Issuu on Google+

PURVEYORS OF FUNCTIONAL FITNESS

ROCK YOUR WORLD

The MARRIAGE of Climbing & CROSSFIT

FEEL the The BURN Science

Sweet Victory!

REEBOK

CROSSFIT Invitational RECAP

of Injuries

Meet the MobilityMaster

KELLY STARRETT JAN/FEB 2017 $5.99 sweatrxmag.com

Funky Thai

Jazz Up Your Meals


FIT RX

26 Strength

Tips to fix your feet which are your foundation.

28 Performance

The Science of Injuries and assessing the risk of high intensity training.

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Recover with Kelly Starrett

34 Health

Physical Activity and the Effects it has on Breast Cancer.

36 Nutrition

The Facts about Good Fats and Bad.

38 Mind

How to stay motivated when you are ready to quit.

41 Pro Talk

Jarett Perelmutter is all Business.

78

WOD Industry Recovery tools you need.

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COVER MODEL: Kelly Starrett PHOTOGRAPHER: Scott Brayshaw


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TRAINING

TOP RIGHT IMAGE: COURTESY OF CROSSFIT INC. MAIN PHOTO: SCOTT BRAYSHAW

72 GET A GRIP The marriage of climbing and CrossFit

66

SURGE OF AMBITION Meet teen crossfitter Lauren Facey

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FUEL

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

56 Funky Thai

Jazz up your meals with festive flavour.

45

Recap of the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Invitational

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Rep Your Box CrossFit Eminence in Colorado

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SWEATRXMAG.COM

FIND MORE OF YOUR FAVOURITE CONTENT ONLINE! PHOTOS, EVENTS, RECIPES, WODS AND MORE ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY.

COMMUNITY EVENT!

THE OPEN FIVE WEEKS

Registration for the Open begins Jan. 12, 2017 and the official 5 weeks of workouts starts on Feb. 23rd. The Open is the first stage of the CrossFit Games season and the largest community event of the year. Each year, this massive online competition has grown to the hundreds of thousands. Athletes of all levels come together to compete in this all-inclusive event. And new this year will be the inclusion of teenage athletes joining the fittest masters athletes, each taking up 20 spots at the games. A new competition division also introduced this year is the 35-39 masters division. CrossFit travels the globe during the worldwide Open to announce each workout at a new location every week. Immediately following the announcement, two athletes take on the workout and set the bar. Stay tuned to games.crossfit.com for the release of this year’s open announcement venues. 

SOCIAL MEDIA

SHOW US SOME LOVE!

Check us out on instagram! Follow along and stay informed about events, news, the latest issue and anything you may need to know inside and outside of your box! Show us some LOVE and ‘LIKE’ us on facebook. Follow us on twitter. We’ll keep you close to the content you love most! @sweatrxmag

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publisher’s note p “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” Wayne Dyer

T

HIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR WHEN CHANGE MAY BE ON YOUR MIND.

You are looking to kick some of the old useless habits to the curb and trade them in for some shiny new ones. You will do great things this year, and if you can make the changes you need to make, you will accomplish, achieve, surpass, and go beyond. Change is good but we know it’s not easy. We put together this issue with your need for change in mind. Kelly Starrett is a beacon of change. He pioneered the movement of performance-based physical therapy for the CrossFit community. Starrett put the importance of recovery on the radar for athletes of all levels. He changed the way we think about movement and mobility and made it accessible. Meet the MobilityWOD master, and see how he is championing change in the community. Our performance section gives you some insight on how you may want to change up your outlook on injuries and recovery. And we’ve got the facts on fats and

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cholesterol in our nutrition section, so that you can change how you fuel up. You’ll see a whole new side of eggs! We’ve even got help for you to change your mind when you think you’re ready to quit. We all recognize the greatness in our sport and we can see over the past decade, the changes that have been made to accommodate the growth and success. We have heard countless stories and testimonials on how CrossFit changes lives. This issue in our training section you’ll hear from a teen crossfitter, Lauren Facey, who found that CrossFit gave her confidence and the ability to see that she can conquer her challenges. It changed her for the better! Sometimes making change is not just about dropping a habit or doing something different, it’s about changing your mind. Being open to receive what you need to get where you want to go. Each of us struggles with making changes, in a very personal way, but we overcome limitations when we change our perspective. Change your thoughts, change your mind, change your life!

