintage Yves Saint Laurent earring, on right ear, $1,045 for a pair, from New York Vintage. Emporio Armani earring, on left ear, $840 for a pair.

STEVEN PAN

More is more with eyes unapologetically rimmed in colour and brought to life with a crimson lip.


Push the boundaries and colour outside the lines. On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Super Antioxidant Serum, $156; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On cheeks: Tom Ford Cheek Color in Flush, $90. On lips: Tom Ford Ultra-Rich Lip Color in Purple Noon and Aphrodite, $78 each. Miu Miu top, $750. Missoni earrings, $290.


Highlighted to perfection, skin takes on an other-worldly luminosity with a colour injection via fuchsia lips.

STEVEN PAN

On skin: Rationale Immunologist Serum, $163; Rationale Beautiful Light SPF50, $60; Rationale Beautiful Skin SPF50, $85. On lips: Yves Saint Laurent Rouge Pur Couture in Le Fuchsia, $55. Glitter, make-up artist’s own. On cheeks: Rationale Beautiful Bronze SPF50, $60. Louis Vuitton top, P.O.A. Fausto Puglisi earring, P.O.A. Stylist: Vanessa Chow Hair: Laurent Philippon Manicure: Mei Kawajiri Model: Julia Banas

VOGUE.COM.AU 211


Get (back) into the groove

Big, brazen, brash and decadent, the 1980s, it seems, really are back in fashion and sensibility. Enjoy the ride, but this time, let’s not crash. By Alison Veness.

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ain and pleasure: that was the 80s. It was a decade of conspicuous consumption which, looking back, is possibly an understatement. Our aspirations and ambitions flew ever closer to the sun so we smouldered, burned so very bright and then became drenched in blackness as we burnt out from the crash and eventually, the terrible spread of AIDS. This time around, of course, the ascendency and ever-higher trajectory of the now is solar-powered. God, it was good. “Too fast to live, too young to die”, that was the post-punk rush and it’s the same today as we power through a time of rapid change, a style storm whipped up and accelerated by Alessandro Michele’s appointment as creative director at Gucci two years ago. Since then, his new world order has flowered quite literally, growing much like the spectacular Gucci garden that he has planted and sustained, all magical and loose and somehow with the promise of freedom. Anything is possible. Never have the words individuality and imagination rung more soundly, profoundly and loudly. And Vetements … one French word and a label packed with Cold War restlessness and irony, such a sweet happy discord. Discontent. And perhaps all this renegade newness, a kind of crazy visceral crescendo to the street style, blogger generation/phenomenon driven by the need for a community state of mind, to being famous for five minutes and achieving some sort of peer group relevance and ultimately, making money. Louder. Brighter. Bigger. Harder. Faster. Eighties core values. Shitloads of money. Dress up. Pile it all on. Dress for success. And at the shiny glittering heart of it, let us not forget then that “greed is (still) good”, Wall Street, 1987, which somehow feels so very 2017, 30 years on. A time to reminisce and time to remember. Vale George Michael, god of all those 80s power hits, Wham bam, thank you for those moves, the good times, and (one of) the songs of the decade – Club Tropicana – and all the rest. The anthems. We had faith. We loved George.

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VOGUE.COM.AU 213

INDIGITAL COLLAGE OF S/S ’17 RUNWAY LOOKS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: BALENCIAGA, SAINT LAURENT, JIL SANDER, KENZO


In February 1986, the coverline of the UK’s style bible Blitz magazine declaimed: “Well Red!” And so we were well red. We loved Blitz but it didn’t work out to be quite so cool. The harsh reality of it was the things I saw working on Fleet Street … For some reason the idea of power became totally channelled through it: any woman who wanted to get anywhere near the boardroom or the editor’s office had a red suit, failing that a red lipstick and rather large brutal clip-on earrings that had to be unclipped to take a call (old-school landline). And shoulder pads. I helped style a group of about 15 women for the office Christmas card one year. It is a fashion moment: they were dressed in red suits with narrow pencil skirts that accentuated the shoulders. The image is now a highly prized collector’s item. The bigger the ambitions the wider the shoulders. Women were taking the charge, facing off against the guys to get the jobs, smashing the ceiling and running with it. I still have a few original jackets with their epic shoulder pads that pan nine centimetres each – true. They were interchangeable, so you could size up or down. Thank God though for the new season and the super-fabulous Balenciaga spring/ summer ’17, look 39 precisely (see opposite page), with its sweeping shoulders and tux lapels. God, Demna Gvasalia (second season at Balenciaga) is good. And Balenciaga’s look one seems to say: “You will walk tall in this, girlfriend, and command them, all of them.” We like to think Gvasalia has channelled Melanie Griffith in Working Girl, 1988, not because he plays VHS tapes in his studio all the time but because he is in search of a new modern way of dressing, something like a neo-expressionist moment. Fast-paced, multi-faceted that is so perfectly synthpop, so Don’t You Want Me, so the Human League and Phil Oakey defining what we did want from the beginning of the decade in 1981. Don’t, don’t you want me? You know I can’t believe it when I hear that you won’t see me Don’t, don’t you want me? You know I don’t believe you when you say that you don’t need me Transformation. Oakey helped lead the charge, all fabulous eyeliner and hair. And then somehow men became peacocks: they wore make-up, there was a lot of soul searching, honestly, it all got quite flamboyant and fearless. A major coming out. And so very Sloane Ranger as well, a kind of nouveau establishment foppery. 2017 has seen an increased acceleration in the feminisation of menswear on the catwalk, a reaction to all the normcore, a kind of anti-authenticity backlash, whiplash. A posthipster movement and so much more. All the reasons so deeply intertwined with upheaval, social and political, success and economic revolution, awareness of environmental and indigenous issues. Now and then. MTV. Margaret Thatcher. She may have ruled the UK but her winter of discontent somehow seeped through the world’s soul. Strikes. Fairness. Hawke. Keating. Midnight Oil’s, Beds Are Burning, 1987 defined so much, so clearly. Like now all over again. The time has come To say fair’s fair To pay the rent To pay our share The time has come A fact’s a fact It belongs to them Let’s give it back How can we dance when our Earth is turning? How do we sleep while our beds are burning? 214 MARCH 2017

We listened to Simply Red. I was in a Simply Red video, dancing away in a club to The Right Thing, 1987. The club was in fact at Elstree Studios, or maybe Ealing. We were all bussed out there from Oxford Circus, a whole load of London College of Fashion students. We did it for the free food, really, and I think we got 10 pounds each. It was fun and relentless: we danced all day. So you see, I’m famous. Honestly. It was all about the music: Frankie Goes to Hollywood, INXS, Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet, the Bangles, Whitney Houston, Tears for Fears, Milli Vanilli and Kylie Minogue. There were so many good hits by Belinda Carlisle, the Proclaimers and Cher. And John Farnham’s one and only You’re The Voice, 1986. You’re the voice, try and understand it Make a noise and make it clear Oh-wo-wo-wo, oh-wo-wo-wo We’re not gonna sit in silence We’re not gonna live with fear Powerful. Yes. Change. Pipes. Drums. Stand up and be counted. These days Flume and Tame Impala feel as good as the Aussie greats were then. And the new Anthony Vaccarello for Saint Laurent or Yves Saint Laurent (whatever) is a pure playlist of 80s iconography and semiotics: his spring/summer ’17 is a line-up of pelmet skirts, bustier tops, one-sleeved tops, gold lamé … kind of epic and vast and branded with the logo, the “Look at me! Look at me!” etched out loud onto heels – YSL glamour. Now that is a word, a blast from the past – seven letters that dragged us all through the decade smelling of Christian Dior’s Poison, YSL’s Opium and Calvin Klein’s Obsession. Hot, heavy, unguent, urgent. Assignations and sex. Circa 1985 Donna Karan invented the bodysuit as part of her Seven Easy Pieces collection. It was all about making women look sleek, streamlined and the business, but it wasn’t very liberating, all that fiddling with a popper fastener. It paved the way for Gossard’s Wonderbra, which somehow everyone associates with the 80s but was in fact most famously relaunched in 1994 with the “Hello, Boys” Eva Herzigova campaign, which seems to claw at the notion of the 80s. It was up there and out there, all the time. Big hair, lots of spray. Shy Di, a royal wedding in 1981. A molten meringue. David and Elizabeth Emanuel. They stopped a nation and the world. I used to ring Buckingham Palace regularly, always tracking Princess Diana’s style moves: “Hello, it’s me again. Can you tell me who designed Princess Diana’s dress and jacket please?” Long pause before the reply: ���We would not like to comment.” Me: “But is it Catherine Walker, Bruce Oldfield?” Silence. “Or maybe Victor Edelstein?” Oh, come on guys! Of course, invariably, it was Catherine Walker. I became obsessed and even went for a fitting and seriously considered buying my very own couture Catherine. She was gracious and elegant. She was so kind and long-suffering. It was ambitious for me, as I was discovering vintage and wearing lots of 1920s and 30s dresses. My first major 80s purchase was a pair of Jean Paul Gaultier wide-leg pants, clown-size, that went all the way up to my armpits. My pay cheques went that way. Somehow I never joined the red army. The art world ignited. Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (When I hear the word culture I take out my checkbook) (1985) appropriated the irony. Nan Goldin, Robert Mapplethorpe, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring and Jeff Koons were a potent mix of the dark side and the shiny blow-up world that became so over-inflated new records were set. And the bubble never burst. Forget Netflix, we had Dallas then Dynasty, two major American soaps that had us


