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PAPER CUP MOULDS

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THE NEW

AUSSIE

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e a Pop tars


choose Don't be

ear case of great ta te Visit Obela.com.au for recipes created by Manu Feildel


contents January/February 2017

this month regulars

6 editor’s letter 9 holiday menus

12 get healthy

10 who’s cooking

16 cover recipe

fruit salad 19 cook the cover

20 you said it

14 in season 24 news

3


this month

83 umper

double–decker Tim Tam pav

ealth Issue

.COM .AU

85 Ea

cook it now! weeknight dinners

PAPER CUP MOULDS

more online

RECIPES IDEAS

&

7

HEALTH BLITZ! r l vers

THE NEW

16 pa es

93

AUSSIE

ICONS

e a Pop tars Recipe Michelle Southan Photography Jeremy Simons Styling Michelle Noerianto Food prep Miranda Payne

n the cover

→ Iced VoVo Cheesecake Pops page 16

→ 7-day health blitz page 105 → new aussie icons pages 16, 36, 46-51, 70-76, 79, 80-84

4

taste magazine January/February 2017

RAINBOW rice paper rolls 27

avocado handbook

27 cook it now! Get ready to

40 crisper cuisine Turn crisper

chop and roll with these no-cook rainbow rice paper rolls. 28 weeknight dinners Make the most of the warmer evenings with weeknight dinners that are fresh, tasty and ready in no time. 36 grab & go Pull Georgia Barnes’ spinach damper out of your tuckerbox and you’ll be the crowd favourite. 38 marion’s express Glam up dinnertime with Marion Grasby’s quick and easy Roast Duck Noodle Salad, perfect for laid-back entertaining or a delicious weeknight meal.

odds and ends into a super-tasty vegetarian hot dog with the delish addition of everyone’s favourite grilled cheese, haloumi. 42 naughty & nice Colin Fassnidge and Louise Keats tackle the toasted sandwich – Colin’s has extra cheese, while Louise adds some skinny pesto.

46 wait, you mean I can eat that? Katrina Woodman makes wholesome versions of classic Aussie treats, including a hummingbird cake, Bounty bar and Weis-inspired mango and coconut no-churn ice-cream.


105 7–day health blitz

97

76 weekend easy entertaining ideas

SHERBET spider

January/February 2017

tastelife

know how

food meets life

creative ideas

cheesy-mite PRETZELS

55

55 sherbet spider Sweet dreams are made of fizz, like a scoop of this raspberry sherbet in cranberry soda. 56 manu’s table Start Valentine’s Day with Manu Feildel’s French Toast with Yoghurt Sorbet. 60 gut instinct In this extract from chef Pete Evans’ latest cookbook, we’ve chosen some light, fresh recipes to get your gut healthier. 66 retro revival Matt Preston and Michelle Southan have created a fully loaded potato salad. 70 cookbook extract Cheat’s desserts for a stress-free summer.

January/February 2017

KITCHEN crops

79

Our puff pastry pretzels feature that fave Aussie flavour combo of Vegemite and cheese.

79 cheesy-mite pretzels

80 the perfect aussie pavlova

Light and fluffy, with chocolate, cream and berries, this Tim Tam pav is to die for. 87 mosaic heart cake Baker extraordinaire Elise Strachan, of My Cupcake Addiction, takes us step-by-step through the heart cake recipe from her new cookbook Sweet! Celebrations. 93 little book of avocado This buttery fruit goes on, and in, everything! 98 Q&A Your summertime cooking questions answered!

January/February 2017

101

101 DIY sprouts 102 health revolution 2017 105 7-day health blitz Nutritionist Chrissy Freer’s healthy meal plan.

122 find it, love it Top products. 124 aisle watch The best muesli. 125 win it! This month’s great prizes. 126 healthy showdown Louise Keats reveals healthier options.

130 bake me happy! Make your

own fortune cookies for Chinese New Year.

subscribe now 52 mag offer Bonus knife set. 104 iPad/tablet Great price.

January/February 2017

taste magazine

5


what’s on ere are ust s

e

the excitin hi hli hts

1001 sensational +

summer salads

ea

... set... l w!

ho’s up for heaped bowls of vibrant healthy food, bursting with fresh flavours and fully loaded with crisp green leaves? Yes, I can see your hands up, dear tasteys. Isn’t that what we all want once the last of the Chrissy ham has been slammed in a summer sambo? Never fear, we’ve got you covered! I promise we have everything to make all your healthy dreams come true. Go all the way with our annual 7-day Health Blitz for Food Lovers (see page 105). Or use our very nifty Blitz Planner (page 107) and the Recipe Index (page 8) to navigate to your favourite low-cal, vego or gluten-free options. As usual, I’m ready for the Blitz, and our nutrition editor, and all-round legendary foodie, Chrissy Freer, has absolutely outdone herself this time! Remember to take a shot of whatever Taste creation you’re about to devour and share it with us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter with #cookedwithtaste. And, finally, some lovely news. We ended 2016 on a high with a wonderful swagger of awards (see page 24). Here’s to another great year of cooking with you in 2017!

PS 6

34

top food trends for 2017

Don’t miss our bonus 7-page Chinese New Year feature! Just flip the mag.

taste magazine January/February

WEB-EXCLUSIVE!

amazing aussie classics with a twist!

s

PLUS

WHAT IS AUSTRALIA’S ULTIMATE DISH? FOR ALL THE LATEST FOOD AT YOUR FINGERTIPS


magazine

.COM .AU

EDITORIAL

contact us! (02) 8045 4891 Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria NSW 2015 tastemag@news.com.au facebook.com/taste.com.au

DIGITAL

general manager Kate Chandler product manager Gemma Battenbough online editor Laura Simpson senior producer Sheryl Deubler digital producer Jessica Holmes digital art director Julian Jones

twitter.com/taste_team @taste_team t

ADVERTISING

t

commercial director, lifestyle Paul Blackburn group solutions director – food and homes Milena Hopkins milena.hopkins@news.com.au group solutions manager – food Ed Faith ed.faith@news.com.au commercial solutions manager Donna Hodges (02) 8045 4743 donna.hodges@news.com.au nsw group sales director Sam Tomlinson (02) 8045 4676 sam.tomlinson@news.com.au

COM .AU

ADVERTISING – CREATIVE

advertising creative director Richard McAuliffe advertising creative manager Eva Chown advertising senior art director Anthony Macarounas advertising copy editor Brooke Lewis

awards

PRODUCTION

production director Mark Moes production manager Neridah Burke advertising production adproduction@news.com.au

Digital Magazine Brand of the Year 2016

MARKETING & CIRCULATION

marketing & commercial integration director – food Ali Cassim marketing director – food Hayley Peacock-Gower marketing manager Emma Humphrey brand manager Alyssa Piva national sales manager – retail Jonathan Gross national circulation manager Mark McTaggart product manager – digital editions Danielle Stevenson

NEWS LIFE MEDIA

chief executive officer Nicole Sheffield director of food Fiona Nilsson director of communications Sharyn Whitten general manager – retail & circulation Brett Willis

Cert f cat on app es o Offset A p ne Pr nt ng in Lidcombe NSW

SO 14001 2004 L C20363 SA G oba

Certified Environmental Management

TM

taste.com.au magazine s publ shed by NewsL feMed a Pty Ltd (ACN 088 923 906), 2 Holt St, Surry H lls, NSW 2010, phone (02) 9288 3000 NewsL feMed a Pty Ltd s a wholly owned subs d ary of News L m ted (ACN 007 871 178) Copyr ght 2016 by NewsL feMed a Pty Ltd All r ghts reserved D str buted by Gordon and Gotch Austral a Pty Ltd, phone 1300 650 666 Pr nted by Offset Alp ne Pr nt ng, 42 Boorea St, L dcombe, NSW 2141, under SO14001 Env ronmental Cert f cat on Offset Alp ne s comm tted to env ronmental mprovement by using environmental management systems, continuously introducing environmental initiatives and benchmarking to globally recognised standards and monitoring. Paper fibre is from PEFC-certified forests and controlled sources. ISSN 0042-8019.

editor-in-chief Brodee Myers-Cooke brodee.myerscooke@news.com.au food director Michelle Southan creative director Anne Marie Cummins managing editor Daniela Bertollo books editor Karen Spresser food editor Katrina Woodman senior food consultant Alison Adams art director Antonietta Scotto chief subeditor Anna Scobie subeditor & digital coordinator Jodi De Vantier digital & books subeditor Gina Hetherington nutrition editor Chrissy Freer editorial coordinator Stephanie Hua

• Media Brand of the Year 2016

• Consumer Magazine of the Year 2016 • Publish Excellence 2016


recipe index → quick

STARTERS & LIGHT MEALS

∙ Antioxidant-boosting smoothie 112 ∙ Avocado & salmon rice bowl 97 ∙ Baked avocado eggs 95 ∙ Broccoli & sesame salad 62 ∙ Cauliflower ‘steak’ & eggs with sautéed greens 62 ∙ Cheesy mite pretzels 79 ∙ Cheesy spinach damper with rosemary butter 36 ∙ Chicken toastie with skinny spinach pesto 45 ∙ Chicken, watercress & roasted capsicum sandwich 114 ∙ Dill & kransky potato salad 68 ∙ French toast with yoghurt sorbet 58 ∙ Frittata wrap with rocket & relish 110 ∙ Haloumi hot dogs 40 ∙ quinoa pots 114 ∙ Quinoa, chickpea & salmon salad with pepitas 110 ∙ Roast beef, mustard cream & capsicum pinwheels 112 ∙ Roasted sweet potato with 118 ∙ Smoked salmon & pesto pizza 118 ∙ Sourdough with nut butter, banana & blueberries 108 ∙ Spicy avocado muffin with ham & spinach 116 ∙ Ultimate cheese & ham toastie 44 ∙ White bean pancakes with strawberries & passionfruit 120

8

→ easy

→ low calorie

MEAT

∙ Cauliflower fried rice with sausage 64 ∙ Dosa with spicy beef & eggplant mince 30 ∙ Pickled jalapeño, peach & honey pork salad 31 ∙ Rosemary garlic steak with salad ∙ Spiced lamb kebabs with tahini potato salad ∙ Spicy pork meatballs with carrot & coriander salad ∙ Twice-cooked pork belly

121

29

111 133

→ low fat

POULTRY

∙ Duck in lettuce cups ∙ Lime & lemongrass chicken lettuce wraps ∙ Roast duck noodle salad ∙ Sumac chicken with

34 134

∙ Better-for-you Bounty bars 115

sauce 35 ∙ Summer greens, tomato & basil frittata 108 ∙ Sweet potato & lentil patties with tzatziki 120 ∙ Vegie sushi bowl 116 ∙ Wholemeal pasta with broccoli, chilli & kale pesto 113

SEAFOOD

∙ Chicken, parmesan & zoodle skillet

SWEET THINGS

VEGETARIAN

∙ Grilled tofu with rice, greens & chilli sesame dressing ∙ Rainbow rice paper rolls

∙ Lemon & basil prawn risoni ∙ Piri piri fish with charred corn salad ∙ Sesame crusted salmon & soba noodle salad ∙ Sichuan-braised fish

→ gluten free

→ freezable

33

∙ Chocolate dipped fortune cookies ∙ Fudgy avocado brownies ∙ Iced VoVo cheesecake pops ∙ Layered lamington ice cream cake ∙ Milo & Coco Pop parfaits ∙ Mini fairy floss pavlovas ∙ Mosaic heart cake ∙ Nic’s chia slab ∙ No churn mango coconut ice cream ∙ Raspberry sherbet mille feuille ∙ Sherbet spider ∙ Tahitian lime cheesecakes with ginger crumb ∙ Tim Tam pavlova ∙ Wholesome hummingbird cake

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&

did you know?

7

HEALTH BLITZ! r l vers

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THE NE

∙ Turmeric spiced turkey & cauliflower lettuce cups

taste magazine January/February 2017

109

32

W AUSSIE

ICONS

e a Pop tars

50 130 96 16 76 75 76 89 64 49 73 55 74 83 50

While we have taken care in the preparation of this magazine to try to make sure the recipes and dietary labels and information are accurate, not all recipes will suit all persons living with a particular allergy or other dietary restriction. We advise anyone with food allergies or special dietary requirements always to check food labels carefully. If you think we've mislabelled a recipe, please let us know. Nothing in this magazine should be taken as medical or health advice.

KEY:


this month

holidaymenus The taste foodies get creative with

these fun summertime menus.

Michelle Southan: Eas entertainin “Keep your cool when entertaining in hot weather with this no-fuss menu, featuring plenty of fresh, colourful fruit and vegies. There’s minimal cooking, too.” p35

starter

main

Rainbow rice paper rolls

p49

p39

dessert

Roast duck noodle salad

No-churn mango coconut ice-cream

Katrina Woodman: ummer picnic fun “Fresh damper is perfect for a picnic. Pack some cheese, ham and pickles for a ploughman’s-style lunch, with potato salad on the side and cake to finish. p68

side

p36

main

Dill & kransky potato salad

p50

dessert

Cheesy spinach damper

Wholesome hummingbird cake

Alison Adams: ustralia a “Celebrate with classic Aussie flavours given a fun twist. These dishes are easy to put together, with pretzels for the kids and a glam ice-cream cake to finish.” p79

snack Cheesy-mite pretzels

p29

main Spiced lamb kebabs

p76

dessert Layered lamington ice-cream cake

January/February 2017

taste magazine

9


this month

who’s cooking What’s in store from the taste magazine foodies this month?

Manu

Michelle

Katrina

Louise

Matt

Marion

Chrissy

Georgia

Colin

Louise Keats’ Chicken Toastie, p42, is big on flavour, with skinny pesto and roast capsicum.