PHOTO: DAVE LAUS

Fred Antwi Publisher


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[ our contributors ] JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Fred Antwi fred@sweatrxmag.com

SCOTT BRAYSHAW Scott Brayshaw is definitely the creative type, working to make the world a better-looking place through photography, graphic design and multimedia. He is also a CrossFit Level 2 trainer coaching at CrossFit Eminence in Thornton, CO. He lives with his wife, two sons and their dog in Denver and you can find more of his work at www.BrayshawCreative.com (@brayshawcreative).

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dina Rich editor@sweatrxmag.com ART DIRECTOR Marco Túlio Grandi PRODUCTION MANAGER Sarah Lichtman COPY EDITOR Pamela Lee CONTRIBUTORS Scott Brayshaw, Lauren Facey, Michael Frazier, Cary Groner, Andrew Heffernan, Elizabeth Jarrard, Eryn Kirkwood, Andre Labbe, Melissa Mead, Darren Miller, Joe Peek, Jarett Perelmutter, Stephen Robinson, Jamie Shane, Grace Van Berkum, DaKari Williams MARKETING/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Debra Antwi debra@sweatrxmag.com SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

social@weatrxmag.com

REGIONAL CORRESPONDENT

DARREN MILLER

wodpress@sweatrxmag.com

SALES ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Darren Miller is a professional photographer and performer based in San Francisco. His artistic paths have led him to create imagery and performance art that evokes and captures people’s exuberant expression. Darren’s focus is to perceive and evoke creativity and vitality, and to record and reflect it. You can see his work at www.darrenmillerphoto.com

sales@sweatrxmag.com

While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, Sweat Equity Lifestyle Media Group cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for information purposes only. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editors. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission from the publisher.

OWNED AND PUBLISHED BY Sweat Equity Lifestyle Media Group 6-1500 Upper Middle Road West, #118 Oakville, Ontario, CANADA L6M 0C2 info@sweatrxmag.com SWEAT RX Magazine is published 6 times a year. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT

sales@sweatrxmag.com

Printed in Canada on paper from a sustainable source using vegetable-based inks.

MICHAEL FRAZIER Michael Frazier grew up in Southern California, where he is currently based. He is also the lead photographer and creative arts director for Legendary Competitor. You will typically find “Fraz” roaming around numerous fitness events working endlessly to capture that perfect moment of every competitor. www.fraziergraphix.com

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CONTACT US Readers are invited to contribute comments, views and photos. Article submissions and photography should be emailed to: info@sweatrxmag.com MODEL/PROFILE SUBMISSION If you’re interested in being considered for a model/trainer/instructor profile please submit details to: info@sweatrxmag.com SWEAT RX is an independent magazine with no affiliation with CrossFit, Inc nor is it endorsed by CrossFit, Inc or any of its subsidiaries. The views and opinions expressed in SWEAT RX Magazine are not those of CrossFit, Inc or its founders. CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit, Inc.


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gallery

Sharing the Intensity

“MY ABILITY

THAN MY

ATHLETE: DAVEY LIND PHOTOGRAPHER: WWW.FRAZIERGRAPHIX.COM

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W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

IS STRONGER DISABILITY.” THERESA SHERIDAN

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rx events

PUTTING THEIR NAME ON THE MAP Atlas Project

Atlas’s Project is on a mission! They are a passionate crew of crossfitters who have created a series of professional events with their sights set on building each one to be inclusive for the community, safe for the athlete and thrilling for the spectators. Mission accomplished! They want to grow the sport of CrossFit in the province of Quebec by crafting large, well-structured competitions that are accessible to everyone who is passionate and motivated to challenge their limits. Well that might not sound so special but what is unique, is their desire to want to help support the athletes financially by giving away cash! Sounds like a windfall but in addition to cha-ching thing, they are focused on building community, offering quality and consistency both with judging and with programming and they offer courses to prepare the team of help. For their first year, they produced 3 big events: the Atlas Qualifier, the Atlas PRO-AM and the Atlas Games.