ALAMY INDIGITAL

all transfixed every week, the Ewings versus Carringtons: Linda Gray and Larry Hagman versus Linda Evans and John Forsythe. Oh, the drama, oh, the bitching, the backstabbing and the wardrobes. Nolan Miller was the Emmy Award-winning costume designer for Dynasty. If anyone is to be credited with the rise of the power suit it has to be him. He got it, he knew it. He knew us. Well, he was the also the costume designer for Charlie’s Angels, which ushered in the 80s. All those flicks and chicks. The 80s equalled clubbing, everyone, everywhere clubbing. Subcultures still not globally amplified; no instant anything more a long slow burn into tomorrow and the decade. Lines were done on the back of deals, envelopes, toilet seats and hands. It’s true. If it was snowing in London then it was a blizzard in New York. The Factory. Poets. Theorists. Typewriters. Despair, love and drugs. Note to self: re-read Lee Tulloch’s Fabulous Nobodies. Read Drugs by Cookie Mueller and Glenn O’Brien. Ronald Reagan. A whole other chapter. Thank god for Madonna and Michael Jackson, both of whom I saw at Wembley Stadium. Material Girl, 1984, kind of sums it up: They can beg and they can plead But they can’t see the light (that’s right) ’Cause the boy with the cold hard cash Is always Mister Right ’Cause we are living in a material world And I am a material girl

OSCAR DE LA RENTA S/S ’17

GUCCI S/S ’17

MOSCHINO S/S ’17

SAINT LAURENT S/S ’17

SAINT LAURENT S/S ’17

Madonna in the video for her 1985 hit Material Girl.

Material? Are we at the Keating “recession we had to have” yet? There are rumblings that the bubble will burst mid-year but the 80s is only really just back, honestly! Way to go. Until then I’m spending big on Balenciaga. Who can remember the crash of October 1987? Dammit, have we learned nothing before we all crash and burn, again? But wait, all that hopelessness fuelled the financial success and rise of the supermodel. Post ’87 the gang of five became six and counting. Big brands wanted instant big supermodel-style success to help then trade through the murky times. Cindy, Naomi, Linda, Christy and Claudia, and then later Kate (who somehow managed to bridge supermodeldom and being dubbed a waif) as well, electrified everything. I hid in hotel kitchens, in studios, lurked behind the scenes on closed sets to get glimpses of the greatness up close. Revlon. Music video shoots. The best were the Versace shows, especially the haute couture shows that were eventually staged at the Ritz in Paris on a specially laid floor cast over the swimming pool. The ancient Greek-inspired patterns and symbols in Gianni Versace’s hands were fashion gold. The girls brought it. Glamazons. Big hair, big boobs. Major contracts. Versace paid the most for them to walk his runway and to appear in those fullformation advertising campaigns. Eye-watering wealth. I met him a couple of times backstage: he was all twinkling eyes, art, books, ideas and music. Always smiling. He captured the swagger, ebullience and exaggeration of a decade. He knew girls ■ just wanna have fun. VOGUE.COM.AU 215


“Fashion is more art than art is” – Andy Warhol

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among the luxury brands that hired Warhol to design their advertisements. His illustrations – often whimsical ink drawings – were featured in more than more than 70 different publications, including Glamour, Rolling Stone, New York Magazine, Time and, of course, Vogue. He was the commercial illustrator who transformed into the controversial provocative pop artist, and one who successfully bridged the gap between art and commerce. As an illustrator, Warhol worked quickly and meticulously. “If they told me to draw a shoe, I’d do it. If they told me to correct it, I would – I’d do anything they told me to do, correct it and do it right. After all the ‘correction’ these commercial drawings would have feelings, they would have a style,” the artist once said. So prolific was his magazine commercial and in-house illustrative work that the art department at Vogue would often

efore Andy Warhol was the world’s most famous pop artist, before his works sold for millions of dollars, before he brought fabulous fashion and endless oeuvre into the Zeitgeist and onto the floors of Studio 54, his artwork ended up in the bin at Vogue. Yes, that’s right. But not because Warhol’s art was thought to be rubbish, far from it. It was that he was so productive with his illustrations that they were overabundant. While these days an excess of Warhol would be a goldmine, back in the 1950s he was just another artist making a living and honing his skills as an expert illustrator for magazines – flowers, perfume bottles, shoes – a decade before he first exhibited in a fine art show. Dior, Tiffany’s & Co. and the small leathergoods company Fleming-Joffe were

WORDS: SOPHIE TEDMANSON IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM, PITTSBURGH AND AGNSW VOGUE COVER: © THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC/ARS LICENSED BY VISCOPY

B

Before pop

Above: Happy Butterfly Day (1955) by Andy Warhol. Opposite: Warhol’s portrait of Princess Caroline of Monaco for the December 1983/January 1984 issue of Vogue Paris.


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Warhol’s ink-on-gauche Pair of Legs, with Coca-Cola bottle (1956) – part of which was originally drawn for I.Miller shoes in the New York Times (Warhol added the Coke bottle later), even has a handwritten note: “Coke bottle should be placed in better layout”. This advertisement was also one of the first publicly revealed to show Warhol’s fascination with the bottled brand, and was also the beginning of his usage of commercial symbols as art. “One can certainly make an argument that Warhol’s interest in images from consumer culture has its point of genesis back in the 50s – flowers, Coke and even Campbell’s Soup make their first appearances in early drawings well before his first pop exhibitions,” says Chambers. Ironically, Warhol’s first major exhibition as a pop artist was an artistic interpretation of a commercial brand – his iconic Campbell’s Soup Cans series in 1962. “It’s telling, because what are the first things that Warhol chooses to paint as an artist? Other people’s commercial illustrations,” observes Chambers. “He already had a very, very successful career as a commercial illustrator and so he enters the world of contemporary art from a very different place to most pop artists.” By 1985 Warhol would stamp this correlation between commerce and art with an entire exhibition of his Ads series reproducing logos of brands including Apple Macintosh, Volkswagen and Chanel – works that mimicked blown-up magazine ads. Warhol’s screen-prints of Elvis and Marilyn cemented his international pop art stardom in the 60s, but he returned to the pages of Vogue as the superstar artist when the title commissioned portraits of President Gerald Ford (US Vogue, October 1974), fashion writer (and later editor) Diana Vreeland (US Vogue, December 1984), and, of course, Princess Caroline of Monaco for Vogue Paris. “I see Warhol as a trailblazer in the 50s,” says Chambers. “Drawing shoes every week for ads in the New York Times while also striving to enter the world of ‘fine art’ was a bold and somewhat problematic position to occupy at the time. It’s true that other pop artists also dabbled in commercial work, but they often did so under a pseudonym and certainly didn’t have the success and profile that Warhol had in the advertising world. “Ultimately, Warhol would maintain this was of working artist, exhibiting in museums and galleries while also making ads … The idea that art and commerce shouldn’t be overtly placed together is something that Warhol disregarded. As he wrote in 1975: ‘Being good in business is the most fascinating kind of art. Making money ■ is art and working is art and good business is the best art.’” Adman: Warhol before Pop is on from February 25 until May 28. Go to www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au.