Matt Preston dishes up the ultimate Potato Salad, p66, with fried kransky, crisp pickles and mayo.

Start the new year right with the annual 7-day Health Blitz Meal Plan, p105, by nutritionist Chrissy Freer.

Georgia Barnes’ Cheesy Spinach Damper, p36, is a must for Australia Day. Serve it warm with lashings of rosemary butter.

’s

10

taste magazine January/February 2017

-

l

sn c ?

Katrina Woodman has dinnertime sorted with her weeknight menu, p28, with healthy, no-fuss dishes for summer nights.

Marion Grasby’s Roast Duck Noodle Salad, p38, is a quick, vibrant salad sure to become a new fave.

You won’t be able to resist Colin Fassnidge’s oozy Cheese & Ham Toastie, p42, with two types of cheese.

PHOTOGRAPHY LENA BARRIDGE, EAMON GALLAGHER, NIGEL LOUGH, JULIE RENOUF, AL RICHARDSON, JEREMY SIMONS, LEANNE STAMATELLOS

She’s done it again! Michelle Southan makes the perfect pav with a choc biscuit twist: Tim Tam Pavlova, p80.

Manu Feildel’s French Toast, p56, is sure to put a smile on the face of your loved one this Valentine’s Day.


T

here’s no better place to be than Noosa this summer, with blue skies and sunshine the order of each day. Discover fresh, local avours, elegant eateries with ocean and river views, outdoor bars and cafes and new brewhouses to quench your thirst.

Immerse yourself in new dining experiences, creative energy, endless shopping and explore the beautiful nature that surrounds, from national parks to river, ocean and hinterland. Don't miss the Noosa Food & Wine Festival from 18-21 May 2017. Book your Noosa escape now. Call 1 3000 NOOSA or visitnoosa.com.au

Ginger Flower & Food Festival

Noosa Residences

The Ginger Factory’s 2017 Ginger Flower & Food Festival, Friday 20 to Sunday 22 January, promises to delight with three VSHFWDFXODU GD\V RI IRRG RZHUV DQG entertainment. It’s a must-do for foodies and garden lovers with cooking demonstrations from renowned chefs, garden talks and a showcase of exquisite gingers and heliconias. Don’t miss it!

Save 15% on boutique retreats with ocean views*

P 1800 067 686 W gingerfactory.com.au

P 07 5474 6700 E reception@noosaresidences.com

Clubb Coolum Beach Resort

Noosa Boathouse

Feb-March special – $175pn* oceanfront

Local produce in absolute waterfront location

Spectacular ocean views! Walk to Coolum’s patrolled beach, cafes, shops and restaurants. Facilities include heated pool and spa, gym and tennis court. $175pn* in 2 bedroom apartment min 4 night stay, Feb and March 2017 only. P 07 5446 3888 W clubbcoolum.com.au

*Subject to availability. Terms and conditions may apply.

23 exclusive boutique retreats, only a 200m stroll to Hastings Street and Noosa’s Main Beach. Award-winning architecture with stunning ocean, hinterland and rainforest views. Save 15% - quote discount promo code “Taste�.

Noosa Boathouse is an absolute waterfront ELVWUR EDU DQG HYHQWV GHVWLQDWLRQ RHULQJ a modern Australian menu that celebrates fresh Australian seafood, quality beef and locally harvested produce, including their famous three-tiered seafood tower. P 07 5440 5070 W noosaboathouse.com.au


this month

gethealthy

9

Don’t miss these supercharged ideas in this issue.

health hi hli hts p113

quick low cal

p34

low cal main

p32

gluten free

Chicken, parmesan & zoodle skillet

Wholemeal pasta with broccoli pesto

Turkey & cauliflower lettuce cups p31

p117

low cal main

easy low fat

p121

low fat meal Piri piri fish with charred corn salad

Pickled jalapeño, peach & pork salad p111

p30

quick low fat

gluten free

Steak with asparagus & white bean salad

Plus

day 7 ealth litz for food lovers

2017 Dosa with spicy beef & eggplant mince

12

Spicy pork meatballs with carrot salad

taste magazine January/February 2017

p105


Entertaining’s easy with Just Veg. Make this Vietnamese Carrot Salad in less than 10 minutes! Just Veg. is powered by the farmers’ wives, who understand that busy people need quick & healthy meal and snacking solutions. Add Just Veg. to your sandwiches, tacos, cakes, stir-fries, platters, or just eat it from the packet.

VI NA IN

S

A

SALA

I N S

1 packet Just Veg. Carrot Shred 5HG &DEEDJH QHO\ VOLFHG  %LUGVH\H FKLOOL QHO\VOLFHG 1 heaped cup mint 1 heaped cup coriander  WEV VK VDXFH 2 tsp coconut sugar (or sugar) 1 tsp sea salt Juice of two limes

&RPELQH WKH VK VDXFH VXJDU VDOW DQG lime juice for the dressing. Stir until dissolved. Combine all other ingredients in a large bowl and add dressing when ready to serve.

Healthy made Easy!


in season fresh in-season

cutie ruit wl

c

rille c rn i i er

14

salad bowl

pan-fried squash with ricotta


ADVERTISEMENT

It’s crunch time! m s C h  - s ++++

“W‫ה‬n   r  us y y! B y

+++++

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– Jr w"


cookthecover Like you, we’re loving all things popsicle, so we’re celebrating summer by turning one of our favourite Aussie biscuits into a frozen treat. I’ve teamed the raspberry coconut flavours of an Iced VoVo with creamy cheesecake and crunchy biscuit layers. And to keep things easy, you don’t need fancy moulds to make them in – just regular paper cups! Michelle Southan

let’s go! 2 x 250g pkts Arnott’s Iced VoVo Biscuits 200g butter, melted, cooled 2 x 250g pkts cream cheese, at room temperature 80g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) icing sugar mixture 2 tsp vanilla extract 600ml ctn thickened cream Pink food colouring, to tint (we used Wilton Icing Colors Rose Paste) 4 tbs raspberry jam Desiccated coconut, to sprinkle

16

iced vovo cheesecake pops makes 8 | prep 15 mins (+ 6 hours freezing time)

1 Process the biscuits in a food processor until coarsely crushed. Add the butter and process until well combined. Set aside. 2 Use electric beaters to beat the cream cheese, icing sugar and vanilla in a bowl until smooth. Gradually add the cream and beat for 1-2 minutes or until well combined and thickened slightly. 3 Spoon a third of the mixture into a separate bowl and set aside. Beat a little food colouring into the remaining mixture until bright pink. Transfer half the pink mixture to a separate bowl. 4 Fold 2 tbs jam into one portion of pink mixture to create a rippled effect. Divide the pink mixture evenly among eight 300ml paper cups.

taste magazine January/February 2017

5 Sprinkle 2 tsp of the biscuit mixture into each cup, pushing it up against the side of the cup slightly. Divide the reserved white mixture evenly among the cups. Repeat with another layer of biscuit mixture, using 2 tsp for each cup. 6 Fold the remaining 2 tbs jam into the remaining pink mixture to create a rippled effect. Divide evenly among the cups. Top with the remaining biscuit mixture, pressing down slightly with the back of a spoon so the pops are well covered. 7 Insert a paddle-pop stick into the centre of each cup. Place pops in the freezer, stick side up, for 4-6 hours or until frozen. 8 Carefully cut away cup from each pop and remove. Sprinkle pops with coconut.

RECIPE MICHELLE SOUTHAN PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION MIRANDA PAYNE

With some cheeky VoVo-voom, our frozen cheesecake pops are too cool for school.


this month

here’s how

All the tips and tricks you need to turn out pops with a beautiful colour, even layers and swirly ripples of raspberry jam.

tip 1

tip 2

tip 3

tip 4

tip 5

tip 6

For an intense colour, try using a food paste or gel. Dip the end of a skewer into the paste or gel and swirl it into the cream mixture. Stir with a wooden spoon until a vibrant pink.

When adding the crumbs, push them to the outer edge of the cups, so the cream is visible in the centre. This helps the layers stick together, keeping the pops intact.

18

Dollop the jam onto the pink cream mixture. Give the mixture one big swirl. Be careful not to overmix the jam and cream mixture, as you won’t get a rippled effect.

Before serving the frozen pops, use strong kitchen scissors to remove the paper cups. Cut down the side of each cup and carefully peel the side away from the popsicle.

taste magazine January/February 2017

Use a large spoon to carefully transfer the pink cream mixture to each cup. This will help to keep the jam swirl intact and create delicious pockets of jam.

After you have removed the side of the paper cup from the popsicle, carefully remove the base. Ease it off the popsicle gently, in case it has stuck a little.


umper

ealth Issue

Terms and conditions: Entries open 00:01 (AEDT) 29/12/16 and close 23:59 (AEDT) 08/02/17. Open to Australian residents only. Winners determined 14:00 (AEDT) 15/02/17 at NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd, 2 Holt Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Winners’ names published in Taste.com.au magazine April 2017. Total prize pool valued at $2,399.60. Full terms and conditions available at taste.com.au/cookthecovercomp or search for ‘cook the cover’.

.COM .AU

85 Eas

co er

PAPER CUP MOULDS

RECIPES IDEAS

&WIN

& HEALTH BLITZ! r l vers

THE NEW

16 pa es

AUSSIE

ICONS

e a Pop tars

Make our cover recipe for your chance to win a blender! an’t wait to recreate our Iced VoVo Cheesecake Pops? Simply make your version, share a picture of your creation and you could win one of eight Breville Boss To Go Plus blenders, valued at $299.95 each! This personal blender is at the top of our wish list for getting healthy this summer, as it pulverises even the toughest ingredients, such as nuts, seeds and kale, to ultra-fine particles. That means super-smooth juices and smoothies, ready to go. It’s made with durable, high-quality materials and includes a stainless-steel mill, plus two 500ml and one 700ml dishwasher-safe tumblers. The tumblers all have flip-top travel lids and no threads or notches around the rim, so they’re nice to drink from, too.

PRIZE Breville Boss To Go Plus

$299.95

SEND YOUR ENTRIES IN BY

8 FEB

t win!

“ I’ll be looking for fruity jam pockets, crunchy crumbs and brightly coloured pink layers.”

matt preston

CELEBRITY JUDGE

two ways to enter email it: Send a photo of your

creation, with your name, address and telephone number to us at tastecookandwin@news.com.au

or

share it: Post the photo on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, with #tastemagcover in the message, and make sure the post is public so we can see the picture!

Check out the entries! See our live feed at taste.com.au/social


you Here’s your latest pics and feedback from recent issues.

➻ 20

EMAIL tastemag@news.com.au SHARE #cookedwithtaste

taste magazine January/February 2017


this month

cook the cover #tastemagcover

Celebrity judge Matt Preston picked his top three Choc Caramel Popcorn Celebration Cakes from our November cover. The winners receive a Whirlpool Induction Oven.

“The highest quality of entries ever! I chose three totally lickable cakes with all the exuberance of the original.”

“ An absolute joy to make and ut terly delicious!”

Mat t Preston COOK THE COVER JUDGE

winners!

TO ENTER our Cook the Cover comp this month, see p19. January/February 2017

taste magazine

21


’ ’

*

TRADITIONAL

BREAD

’ Find out more at

Helga’s Continental Bakehouse


FIRST

taste

s

th ves

Here’s the fun foodie stuff that’s good to know this month.

tr

ne

ON THE GO Blitzing your way to healthy green juices and power smoothies just got easier and, dare we say, a little sexier, with the new Bottle To Go by Smeg, $49. Designed to attach to the Smeg blender, Bottle To Go takes your drink or soup from the kitchen to out the door without skipping a beat. From Harvey Norman. For your chance to win a Bottle To Go set, go to page 125.

winners, GRINNERS!

stick

Feeling inspired by our cover popsicles to create your own fun versions? These cool summer-vibing Pop Moulds by Sunnylife will get you in the freeze frame of mind. Choose from Tropical and Fruit Salad, $26.95 – each set includes a tray and 2 pop mould sticks. Find them at sunnylife.com.au

24

taste magazine January/February 2017

There’s been a lot of celebrating and raising of glasses in the taste.com.au office, thanks to a sweep of awards we’ve recently collected, including Digital Magazine Brand of the Year at the Australian Magazine Awards 2016, Consumer Magazine of the Year and Publish Excellence at the Publish Australia Awards, and Media Brand of the Year at the B&T Awards. Here’s cheers!


ite e!

CHEERS TO CHEESE

Not surprisingly, it’s taken a French study to prove something we’ve all long suspected – that cheese makes wine taste better. So much so, that if you want to get away with offering guests a cheaper wine (shh!), serve it with cheese.