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ATLAS QUALIFIER (OCTOBER 8-9TH 2016) For the first edition, there were 2 ways to participate. The Masters and the Teens were doing the online process and the scaled & RX individuals and teams were competing live at the Percival Molson Memorial Stadium in Montreal. The best “24 to 32” in each category were invited to the Atlas Games (The Final). Check out the prizing chart for the Qualifier 2016. Not often –or ever, that you’d seeing prizing going right down to 16th place. Sweet!

PHOTO: MAIN PHOTO: ROGER BAZINET; INSET PHOTO JASON KHALIPA: NEIL MOTA

MONTREAL QUALIFIER PRIZE PURSE POSITION

IND RX

IND INTER

TEAM RX

TEAM INTER

1

2 500.00 $

300.00 $

2 500.00 $

600.00 $

2

1 250.00 $

250.00 $

1 500.00 $

500.00 $

3

750.00 $

200.00 $

1 000.00 $

400.00 $

4

500.00 $

175.00 $

900.00 $

350.00 $

5

450.00 $

150.00 $

800.00 $

300.00 $

6

400.00 $

125.00 $

750.00 $

250.00 $

7

350.00 $

725.00 $

8

325.00 $

675.00 $

9

300.00 $

625.00 $

10

250.00 $

575.00 $

11

225.00 $

525.00 $

12

200.00 $

475.00 $

13

175.00 $

450.00 $

14

150.00 $

425.00 $

15

125.00 $

400.00 $

16

100.00 $

375.00 $

MOVING ON TO THE FINAL IN NOVEMBER

TOP 32 MEN

TOP 28 MEN

TOP 32 WOMEN

TOP 28 WOMEN

TOP 24 TEAMS

TOP 24 TEAMS

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rx events ATLAS PRO-AM (NOVEMBER 5TH 2016) This event was a private Gala style, friendly competition gathering together some of the best athletes in the world preceded by a full day of activities in collaboration with SWEAT RX Magazine, to raise money to support pediatric cancer research. During the day, Mike Lee from OPEX, Pro athlete Margaux Alvarez and celebrity Games athlete and businessman, Jason Khalipa gave 30 mins talks on the human side of training. In the afternoon, people could gather and perform a fundraiser WOD under the supervision of Jason Khalipa! And to cap off the incredible day, from 6pm-11pm, 2 teams coached by Jason Khalipa and Michele Letendre, where there to lead the main show featuring the best individuals RX (3 women and 4 men) from Atlas Qualifier and 9 pro athletes. (PROfessionals-AMateurs) Thanks to some generous sponsors, a silent auction managed to raise more than $7000 for the cause. The donations were shared between the Montreal Children’s Hospital and the CHU Sainte-Justine Foundation.

INDIVIDUAL SCALED WOMEN 1 - Léa Malo 2 - Rebecca Desrochers 3 - Annabelle Morin

INDIVIDUAL MASTER WOMEN 1 - Nathalie Connors 2 - Sue Durfy 3 - Jessica Glazer

Alexandre Caron, AlbertDominic Larouche, Alex Vigneault, Emmanuelle Blais, Carol- Ann Reason-Thibault, Chyna Cho, Jason Khalipa, Alexis Dufour, MarieÉmilie Perreault, Cédric Lapointe, Renaud Belisle, Sonia Hurtubise, Paul Tremblay, Michèle Letendre, Margaux Alvarez, Patrick Vellner, Camille Leblanc-Bazinet, Emily Abbott.