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM, PITTSBURGH AND AGNSW © THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC/ARS LICENSED BY VISCOPY

discard drafts – images that would no doubt today be worth millions. In the catalogue raisonné Andy Warhol The Complete Commissioned Magazine Work 1948-1987, Paul Maréchal states that more than 90 per cent of artworks that Warhol submitted for magazines were destroyed by various art departments. Maréchal writes: “Nicholas Haslam, who worked at Vogue in the 1960s, admits: ‘I am ashamed to say that in the art department we’d throw away reams of Andy’s drawings after we had ‘statted’ his originals to the dimensions we wanted for layout.” Eventually, though, his art made it onto the cover. When Warhol photographed Princess Caroline of Monaco for the cover of Vogue Paris 1983/84, it was the perfect synergy of art and fashion. The photo-silkscreen image was classic Warhol: the princess depicted in profile with a strong, swan-like elongated neck, chin jutting skywards, hair flowing and a roseshaped earring clipped to one lobe. It was coloured and screen-printed with a flame red shadow. Strong, sexy, chic. A new exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (AGNSW) – Adman: Warhol before Pop – delves into his commercial work and album cover illustrations, predominantly through the 1950s. It was the height of the advertising boom era in New York, where Warhol arrived fresh from studying art at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh. This decade formed part of a crucial period in his development and honed the passions that would cement Warhol into the artistic lexicon. “The exhibition has been structured so that audiences will have to grapple with the fact that he maintained two parallel practices: as a commercial artist and a fine artist,” says Nicholas Chambers, senior curator of modern and contemporary international art at the AGNSW, who curated the Adman exhibition in collaboration with the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. “I think that one thing people find quite surprising is that Warhol was an incredibly talented draftsman. Beginning with pop and in the work that followed, Warhol’s art privileged photographic images. In the 1950s, however, it is drawing that lies at the heart of his practice; you can find it everywhere, on record covers, magazine commissions, books projects and even shopfront window displays.” A look through the archive of Warhol’s commercial work is a fascinating insight into his enduring motifs: flowers, butterflies, perfume bottles, dresses, gloves, shoes, even a Coke bottle. Warhol’s Tiffany’s & Co. Christmas card from 1958 features coloured doves in the shape of a festive star. While his advertisement for Miss Dior in 1955 was much more avant-garde: a shield with a portrait embossed with a sewing kit inside the head and surrounded by heels, stockings and mermaids.


Daniella Borg, second from left, and her daughters.

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sisterhood

The Rule family – a single mum and her nine daughters – star in a compelling new TV series that offers a fresh take on contemporary Indigenous family life. Jane Albert gets amid the happy chaos. Styled by Petta Chua. Photographed by Duncan Killick. VOGUE.COM.AU 221


H

ow did I do it? I just did what I had to do in the moment, and it seemed to work out. Actually, to be honest, I don’t really know how I did it.” Daniella Borg is trying to explain her secret to successfully and single-handedly raising her family of nine daughters. Nine. She has been a parent for 30 of her 47 years, 12 of which she has had to endure on her own after her husband Kevin Rule was killed by a coward punch when their ninth and youngest daughter was just a few weeks old. This family of nine sisters comes from suburban Perth and ranges in age from “second mum” Angela, aged 30, to Hannah the youngest, at 12; not to mention three grandsons and two granddaughters thrown into the mix, meaning there are now 14 of them. They are the Rules, a perfectly normal, perfectly extraordinary family of proud Aboriginal women whose every nuance has been captured on camera over nine months for a new entertaining sixpart series, Family Rules. Meeting the Rules in person is quite an overwhelming experience. Crowded around a table groaning with loaves of sandwiches, drinks and fruit platters is this group of boisterous, bubbly, dynamic women and girls, in addition to a handful of babies, toddlers and small children. Nursery rhymes are being sung, nappies changed and lip gloss applied, all to a soundtrack of laughter and barely controlled chaos. Sitting quietly within it all is Daniella. Calm and dignified, she too is one of the girls. But she is also very clearly the boss. Who are the Rules, and how did this unique and quirky televised production of their lives come about? “I’m a singer-songwriter and we did Angela’s Rules, a documentary on NITV about my journey and how the family supported me and how our bond is so special,” says Angela, a mother of one. “It captured a lot of moments on film about us being crazy and this series came about from that, it was an opportunity we couldn’t say no to. Kind of like a really professional home video!” Executive producer Renee Kennedy had been so taken with this unconventional and entertaining family she approached them about shooting a fly-on-the-wall reality television series to provide an insight into a contemporary urban Indigenous family, so unique yet so familiar with the complexities that come from raising children, teenagers and young adults, let alone the challenges of parenthood. “What makes the Rule children so intriguing is that they are representative of young Australia – aspirational, media savvy, tech-literate, opinionated and thoughtful – and they allow us to see this aspect of our society from the perspective of Indigenous Australians,” she says. “Rarely has an urban Indigenous family opened their doors to Australia in this way. This is not Redfern or Western Sydney, it is not the remote Northern Territory or the Kimberley, but an unassuming suburb 12 kilometres east of Perth.” The series was shot in three-week blocks with call times starting as early as 6am. “Sometimes it was really very demanding,” says Daniella. “We had cameras in front of us, behind us, underneath us, but we’d all agreed if we were to do it we would be ourselves, and that’s what we did.” Family Rules has been produced as six half-hour episodes in observational documentary style, providing a snapshot of modern Indigenous family life. Each episode has a

different theme and introduces us to a couple of Rules, who grapple with everything from finding the elusive perfect formal dress to moving out of home for the first time and their return to country and immersion in their traditional culture. We meet successful model Shenika, a 28-year-old wife and mother of two young children who lives around the corner from her mum but is always dropping in to help discipline the young ones; third eldest Helen, 26, also a mother of two, who aspires to be a teacher, spirited Aleisha who at 18 has a healthy obsession with clothes, make-up and Facebook when she’s not sneaking a peek at Nic Naitanui during her part-time job with the West Australian Football Commission. Jessica, who is 15 and desperate to follow in model Shenika’s high-heeled footsteps and the angel child who is always there to lend a hand; and 12-year-old Hannah, the baby, who gets away with all sorts when she’s not distracted by Snapchat and the Nintendo Wii. With nine spirited daughters you might imagine Daniella has her hands full at home, so it is impressive to learn she has a fulltime job as the Aboriginal education officer at the local Governor Stirling Senior High supporting the Indigenous students who make up 20 per cent of the school. She is also studying for a bachelor of arts in social science at Edith Cowan University. “I’m really lucky to have daughters who do support me, so if I need to study they’ll make dinner and help out,” she says. “Everybody pulls their weight when they have to, but in saying that, there are plenty of times when no-one wants to do the dishes. They’re all lazy at the same time, but it balances out.” The three oldest Rules live out of home with their own families, albeit within a five-kilometre radius of the family home; while the next two daughters Kelly and Kiara are away more often than they’re home. Kelly – who Angela named in honour of the Frente song Accidentally Kelly Street in a bid to help her parents find yet another girl’s name – is 24 and works full-time on an oil rig two hours outside Broome; while Kiara, 22, is studying a double degree, anthropology and business, at Monash University in Melbourne. Gregarious and feisty, Kelly looks forward to returning to Perth to let her hair down and go out, although the family invariably has other ideas. “Most of the time I’m babysitting, but I do get to catch up with friends and family as well,” she says. Although nervous about leaving the family and moving interstate, Kiara had always had her heart set on living in Melbourne once she finished high school. “There have been a lot of challenges but also a lot of good surprises. I’ve made a second family over there so that’s good and uni has a really good support network,” Kiara says. “But I miss home. I get really homesick and when I need someone to talk to I can’t just walk into the other room and say: ‘Mum’. So you have to call but sometimes she’s busy at work or I’m in a class and you have to find the time to talk. It’s difficult in that sense.” Nevertheless Kiara is aiming for postgraduate studies in anthropology, either in Australia or abroad. Sharna, 20, still lives at home, works hard and loves to treat her family, but is ready to branch out of the family home soon. Amid all the personal milestones, teenage angst and mayhem of family life, Daniella is determined to ensure all her daughters finish high school (she finished secondary school later in life), and reminds them about the importance of their traditional culture.