PAV-LOVERS

WORDS DANIELA BERTOLLO & STEPHANIE HUA ILLUSTRATION KAT CHADWICK

In the lead-up to Australia Day, we invited you to take part in our online taste.com.au Ultimate Australian Food Survey. With more than 400 votes so far, pavlova has taken the lead as your all-time favourite Aussie food, followed closely by the lamington. Other take-outs? You’d miss Vegemite the most; and respondents from each state say mango tastes best in Oz (except for Victorians, who reckon our coffee is unsurpassed). Have your say now at taste.com.au/ausfoodsurvey

alc -

cool recipes The cooking is easy with our latest cookbook Summertime, $9.99, on sale 9 January. Filled with laid-back alfresco eating, new barbecue classics and easy entertaining, as well as some refreshingly sweet treats, this is one cool recipe collection. Get it while it’s hot! For our exclusive extract, see page 70.

i uor ize

Calippo meets popsicle with these gorgeous new adults-only alcoholic treats from Pops, from $8 each. Available in Bellini (prosecco & peach) and Champagne, they’re just the thing to break the ice at your next summer soiree. Coming to a freezer near you soon. Visit wearepops.com/au

January/February

25


cook it now! weeknight dinners

more online

RAINBOW rice paper rolls 27


new n le ave

sesame-crusted salmon & soba noodle salad serves

prep & cooking

3

product watch

1 4 2

dressing

28

quick & easy

get ahead!


cook it now!

spiced lamb kebabs with tahini potato salad serves 4 | prep & cooking 30 mins 2 tbs water 750g baby red-skinned potatoes, 1 garlic clove, chopped halved 1 ⁄ 2 tsp ground coriander 600g lamb fillet, cut into 3cm pieces 1 ⁄ 2 tsp ground cumin 1 tbs extra virgin olive oil 1 tbs fresh lemon juice 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 Place the potatoes in a saucepan. 1 1 ⁄ 2 tsp ground coriander Cover with cold water. Bring 1 1 ⁄ 2 tsp ground cumin to the boil over high heat. 235g (1 1 ⁄ 2 cups) frozen Simmer for 10-12 minutes broad beans, thawed, or until just tender. podded Tahini makes a creamy Drain. Refresh under Sorrel leaves, to serve cold running water. dairy-free potato (optional) 2 Combine lamb, oil, dressing, full of

secret ingredient

tahini sauce

75g (1 ⁄4 cup) hulled tahini 1 cup combined fresh continental parsley and mint leaves 1 small lemon, rind finely grated, juiced 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil

lemon, garlic, coriander and cumin in a bowl. Season. Thread onto 8 small pre-soaked bamboo skewers.

healthy fats.

quick & easy

3 For the tahini sauce, place all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Season. 4 Preheat a chargrill pan or barbecue grill on medium-high. Cook the lamb skewers, turning, for 4-5 minutes for medium or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate. Set aside for 3 minutes to rest. 5 Combine potatoes, broad beans and three-quarters of the sauce in a bowl. Divide among plates. Top with lamb. Drizzle with remaining sauce. Serve with sorrel leaves, if using. PER SERVE • 41g protein • 32g fat (6g saturated fat) • 23g carb • 11g dietary fibre • 564 Cals (2359kJ)

January/February 2017

use it up! Try processing any leftover broad beans with fresh ricotta, lemon rind, lemon juice and fresh mint leaves for a tasty and healthy dip or sandwich spread.

reen tahini sauce

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in ian urrit twist

dosa with spicy beef & eggplant mince serves

prep & cooking

switch it!

1 3 2

use it up!

dosa batter

30

secret ingredient

4


cook it now!

pickled jalapeño, peach & honey pork salad serves 4 | prep & cooking 40 mins 150g sourdough bread, coarsely torn 1 For the pickled jalapeño, combine 1 tbs extra virgin olive oil, the chilli and onion in a small bowl. plus extra, to serve Combine vinegar, sugar and salt in 450g (1 large) pork fillet a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave 1 tbs honey on High for 30 seconds or until hot. 2 tsp white wine vinegar Pour over chilli mixture. Set aside 80g baby rocket to develop the flavours. 1 ⁄ 2 cup fresh basil leaves 2 Preheat oven to 2 yellow peaches, 180°C/160°C fan cut into wedges forced. Line a baking 1 small fennel bulb, tray with baking Homemade pickled thinly sliced paper. Place bread jalapeño chilli makes 150g grape tomatoes, on prepared tray. a tasty, fiery dressing, halved Drizzle with oil. perfect with pork.

secret ingredient

pickled jalapeño

1 fresh jalapeño, deseeded, thinly sliced 1 ⁄ 2 small red onion, finely chopped 2 tbs white wine vinegar 2 tsp caster sugar 1 ⁄ 2 tsp sea salt

Season. Bake for 12 minutes or until the bread is golden and crisp.

3 Heat an ovenproof frying pan over

switch it!

medium-high heat. Spray the pork with oil. Season. Cook, turning, for 5 minutes or until browned. Transfer to oven. Roast for 8 minutes. Pour over combined honey and vinegar. Roast for a further 5 minutes or until just cooked through. Set aside to rest for 5 minutes. Slice the pork. 4 Arrange the rocket, basil, peach, fennel, tomato and sliced pork on a serving plate. Drizzle with the pickled jalapeño mix, pan juices from the pork and extra olive oil.

You can replace the pork fillet with leftover roast pork or leave it out and serve the salad as a side with roast or barbecue pork.

PER SERVE • 34g protein • 10g fat (2g saturated fat) • 35g carb • 6g dietary fibre • 375 Cals (1569kJ)

eas chilli ickle

January/February 2017

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31


l w cal ain

turmeric-spiced turkey & serves

quick & easy

prep & cooking

use it up!

1

secret ingredient

32

3 2


cook it now!

lemon & basil prawn risoni serves 4 | prep & cooking 35 mins 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) extra virgin olive oil 1 Heat 1 tbs of the oil in a shallow 1 small brown onion, casserole dish over medium finely chopped heat. Add the onion, 1 ⁄ 2 bunch fresh basil, basil stems and half leaves picked, stems the garlic. Cook, Adding the basil stems stirring, for 4 minutes finely chopped when frying the onion 4 garlic cloves, or until softened. gives extra flavour crushed Transfer to a bowl. and saves waste! 400g peeled green prawns, 2 Add 1 tbs oil and tails intact prawns to dish over 1 1 ⁄ 2 lemons, rind finely grated, medium-high heat. Season. juiced Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add 1 ⁄ 2 tsp dried chilli flakes rind, chilli and remaining garlic. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until 350g dried risoni pasta 1L (4 cups) salt-reduced chicken stock aromatic. Transfer prawn mixture 2 bunches asparagus, trimmed, to a bowl. Set aside. chopped 3 Return onion mixture to dish over 200g grape tomatoes, halved medium heat. Add risoni and cook, Lemon wedges, extra, to serve stirring, for 1 minute or until coated.

secret ingredient

Add stock and lemon juice. Cook, stirring regularly, for 12-14 minutes or until risoni is al dente and liquid is almost all absorbed. 4 Meanwhile, preheat oven grill to high. Line a baking tray with foil. Place asparagus and tomato on tray. Drizzle with remaining 1 tbs oil. Season. Cook for 4-5 minutes or until blistered and tender. 5 Stir the prawn mixture, half the vegetable mixture and the basil leaves into the risoni, until warmed through. Remove from heat. Top with remaining vegetable mixture and basil. Serve with lemon wedges. PER SERVE • 35g protein • 16g fat (3g saturated fat) • 65g carb • 7g dietary fibre • 567 Cals (2372kJ)

January/February 2017

switch it! Try replacing the prawns with 2 large skinless salmon fillets, cut into 3cm pieces.

w w the cr w

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quick & easy

luten ree ar i

chicken, parmesan & zoodle skillet serves

prep & cooking

2

secret ingredient

3 1

4

34

top tip!


cook it now!

rainbow rice paper rolls with tofu peanut dipping sauce serves 4 | prep & cooking 45 mins 12 round 22cm rice paper wrappers 2 avocados, thinly sliced 24 fresh coriander sprigs 24 large fresh mint leaves 300g red cabbage, finely shredded 2 large carrots, cut into matchsticks 2 Lebanese cucumbers, deseeded, cut into matchsticks 100g bean sprouts, trimmed 3 green shallots, thinly sliced diagonally

tofu peanut sauce 150g silken tofu 70g (1 â „4 cup) natural smooth peanut butter

tea towel. Place on a 2 tbs rice wine vinegar work surface. Top 1 tbs Hikari Shiro Miso Paste with 2 avocado slices, 3 tsp honey 3 tsp finely grated 2 coriander sprigs, Shiro (white) miso fresh ginger 2 mint leaves, a little paste adds an umami 2 tsp tamari flavour that works well cabbage, carrot, 1 small garlic clove, cucumber, bean with the honey and crushed sprouts and shallot. ginger.

secret ingredient

1 For the tofu sauce, place all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. 2 Dip 1 rice paper wrapper in cold water for 10-20 seconds or until starting to soften. Drain on a clean

Fold in ends and roll up firmly to enclose. Repeat with

use it up! Throw any leftover silken tofu into a fruit smoothie for a protein boost, add to a vegan mousse or scramble with onion and curry powder for an easy dinner.

with tofu sauce on the side. (6g saturated fat)

•

41g carb

n

c k ve

January/February 2017

SNAP & SHARE YOUR TASTE CREATIONS WITH US

#cookedwithtaste

taste magazine

35


grab & go cheesy damper

“Damper is about as Aussie as food can get, and this is my kind of green and gold – the fresh spinach and crisp cheese crust make it look and taste fantastic! It’s best served warm, and is perfect for an Australia Day lunch. It can be made in advance – simply store in an airtight container in the freezer. Before serving, pop it in the oven to warm through.” Georgia Barnes

cheesy spinach damper with rosemary butter serves

prep

GRAB

cooking

GO...

1 2

3 4 36


37


arion’s

EXPRESS Beat the summer heat with Marion Grasby’s zesty noodle salad with roast duck.

38

taste magazine January/February 2017


cook it now

“I adore the riot of colours here. Vibrant and herbaceous, this salad is no one-trick pony — it’s easy enough to make for a weeknight dinner, but special enough to serve at a dinner party or Chinese New Year celebration.” Marion Grasby

roast duck noodle salad

RECIPE MARION GRASBY PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION DIXIE ELLIOTT

serves 4 | prep 30 mins 200g rice vermicelli noodles 2 Lebanese cucumbers 1 cup finely shredded red cabbage 1 cup finely shredded wombok (Chinese cabbage) 1 carrot, peeled, cut into matchsticks or coarsely grated 1 cup fresh mint leaves 1 ⁄ 2 cup fresh coriander leaves 400g Chinese roast duck, warmed, sliced (see tip) Fried shallots, to serve

3 Use a vegetable peeler to peel cucumbers into ribbons, discarding the seeded centres. Place the cucumber ribbons in a bowl and place in the fridge until ready to serve. 4 Place the noodles, cabbage, wombok, carrot, mint and coriander in a large bowl. Add the dressing. Gently toss until combined. 5 Divide the noodle mixture among serving bowls and top with slices of warmed duck, cucumber ribbons and fried shallots.

sweet chilli & sesame dressing

Chinese roast duck can be bought from Asian BBQ restaurants. Or, use Luv-a-Duck Ready Roasted Peking Duck Breasts, available in major supermarkets. You can substitute the duck with roast chicken, cooked prawns or cubes of marinated tofu if you like. If entertaining, prepare salad ingredients and dressing in the morning. Store in separate containers in the fridge. Toss together and add duck just before serving.

60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) sweet chilli sauce 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) fresh lime juice 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) fish sauce 2 tsp sesame oil

1 For the sweet chilli dressing, whisk all the ingredients in a bowl until well combined. 2 Place the noodles in a heatproof bowl. Cover with boiling water. Set aside until softened. Drain well. Use scissors to cut the noodles into manageable lengths. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

tips & tricks!

January/February 2017

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crispercuisine haloumi and veg

haloumi hot dogs it’s a blitz!

serves

prep

1

3 4

crisper raid •

2

uick an eas

• •

fridge raid • •

pantry raid • •

what we used up * haloumi * onion * capsicum * avocado * broccolini * zucchini

40

cooking


ADVERTISEMENT

ham sandwiches with homemade pickles serves 4

1⁄3 cup (100g) whole-egg mayonnaise 4 Tip Top English Muffins Original, halved and toasted Pinch of cayenne pepper 8 slices of ham (Christmas ham leftovers work well) 1 cup salad leaves HOMEMADE PICKLES 1 cucumber, thinly sliced 1 red onion, thinly sliced ¼ cup (60ml) rice vinegar 2 tbs apple cider vinegar ½ tsp caster sugar Toss pickle ingredients in a container with 1 tsp salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours. Spread mayonnaise generously over the muffins. Sprinkle with cayenne pepper, then layer with the ham, pickles and salad leaves.

prawn & salsa verde mini pizzas

top choice

makes 6

1 tsp lemon rind, finely grated 2 tbs lemon juice

3 Tip Top English Muffins Original, halved ½ cup pizza sauce 100g (1 cup) mozzarella, coarsely grated 1 tbs olive oil 18 green king prawns, peeled SALSA VERDE ¼ cup continental parsley, chopped ¼ cup basil leaves, chopped 2 tbs baby capers, drained 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 200ºC/180ºC fan forced. Spread muffin halves with pizza sauce and top with mozzarella. Place on a baking tray and cook for 10 12 minutes or until cheese melts. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a frying pan, add the prawns and cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes or until cooked through. For the salsa verde, combine ingredients in bowl and mix well. Top each muffin half with three prawns and salsa verde.

• Find Tip Top English Muffins in four varieties – Original, Wholemeal, Multigrain and Spicy Fruit – at your local supermarket.


naughty “ This is not your regular ham and cheese toastie!�

Stop the sandwich press! These cheesy toasties from Louise Keats and Colin Fassnidge are bliss in a bite. Which tickles your tastebuds?

Smoked ham, double cheese and plenty of tasty extras make this an easy dinner winner! 42

taste magazine January/February 2017

indulgent


“ Think outside the box for a tasty, healthier toastie.�

light January/February 2017

taste magazine

43


his is my go-to quick meal before a busy night at my restaurant, not only because it’s incredibly tasty but it also gives me heaps of energy. For me, a good toastie has to be really creamy and oozy, and adding sour cream to the filling does the trick nicely. Combined with the cheeses, it’s pretty rich, so I cut it with two mustards (one hot, one not!) and capers. To get the best result, you need to cook these bad boys low and slow – they’ll still be ready to eat in 10 minutes so don’t be tempted to crank up the heat. I like to place a weight on top of them, such as another frying pan, with baking paper in between to keep the heat inside the sandwich. Cap it all off with fried sage and a good chutney or pickle – my favourite is the classic Branston Pickle.