INDIVIDUAL SCALED MEN 1 - Martin D’Aoust 2 - Hugo Lauzon 3 - Marc-Antoine Roy

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INDIVIDUAL MASTER 40-48 MENS 1 - Nick Harbilas 2 - Jeff Adams 3 - Dave Roussel

INDIVIDUAL MASTER 49+ MENS 1 - Richard Cossette 2 - Eric Pepin 3 - Martin Tanguay


INDIVIDUAL RX MENS 1 - Patrick Vellner 2 - Alexandre Caron 3 - Nycolas Joyal

ATLAS GAMES (CLAUDE-ROBILLARD COMPLEX, NOVEMBER 25-26-27TH 2016) There were 16 lanes, making this likely the biggest rig in Canada! It was a really successful and thrilling finale. Every category was competing live during the 3 day Finale. There was no shortage of passion, determination, and hard work alll supported by a strong community vibe.

INDIVIDUAL RX WOMEN 1 - Ariane St-Louis 2 - Manon Lesur 3 - Marie-Émilie Perreault

TEAMS SCALED 1 - Rx Lab1 (Usine 640) 2 - Pro1 Montreal MandelBaums 3 - Crossfit St-Jean

PHOTOS: NEIL MOTA

TEAMS RX 1 - Pro1 Montreal Team Hatlex 2 - CrossFit Quebec City 3 - Team Badass

WINNERS OF THE TEAM RX CATEGORY: PRO1 MONTREAL - HATLEX

INDIVIDUAL TEENS U18 BOYS 1 - Jeff Charbonneau 2 - Samuel Guertin 3 - Justin Proulx

THE JUDGES

MASTER WOMEN CATEGORY (FRATERNITY)

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rep your box

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

BUILDING A STRONGER COMMUNITY The large team of trainers and coaches at CF Eminence gave us the low down on their massive, long-standing affiliate. The Venue: Back in 2011, CrossFit Eminence was the only box in Thornton, Colorado.

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rep your box The Glue: Who makes up the core team? Kris and Lindsey are both prior military, both served in Iraq for a 15 month tour. They got married in 2010, opened the gym together in 2011, and are both full time at the gym. Their members are mostly made of 20-50 year old athletes, ranging from teachers to fire fighters, to construction workers to entrepreneurs, to stay at home parents to oil field workers. They have it all. In the gym, it doesn’t matter what goes on in your day, the hour (well more because everyone hangs out after the workout) is the highlight of everyone’s day. The support for each other is something rare to see in such a large community. There are 14 total staff members. Our coaches are the same as our members, just with different backgrounds. We have prior military, fire fighters, competitive gymnasts, bodybuilders, professional baseball player, nutritionist, and more. Each coach brings something unique and fun to the gym; and 14 different ways of coaching CrossFit to our community. Our members are always getting new tips and advice on techniques which is why our members move incredibly well and understand movement. Thanks to our diverse coaching staff, members are educated on all aspects of health and fitness. We couldn’t ask for better!

The Fabric: What makes your box unique? We have amazing retention at CFE. We do our best to make every member feel like CFE is their second home. We send out cards, we check in with emails and calls, we promote members Bright Spots, we have social gatherings, and we get to see families grow and relationships evolve. CFE is constantly ensuring we provide the best equipment, the cleanest gym, and a variety of programs to help everyone reach their goals. We can’t forget to mention the little perks and benefits, from free coffee to free yoga and/ or rock climbing at local gyms, to having grass fed meat delivered to the gym. We use #bestforthebest for we truly believe that everyone deserves the world. What makes this community amazing is the people that walk in these doors. It is more than just fitness, you find a tribe.   Strength Session: Tell us also about the variety of unique programs offered at your box. We offer CrossFit programming that we have done ourselves for the last 5 1/2 years. We love the art and