“HE WOULD BE VERY PROUD OF HIS DAUGHTERS KNOWING THEY ARE ON A GOOD ROAD”

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The remarkable family are the subject of a documentarystyle TV show.

DUNCAN KILLICK

Previous spread, from left to right: Hannah wears a Karen Millen dress. Swarovski watch. Alexander McQueen sneakers, from Cosmopolitan Shoes. Daniella wears a Victoria Beckham dress, from Harrolds. Canturi Jewels earrings, bracelet and rings. Jimmy Choo shoes. Kiara wears a Maticevski top, from Myer. Keepsake the Label playsuit. Bulgari watch and ring. Christian Louboutin shoes. Angela wears a Sportmax top. Bianca Spender skirt. Bulgari bangle and rings, and her own ring. Alexander McQueen shoes, from Cosmopolitan Shoes. Kelly wears a Maticevski top and skirt, from Myer. Cerrone Jewellers earrings, bracelet and ring. Christian Louboutin shoes. Sharna wears a Karen Millen top. Seed skirt. Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels. Harlequin Market clamp bangle. Christian Louboutin shoes. Jessica wears a Karen Millen top. Sportmax shorts. Swarovski watch. Saint Laurent sneakers, from Miss Louise. Aleisha wears an Ellery dress. Bulgari watch and ring. Gucci sneakers. Shenika wears a Balmain top, from Cosmopolitan Shoes. Dion Lee skirt. Georg Jensen necklace, bangle and rings. Jimmy Choo shoes. Helen wears a Dion Lee dress. Oscar de la Renta earrings, from Pierre Winter Fine Jewels. Hardy Brothers rings. Bulgari bag. Aquazzura shoes, from Miss Louise. Fashion details last pages. Hair: Anthony Nader Make-up: Molly Warkentin

“When Kevin was alive we’d often go back to the country with him, go bush, and do things with him,” Daniella says. “It was very emotional going back to Norseman, where Kevin is from, without him. It’s not easy to do, to go back (and it’s 700 or 800 kilometres away). But going back as a family last year was really nice, it’s a special feeling that comes through inside. And he’s buried there, so it’s even more special. I really hope we’ve done something good with that, in terms of sharing it on the show.” Daniella says both the support of her extended family and her decision to return to a job that has proven so rewarding was her salvation following her husband’s death in 2004. “Eighteen months after Kevin passed away I was sitting at home, and Mum said: ‘You need to go back to work and keep your mind occupied’, because I was on maternity leave. So I went back to work and it was the best thing I ever did, because I didn’t have time to feel sorry for myself.” The pace of life today has definitely eased from the frantic early years when days and weeks blurred into a never-ending treadmill of school lunches and homework and baskets of washing,

although there is still plenty of that. “It’s changed now because they all have their own lives and their own houses and their own vehicles. I’ve been through the buses and the Taragos, sometimes it was like being in a convoy,” jokes Daniella. “But by the time Hannah was born Angela had her licence, so that made it easier.” Watching this bunch of sassy, confident and frequently hilarious family sashay about their daily lives it’s clear many of them have inherited their father’s flair for performance; and their mother’s optimism and grace. When asked what Kevin would make of his exuberant family today, Daniella replies: “I actually think he would be very proud of his daughters knowing they are on a good road, as it could have gone in any direction. And he would have loved this series, because he was a performer and traditional dancer in his own right. So yes, I think he’d be very proud of his girls,” she says. “And you mum,” Kelly chimes in. “And me,” Daniella ■ acknowledges modestly. “Of course, me too.” Family Rules will air on Saturday nights from February 18 at 7pm on NITV (channel 34 and Foxtel 144). VOGUE.COM.AU 223


Some kind of wonderful It’s a Technicolor dream world, all pink and perfectly imperfect pastel. It’s the new pretty, gritty pretty, a fashion reality. Styled by Natasha Royt. Photographed by Sebastian Kim.

Sies Marjan jacket, $12,025, shirt, P.O.A., and skirt, $1,350. Giorgio Armani top, worn underneath, $4,050. Eddie Borgo necklace, $520. Balenciaga boots, $4,290, worn throughout. All prices approximate; fashion details last pages.

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Prada dress, $3,160. Eddie Borgo necklace, $520. Vintage gloves, P.O.A., from The Vintage Clothing Shop. Mansur Gavriel bag, $965.


SEBASTIAN KIM

Y/Project jacket, $2,499, and pants, $745. Bottega Veneta top, $1,590. Eddie Borgo necklace, $520.


Loewe dress, P.O.A. Annie Costello Brown earrings, $300.


SEBASTIAN KIM

Balenciaga jacket, $4,665, dress, $1,610, and bag, $4,365.


SEBASTIAN KIM

Maison Margiela coat, $4,090. Salvatore Ferragamo dress, $3,550. Eddie Borgo necklace, $520.


Chanel cardigan, $5,500, top, $2,530, T-shirt, P.O.A., and skirt, $3,680, from the Chanel boutiques. Erickson Beamon earrings, $595.


Christian Dior dress, $12,000. Edun top, $675. Eddie Borgo necklace, $520. Beauty note: Yves Saint Laurent Touche Éclat in Luminous Sand.


SEBASTIAN KIM

Céline dress, $3,650, and bag, $4,950. Erickson Beamon earrings, $595.


Marni coat, $1,405, and skirt, $1,245. Annie Costello Brown earrings, $300.


SEBASTIAN KIM

Vetements x Hanes T-shirt, P.O.A. Vetements x Champion jacket, P.O.A., and pants, $1,120. Hair: Chi Wong Make-up: Kristi Matamoros Manicure: Mar y Soul Model: Harleth Kuusik Casting: Shawn Dezan Props: Juliet Jernigan


When not in front of the camera, actor Mirrah Foulkes is expanding her skill set behind the scenes. By Sophie Tedmanson. Styled 3J&6EE2É9F2 &9@E@8C2A9653J 2<6*6CC6J 

T

here’s a Hepburn-esque quality to Mirrah Foulkes: a sway of sandy-blonde hair, intense hazel eyes and elegantly sculptured cheekbones, with a smart, sassy, spirited attitude to boot. The Australian has that unique triumvirate of creative talents – actor, writer, director – that puts her in the busy league. In the past 12 months, Foulkes has been juggling roles (including in The Crown, the Netflix hit that chronicles the life of Queen Elizabeth II from the 1940s to modern times), while writing and preparing to direct her first feature film, setting up 2017 to be her year to shine. “It’s kind of segued into being a pretty complicated career,” Foulkes says with a warm laugh. “For a while I was quite insecure, whereas now everything is kind of happening all at once, which is wonderful and I’m really grateful for it. I love it, but my life certainly feels a bit schizophrenic when juggling all those different things.” It’s summer in Australia and Foulkes has just returned from her part-time base in Los Angeles to Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, where she’s built her own writers’ sanctuary in converted horse stables on her parents’ farm, finding solace in the serenity of the hinterland where she grew up. There’s a palm tree out the front, paddocks out the back, retro furniture in the lounge, and the family rescue dog, Mark, is sunning himself by the window. “It’s so beautiful, I’m just so in love with it up here at the moment. It’s a nice little change,” she muses of her most recent months spent living in Hollywood, where her partner, film-maker David Michôd, was directing Brad Pitt and Tilda Swinton in the upcoming satire War Machine. The couple leads the typically itinerant lifestyle of the artist, last year variously residing on different continents: Foulkes filming The Crown in Cape Town, occasionally returning to their apartment in Bondi, and oftentimes in Los Angeles, where they’ve been mainly based for the past few years while their careers have taken off. There they share a house with two other Australians, writer Luke Davies (Lion and Candy) and actor Alex O’Loughlin (Hawaii Five-O). “The four of us have this very grown-up share house situation and we love it. We just come and go,” she says. “It’s so crazy in LA, so it’s nice to have a home to go to. I don’t love spending time there, so I try to only be around when I have to. But it makes a huge difference to have a house and it does feel like a creative hub here as well.” Foulkes is used to being in the midst of a creative team; she thrives in it. She is the only female member of the Blue-Tongue Films collective, made up of Michôd, Edgerton brothers Joel and Nash, Spencer Susser, Sean Kruck, Luke Doolan and Kieran Darcy-Smith. The men form her “creative counsel” and have encouraged Foulkes to venture from being in front of the camera (she made her acting debut in Blue Heelers in 2005, before taking on roles in All Saints, Michôd’s award-winning Animal Kingdom and, more recently, Top of The Lake) to creating magic behind the scenes as a writer and director. “It’s been an easy progression for me in terms of writing and directing because I’ve been supported by everyone around me,” she says.