44

ultimate cheese & ham toastie makes 2 | prep 10 mins | cooking 10 mins 65g (1 ⁄4 cup) sour cream 1 tbs wholegrain mustard 1 tsp hot English mustard 1 tbs chopped capers 1 tbs chopped fresh sage leaves 70g vintage cheddar, coarsely grated 70g mozzarella, coarsely grated 100g chopped smoked ham 4 thick slices sourdough 50g butter, at room temperature 1 tbs olive oil Branston Pickle, to serve (optional) Fried sage leaves, to serve (optional)

Cut the sandwiches in half. Serve hot, topped with Branston Pickle and fried sage leaves, if using. PER SERVE • 40g protein • 68g fat (37g saturated fat) • 59g carb • 6g dietary fibre • 1016 Cals (4246kJ)

cook’s tip

These toasties can be made in a jaffle maker or a sandwich press if you prefer. I’ve used a combination of cheeses: cheddar for its sharpness and mozzarella for its ooziness. Other full-flavoured melting cheeses, such as raclette, gruyère or provolone would also work well. Adding a little knob of butter to the pan before frying the toasties will give a lovely golden colour. I always have a jar of Branston Pickle in the 1 Combine the sour cream, mustards, capers and fridge. It’s made from a combination of vegetables, sage in a medium bowl. Add cheeses and ham. including cauliflower and carrots, and is perfect on Stir to combine. Season. 2 Butter one side of each bread slice. Turn two bread a plain old cheddar sandwich or served with grilled sangas or chops. If you don’t have any Branston slices over and spread evenly with cheese mixture. Pickle on hand, serve the toasties with good-quality Top with the remaining bread, buttered side up. chutney to help cut through the richness of the filling. 3 Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over To fry sage leaves, cook in oil over medium heat low heat. Cook the sandwiches for 3-4 minutes each side or until golden brown and the cheese is melted. until crisp. Drain on paper towel and season with salt.

taste magazine January/February 2017

RECIPES COLIN FASSNIDGE & LOUISE KEATS PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION LUCY BUSUTTIL

Mustard, capers and pickle offset the rich sour cream filling.


cook it now!

This chicken and capsicum toastie looks almost too good to eat!

y grilled toastie has all the flavour of a fried one, but with less than half the calories! I have used chicken tenderloins in the filling, which give a lean protein hit that’s more moist than the rest of the breast, as well as roasted capsicum for a natural sweetness and burst of colour. As for melted cheese, choosing a sharp vintage cheddar means a little goes a long way. Pesto adds flavour to any meal, but traditional versions are seriously high-cal. My skinny pesto uses spinach and coriander for a brilliant green flavour boost, with minimal cheese and oil. Teff is a tiny gluten-free seed that has a big nutritional punch – it’s packed with fibre, protein, calcium, iron and other minerals. Look for it in the health food aisle at the supermarket.

more online Nuts about toasties? Go to taste.com.au/ toastierecipes for more super-tasty combos.

su er reen est chicken toastie with skinny spinach pesto makes 2 | prep 25 mins | cooking 50 mins 1 small red capsicum, halved, deseeded 200g chicken tenderloins, trimmed 4 slices seeded wholegrain bread 2 thin slices (about 40g) vintage cheddar Handful baby spinach leaves, to serve Micro coriander, to serve (optional)

skinny spinach pesto 60g (about 2 cups) baby spinach leaves 30g fresh coriander leaves 20g parmesan, chopped 1 small garlic clove, chopped 1 tbs pine nuts or roasted cashews 1 tbs extra virgin olive oil 1 tbs fresh lemon juice 2 tbs water 2-3 tsp brown teff grain (optional)

1 Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Place capsicum in a small ovenproof dish and cover tightly with foil. Cook for 35 minutes or until tender. Set aside for 10 minutes to cool slightly. Use your fingers to peel the skin from the capsicum and discard. Cut the capsicum into strips and set aside.

2 For the pesto, place the spinach, coriander, parmesan, garlic, pine nuts or cashews, oil, lemon juice and water in a blender and blend until smooth. Stir in the teff, if using. Season. Transfer to a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge until required. (Makes about 3 ⁄4 cup. The pesto will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days.) 3 Preheat a chargrill pan over medium heat. Lightly spray the chicken with olive oil. Cook, turning, for 6 minutes or until golden and cooked through. Slice. 4 Lightly spray one side of 2 bread slices with olive oil. Place, oiled side down, on a clean work surface and spread each slice with 2 tsp pesto. Divide the cheese, chicken, capsicum and spinach between the bread slices. Spread each remaining slice with 2 tsp pesto and place on top of filling, pesto side down. Lightly spray top slices with olive oil. 5 Cook toasties in chargrill pan over medium-low heat for 2-3 minutes each side or until golden and cheese is melted. Cut the toasties in half and serve with micro coriander, if using. PER SERVE • 38g protein • 22g fat (7g saturated fat) • 31g carb • 9g dietary fibre • 486 Cals (2031kJ)

January/February 2017

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wait,youmean i can eatthat? Aussie treats

eas stir & ake

46


RECIPES KATRINA WOODMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION DIXIE ELLIOTT

li ht crea t

wholesome hummingbird cake

see page 50

47


tr lav ur c

Katrina Woodman 48

taste magazine January/February 2017


cook it now!

no-churn mango coconut ice-cream serves

makes

prep

1

4 5

coconut ice-cream

2 mango ice-cream

3

air ree sc

January/February 2017

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wholesome hummingbird cake

better-for-you bounty bars

serves 12 | prep 35 mins (+ cooling time) | cooking 45 mins

makes 18 bars | prep 30 mins (+ 5 hours chilling time) cooking 5 mins

240g (1 1 ⁄ 2 cups) wholemeal spelt flour 35g (1 ⁄ 3 cup) rolled oats 35g (1 ⁄ 3 cup) desiccated coconut 60g (1 ⁄ 3 cup) coconut sugar 2 tsp baking powder 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 ⁄ 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda 130g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) Greek-style yoghurt 100ml light extra virgin olive oil 2 eggs 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) honey, plus extra, to drizzle (optional)

1 tsp vanilla extract 2 large, very ripe bananas, mashed 440g can crushed pineapple in juice, drained Toasted coconut flakes, to serve (optional) Lime zest, to serve (optional)

cream cheese frosting 200g light cream cheese, at room temperature 70g (1 ⁄4 cup) Greek-style yoghurt 3 tsp honey 1 lime, rind finely grated

85g (3 ⁄4 cup) almond meal, lightly toasted 65g (3 ⁄4 cup) desiccated coconut, lightly toasted 2 tbs coconut flour 1 1 ⁄ 2 tbs raw cacao powder Large pinch of sea salt 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) maple syrup 2 tbs coconut oil

coconut filling 260g (4 cups) shredded coconut 160ml (2 ⁄ 3 cup) coconut milk 60g (1 ⁄4 cup) solidified coconut oil 80ml (1 ⁄ 3 cup) maple syrup 1 ⁄ 2 tsp vanilla bean paste

cacao topping 50g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) raw cacao powder 80ml (1 ⁄ 3 cup) coconut oil 80ml (1 ⁄ 3 cup) maple syrup Large pinch of sea salt

1 Grease the base and sides of a 26 x 16cm (base measurement) slice pan. Line with baking paper, allowing the paper to overhang the long sides of the pan. 1 Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Grease the base and side of a 22cm (base measurement) springform pan with oil 2 Process the almond meal, coconut, coconut flour, cacao, salt, and line with baking paper. maple syrup and oil until a sticky mixture comes together. Transfer 2 Combine the flour, oats, coconut, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon to the prepared pan and use a spatula or straight-sided glass to and bicarb in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre. Place yoghurt, smooth the surface. Place in the fridge for 1 hour or until firm. oil, eggs, honey and vanilla in a jug. Use a fork to whisk to combine. 3 For the coconut filling, place all the ingredients in the bowl of a 3 Add the yoghurt mixture, banana and pineapple to the well. Stir food processor. Process, scraping down the side occasionally, until smooth and combined. Spread over chilled base and use a spatula until well combined. Spoon into the prepared pan and smooth the to smooth the surface. Place in the fridge for 2 hours or until firm. surface. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes. 4 For the topping, place all the ingredients in a heatproof bowl Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. over a saucepan of simmering water. Stir until melted and smooth. Pour over the coconut filling. Smooth the surface. Place in the fridge 4 For the frosting, place the cream cheese, yoghurt, honey and for 2 hours or until set. lime rind in a bowl. Use a wooden spoon to beat until smooth. 5 Spread frosting evenly over the cake. Drizzle with extra honey 5 Remove the slice from pan and use a sharp knife to cut it into and sprinkle with coconut flakes and lime zest, if using. 18 pieces. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week. PER SERVE • 7g protein • 16g fat (6g saturated fat) • 4g dietary fibre • 318 Cals (1331kJ)

50

36g carb

taste magazine January/February 2017

PER SERVE • 3g protein • 26g fat (21g saturated fat) • 13g carb dietary fibre • 305 Cals (1276kJ)

• 4g


Katrina Woodman

ch c ri e slice

51


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weekend easy entertaining ideas

SHERBET spider

January/February 2017

55


“Pain perdu is the original French toast. I promise, it will be love at first bite!” Manu Feildel

anu’s TABLE If the way to our hearts is through our stomachs, Manu Feildel’s deluxe French toast will get Valentine’s Day off to a flying start.

56

taste magazine January/February 2017


RECIPE MANU FEILDEL FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS FOOD STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION DIXIE ELLIOTT PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH PORTRAIT STYLING SARAH O’BRIEN HAIR & MAKE-UP YOLANDA LUKOWSKI

weekend

french toast with yoghurt sorbet see page 58

January/February 2017

taste magazine

57


weekend

manu’s tips You can make this recipe to the end of step 6 a day ahead. Just before serving, fry the French toast, add sorbet and coulis, then sit back and enjoy this beautiful brekky or dessert. The coulis can be made with frozen berries. Thaw in a glass or ceramic bowl before using. You can use a full-bodied red wine, such as cabernet sauvignon, in the coulis for a ballsy flavour that accentuates the dark fruit.

french toast with yoghurt sorbet (pain perdu et sorbet au yaourt) serves 6 | prep 50 mins (+ chilling, freezing & 2 hours macerating time) | cooking 45 mins 150g unsalted butter, chopped 450g piece brioche, crusts removed, cut into 2cm pieces 250ml (1 cup) milk 3 eggs 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped 110g caster sugar, plus 1 tbs, extra Fresh berries, to serve

yoghurt sorbet 300ml water 150g caster sugar 150g liquid glucose 750g Greek-style yoghurt

58

coulis 100g fresh strawberries 100g fresh raspberries 100g fresh blackberries 100g fresh blueberries 200ml light red wine (such as pinot noir) 50g caster sugar 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped

1 For the sorbet, place water, sugar and glucose in a saucepan over medium heat. Slowly bring to the boil, stirring, until glucose dissolves and mixture is smooth. Set aside to cool. Transfer to a large jug. Cover with plastic wrap. Place in the fridge to chill.

taste magazine January/February 2017

2 Place the yoghurt in a large bowl. Whisk in the cold syrup and pour into an ice-cream machine. Churn following the manufacturer’s directions. Freeze until required. 3 For the coulis, place half the berries in a large bowl. Crush with a fork. Add remaining berries, red wine, sugar and vanilla seeds. Set aside, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours to macerate. Process in a food processor until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl; discard solids. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge until required. 4 Meanwhile, melt 50g butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add half the brioche and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes or until golden. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with another 50g butter and remaining brioche. 5 Line a 1L (4 cup) loaf pan or terrine mould with baking paper. Arrange brioche in pan. Combine the milk, eggs, vanilla seeds and 75g caster sugar in a jug. Pour over the brioche. Set aside for 10 minutes to soak. 6 Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Bake brioche mixture for 10 minutes. Sprinkle with extra 1 tbs sugar. Bake for 10 minutes, until top is golden. Set aside to cool. Cover and place in the fridge for 2 hours to set. 7 Remove French toast from pan. Cut into 6 slices. Melt remaining 50g butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add remaining 35g sugar. Cook French toast, in 3 batches, for 1-2 minutes each side or until golden. 8 Divide the French toast among serving plates. Serve with a scoop of sorbet, a drizzle of coulis and fresh berries.