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PHOTO: SCOTT BRAYSHAW

PreWOD: What made you decide to open up shop? Lindsey started working in the fitness industry while in college, and taught group fitness classes while in the military at the post gym. After the military in 2010, she started as a personal trainer at a globo gym. She loved training clients! She was offered a fitness manager job and turned it down when she realized it was more focused on numbers vs clients. Kris at the time was working in construction management, long exhausting days with no time to work on his own health and fitness. In May 2011, they sat down and talked about their goals and that they wanted to train more people, more often and train with each other and work together. About one month later they were open! It was insane thinking back how fast the process went. Lindsey was the sole coach and managed the gym by herself the entire first year. Their goal was to grow enough to have Kris be able to quit his job and work full time at the gym. They accomplished that goal at their one year mark and Kris and Lindsey have been full time together at the gym ever since.

The Top:  Kris and Lindsey Marcelli opened CrossFit Eminence in 2011 starting at 4000 sq/ft. At their 2 year mark they expanded to 5600 sq/ft and now are expanding again to 8000 sq/ft!


W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

“We want to Build a Strong Community through all levels of fitness, so anyone can find something they love here.”

methodology behind programming. We have a USAW barbell club, called Eminence Barbell Club, who nicknamed themselves, The ULC (under the loft club) since they lift under our loft. The ULC follows several different programs depending on what they are currently training for. We offer women only programs, boot camps, personal training, and are bringing our kids programs back in 2017. We do programs for schools, corporate wellness programs, and more. Although our gym has a physical location, we do our best to reach out to the community by going to them. We want to Build a Strong Community through all levels of fitness, so anyone can find something they love here.  Outside the box: Tell us about any special initiatives your box has created for charity/for community. We started Girls Gone Rx here in 2012 and our owners took it nationwide in 2014. They recently expanded to Canada

and Europe and added in women’s weightlifting meets called The Lift Up Series. The events are all about getting women together to support each other and benefit breast cancer. It is fun to see their passion grow and help other gyms put on events that are all about women supporting each other. They started it as a way to give back since Lindsey’s mom had breast cancer when Lindsey & Kris were deployed in 07-08. We support our community and have adopted a street that we clean up every month. At Christmas, we adopt 70+ kids through the Denver Children’s home and provide presents and gifts for them. Every month we use Causely (or sometimes known as Sweat Angels) to benefit a charity through check in’s on Facebook. It is all about creating that stronger community as a whole, not just through working out.   

HighFives: Any last words? In early 2016, the old landlord was selling the building, so Kris and Lindsey bought the space to secure the future of CFE! They are also now undergoing an expansion, adding another 2000 sq/ft! So much more room for activities!  CFE wouldn’t be anywhere without the support of our community! They are the driving force in our efforts to provide the #bestforthebest. We are incredibly lucky to have our community.

CrossFit Eminence

 64 E 78th Ave, Thornton CO 8 80229 www.crossfiteminence.com  Supporting our CrossFit community is what we do. Share your stories about successes, achievements, inspiration – it’s all about the journey!

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FIT

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

RX

DO THE WORK RESULTS WILL FOLLOW ”No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training… what a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable.” – Socrates Strength p. 26 Performance p. 28 Health p. 34 Nutrition p. 36 Mind p. 38 Pro Talk p. 41

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RX

STRENGTH

+

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BASE!

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

TIP:

The second way to strengthen the muscles that surround the ankle is through a calf raise. Calf raises should be done both seated and standing to strengthen both calf muscles and the Achilles tendon.

HEEL BOY Tips to Fix Your Weak Foundation

The ankle may be the most ignored joint next to the wrist in terms of athletic performance, flexibility, and injury prevention. Speaking in terms of a structural integrity, the base is the single most important factor.  It may seem silly to look for gains in strength in such a small joint, but having an effective and efficient base will translate to improving all other standing movement patterns. First we need to establish proper range of motion and then stabilize the joint.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO KEEP THE ANKLE STRONG? When an athlete performs any movement—whether running or jumping—the ankle and surrounding muscles are put under a great deal of stress. If the ankle musculature is strong, the athlete can withstand greater force before an injury is sustained. In addition to decreasing ankle injuries, strengthening lower leg muscles will help prevent chronic conditions such as shin splints and Achilles tendonitis. STRENGTHENING The ankle can be strengthened in several ways. One of the best ways is to use a thera-band for resisted range of motion. When performing the following exercises, place the band around the top of the foot and curl the toes at the end of the movement to work the internal muscles of the foot. Perform three sets of 20 in each direction.