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Mirrah Foulkes wears a Burberry dress, $3,095. Vintage brogues, worn throughout, from The Vintage Clothing Shop. All prices approximate; fashion details last pages.


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Dion Lee top, $450. Penny Sage skirt, $440.

JAKE TERREY

“It’s great how it has worked out, but I hope I’m not just the token lady in there. I’ve been working with those [Blue-Tongue] guys for a long time and they’re very much a film collaboration, a group of filmmakers. They’ll always be my creative council and my allies, but now that I’m making stuff, I’m really lucky to have them there to help me out. They push me as well; they really get me to get things moving, which is good. It’s frightening, I never went to film school and I feel like I’m just making it all up as I go, but everyone feels like that.” Foulkes is self-deprecating about her talents: she talks openly of her anxiety as an actor, and describes the first script she penned as “this pretty dumb little thing” – but she eventually directed it as the short Dumpty Goes To The Big Smoke, which went on to win a slew of short film awards. As did her second short, Florence Has Left the Building, starring Jacki Weaver, a gorgeous snapshot of a woman trying to escape a nursing home. Directing has boosted her confidence, both in her abilities in front of and behind the camera; honing her skills as a director and opening up new doors has in turn given her more freedom as an actor. “I definitely feel more empowered,” she says. “I love acting so much and I’d never let it go altogether. I find it enjoyable working on something that you really love. But as soon as I started creating my own work as a writer and director, all the anxiety I had while acting just seemed to disappear because I realised there was something else … it was like: ‘Okay, I get to finish this job and then go back to the writing shack and keep working on whatever I’m doing’, so it just shifted everything for me in a really positive way.” Foulkes last year won grants for two projects through the Screen Australia Gender Matters program – an initiative aimed at addressing the gender imbalance on screen by encouraging women to create more stories. Her feature film Runaway – a relationship drama based on a short story by Canadian Nobel prize winner Alice Munro, about a young girl who leads her husband into a dangerous world of sexual fantasy that entangles the lives of her older neighbours – will be executive-produced by Jan Chapman and Jane Campion, who have been mentoring Foulkes. She’s also directing the Australian TV series Silver Lining – about a woman who returns from overseas to convince her eccentric parents to move into assisted living – which Foulkes is developing with her LA flatmate Davies and Carver Films. “While I’ve never felt that it’s been particularly difficult for me, I’m very aware of the gender disparity,” she says of the groundbreaking Gender Matters program. “I’ve always felt really supported, but in a lot of ways maybe I’ve just been really lucky and not everyone has an in-built network of film-makers around them. I’m so grateful to be a writer, director and actor at this time because it has been really beneficial to nab some of that funding. I got funded for two projects and it literally meant everything to me. It meant that I could pay myself to do what I was already doing and there was a huge shift; it just changed everything. So I think they’ve really got it right, actually.” Foulkes says that being remunerated for her non-acting work has helped her see herself as more than a performer. “To have a culture of writing development and making sure emerging writers are really protected and are given the chance to learn and to be learning on the back of something where you’re able to pay yourself makes a fundamental difference between doing that and just writing in-between your day job,” she says. “Your sense of self in the world changes. I always used to say: ‘Oh, I’m writing at the moment, but I’m not a writer’ or: ‘I’m trying to make a film, but I’m not a film-maker.’ And then suddenly you’re being paid to do that, and now I find I’m much less tempted to follow that sentence with ‘but’. Now I’m able to say: ‘I’m a writer and I’m a director.’ There’s a shift.” ■


Bottega Veneta coat, $2,430. Rag & Bone pants, $855.

Bally jacket, $3,550. Penny Sage dress, $450. Right: Prada shirt, $1,180, and bag, $4,680. Vintage Yves Saint Laurent pants, $150, from Cara Mia Vintage. Hair: Taylor James Redman Make-up: Molly Warkentin


INVITES

Reader event

Join Vogue and a team of experts for a preview of the latest beauty and anti-ageing advances.

THE EVENT INCLUDES $15,000 WORTH OF LUCKY DOOR PRIZES EXPERT SPEAKERS

Dr Joseph Hkeik, cosmetic physician

Dr Luke Cronin, cosmetic dentist

Dr Jack Zoumaras, cosmetic plastic surgeon

Jon Pulitano, Headcase Hair hairstylist

Dr Nina Wines, consulting dermatologist for L’Oréal Paris

Dr Johnny Kwei, plastic surgeon

Grant Power, Giorgio Armani Beauty national face designer

Dr Steven Liew, cosmetic injectables expert

MAIN PHOTOGRAPH: EREZ SABAG/BLAUBLUT EDITION

From hair and make-up tips to innovative cosmeticenhancement treatments, the speakers (see panel, below right) at the Vogue Beauty and Anti-Ageing Event in Sydney will give you the lowdown on a host of ways to look your best. The event includes morning tea and a buffet lunch, plus guests receive gift bags, each valued at more than $350, containing Alpha-H and L’Oréal skincare products, L’Oréal Professionnel hair care, Total Face Group vouchers, magazines and more. There are also $15,000 worth of prizes, including gift baskets from Giorgio Armani Beauty and L’Oréal, fragrances, and vouchers for teeth whitening and non-surgical body treatments. On the day, there will be mini-makeovers, facials, body treatments, make-up tutorials and demonstrations of equipment being used for noninvasive body treatments. Everyone who attends will also have the chance to talk with the experts about beauty and anti-ageing innovations.


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 196 to have children. “I literally thought having kids would be the end of my career. My mum put on a little bit of weight with each kid and she never took it off and I thought it could happen to me. It was scary.” She acknowledges that while juggling motherhood with her career was challenging, “I felt so lucky because I could have a wet ponytail, jeans and a T-shirt and show up to work and sit in a make-up chair and two hours later I look like Cindy Crawford. But there are the mothers who have to go look presentable, attorneys and lawyers who have three kids who have to be dropped off to school and then she still has to turn up in a skirt and heels. Like wow. You’re my hero. I don’t know how you do that,” she shrugs. “Life is challenging. It’s supposed to be.”

F

ifteen-year-old Kaia is a mini Cindy Crawford lookalike and has already started modelling, appearing in advertisements for Versace and Miu Miu and on magazine covers for Vogue Paris and Love. Crawford’s son, Presley, is equally genetically well turned out. Those Crawford-Gerber genes worked a charm. “I have no concerns with Kaia wanting to do it and she respects me because I’ve been there and I feel like I’ve been a great mentor,” Crawford says, telling me how she schools her on punctuality, researching photographers, not spending too much time on her phone, talking to the hair and make-up team and making connections. But she is a little surprised that it has started so young for her daughter: “The only concern I have for her, and it isn’t an issue, is that in the modelling world I hit the top, and if she doesn’t it might be a lot of pressure for her. If you have a successful parent and you go into the same business but if you’re not more successful, then what?” Increased attention on her teenage children also comes with negative consequences. “As a parent I have a hard time counselling my kids about social media comments. All teenagers are insecure and you used to compare yourself to other girls at your school, but now with Instagram it’s hard on their self-esteem. And I didn’t experience people saying I was too fat or too thin. People say things online now that you wouldn’t say to your own worst enemy, to their face.” She’s a planner, but having children has changed her perspective. “There is a saying that says: ‘Man plans and God laughs,’ and I always say: ‘Mum plans and kids laugh.’” Looking out to the panoramic view of Hollywood Hills all lit up from Soho House, she mentions that she rarely visits this part of the city. Living in Malibu, her family’s lifestyle is more centred around the beach. Her husband, Rande Gerber, a former model, is now an entertainment mogul with investments in Casamigos tequila in partnership with George Clooney. We’re drinking the tequila on the rocks as we talk and it’s 5pm on a Monday – so even Crawford has her vices. She met her husband at the wedding of her agent, who knew Gerber from summer camp. “It’s funny, both my sisters met their husbands at weddings too. But I wasn’t ready, I didn’t want to be going straight from being married [she was married to Richard Gere from 1991 to 1995] to another relationship,” she remembers. “We became really good friends, so two years after that we were like: ‘Okay, we really like each other!’” They married in 1998 on the beach. She wore an off-therack John Galliano dress, had bare feet, and instructed guests not to wear suits and ties. “The thing I love with Rande that I didn’t have in the past was that we were friends. We were attracted to each other but we didn’t act on it right away so we developed a friendship first, which I think is undervalued. That to me is a

Decades on from her 90s modelling zenith, Cindy Crawford still has us enthralled. Zara Wong meets the smart, savvy and confident supermodel. Styled by Paul Cavaco. Photographed by Emma Summerton.