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For more information and recipes, visit obela.com.au


ut

instinct Pete Evans’

60


RECIPES PETE EVANS PHOTOGRAPHY MARK ROPER, STEVE BROWN & ROB PALMER STYLING DEB KALOPER & LUCY TWEED EXTRACT FROM THE COMPLETE GUT HEALTH COOKBOOK BY PETE EVANS WITH HELEN PADARIN (PLUM,$39.99).

weekend

ast a il eal

January/February 2017

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61


cauliflower ‘steak’ & eggs with sautéed greens serves 4 1 tbs coconut oil 4 eggs

1 tsp finely snipped chives 150ml extra virgin olive oil

cauliflower ‘steak’

sautéed greens

2 tbs coconut oil 1 large head of cauliflower (about 1.2kg), cut crossways into 4 pieces about 1.5cm thick Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 bunches of broccolini (about 360g), trimmed and halved 3 tbs coconut oil 3 garlic cloves, sliced 1 bunch silverbeet (about 300g), stems removed (save for broths or soups), leaves torn 3 tbs hazelnuts (activated if possible), toasted and roughly chopped, plus extra to serve

bacon vinaigrette 1 tbs coconut oil 2 French shallots, finely chopped 150g rindless bacon, finely diced 3 tbs apple cider vinegar

broccoli & sesame salad serves 4-6 200g broccoli, broken into florets, stems reserved 1 bunch (about 180g) broccolini 2 green shallots, thinly sliced 2 handfuls of rocket 1 small handful of mint leaves, torn 80g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) almonds (activated if possible), toasted, chopped

2 tbs olive oil 1 tsp sesame seeds, toasted

dressing 65g (1 ⁄4 cup) hulled tahini 3 tbs apple cider vinegar 1 garlic clove, finely chopped Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 To make the dressing, combine the tahini, vinegar and garlic with 3 tbs of water in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper and mix well. 2 Thinly slice the broccoli stems lengthways using a mandoline, or peel thinly with a vegetable peeler, and place in a bowl. Slice the broccolini lengthways, chop into 2cm pieces and combine with the sliced broccoli stems. Add the broccoli florets, green shallot, rocket, mint and half the almonds. Pour over the olive oil, season with salt and pepper and gently toss to combine. 3 Arrange the salad in a serving bowl, drizzle over the dressing and sprinkle over the sesame seeds and remaining almonds. 62

taste magazine January/February 2017

1 Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper. 2 For the cauliflower ‘steak’, melt 2 tsp of the coconut oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Add a cauliflower ‘steak’ and cook, turning once, for 2 minutes or until golden on each side. Transfer to prepared tray and season with salt and pepper. Repeat this process with the remaining oil and ‘steaks’. Place in oven and roast for 12-15 minutes, until cauliflower is tender. 3 For the vinaigrette, melt half the coconut oil in a small saucepan over low heat, add the shallot and gently cook for 1 minute, until slightly softened. Remove from the pan, wipe the pan clean and place over medium heat. Add the remaining oil and the bacon and fry for 6-8 minutes, until bacon is crispy. Add the vinegar and shallot and set aside to cool. Transfer to a bowl and whisk in the chives and olive oil. Season with salt. 4 For the sautéed greens, bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil. Blanch the broccolini for 1 minute or until almost cooked through. Plunge into ice-cold water, then drain. Set aside. Melt the coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 20 seconds, until fragrant. Stir in the silverbeet, broccolini and 2 tbs water and cook, tossing occasionally, for 1 minute or until the silverbeet is slightly wilted and the broccolini is heated through. Toss in the hazelnuts and season. 5 Heat the coconut oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Fry the eggs for 2-3 minutes or until cooked to your liking. Season, slide onto a plate and keep warm. 6 Place the cauliflower ‘steaks’ on warm serving plates and top each with a fried egg. Add the sautéed greens, drizzle over some bacon vinaigrette and scatter with extra hazelnuts. Serve with the remaining vinaigrette on the side.


weekend

“This is my take on steak and eggs, but a modern version that incorporates vegetables and makes them the star.”

cauliflower ‘steak’ & eggs with sautéed greens see opposite page

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nic’s chia slab makes 24 pieces 2 tbs powdered gelatine 800ml coconut cream 3 tbs honey (optional) 200g chia seeds Zest of 1 ⠄ 2 lemon 400g mixed fresh or frozen berries

cauliflower fried rice with sausage serves 4 1 head of cauliflower (about 1kg), separated into florets (discard stalk or use it for another meal) 4 tbs coconut oil 4 eggs, whisked 5 beef, chicken or pork sausages 1 onion, finely chopped 1 â „ 2 red capsicum, finely chopped 1 small red chilli, deseeded, finely chopped 2.5cm-piece ginger, finely grated

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tbs tamari or coconut aminos (from health food shops) 2 green shallots, thinly sliced 2 tbs chopped coriander leaves, plus extra leaves to serve Sea salt and freshly ground white pepper Black and white sesame seeds, toasted, to serve Sriracha chilli sauce, to serve (optional)

1 Place the cauliflower in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until it resembles grains of rice. Remove from the food processor and set aside. 2 Melt 1 tbs of the coconut oil in a wok or large frying pan over medium-high heat. Pour in the whisked egg and tilt the pan so it covers the base. Cook for 3 minutes or until the egg is set. Remove, slice into thin strips and set aside. 3 Wipe wok or pan clean with paper towel, then melt 1 tbs of the remaining coconut oil over high heat. Add the sausages and cook for 5 minutes or until lightly golden and half cooked through. Remove the sausages from the pan and, when cool enough to handle, cut into bite-sized pieces. Set aside. 4 Melt the remaining coconut oil in the wok or pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, capsicum, chilli, ginger and garlic and stir-fry for 5 minutes or until softened. Stir in the chopped sausage and cook for 3 minutes or until the sausage is almost cooked through. Add the cauliflower and cook for 2-3 minutes, until tender. Add the egg, tamari or coconut aminos, green shallot, coriander and salt and white pepper and stir-fry for 2 minutes or until everything is heated through and well combined. 5 Spoon onto a platter and serve with the extra coriander leaves, a sprinkle of sesame seeds and the sriracha chilli sauce on the side, if using. 64

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1 Grease a 20 x 30cm baking pan and line the base and sides with baking paper. 2 Place the gelatine in a small bowl. Add 4 tablespoons water and set aside for 5 minutes to allow the gelatine granules to soften and expand. 3 Heat the coconut cream in a saucepan over medium heat until just starting to simmer. Remove from the heat, add the gelatine mixture and stir until the gelatine has dissolved. Stir in the honey (if using). 4 Pour the warm coconut cream mixture into a bowl, sprinkle on the chia seeds, a little at a time, and mix through. Fold in the lemon zest and half the mixed berries and pour into the prepared pan. Smooth the top with a spatula, then sprinkle on the remaining berries. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 4 hours to set. 5 When the chia slab is firm, remove from the pan and cut into 5cm squares. Place on a platter and serve. Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 1 week.

The Complete Gut Health Cookbook by Pete Evans with Helen Padarin is published by Plum, $39.99. Available now from good bookstores and online.


weekend

“When my wife, Nic, made this I begged her for the recipe so I could share it. And here it is, in all its gut-healthy glory!”

nic’s chia slab

see opposite

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revival

Matt Preston and Michelle Southan’s potato salad is a modern masterpiece.

dill & kransky potato salad

see page 68

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WORDS MATT PRESTON RECIPE MATT PRESTON & MICHELLE SOUTHAN PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION DIXIE ELLIOTT

weekend

aybe it’s the weather, maybe it’s all those barbecues, but this is the time of year for potato salads. The taste.com.au website is besieged with people trawling through the 835 potato salad recipes looking for inspiration. The first recipe for potato salad ever recorded was by John Gerard back in 1597. He advised that potatoes be “boyled and eaten with oyle, vinegar and pepper”. Add a little salt and that was pretty much the recipe for all salads going as far back as the ancient Romans. What’s interesting, however, is that not much changed on the potato salad front for around 250 years after Gerard wrote his recipe. (Note: There is talk of potatoes that were served with prunes or sopped in wine after cooking, or even cooked in wine with spices, but it’s hard to find primary sources to support this.) The development of interesting potato salads was stymied by two things; this rather dull approach to all salads, which continued through the meat-obsessed Middle Ages, and the fact that the potato was a fairly late arrival on the culinary scene. It only landed in Spain in 1570 and even then spent a couple of hundred years gaining acceptance, first as food for livestock, then as food for prisoners in Germany before it was finally seen as something fit for the working man. By 1750, the potato was widely planted and when the Little Ice Age famine of 1770 hit and old staple crops failed in the cold weather, it confirmed the importance of this new crop. Yet, in spite of this, its presence in recipes was utilitarian at best – largely replacing turnips and swedes – and the unimaginative potato salads were a case in point. Germans, who were early adopters of the potato along with Basque fishermen and some northern Italians, at least invented warm potato salads. The potatoes were dressed in hot stock, loaded with speck and vinegar, and served lukewarm. It wasn’t until the mid-to-late 19th century that cooks in France, the US and the UK started to experiment, adding pounded cooked egg yolk to their vinaigrettes and including new ingredients, such as anchovies, onions, mustard, celery, herbs like tarragon and parsley, and pickled cucumbers.

Mayonnaise was a later addition. The legendary French chef Auguste Escoffier did not regard it as a suitable dressing for fish, chicken or vegetables, preferring strange liaisons of warm gelatinous aspic with cream, egg yolks and bechamel sauce. It wasn’t until the 1940s that mayonnaise started to take off as a dressing and appear in potato salad recipes. It’s amazing it took this long, as the combination is so perfect and mayonnaise had been around since 1756, according to my preferred version of the ‘mayonnaise creation myth’ at any rate. This credits the famous bon vivant and lover of nude dinner parties, Duc de Richelieu. It’s said he invented mayonnaise to celebrate his bloodless capture of Minorca’s port of Mahon, hence mahonnaise. With no cream left in the town, he (or more likely his chef) discovered the magical properties of whisking oil with egg instead for the celebratory dinner.

“In the 1940s mayonnaise started to take off as a dressing and appear in potato salad recipes.” Yes, I know that chef Marie-Antoine Carême thought the name came from manier, the old French word for ‘to stir’, and that it should be corrected to magnonaise, and that ‘mayonnaise’ is close to the old French word for ‘yolk’ (moyeu, don’t ya know). And I know the people of Bayonne think it was invented there, as Bayonnaise, which got misheard. They say that France’s first famous foodie and food reviewer, Grimod de la Reynière, was fond of chicken bayonnaise for lunch and supported their claim. But one suspects he did this out of French culinary snobbery – how could something so good come from a Spanish island or not have a French name? So, given the reports that Richelieu’s sauce was subsequently served at a dinner in his honour in Marseilles shortly after his victory, my heart and head are going with that claim! Now, we have a vast array of recipes that pair various textures and dressings with different potato varieties, from pink eyes with crème fraîche and mint to kipflers with hard-boiled egg, trout and a dill dressing. From chats with corn, bacon, paprika and maple syrup to our latest version, overpage. January/February 2017

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dill & kransky potato salad serves 6 as a side | prep 30 mins (+ cooling time) | cooking 25 mins 1.2kg small (about 85g each) coliban or pink eye potatoes, scrubbed 2 kransky sausages, coarsely chopped 1 ⁄4 cup chopped fresh dill 80g baby cornichons, thinly sliced 2 green shallots, thinly sliced 2 tbs drained baby capers 170g (2 ⁄ 3 cup) whole egg mayonnaise 180g (2 ⁄ 3 cup) Greek-style yoghurt 3 tsp fresh lemon juice 4 hard-boiled eggs, quartered

1 Place potatoes in a large saucepan. Cover with plenty of cold water. Bring to the boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 15 minutes or until just tender. Drain. Set aside for 15 minutes to cool slightly. When cool enough to handle but still warm, peel the potatoes. Cut into quarters and transfer to a large bowl. 2 Meanwhile, cook sausage in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat for 5-8 minutes, until golden. Transfer to a heatproof bowl to cool. 3 Combine dill, cornichon, shallot and capers in a separate bowl. Combine mayonnaise, yoghurt and juice in a small bowl. Season well. 4 Add the mayonnaise mixture, half the sausage and two-thirds of the dill mixture to the potatoes. Toss gently to combine. Transfer potato mixture to a serving plate. Top with the eggs and remaining sausage. Sprinkle with the remaining dill mixture to serve.

“The first potato salad recipe advised they be ‘boyled and eaten with oyle, vinegar and pepper’.”

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i sher et hit

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raspberry sherbet mille-feuille serves

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tahitian lime cheesecakes with ginger crumb serves

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lit whi serve

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milo & coco pop parfaits serves

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weekend

mini fairy floss pavlovas

makes 8 | prep 20 mins

250ml (1 cup) thickened cream 150g mascarpone 2 tbs icing sugar 2 drops rosewater 8 store-bought mini pavlovas 150g Turkish delight, chopped

1 pomegranate, seeds removed (or seeds sold in packets at the chilled fruit and vegie section at the supermarket) 55g (1 ⁄ 3 cup) pistachios, coarsely chopped Pink fairy floss, to serve

1 Use electric beaters to beat cream, mascarpone and icing sugar until soft peaks form. Add rosewater and beat quickly to combine. 2 Place pavlovas on a serving platter. Divide the rosewater cream mixture among the pavlovas. Arrange Turkish delight, pomegranate seeds and pistachio over the cream. Top with the fairy floss.

Our fabulous new cookbook! On sale 9 Jan The living really is easy this summer with our new favourites Summertime cookbook. It’s packed with cool seasonal starters, mains, sides and desserts. Find it at supermarkets and newsagencies for $9.99.

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layered lamington ice-cream cake serves 8 | prep 20 mins (+ 4 hours freezing time) | cooking 5 mins 1.5L raspberry ripple ice-cream (see tip) 460g pkt round double sponge cake, unfilled 3 tbs raspberry jam 200g dark chocolate, coarsely chopped 185ml (3 ⁄4 cup) thickened cream 35g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) flaked coconut

1 Spoon ice-cream into a large bowl. Set aside for 15 minutes or until softened slightly but not melted. Use a large serrated knife to carefully cut each cake in half horizontally. Line the plastic container lid from the sponge packaging or a deep, round 17cm (base measurement) cake pan with plastic wrap, allowing the edges to overhang. 2 Place 1 cake layer in prepared pan. Top with one-third of the ice-cream, pressing down with the back of a spoon to cover cake. Make indentations in the ice-cream. Dot with one-third of the jam. Repeat with two more layers of cake, ice-cream and jam. Top with remaining cake. Fold plastic wrap over top. Place cake in the freezer for 4 hours or until firm. 3 Combine the chocolate and cream in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on Medium, in 1 minute bursts, stirring, until smooth. Set aside for 15 minutes or until cooled slightly. 4 Carefully remove the cake from the pan and place on a serving plate. Spoon over ganache, allowing it to drip down the sides. Sprinkle with the coconut. Serve immediately.

top tip! If you can’t find raspberry ripple ice-cream, mash up some fresh raspberries and stir through softened vanilla ice-cream instead.


know how creative ideas

cheesy-mite PRETZELS

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make the perfect

aussie PAVLOVA

We’ve advanced Australian fare with this pavlova, featuring a surprise Tim Tam crunch.