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INVERSION The second way to strengthen the muscles that surround the ankle is through a calf raise. Calf raises should be done both seated and standing to strengthen both calf muscles and the Achilles tendon. Perform 3 sets of 20. PROPRIOCEPTION Proprioception is the body’s ability to realize its place in space. If an athlete is moving into a position that could sprain his or her ankle, increased proprioception can decrease the risk by alerting the athlete to the danger. Proprioception can also increase an athlete’s performance. An athlete with superior balance and awareness will be able to control his or her body more effectively. This is especially true in sports like basketball and soccer, but valuable in all sports or training. Proprioceptive training is done with balance exercises.

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Dorsiflexion

Plantar Flexion Eversion

Inversion


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PERFORMANCE

TH E

RX

F INJURIES O E C N E I C S

By Cary Groner

g n i As in a se r T ssin y t i s g the R isks of High-Inten "When load exceeds capacity, your body gets injured and expresses itself with symptoms through the conscious feeling of pain”. 28

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As increasing numbers of fitness enthusiasts embrace high-intensity training, reports of injuries have sparked a debate among clinicians about the benefits and risks associated with these programs. High-intensity training (hit) programs are attracting increasing numbers of participants who want to improve their conditioning for other activities including sports and the military, but they’ve also become a kind of sport themselves. Such programs often include a mix of aerobic, core strengthening, weight training, gymnastic, and endurance elements, typically performed at high intensity with little recovery time between exercises. although their approaches differ in the specifics, the general philosophy is to push people—alone or in groups, and sometimes competitively—through their perceived limitations in order to reach new levels of fitness.

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

1. Feel the burn, Not the Pain

Soreness and muscle fatigue are normal signs that the muscle has been overloaded. But the burn you feel when building muscle is different than outright pain. Pain means an injury is on the way or already happened. If you feel a sharp pain and contineu, you may do lasting damage.

2. Find a Good Gym

Having a good coach can make a big difference. Not all gyms are created equal and education is important. Athletes who had supervision from a coach had an injury rate of less than 15 percent.

3. Find a Good Sports Physician

The goal of a good sports medicine physician is to help patients participate in the activities they love, and educate the athlete about how to prevent injuries and manage existing ones.

Prospective research does suggest that High-intensity training (HIT) can help users improve their fitness. In one 2015 study, 43 participants (23 men) completed 10 weeks of supervised training, after which their maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) increased while body fat percentage declined.

The authors concluded the program significantly improved aerobic capacity and body composition in both sexes and at all fitness levels. A recent retrospective study by UK researchers found that 43.5% sustained an injury during training, 7% of which required surgical intervention.

The authors noted these injury rates were similar to those reported for sports such as Olympic weightlifting and gymnastics, and were lower than those in competitive contact sports such as rugby. J A N U A RY/ F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 7 |

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The fastest way to halt progress is to injure yourself. So, how do you keep yourself strong and healthy? We've got just the man to provide some insight. Meet Gray Cook; founder of Functional Movement Screen (FMS). FMS lays down a fundamental baseline on function (a person's ability to move), and identifies potentially faulty function before it becomes detrimental.