Cindy Crawford wears a Bottega Veneta dress $6 940 Gigi Burris hat worn throughout $550 Soludos sandals $175 worn throughout A l prices approximate fashion details last pages.

1 MARCH 2017

VOGUE COM AU 2

great indicator of relationships. Relationships are hard, but if at your core level you’re friends, that doesn’t really go away.” Punctual, organised, intelligent and disciplined – and looking like Cindy Crawford – she is also human, and aware of her failings. Though she is making conscious amends on how to improve on them, so she’s still more highly functioning than your norm. “The thing I have to make time for is exercise. That doesn’t just happen unfortunately, that is where I have to be disciplined.” She adds that she can also be impatient. “I sometimes forget to praise people for a job well done, but I don’t attack either, I have to remind myself to give a compliment first. I know how to do it but in the speed of communicating I can be quite short,” she says. “Because I am so strict with myself and have high expectations, I expect people to do what they say, to bring their A-game, because I put that on myself as well.” And while she did work in the cornfields during the school holidays, the truth is that Crawford was discovered when a model agent saw her in a bikini shot that appeared in a local newspaper. She modestly attributes most of her career to being lucky. “Right place, right time. If I were modelling today, I don’t know if I would make it because I’m not a size two.” Chance does play a part in it but her famed work ethic and conscientiousness has put her in good stead, transitioning her from a woman who was famous in the 90s for being on TV and in magazines to a true icon today. “You can be a pain in the ass as a model, high-maintenance and hungover and they will put up with it for a while if you’re the hot new kid on the block. But that gets old and soon there is another new hot thing. But if you’re professional, ready to work and trying to learn, you are bringing something to the table.” She avoids identifying herself as a role model – a complicated weight to bear. “I don’t feel like I have to be a role model for anyone other than myself and my kids.” She acknowledges the effort it takes to look the way the public sees her. In an era where celebrities either seem to present carefully curated veneers or graphic openness, Crawford has navigated this new world of celebrity adeptly, showing just enough of her personal life, and what we expect: she knows we want to see Cindy Crawford as Cindy Crawford. She’s always looked more like a woman rather than a girl, but now with her biological age in tandem with her inner maturity, she has the ability to express herself as more than just another professional beauty. “When you’re young you’re unsure of when you can claim your power or voice your opinion,” she tells me. “But over time you start getting the confidence to say: ‘I don’t know everything but I know what I know and I’m going to say it.’” So, where can we get that Cindy Crawford sweatshirt? ■

EMMA SUMMERTON

“I EXPECT PEOPLE TO BRING THEIR A-GAME BECAUSE I PUT THAT ON MYSELF”

VOGUE.COM.AU 241


Alexander McQueen available from a selection at Cosmopolitan Shoes (02) 9362 0510. Annie Costello Brown www.anniecostellobrown.com. Antonio Berardi www.antonioberardi.com. Aquazzura available from a selection at Miss Louise (03) 9654 7730. Armani Junior (02) 9328 3223. Atelier Cologne (02) 8002 4488. Balenciaga available from a selection at Harrolds (02) 9232 8399, Parlour X (02) 9331 0999 and www.thestyleset.com; www.balenciaga.com. Bally 1800 781 851. Balmain available from a selection at Cosmopolitan Shoes (02) 9362 0510 and Miss Louise (03) 9654 7730; www.balmain.com. Bare Minerals available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. Ben-Amun available from a selection at Pierre Winter Fine Jewels (02) 9331 2760; www.ben-amun.com. Bernardo available from a selection at www.amazon.com. Bianca Spender www.biancaspender.com. Bordelle available from a selection at Baby Likes To Pony www.babylikestopony.com. Bottega Veneta (02) 9239 0188.

242 MARCH 2017

Bourjois 1800 812 663. Bulgari (02) 9233 3611. Burberry (02) 8296 8588. Canturi (02) 9246 2888 or (03) 9280 5500. Cara Mia Vintage www.caramiavintage.com. Carmen March available from a selection at www.montaignemarket.com and www.Net-A-Porter.com. Cartier 1800 130 000. Céline available from a selection at David Jones 133 357; www.celine.com. Cerrone (02) 8246 9119. Chanel 1300 242 635. Chanel cosmetics and fragrances 1300 242 635 or (02) 9900 2944. Chantecaille available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. Charlotte Tilbury www.charlottetilbury. com/au or www.Net-A-Porter.com. Chloé www.chloe.com. Christian Dior (02) 9229 4600 and (03) 9650 0132. Christian Dior cosmetics and fragrances (02) 9695 4800.. Christian Louboutin (02) 8355 5252. Christie Nicolaides www.christie-nicolaides.myshopify.com. Christopher Kane www.christopherkane.com. Clarins (02) 9663 4277. Clinique (02) 9381 1200 or 1800 556 948.

New York Vintage www.newyorkvintage.com. Nikki Witt www.nikkiwittjewellery.bigcartel.com. Nina Ricci available from a selection at Miss Louise (03) 9654 7730. Off-White available from a selection at www.Net-A-Porter.com; www.off---white.com. Omega (02) 8080 9696. Oscar de la Renta jewellery available from a selection at Pierre Winter Fine Jewels (02) 9331 2760; www.oscardelarenta.com. Penny Sage www.pennysage.com. Philippe Paris for Harlequin Market (02) 9328 5430. Prada (02) 9223 1688. Preen by Thornton Bregazzi www.preenbythorntonbregazzi.com. Rag & Bone (02) 9698 1688. Rationale 1800 350 821. Ray-Ban available from a selection at Sunglass Hut 1800 556 926. Roberto Cavalli available from a selection at Cosmopolitan Shoes (02) 9362 0510; www.robertocavalli.com. Saint Laurent available from a selection at Harrolds (02)) 9232 8399, Miss Louise (03) 9654 7730, Parlour X (02) 9331 0999, www.Net-A-Porter.com and www.thestyleset.com. Sally Hansen (02) 9267 5500 or 1800 812 663. Salvatore Ferragamo 1300 095 224. Seed www.seedheritage.com. Sharon Wauchob available from a selection at www.yoox.com. Shu Uemura 1300 651 991. Sies Marjan available from a selection at www.matchesfashion.com. Sisley 1300 780 800. Soludos www.soludos.com. Sportmax (02) 8084 9113. Stila available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. Svenskt Tenn www.svenskttenn.se. Swarovski (02) 9231 1074. The Kooples www.thekooples.com.au. The Vintage Clothing Shop (02) 9238 0090. Tom Ford cosmetics and fragrances 1800 061 326. Tome www.tomenyc.com. Tory Burch 1800 061 326. Urban Decay available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. Valére www.valere.com.au. Van Cleef & Arpels (03) 9983 4200. Victoria Beckham available from a selection at www.harrolds.com.au www.victoriabeckham.com. Viktor & Rolf fragrances 1300 651 991. Wella 1300 885 002. Wolford (03) 9650 1277 or (03) 9820 0039.

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NICOLE BENTLEY

The details of stores listed on these pages have been supplied to Vogue by the manufacturers. For enquiries, contact Vogue Fashion Information, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015 or Level 5, 40 City Road, Southbank, Victoria 3006. All prices correct at the time of going to print.