You can’t go wrong with a pavlova when entertaining. This one is pure decadence, studded with Tim Tams that soften into chewy, fudgy mouthfuls. Michelle Southan

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know how

“I’ve topped the pavlovas with a rich chocolate ganache and whipped cream. The fresh raspberries help to cut through all the sweetness.” January/February 2017

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’ll n

‌

cream

tim tams

vanilla extract

caster sugar

cream egg whites

cornflour

dark cooking chocolate cream of tartar

raspberries white butter

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let’s go! tim tam pavlova serves 10 | prep 30 mins (+ cooling time) | cooking 1 hour 30 mins → 1 tsp white vinegar → 2 tsp vanilla extract → 150g dark cooking chocolate, finely chopped → 30g unsalted butter, chopped

→ 300ml ctn thickened cream, plus 185ml (3 ⁄4 cup), extra → 300ml ctn double cream → 2 x 125g punnets fresh raspberries

1

2

3

4

5

6

RECIPE & WORDS MICHELLE SOUTHAN PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING MICHELLE NOERIANTO FOOD PREPARATION LUCY BUSUTTIL

→ → → → →

200g pkt Arnott’s Original Tim Tam 8 egg whites, at room temperature Pinch of cream of tartar 430g (2 cups) caster sugar 1 tbs cornflour

Preheat the oven to 150°C/130°C fan forced. Using the base of a cake pan (or other round 20cm cookware) as a guide, draw a 20cm circle on each of 2 pieces of baking paper. Place each piece of paper, marked side down, on a baking tray.

Divide meringue between marked circles. Shape meringue and create furrows up the sides. Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce oven to 110°C/90°C fan forced. Bake for 1 hour 15 minutes or until crisp. Turn oven off. Cool completely in oven (door closed).

Use a long sharp knife to slice 3 of the Tim Tams in half diagonally and reserve. Roughly chop the remaining Tim Tams into 1cm pieces and place in a bowl, along with any crumbs on the chopping board. Set aside.

Put chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl. Heat extra cream in a saucepan until almost boiling. Pour over the chocolate and butter. Set aside for 5 minutes. Stir until melted. Beat the creams and remaining vanilla in a bowl until firm peaks form.

Beat egg whites and cream of tartar in a bowl until firm peaks form. Add sugar, 1 tbs at a time, beating constantly until sugar dissolves and mixture is thick and glossy. Beat in cornflour, vinegar and 1 tsp vanilla. Fold in chopped Tim Tam until just combined.

Divide ganache between pavlovas. Spread to cover, dripping over sides. Set aside for 10 minutes to set. Top 1 pavlova with half the cream and half the raspberries. Place remaining pavlova on top. Top with remaining cream, raspberries and reserved Tim Tams.

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know how

10aussie pavlova top tips for the perfect

Before you start, make sure your equipment is clean and dry. Don’t use plastic bowls as they retain moisture, which prevents egg white aerating properly.

1 2 3 4 5

Remove eggs from fridge 20 minutes before using to bring to room temperature. Cold eggs won’t hold as much air, which is essential for a light, fluffy meringue. Don’t allow any egg yolk to spill into the egg white – the tiniest bit can inhibit aeration, which can prevent your meringue increasing in volume. Keep out any traces of water or fat, such as oil or butter – these also prevent egg whites from producing good volume.

Beat the egg whites until firm peaks form. Don’t overbeat the mixture at this stage or your pavlova may crack and collapse.

Use fine sugar, such as caster, instead of granulated white sugar, which takes longer to dissolve and may cause you to overbeat the meringue.

6 7 8 9 10

Ensure the sugar has fully dissolved. Rub mixture between your fingers to test. Undissolved sugar can cause pavlovas to ‘weep’ (liquid forms on the crust). Stop beating as soon as all the sugar is dissolved. Overbeating can produce cracks around the edges of the pavlova and cause it to collapse.

Adding cornflour and vinegar to the meringue mixture helps to create a soft marshmallow centre and crisp crust on your pavlova. Its best to make pavlova (and meringues) when the humidity is low, because moisture in the air can affect the mixture’s texture and stiffness.

li ht an lu

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weet

hearts RECIPES ELISE STRACHAN PHOTOGRAPHY LAUREN BAMFORD THIS IS AN EDITED EXTRACT FROM SWEET! CELEBRATIONS BY ELISE STRACHAN (MURDOCH BOOKS,$39.99).

mud cake from our exclusive preview of the new book Sweet! Celebrations by online sensation Elise Strachan of My Cupcake Addiction.

mosaic heart cake

see page 89

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heart hearts

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know how

mosaic heart cake

makes one 8 layer cake

2 batches Dark Chocolate Ganache (see page 91) 2 batches Rich Chocolate Mud Cake batter (see page 91) 20cm cake board 13cm thin cake board

100g milk chocolate cup red M&M’s Minis 450g brown M&M’s, approximately 280g red M&M’s, approximately

1 ⁄2

1 Make ganache. Cool at room temperature to spreading consistency. 2 Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Grease and flour

4 round 15 x 7.5cm cake pans. Line bases with baking paper. (If you only have 2 pans, do in 2 batches. Do not mix up the second batch of batter until you’re ready to bake the second set of cakes.) 3 Make cake batter. Scrape into prepared pans. Bake until a skewer inserted in centre of cakes comes out clean, about 45-55 minutes. 4 Cool in the pans for 15 minutes. Run a flat-bladed knife around the edge of each cake. Turn onto wire racks to cool completely. 5 Level the cakes and carve away any browned edges using a bread knife and a steady hand (or a cake leveller for more precise results), then slice each cake horizontally in half for a total of eight layers. Place a small amount of ganache on the 20cm cake board to hold your cake in place. Place one cake layer in the centre of the board. Place a small amount of ganache on the top of the cake layer and use an offset spatula to spread it in a back-and-forth motion to create a very thin layer that will catch any crumbs. Then, apply a generous amount of ganache and spread it across the cake layer, letting it protrude slightly over the edges of the cake layers. At the fourth layer, add six supports (I use either fat straws or dowels). Insert the first support into the centre of the top cake layer, pushing down until it hits the board. Then, add remaining supports spaced evenly in a circle around the centre, cutting them so they are in line with the top cake layer. Place

the 13cm cake board on top, add a small amount of ganache and start layering the upper half of the cake as before. 6 Use an offset spatula to apply a very thin coat of ganache to the outside walls and top of your cake, firmly working the spatula back and forth, allowing the ganache to fill in any gaps between the layers and catch any stray crumbs. (This is called the crumb coat.) Place in fridge for 20 minutes to set crumb coat. Then, apply a generous layer of ganache – more than you think you’ll need – and distribute it evenly around sides and top. Drag a ruler or scraper around outside of cake to leave a smooth, flat, seamless surface. Repeat to level the ganache on the top of the cake. 7 Draw a love heart on a piece of card, 8cm long down the centre (from the ‘v’ to the tip) and 12.3cm at the widest point, and cut out. Trace 9 hearts onto sheets of baking paper and cut out 8 of them. Leave the sheet with the last heart uncut and sitting on top of the template – this will be the topper. 8 Melt chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Transfer to a snap-lock bag, cutting off a small corner to make a fine tip. Place a wooden skewer at bottom point of the topper heart template, positioning it about halfway up. Pipe outline of heart with melted chocolate (go over skewer). Leave to set. 9 Pipe thick lines of melted chocolate across the heart, affixing rows of red M&M’s Minis until the whole heart is covered. 10 Stick 8 paper hearts evenly around the outside of the cake. Start at the bottom of the cake and line up brown M&M’s in even rows (ensure the ‘M’ isn’t showing). Any time you encounter a heart, peel back the paper a little and place red M&M’s in its place, keeping the lines straight. Feel free to add a little more ganache to the top of the cake before adding the final row. 11 Once set, remove the heart topper from the paper. Trim the skewer to size and insert the chocolate heart on top of the cake.

step- -step ecorations

1

Pipe melted chocolate over the outline of the reserved topper heart, making sure to go over the wooden skewer.

2

Pipe thick lines of melted chocolate across the heart. Affix rows of red M&M’s Minis until the whole heart is covered.

3

Stick 8 paper hearts evenly around the outside of the cake – the ganache will help hold them in place.

4

Any time you encounter a heart, peel back the paper a little and place red M&M’s in its place, keeping the lines straight.

January/February 2017

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u ch c centre

rich chocolate mud cake

This is a great crafternoon project, for a wedding, birthday party, anniversary or Valentine’s Day. You can carry the heart theme through to other decorations, too.

dark chocolate ganache

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know how

The mud cake for the mosaic heart cake can also be made into one large cake or cupcakes. Chocolate ganache is used to hold the M&M’s in place.

rich chocolate mud cake

dark chocolate ganache

makes one 23cm round cake or 28 cupcakes

makes 750g

250g salted butter 180ml water 8 tsp instant coffee 250g dark or milk chocolate, chopped or broken 150g plain flour, sifted 150g self-raising flour, sifted

500g caster sugar 60g unsweetened cocoa powder 1 ⁄ 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda 5 extra-large eggs, lightly beaten (room temperature is best) 125ml buttermilk 3 1 ⁄ 2 tbs vegetable oil

1 Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan forced. Grease and flour a round 23 x 7.5cm cake pan. Line the base with baking paper. (Or, to make cupcakes, line 28 muffin pan holes with paper cases.) 2 Combine the butter, water and coffee in a saucepan over medium heat until the mixture comes to a slow boil. Remove from the heat and add the chocolate, stirring until it’s completely melted. Set aside to cool to room temperature. 3 In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, sugar, cocoa and bicarb and make a well in the centre. 4 Pour in the eggs, buttermilk, oil and cooled chocolate mixture. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until there are no lumps. 5 Pour the batter into the prepared pan (or muffin holes, filling each about two-thirds full). Bake the cake until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean, about 50-60 minutes, and completely cool in the tin before removing. Bake the cupcakes for 20-24 minutes, until the centre of a cupcake springs back when touched. Check cupcakes first at 18 minutes and then each minute thereafter. Transfer the cupcakes to wire racks to cool.

Sweet! Celebrations by Elise Strachan is published by Murdoch Books, $39.99. Available in good bookstores and online.

300ml pouring cream 600g dark chocolate, chopped

1 Microwave method: Place the cream and chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave on High in 1-minute intervals, stirring for 2 minutes in between, until there are no lumps. This should take 2-3 minutes maximum. 2 Stovetop method: Bring the cream to a rolling boil in a small saucepan (this means a boil with bubbles all over the surface, not just around the edges). Remove from the heat and add the chocolate, stirring until there are no lumps.

workin with anache

For pouring and dipping, use the ganache while it’s still warm. Don’t be afraid to dip marshmallows and strawberries into freshly warmed ganache – it’s delicious. For a whipped, fluffy frosting (when a piping consistency is needed), wait until the ganache reaches room temperature and then beat on high speed using an electric mixer until the ganache lightens in colour and becomes a thick and spoonable consistency. For a spreadable consistency (ideal for layering large cakes, covering cakes and for use under fondant), allow the ganache to cool at room temperature for 6-8 hours before use. (Try to at least frost your cake before you commence eating ganache straight from the bowl.) To store, cover the ganache with plastic wrap and make sure that the wrap touches the surface of the chocolate. If the ganache starts to set too quickly, you can use a hair dryer on low to gently warm it up again. This will return the ganache to a workable consistency. One heaped tablespoon of room-temperature ganache folded into 1 cup of whipped cream makes an amazing chocolate mousse.

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avocados versatile fruit

more online

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e s in av cu s baked avocado eggs serves

prep

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2

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fudgy avocado brownies makes

prep

cooking

2 3

Avocado makes these brownies really fudgy and not so naughty! 96

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avocado & salmon rice bowl serves

prep

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3 4 1 2 5

si le sushi sala

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know how

Q&A

we’re here to help Each month we ask our foodies for their

expert tips and ideas for our kitchen queries.