Comfort Zone (02) 9430 2200. Comme des Garçons cosmetics and fragrances available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. David Mandel for The Show Must Go On available from a selection at Harlequin Market (02) 9328 5430. Derek Lam www.dereklam.com. Diane von Furstenberg available from a selection at David Jones 133 357; world.dvf.com. Dion Lee www.dionlee.com. Eddie Borgo available from a selection at www.Net-A-Porter.com; www.eddieborgo.com, Edun available from a selection at Harrolds (02) 9232 8399, www. matchesfashion.com, www.Net-A-Porter. com and www.shopbop.com. Ellery www.elleryland.com. Emanuel Ungaro www.ungaro.com. Embellishments available from a selection at www.photiosbros.com.au. Emporio Armani (02) 8233 5858 or (03) 9654 1991. Erickson Beamon available from a selection at selection at www.Net-A-Porter.com; www.ericksonbeamon.com. Erno Laszlo (02) 9221 5703. Estée Lauder 1800 061 326. Fausto Puglisi available from a selection at www.luisaviaroma.com and www.vinicioboutique.com. Fendi eyewear available from a selection at Safilo (02) 9540 0500. Georg Jensen 1800 441 765. Gigi Burris www.gigiburris.com. Giorgio Armani (02) 8233 5888 or (03) 9662 1661. Giorgio Armani Cosmetics 1300 651 991. Givenchy (02) 8197 0420, (03) 8547 6925 or (07) 5631 4594. Gucci 1300 442 878. Haider Ackermann available from a selection at Assin (02) 9331 6265 or (03) 9654 0158 and Poepke (02) 9380 7611; www.haiderackermann.com. Hardy Brothers www.hardybrothers.com.au. Harlequin Market (02) 9328 5430. Hermès (02) 9287 3200. James Read available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au. Jason Wu available from a selection at www.Net-A-Porter.com; www.jasonwustudio.com. Jimmy Choo (02) 8666 0606. Karen Millen www.karenmillen.com.au. Keepsake the Label www.keepsakethelabel.com.au. Kenneth Jay Lane available from a selection at Pierre Winter Fine Jewels (02) 9331 2760; www.kennethjaylane.com. Kenzo available from a selection at Myer 1800 811 611. La Prairie (02) 9888 0600 or 1800 649 849. Lele Sadoughi available from a selection at Pierre Winter Fine Jewels (02) 9331 2760; www.lelesadoughi.com. Loewe available from a selection at Harrolds (02) 9232 8399 and Marais (03) 8658 9555; www.loewe.com. Louis Vuitton 1300 883 880. M.A.C 1800 613 828. Maggie Marilyn available from a selection at www.Net-A-Porter.com; www.maggiemarilyn.com. Maison Margiela available from a selection at Harrolds (02) 9232 8399, www.matchesfashion.com and www.thenewguard.com.au; www.maisonmargiela.com/au. Mansur Gavriel available from a selection at The Corner Shop (02) 9380 9828, Incu (02) 9331 1014, www.cultstatus.com.au and www.matchesfashion.com; www.mansurgavriel.com. Marimekko www.marimekko.com. Marni (02) 9327 3809. Maticevski available from a selection at Myer 1800 811 611; www.tonimaticevski.com. Michael Kors www.michaelkors.com. Nars available from a selection at www.meccacosmetica.com.au.


HOROSCOPES

PISCES

TAURUS

21 MARCH – 19 APRIL

20 APRIL – 20 MAY

Whatever you yearn for now, it looks like you’re going to have to earn it. Others around you have wants and needs, too, and you could find that they drain your resources and your patience, so set up some boundaries to ensure lines are not crossed. Sticking to your word earns you extra kudos this month. STYLE ICON: Laura Prepon

“Must have it” and “can’t live without it” are phrases you’ll be using a lot this month, whether it’s about a fashion steal or someone special. Get it (or him or her), fight for it if you must, but don’t burn yourself out in the process. Count the cost too, as a change of heart and a need to change your ways are also likely now. STYLE ICON: Elle Fanning

It might be just your imagination running away with you this month, especially with a relationship that’s flickering on and off. But then again, it might not. You’re unlikely to back down (in any situation) but be cool rather than try to bend things to your will. A hands-off approach and time will help you work things out. STYLE ICON: Cate Blanchett

LEO

21 MAY – 21 JUNE

22 JUNE – 22 JULY

CANCER

23 JULY – 22 AUGUST

Home or anything that’s become too cosy could be abandoned now in favour of new people and adventures. This could strain a long-term love or put a budding relationship on hold, but the desire to achieve an ambition is strong. It could be your destiny calling, so you need to decide whether to screen the call or answer it. STYLE ICON: Carey Mulligan

Your career could be influenced by reversals now, connected to money and perhaps romance. Home life may need to go lower on your to-do list while work gets back on track. This could be the incentive you need to put new passion into a dormant ambition. Make every word, in all you do or say, count this month. STYLE ICON: Margot Robbie

It’s a good month for ideas that take you off-piste. A pioneering attitude works best now, whether you’re learning something new for your career or travelling to places you’ve never been. A getaway could even help you discover love that challenges your preconceived ideas. Work out a financial plan to make it happen. STYLE ICON: Charlize Theron

GEMINI

VIRGO

LIBRA

SCORPIO

23 AUGUST – 22 SEPTEMBER

23 SEPTEMBER – 23 OCTOBER

24 OCTOBER – 22 NOVEMBER

There’s a chance for a new beginning with money now, especially if you’re contemplating a joint account in a love or business partnership. Prepare to negotiate rather than go over the top at work or fall out over splitting the bill at dinner. Taking a risk shakes off a feeling of being stifled, so long as you bet on a sure thing. STYLE ICON: Beyoncé

You take a back seat this month as someone close gets the glory. It could be a partner, but it might be a rival at work or in romance. There’s a hint of love/ hate about this relationship, but keep an open mind as events could turn out surprisingly well. It’s also an ideal time for health check-ups to keep your head, heart and soul running smoothly. STYLE ICON: Dakota Johnson

You could celebrate a friendship or tick off a wish now. Plan B is that you edit your friends and ambitions, so that only the people and dreams you truly gel with are in your orbit. If power struggles arise in love or at work, aim to be the giver not the taker, and if it’s a choice between being right or being happy, choose happiness. STYLE ICON: Emma Stone

SAGITTARIUS

ASTROLOGER: STELLA NOVA

ARIES

19 FEBRUARY – 20 MARCH

AQUARIUS

23 NOVEMBER – 21 DECEMBER

22 DECEMBER – 20 JANUARY

CAPRICORN

21 JANUARY - 18 FEBRUARY

Pleasure and pain are a huge feature for you this month. You get to see both sides of romance as well as the joy and frustration of being creative. What works best now is getting practical and making things happen, so hitting the gym or ploughing through a task that needs dedication will soon pay off, big time. STYLE ICON: Nicki Minaj

There’s no need for your passport as home is where you’re most adventurous this month. A home makeover, family reconciliation or revamp of your traditions and habits is likely, so try out some new swatches alongside some new beliefs. As a love and life renovation progresses at home, work may need to go on temporary autopilot. STYLE ICON: Ruth Wilson

Seductive sighs and loose lips could get you into trouble this month. Talk is cheap but could prove expensive if you can’t follow through with deals that are signed, sealed and delivered, whether they’re linked to love or to money. Home is where you’re most dynamic now, so consider a declutter: keep the best and eBay the rest. STYLE ICON: Rosamund Pike

VOGUE.COM.AU 243


VOGUE AUSTRALIA

D I R E C TO RY KIRA PIZZINGRILLI A ready to wear label that maintains a modern design aesthetic whilst complementing a classic feminine silhouette. Each print is an original design, which adds a point of difference to each collection. For the love of arts and creativity, KIRA PIZZINGRILLI continues to gain traction as the label is introduced to the industry. Proudly made in Australia.

I LOVE LINEN

Love the seductive power a good set of sheets can create? So do we. Slip into our vintage wash French flax, luxe Bamboo & soft Egyptian cotton bedding and you’ll want to stay in bed all day. Delivered straight to your door, let us help you live a beautiful life.

hellothere@kirapizzingrilli.com kirapizzingrilli.com

ILOVELINEN

STYLE SECRET HANDBAG HIRE

ilovelinen ilovelinen.com.au

JETT BLACK Runway Redefined.

Hire the latest range of designer handbags from Saint Laurent, Chanel, Givenchy, Louis Vuitton and much more from as little as $30!

Sleek Fashion Luggage and Travel Accessories designed in Australia for the Frequent Traveller.

Enter code: Vogue at the checkout to get $20 off your hire.