Michelle

Katrina

Marion

Chrissy

Matt

Q Do you have an

Q What are some

Q What’s your go-to

Q How can I easily

Q What’s your

easy cheat for hungry kids over the holidays? I try to make kids’ snacks a touch healthy, but most of all fun, and these ideas always work a treat on my son’s playdates. Microwave popcorn is a winner, so I usually have a pack in the cupboard. I turn it into a tasty trail mix by tossing it with pretzels and choc-coated cranberries. You could also add cereal, mini biscuits or perhaps some marshmallows. Apple sandwiches are great, too; core apples, then cut into 1cm-thick slices to make rings. Spread with your child’s favourite spread, such as peanut butter, Nutella or cream cheese. Sprinkle with dried fruit, coconut or toasted muesli. Top with another apple ring and sandwich together.

simple barbecue sides? When I’m having a barbie, I like to keep things as easy as possible by cooking the side dishes on the barbecue, too. A simple favourite of mine is grilled zucchini slices dressed with extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice and torn fresh mint leaves. This is perfect with grilled chicken or fish. For lamb, I love to grill slices of eggplant and red onion until lightly charred, then toss them with a can of drained chickpeas and fresh herbs, and finish it off with a tahini-style dressing. And for beef, my perfect side is barbecued mushrooms and asparagus spears tossed with either cooked French-style lentils or brown rice, and dressed with a tangy lemon and mustard vinaigrette.

salad dressing for summertime? My go-to sauce for summer is a Vietnamese nuoc cham. This is traditionally a dipping sauce, but it also makes a super-tasty salad dressing. Whipping up a batch of this versatile sauce couldn’t be easier – it’s equal parts water, sugar, rice vinegar and fish sauce, with a squeeze of lime juice. Add as much or as little chopped fresh chilli and garlic as you like. Shake it all up in a jar and you’ve got the perfect dipping sauce or dressing for summer entertaining. Serve it with rice paper rolls or crumbed prawns, or pour it over coleslaws, green salads and noodle dishes.

supercharge my breakfast? A crunchy seed and nut mix to sprinkle over porridge, yoghurt or smoothies delivers extra protein and a good dose of healthy fatty acids. Plus lots of crunch and flavour! Spread a mixture of sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, cinnamon, chopped almonds and pepitas (or whatever combo you like) over a baking tray and bake in a moderate oven for 5-10 minutes or until lightly toasted. Once cool, stir through a spoonful of cacao and/or maca powder.

favourite slushie combination? I keep coming back to one of my first slushie recipes – a take on a dark and stormy cocktail. Freeze 750ml ginger beer in a container. Grate a large knob of ginger and squeeze the juice into a jug. Mix in 1 tbs caster sugar. Freeze this in a small shallow container. Blitz chunks of frozen ginger beer with lime juice. Garnish with shards of ginger ice. For an adults-only version, blitz the frozen ginger beer with 120ml dark rum. Pour into 4 glasses. Add 30ml rum to each. Garnish with a lime cheek and ginger ice.

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crunchy

need a little help?

If you have a question for one of our foodies, send it to tastemag@ news.com.au


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Discover the Freedom Foods range in the health food aisle at major supermarkets. For more details, visit freedomfoods.com.au


tastelife food meets life

more online

KITCHEN crops

January/February 2017

101


l ve ur ve

health revolution 2017

Start the year well, armed with our Health Council membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annual wrap-up of the latest in science and nutrition from the newest studies. Plus, they share the one habit that will be your game changer. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to your best year ever! 102

taste magazine January/February 2017


taste life

Change your exercise mindset and you’ll eat better

Plant-based diets could be the key to a longer life

Dr Kym Guelfi

Associate Professor Tim Crowe

the stu

It’s not really a study, but what I’ve been reading a lot about in 2016 are areas of the world called Blue Zones. The term was coined by researchers who were looking at specific regions where people lived long lives – the name came from the blue line they drew around these areas. Research found that the diets of these people were quite diverse, without one miracle superfood, however the common theme was that their diets are mostly plant-based.

take ut

Take a leaf, so to speak, from the Blue Zones and choose to eat a more plant-based diet, limiting processed foods.

ne ha it

r 2017

the stu

We all know the benefits of regular exercise. But, thanks to recent research from The University of Western Australia, we now have evidence to suggest that the way we go about exercise also affects our food choices afterwards. If you exercise on your own terms because you either choose to or you enjoy it, you may be less likely to eat unhealthy foods in the hours that follow, compared with exercise done because you’ve been made to, or you feel you have to.

take ut

Reward yourself by doing exercise you enjoy and you’ll be less likely to look for unhealthy food ‘rewards’ after.

ne ha it

Sit less, move more! Moving more throughout the day can help control your weight, strengthen muscles and bones, and decrease your risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.

ASSOC. PROF. TIM CROWE, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at Deakin University.

DR KYM GUELFI, senior lecturer, School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health at The University of Western Australia.

hat ke

acts have u learne a ut health eatin in the ast ear hat’s the ne ha it that c ul chan e ur health in 2017 Improve brain function with the Mediterranean diet

Variety really is the spice of life for a healthy diet

Professor Catherine Itsiopoulos

Professor Clare Collins

the stu

the stu

take ut

take ut

Recent studies show that greater diversity within the healthy foods you eat will result in better health. Eating a wide range of healthy foods has been associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome and greater success in reducing weight and waist circumference. In a UK study of more than 23,000 people over a 10-year period, those who consumed the biggest variety of healthy foods had a 30 per cent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

ILLUSTRATION KAT CHADWICK

r 2017

Eat foods that expire quickly. Most foods that expire quickly are generally good for us (because they don’t have preservatives to make them last longer), including all fruit and vegetables, then, if you want, fresh meat, chicken or fish (not processed meats).

Eat more variety in all the healthy food groups (dairy products; fruits and vegetables; meat; and grains). Rather than eating more of one vegie, choose different colours and types.

ne ha it

r 2017

Add a fruit or vegie you haven’t eaten during the past two weeks to your shopping trolley. Do this for fresh herbs and spices, too. PROF. CLARE COLLINS, Senior Research Fellow, School of Health Sciences (Nutrition and Dietetics) at The University of Newcastle.

A number of studies released in 2016 show that a Mediterranean-style diet improves brain volume, which has an impact on perception and memory. An Australian study of older people showed that over a period of five years, those that were eating a healthy diet (in line with a Mediterranean-style diet) had retained their brain volume more than those who ate a poor diet. It’s thought that if you have more brain volume retention, you have better brain function.

A mostly plant-based diet, with lots of legumes and small amounts of fish, and occasionally meat, can help improve brain function.

ne ha it

r 2017

Boost the omega-3 fats in your diet by including plenty of ‘good’ oils, oily fish, shellfish, leafy greens, bitter greens, walnuts, seeds, free-range eggs and meats. Also algae and seaweed, so dig into miso soup and nori rolls. PROF. CATHERINE ITSIOPOULOS, Head of School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering at La Trobe University. January/February 2017

taste magazine 103


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RECIPES CHRISSY FREER PHOTOGRAPHY GUY BAILEY STYLING SARAH Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BRIEN FOOD PREPARATION MIRANDA PAYNE

taste life

day 7 ealth litz

2017 Your fresh and healthy new year starts here! January/February 2017

taste magazine 105


day 7 ealth litz for food lovers

2017

oin our tast 7- a

ealth

litz

New ear New ou

JUST

1200

cal ries A DAY

Our 7-day Health Blitz is one of our most popular features each year, which is no surprise as it really gets results. Taste nutritionist Chrissy Freer has done all the hard work for you, creating an easy, nutritionally balanced and budget-friendly meal plan for lovers of good food – condensed into one energising, calorie-busting week. So come and join us; your new year health transformation starts now!

HOW IT WORKS Chrissy’s clever meal plan gives you just what you need, delivering the right number of calories for safe weight loss (around 1200 per day).

GET MOVING Increase your

A Health Blitz day consists of three main meals, two snacks and a bonus sweet treat. Don’t be tempted to skip the snacks, as they’re essential to prevent you from potentially overeating later in the day.

BUDDY UP Get support – invite a

Use the handy meal planner, opposite, to map out your day. You can mix and match the snacks and meals, but keep in mind that Chrissy has balanced each day with specific food combos to maximise energy and nutrition. Balanced daily nutrition means you meet all your nutrient requirements, helping you maintain good energy levels throughout the day. It’s designed for food lovers like you, focusing on real whole foods, rather than diet or low-fat foods. Whole foods tend to be naturally higher in dietary fibre and contain good fats, to help you feel fuller for longer and to reduce cravings.

➻ 106

teps to success daily steps. If you have a pedometer, aim for at least 10,000 steps per day.

friend to do the meal plan with you.

STAY HYDRATED Aim for eight

glasses of water per day. For flavour, add fresh lemon, lime, mint leaves or ginger. Herbal teas also count!

SKIP the sugary drinks and alcohol, as they will add extra calories. LIMIT caffeinated drinks to one coffee or tea per day with just a dash of milk, and skip the sugar. SWAP your sweet treat with a small glass of wine on just one day, if you like. RELAX! If you slip up, don’t throw in the towel. Simply get back on track with the next meal.

healthy meals share your health blitz keep it Forformore food lovers, go to Join our new year health revolution and snap and share going taste.com.au/lowcaldinners your healthy creations with us at #tastehealthblitz

taste magazine January/February 2017


taste life

Tamari roasted almonds 123 Cals

Hot chocolate 147 Cals

Quick blueberry smoothie 140 Cals

Carrot sticks + hummus 94 Cals

Diced mango + passionfruit + natural yoghurt 121 Cals

Cheese + carrot & celery sticks 132 Cals

Popcorn + mandarin

69 Cals

Vanilla ice cream 83 Cals

Hard boiled egg + multigrain corn thins 111 Cals

Natural yoghurt + honey + cinnamon

140 Cals

Medjool dates 133 Cals

Cheddar cheese 119 Cals

Peach + almonds 132 Cals

Frozen yoghurt 83 Cals

Small flat white 108 Cals

Apple + cottage cheese + cinnamon 128 Cals

Berry fruit salad 105 Cals

DAY 6 DAY 7

Multigrain corn thin + cheese + tomato

124 Cals

Natural yoghurt + blueberries

103 Cals

January/February 2017

Dark chocolate 130 Cals

taste magazine 107

TOTAL 1211 Cals

Natural yoghurt + sliced strawberries 129 Cals

TOTAL 1222 Cals

sweet treat

TOTAL 1208 Cals

dinner

TOTAL 1210 Cals

snack

TOTAL 1197 Cals

lunch

TOTAL 1201 Cals

snack

DAY 5

DAY 4

DAY 3

DAY 2

DAY 1

breakfast

meal planner

TOTAL 1179 Cals

7-


day1

summer greens, tomato & basil frittata serves

sourdough with nut butter, banana & blueberries serves

prep

prep

cooking

ast an illin 1

cooking

3

1

4 NOTE:

108

luten ree ave


sumac chicken with chickpeas & baba ghanoush serves

prep

cooking

3 1 4 2

eas a il eal 109


day2 frittata wrap with rocket & relish serves

prep

quinoa, chickpea & salmon salad with pepitas serves

1

1 2

use it u wra 110

prep

su er st sala


taste life

rea in 30 ins

spicy pork meatballs with carrot & coriander salad serves

prep

cooking

1

2 3

4

111


day3 c l err lit acke with ir n roast beef, mustard cream serves

antioxidant-boosting smoothie serves 1 | prep 5 mins 60g (1 ⁄ 2 cup) frozen berries (such as raspberries or blueberries) 1 ⁄ 2 small banana, sliced 250ml (1 cup) reduced-fat milk 2 tbs rolled oats 2 tsp LSA mix 15g baby spinach leaves

1 Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. PER SERVE • 15g protein • 8g fat (3g saturated fat) • 35g carb • 9g dietary fibre • 288 Cals (1202kJ)

112

1

prep


l w at asta

wholemeal pasta with broccoli, chilli & kale pesto serves

prep

cooking

2 3 4

1

113


day4 overnight raspberry, chia & quinoa pots serves

prep

lunch x le en 1

chicken, watercress & roasted capsicum sandwich

2

serves

1 2

ake ahea rekk

114

prep


grilled tofu with rice, greens & chilli sesame dressing serves prep cooking

heart ve ain

1

2 3

4

5

115


day5 spicy avocado muffin with ham & spinach serves

prep

cooking

s ee sushi sala

1

vegie sushi bowl serves

1

s ic av s ash 116

prep


piri piri fish with charred corn salad serves

prep

cooking

new ar ie sta le

2

3 4

1

117


day6 l w at i a

roasted sweet potato with poached egg & garlic kale serves

prep

cooking

2

smoked salmon & pesto pizza serves

3 1

ca e st le rekk

1

2

118

prep

cooking


resh citrus tan

lime & lemongrass chicken lettuce wraps serves prep cooking

2 3

4

1

119


day7 white bean pancakes with strawberries & passionfruit serves prep cooking

eas ve atties

sweet potato & lentil patties with tzatziki serves

1 2

1

clever ancake twist

120

2 3

prep

cooking


serves

prep

cooking

1

3

2 4

nl 270 cals

121


find it

LOVEIT Discover the latest products and supermarket treasures.

EATING

BAR SNACKS

First in our new series on great foods to keep in your desk drawer for eating ‘al desko’ when hunger strikes, are these gluten-free Savoury Nut Bars by Thankyou, $3. Made with better-for-you faba beans and chickpeas, big on nuts and seeds, and with grown-up flavours including Mexican Chipotle and Lime & Black Pepper, your snack o’clock is sorted! There’s a feel-good factor, too – 100 per cent of the profits from Thankyou products are donated to food, health and water programs. To find out more, visit thankyou.co

ee the est!

oh, hone ! Sweeten up your digestive system with the new Capilano Beeotic Prebiotic Honey, $7.99. Made from 100 per cent Australian honey, it is the world’s first clinically tested prebiotic honey. Just a tablespoon a day can help improve the ratio of good to bad bacteria in your gut and boost your digestive health. Find it in major supermarkets.

122

taste magazine January/February 2017

s r ut ur wn

Lack a green thumb? You won’t need it with a GEFU Sprouting Jar, $59.95. Grow your own alfalfa sprouts, mung beans or broccoli sprouts in this miniature greenhouse, fitted with smart ventilation to give sprouts room to breathe. Go to page 101 for our quick grow guide and you’ll be harvesting by the end of the week. Get yours from Myer.


taste life

top drops

s ueeze me Added sugars have become the norm in most snacks for children, so it’s great to finally see a kid-friendly squeezy yoghurt that really lives up to its ‘all natural’ tag. Tamar Valley Dairy Kids All Natural Greek Yoghurt pouches, $1.69, contain half a serve of dairy per pouch and (hooray!) no added sugar. Choose from Strawberry, Vanilla or Tropical – perfect for lunch boxes and an on-the-go snack. Find them in supermarkets.

Drinks editor Jane Thomson picks three top tipples to drink to your health. Artwine Prosecco 2016 $25 Prosecco is lower in alcohol than many other wines, and this example is a first from the Adelaide Hills. It’s fresh, vibrant and laced with lemon and pear.

ive it a twirl

COMPILED BY STEPHANIE HUA. ALL PRICES ARE APPROXIMATE AND A GUIDE ONLY.