Purchase through our online store and enjoy free shipping Australia wide.

hire@stylesecret.com.au 1300 4 STYLE stylesecret.handbaghire stylesecret.com.au

Jettblack Jettblackofficial Jettblack.com.au

MARHO

IVORY LANE

Pieces that will feature in any timeless wardrobe, characterised by exceptional quality, raw materials and classic style.

Women and Children’s boutique in the heart of Wollongong featuring a range of products and brands including Finders, Zaliah, Cooper St, Rollas, James Smith, Fella Swim, Kore Swim, Cocolux Candles, Sunday Somehwere, Little Horn, Sunday the Label, Saya skincare.

Marho is unique, casual and interesting… for the ocean lovers, the dreamers and believers.

0400 314 091 Shop 5/4 Globe Lane Wollongong NSW 2500 ivorylaneaustralia www.ivorylane.com.au

marhothelabel marho.com.au

SAGE INSPIRATIONS Sage is a unique boutique that focuses on high quality designer clothes for the everyday woman. Stocking sizes 6-16 with labels such as Once Was, Bird + Kite, Conchita, Mesop, Lilya, Imonni, Dept of Finery & More. Sage has something to suit every occasion.

250 Pakenham Street Echuca, Victoria (03) 5482 3726 sageinspirations sageinspirations sageinspirations.com.au To adver tise ple ase contact Amy Fre ar 130 0 139 305

THE TACK ROOM BOUTIQUE A beautifully curated collection of Racewear, Millinery, Designer Fashion and Accessories for the modern Australian woman. We Are Kindred, Pasduchas, Ministry of Style, Mavi, Binny, Cooper Street, Olga Berg, Phyllis & Mimosa, Scotch & Soda, Elk Accessories, Mesop, Nude Footwear, Samantha Wills.

thetackroomboutique thetackroomboutique thetackroomboutique.com.au Email: vo gue classi fie ds@newsli feme dia.com.au


lifestyle collection SAYLOR & SAIGE Saylor & Saige is a fashion & lifestyle e-boutique stocking a curated collection of Australian designer labels, providing a destination for the latest in ready to wear, accessories and luxe interior styling pieces. Our premium collections are a fashion-lovers dream, featuring chic daywear to stunning special occasion dresses, each chosen for their exceptional fit and quality. Enjoy fast shipping, with each order beautifully wrapped and personalised for every customer.

info@saylorandsaige.com saylorandsaige saylorandsaige.com

SAINT ROSE Saint Rose embodies a Modern minimalistic style with a soft feminine edge. Designed in Melbourne for the lifestyle of the Australian urban woman who appreciates beautiful clothing with an unprompted style and attention to detail. Sign-up online and receive 15% off your first order.

saintrosethebrand saintrosethebrand saintrose.com.au

EXPERIENCE THE LUXURY OF YOUR OWN PERSONAL JEWELLER Specialising in sourcing the finest quality materials and jewellery crafting processes at each step of the way, we have a passion for perfection and an eye for detail that is unparalleled. Scarab Rouge is your creative team for uncompromising excellence in bespoke jewellery. Consultations by appointment, we come to you.

scarabrouge scarab_rouge scarabrouge.com

AMAROSO BOUTIQUE

ATIANA Quality leather and suede shoes designed in Australia and made in Italy.

Let us dress you in confidence. Fast becoming one of the top Australian online shopping destinations.

Recently shown at London Fashion Week. See our latest collection online now.

boutique.amaroso amaroso_boutique amaroso.com.au

atiana_co atiana.co

AUSTRALIAN COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL STYLING Get Into Fashion Styling. Online Diploma Course. Work as a freelance fashion stylist or within the main branches of professional styling including TV, advertising, photo shoots, wardrobe and image consultancy. Phone for a free information kit.

SKIN O2 1800 238 811 austcollegeprofessionalstyling.com To adver tise ple ase contact Amy Fre ar 130 0 139 305

Feed your lashes. See results in as little as 4-6 weeks.

Shop now skino2.com.au Email: vo gue classi fie ds@newsli feme dia.com.au


VOGUE AUSTRALIA

D I R E C TO RY ONE PALM

DREAMERS & DRIFTERS

One Palm prides itself on bringing quality products to fashion lovers and adventure seekers. The site is a mecca for curated travel goods, featuring One Palm-designed garments (including a brand new denim range) and products from labels like Spring Court, Delsey Paris and Sancia. The store pretty much houses all you could need for a trip away, from luggage to toiletries. Next step: plane ticket.

Clothing for the Romantic Bohème. Our Winter 2017 campaign was shot in the Byron Bay hinterland with muse Jamie Kidd; Californian style blogger and Instagram sensation. Receive 15% Off your first order just use code: VOGUE

dreamersdrifters dreamers_and_drifters

@onepalmstudio onepalmstudio.com

dreamersanddrifters.com.au

LILLEVENN

ALCIEMAY

Lillevenn is a women’s fashion boutique featuring a distinct Scandinavian influence.

Each detailed piece of AlcieMay swimwear and activewear is designed and made in Australia for the woman who wants the perfect balance of comfort and style. If you desire nothing less than the best in quality and individuality… Welcome to AlcieMay

We thoughtfully choose labels that are ethical, comfortable, elegantly simple and on-trend, including Kowtow, Laika, Ryder and more. March reader exclusive: use code VOGUE20 for a 20% discount!

lillevenn_denmark_wa

alciemay alciemay.com

lillevenn.com.au

ALISTE BOUTIQUE

LELULAH BOUTIQUE

Aliste Boutique, are inspired to deliver the best in quality clothing and superior service, for both men and women. Belen, Dennise and Jasmine, are dedicated to provide the very best in both street and high-end fashion, whilst focusing on dependability, customer service and uniqueness.

Seeking an effortless shopping experience? Renowned for our unique & stylish range, we will have you feeling perfectly luxe for every occasion. Proudly styling sizes 6-18. Indulge with 15% off your on line purchase for March & April, simply use code ‘VOGUEAUS’.

122 Liverpool Street Hobart 03 6288 7204 Aliste Boutique

shop.lelulah lelulahboutique lelulah.com.au

alisteboutique Alisteboutique.com

MS MORALES COUTURE Explore your other side. Embrace her. Let her show you new delights. Ms Morales Couture, elegant and exclusive lingerie from Colombia.

MS.MORALES COUTURE

BROWS BY ANISA

Ms Morales Couture - The Álter Ego of Lingerie.

Anisa uses the Microblading technique which implants colour into the skin creating hairlike strokes that look natural and undetectable. Perfect for those who want a little definition or those who want to totally redesign their shape. Achieve semi-permanent perfect Brows 24/7.

msmoralescouture.com

Phone 0402 367 694 browsbyanisa.com.au

To adver tise ple ase contact Amy Fre ar 130 0 139 305

browsbyanisa

Brows By Anisa

Email: vo gue classi fie ds@newsli feme dia.com.au


lifestyle collection TOTAL FACE GROUP

‘We believe in a world where acceptance and compliments can come naturally’ Total Face Group is Australia’s largest group of premium cosmetic clinics, offering a range of Cosmetic Beauty Treatments including Cosmetic Injectables, Skin Solutions and CoolSculpting body fat reduction. Total Face Group employs a highly experienced team of Doctors, Aesthetic Nurse Consultants and Dermal Therapists as part of our commitment to customer service, excellence, education and safety. Clinics are located in VIC, NSW, ACT & QLD.

Call 13 FACE (13 3223) or visit a clinic to book your complimentary total face consultation FOR GOOD LOOKS

totalfacegroup.com.au

CZARINA KAFTANS Every girl’s wardrobe needs a slice of summer all year around. Discover Czarina an Australian designer fashion brand for luxury resort wear & evening wear instore and online.

ZEBRANO | SIZES 14+

Shop 499 Malvern Road South Yarra Vic

Designer collections, casual wear, essential clothing for everyday. Be first to view the new season collections – have your selection delivered direct to your door in Australia (gst free). View lookbooks, discover trends and shop online.

nikki@czarinakaftans.com.au czarinakaftans.com.au

zebrano.com.au

THE LITTLE TANNING DRESS

Feel confident in your post tan glow or after a massage in one of our stylish designs. The LTD is a crease free fabric making it ideal for travel and pregnancy with room for a growing bump. Free sizing accommodates every shape and size.

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Vogue - March 2017 AU