TOP IT OFF

Revisit childhood DIY dessert classics like the banana split or ice-cream sundae with a sprinkling of Lucky’s new Topperz, $5.49. Just shake and create with your choice of two flavour combos, Peanuts & Choc Peanuts and Peanuts & Almonds. Find them in the toppings aisle at Coles.

Ink Gin $79.99 (700ml)

shake thin s u

oo les les

Gin has virtually no sugar and is low-cal, so you can start the evening right! This pretty, purple Aussie gin is infused with rainforest botanicals.

Angove Warboys Vineyard Shiraz 2015 $44 From an organic, biodynamic vineyard with some of McLaren Vale’s oldest vines, this is worth splurging on. It hasn’t been refined or filtered.

Vegie noodles are hitting the mainstream, with Woolworths Simply Steam Zucchini Spaghetti, $3, now available at select stores. Just heat and eat, no spiraliser needed. Serve in a salad, lightly stir-fried or tossed with sauce – for a great midweek recipe, see page 34. January/February 2017

taste magazine 123


aisle watch

We ate it. We rate it.

Our monthly guide to the supermarket gems down every aisle.

he nutrition panels have been deciphered, the numbers have been crunched and the results are in. This month,

hi her r tein

l wer su ar

we’ve been hunting around the breakfast cereal aisle to bring you our top five better-for-you choices for muesli. The only question left is what milk to serve it with?

Dorset Cereals Fabulous High Fibre Muesli, $8.29 With a whopping

10.8g of fibre per 100g, this fruit-packed muesli should help keep your digestive system healthy.

hi h re

Be Natural Coco-Nutty Granola Coconut, Almond, Spelt & Cinnamon, $5.99 Start the day with

With just 5.6g of sugar per 100g, this is our go-to choice for a breakfast that’s low

a protein boost with this wholegrain granola, at 11.2g protein per 100g.

luten ree

Date & Almond Muesli, $3.75

Freedom Foods Crafted Blends Muesli with Nuts,

This low-cost muesli came out on top for being lower in calories, at just 375 Cals per 100g.

$6.99 Highly rated by our resident coeliac, this blend of muesli, nuts and fruit is the perfect GF alternative. It tastes delicious, too.

ere’s w at else we t ou t… Budget Friendly

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taste magazine January/February 2017

Snackalicious

Natural Ingredients

PRICES ARE CORRECT AT TIME OF PUBLISHING.

l wer cal ries

Freedom Foods Muesli Ancient Grains, $5.49


taste life

win it!

1

CHECK OUT THIS MONTH’S GREAT GIVEAWAYS! For entry details, visit us on Facebook or go to taste.com.au/win

1

t win!

t win!

go-go gadget just beat it The closest thing to having Adriano Zumbo on hand to help you with your baking, the Sunbeam Zumbo Limited Edition Planetary Mixmaster, valued at $599, is more than just a pretty machine. New features include a super-scraper whisk that incorporates more air (hello, perfect pavlova!), a timer with pause button and a specially designed beater that combines ingredients and scrapes down the bowl at the same time. Choose from Pink Marshmallow, Magenta or V8 Vanilla. For more info, go to sunbeam.com.au/zumbo

If you’re a big blender, you’ll want to spend a little time with this Smeg prize pack, valued at $348. The pack includes a Smeg Blender, with a sleek retro look, powerful 800watt motor and smooth-start and ice-crush functions. Plus, you’ll get a new Bottle To Go, which can be used instead of the standard jug to blend smoothies, juices and soups. Screw on the cap and you’re good to go. For more info, visit smeg.com.au

t

1win!

set for life We know a good cook never blames their tools, but we also know that quality saucepans really do give a better result. We love Scanpan’s Impact 5-piece cookware set, $549, made of high-quality stainless steel with heavy bases to ensure food cooks evenly. Tempered glass lids make tracking progress easy, too. The set includes two saucepans, a casserole dish with lid, frying pan and steamer, and can be used with all energy sources. Go to tableking.com.au January/February 2017

taste magazine 125


taste life

healthy

showdown

Louise Keats chooses the healthier options in our monthly food and drink battle.

buckwheat flour

vs

vs

Buckwheat flour has over twice the iron and calcium of regular plain flour, plus three times the folate and vitamin B3, five times the vitamin E, six times the zinc and seven times the magnesium. It also has fewer calories. Try wholemeal flour instead of regular plain flour – wholemeal has three times the fibre and is closer to buckwheat in its nutrient profile. Or, you can combine plain and buckwheat flours for a healthier baking blend. winner: buckwheat flour

Canned baked beans are the brekky winner here. Gram for gram, cornflakes have four times the calories, twice the fat and less fibre. Baked beans have 20 times more calcium, about twice the potassium and selenium, and less than half the salt. But because cornflakes are typically fortified, they have ten times the iron, seven times the folate and more vitamins B1, B2 and B3. Go for salt-reduced beans or a low-sugar cornflake brand. winner: baked beans

vs

vs

A chocolate milk that’s made with cocoa and sugar typically has about 20 per cent fewer calories and 10 per cent less fat than one made with fortified choc-malt powder. However, the choc-malt version has almost eight times the iron, twice the vitamin A and 60 per cent more calcium, plus more vitamin B2 and protein. For the most natural option, try raw cacao and minimal sugar. winner: it’s a tie

Brands vary, but shredded wheatmeal biscuits tend to have about 20 per cent more calories and almost twice the fat of fruit-filled biscuits. They also have less potassium and more than twice the salt. However, wheatmeal biscuits also have twice the fibre and almost half the sugar of the fruit-filled biscuits. Ultimately, both of these biscuits should be regarded as treats. winner: it’s a tie

vs

vs

to their higher sugar content, but they’re redeemed by having twice the fibre, vitamin C and potassium, as well as over three times the calcium. Watermelon, on the other hand, has over seven times as much beta-carotene. Both these summer fruits make healthy snacks when enjoyed in moderation. winner: it’s a tie

Recipes vary, but quiche lorraine typically has over 35 per cent more calories and 25 per cent less protein than a regular hawaiian pizza. It also has almost three times the fat and half the fibre, as well as less calcium. So, pizza takes the prize here. Opt for a thin crust, which has fewer calories than thick. Or, make your own quiche using more eggs and less cream, with lean ham. winner: hawaiian pizza

126

taste magazine January/February 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES

plain flour


Tired *

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bake me

happy! Chinese New Year

chocolate-dipped fortune cookies makes prep cooking

1

2

4

5

130

Al wi l ll yo u co r me d r e tr a m ue s

3


YOUR BUDGETISSUE $2. 7 er serve luten ree

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.COM .AU

hinese

NEWYEAR Fabulous food for your celebratory feast.

7-pa e

FEATURE

These special C hinese New Year celebration dishes are per fect t o share with friends and family.


RECIPES ALISON ADAMS PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KRISTEN WILSON FOOD PREPARATION KERRIE RAY

a

hinese ew ear

y love of Chinese New Year started when I was a kid. Every year, our parents would take us to Chinatown to see the dragons and music, then we’d queue up at the Old Tai Yuen for a family dinner at Laminex tables. But it wasn’t until I was lucky enough to visit Hong Kong and China for Chinese New Year with a bunch of fellow foodies that the true meaning of this wonderful event was brought home to me. During a magical home-cooked feast at the apartment of our Hong Kong hostess, we learnt about many of the symbols and rich traditions that make this event so special, not just in China and Hong Kong, but across Asia. In Thailand, dumplings are popular as they resemble ancient gold ingots, while Malaysians share the Prosperity Toss Salad, where they toss salad ingredients together with chopsticks – the higher they’re tossed, the more luck is headed their way! That Hong Kong dinner was one of those meals you remember forever. For this menu, too, we’ve chosen dishes with symbolism, using favourite flavours and popular ingredients, such as pork belly and whole snapper. With this we wish you a year of luck, prosperity, happiness and plenty of great food!

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Chinese New Year begins on the 28th of January. This year will be the Year of the Rooster — the turn of the Fire Rooster to be exact (fire being one of the four elements). The rooster is said to be trustworthy, responsible and honest.

January/February 2017

taste magazine 136


Whole fish is associated with prosperity and abundance.

sichuan-braised fish see opposite page

135

taste magazine January/February 2017


sichuan-braised fish serves 6 (as part of a banquet) | prep 20 mins (+ 30 mins marinating time) | cooking 25 mins 1 (about 900g) whole snapper, cleaned, scaled 2 tbs shaoxing wine 3 tsp Lee Kum Kee Premium Soy Sauce 2 tsp cornflour Peanut oil, to deep-fry 1 tbs finely shredded fresh ginger 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 tbs Lee Kum Kee Chilli Bean Sauce 250ml (1 cup) chicken stock 1 tsp caster sugar 1 tsp chinkiang vinegar Green shallots, trimmed, sliced Steamed rice, to serve

1 Use a sharp knife to score both sides of the fish in a diamond pattern, taking care not to cut through to the backbone. Place the fish in a glass or ceramic dish and rub the inside and outside with shaoxing wine and some salt. Place the fish in the fridge for 30 minutes to marinate. 2 Combine the soy sauce and cornflour in a small bowl. Set aside. 3 Pour enough oil into a large wok to come one-third of the way up the side. Heat the wok over high heat until the oil is smoking. Remove the fish from the marinade and pat dry with paper towel. Gently slide fish into oil and cook for 2 minutes each side (be careful when turning). Carefully transfer to a serving dish. Allow the oil to cool slightly, then discard all but 2 tbs. 4 Return the wok to high heat. Add the ginger and garlic and cook for 1 minute or until aromatic. Add the chilli bean sauce and stir for 2 minutes. Add the stock. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes or until reduced slightly. Return the fish to the wok and simmer for 8 minutes or until cooked through. Carefully transfer the fish to a serving dish. Add the soy sauce mixture to the wok and simmer for 3 minutes or until thickened slightly. Add the sugar and vinegar. Pour hot sauce over fish and sprinkle with the shallot. Serve with rice.

The duck mixture is topped with crisp long noodles, which symbolise longevity.

duck in lettuce cups serves 6 (as part of a banquet) | prep 20 mins (+ 30 mins soaking time) | cooking 20 mins Peanut oil, to deep-fry, plus 1 tbs, extra 50g rice vermicelli noodles 2 (about 500g) duck breast fillets 1 iceberg lettuce, leaves separated 4 Jade Phoenix Whole Black Fungus 35g (1 ⁄4 cup) drained bamboo shoots 50g (1 ⁄4 cup) drained Valcom Water Chestnuts 1 tbs finely chopped fresh ginger

2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped Thinly sliced green shallot, to serve

sauce 60ml (1 ⁄4 cup) oyster sauce 1 1 ⁄ 2 tbs shaoxing wine 1 1 ⁄ 2 tsp Yeo’s Pure Sesame Oil 1 ½ tsp caster sugar Pinch of ground white pepper

1 Pour enough oil into a wok to come one-quarter of the way up the side. Heat over high heat until smoking. Cook noodles, in batches, for 20 seconds or until puffed. Transfer to a tray lined with paper towel. Set aside. Allow oil to cool slightly. Drain and wipe wok clean. 2 Return the wok to medium heat. Add the duck breasts, skin side down, and cook, turning once, for 16 minutes, until golden and cooked through. Transfer to a plate. Set aside to cool. Remove and discard skin. Finely chop the duck. Discard duck fat and wipe wok clean. 3 Meanwhile, place the lettuce leaves in a bowl of iced water. Set aside. Place mushrooms in a heatproof bowl. Cover with boiling water. Set aside for 30 minutes to soak. Drain. Trim and discard the stalks. Finely slice the mushrooms. 4 For the sauce, combine all the ingredients in a small bowl. Set aside. 5 Finely chop the bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Heat extra oil in wok over high heat. Stir-fry ginger and garlic until aromatic. Add the duck, mushroom, bamboo shoot and water chestnut. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the sauce. Stir-fry for 1 minute or until coated. Transfer to a bowl. Drain lettuce cups well. Serve with fried noodles, duck mixture and green shallot. January/February 2017

taste magazine 134


twice-cooked pork belly serves 6 (as part of a banquet) | prep 30 mins (+ overnight chilling time) | cooking 2 hours 55 mins 1.25kg piece pork belly Shredded green cabbage, to serve Thinly sliced fresh red chilli, to serve Fresh coriander leaves, to serve

braising liquid 1L (4 cups) water 250ml (1 cup) Yeoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dark Soy Sauce 250ml (1 cup) shaoxing wine 315g (1 1 â &#x201E; 2 cups) caster sugar 4 whole star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 3 thick slices ginger, skin on

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1 Starting from the thick end, roll up the pork belly firmly into a tight roll. Use unwaxed white kitchen string to tie the pork crossways at 2cm intervals. 2 Combine braising liquid ingredients in a large saucepan. Add pork. Bring to the boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and cook, partially covered, for 2 hours 30 minutes or until tender. Set aside to cool. Transfer pork to a plate. Pat dry. Cover and place in fridge overnight to chill. Strain braising stock into a bowl. Cover and place in fridge.

taste magazine January/February 2017

3 Skim the fat from the reserved braising stock and discard. Transfer stock to a saucepan and cook over medium heat for 20 minutes to reduce and thicken slightly. 4 Thickly slice the pork. Preheat a barbecue or chargrill pan on high. Cook pork for 2 minutes each side or until crisp and lightly charred. 5 Place the cabbage on a platter and top with the chargrilled pork. Sprinkle with the sliced chilli and coriander leaves.


CNY 2017



Taste - Feb 2017