[ + ] Pain [ + ] Swelling [ + ] Bruising  imited ability to move [+] L the affected joint [+] A  t the time of injury, you may hear or feel a "pop" in your joint

SIGNS OF SPRAINS Mild sprains and strains can be treated at home. But you should see a doctor if you: [ + ] Can’t walk more than four steps without significant pain [ + ] Can’t move the affected joint [ + ] Have numbness in any part of the injured area

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR [+] [+] [+] [+]

Pain Swelling M  uscle spasms L  imited ability to move the affected muscle

STRAINS

Gray Cook: CrossFit has accelerated our exposure to innovative bodyweight and Olympictype lifting techniques. A lot of people learned about old and new school techniques through CrossFit. The modern evolution of fitness has been on fast forward, causing some problems to quickly rise to the surface. But I don’t think it’s a CrossFit problem. The average consumer of fitness doesn’t know how best to “consume” those sources of fitness. CrossFit has just given us a model that could potentially be the vehicle of how we actually change physical education in our country.

SRX: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON CROSSFIT’S INCIDENCE OF INJURIES?

A

Mark Verstegen, president and founder of Athletes’ Performance and Core Performance.

Gray Cook: The data says that the number one risk factor for sustaining a future injury is having had a previous injury. So many athletes are going back to training without having fully recovered from an injury, which is partly the fault of the athlete and partly the fault of the medical system. It’s hard to say that one type of injury happens more often in one sport than another, but rather, programs where the metabolic environment and heavy loading schemes under huge amounts of stress tend to “wake up” old injuries that have been mismanaged in the past by the athlete, rehab specialist, or coach. Lower backs, shoulders, and knees often take the brunt of the hit when talking about injury rates in High Intensity Training programs. But with good mobility, stability, and technique, many of these common injuries can be avoided.

SRX: AS A PHYSICAL THERAPIST, WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON TYPES OF INJURIES YOU SEE?

B

“About 65 percent of injuries — both athletic and lifestyle-related — come from overuse, which is repetitive use of joints that are rendered dysfunctional by muscular imbalances".

COULD FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREENING BE THE ANSWER?


Gray Cook: Coaches need to spend as much time defining the individual’s capabilities as they do setting up a workout. People don’t know their own limitations, which sometimes gets them into problems that elevates the unnecessary risk of injury while training. A lot of people blindly shuffle into these challenging environments not really knowing what they’re physically capable of without getting hurt. That needs to be addressed to protect the athletes, and offer some alternatives in programming to match their current functional status.

SRX: ANY TIPS ON WHAT COACHES SHOULD CHANGE PROGRAMMING WISE, TO AVOID INJURIES?

C Gray Cook: Making sure that every movement programmed has workable modifications for athletes that aren’t currently executing at a higher level of movement without having an increased risk of injury. This may require the coach to check off whether an athlete can proceed in a workout on a daily basis as is, or needs to simplify a movement or two. Knowing the moves that people struggle with, so they don’t get into a highly challenging metabolic and time-sensitive environment, with faulty movement mechanics can do the athlete a lot of good. Our job as coaches is to expose our athletes to new exercises and new combinations, not necessarily to force feed numeric training packages that may not be appropriate for ones skill set or conditioning level.

SRX:  HOW CAN COACHES PROTECT THEIR ATHLETES?

D

Gray Cook: When you’re gaining a new client, or reappraising the training with your athletes, obviously we want to put a metric on movement along with other performance metrics like strength and metabolic capacity. The screen is meant to pick up potential problems that are going to impede the teaching platform that you’re currently standing on. It’s important to correct these dysfunctions and at the same time stop loading these faulty patterns. For a movement pattern that’s considered dysfunctional, the best evidence says don’t load it.

SRX: MOVEMENT SCREENING IS A SIMPLE TOOL USED BY ALMOST EVERY PROFESSIONAL SPORTING ORGANIZATION. HOW CAN COACHES BENEFIT FROM FMS?

E

INJURY RATE IN STRENGTH SPORTS? 82%

Strongman Researchers recruited 213 strongman athletes with several years of resistance-training experience and strongman experience and asked them to complete a 1-year retrospective survey of injury. Researchers found that 82% of the subjects reported at least one injury over the year and the injury rate was 5.5 injuries per 1,000 hours of training. Region of injury: low back (24%), shoulder (21%), bicep (11%), and knee (11%).

73%

High Intensity Training Researches assessed the injury rates of participants in high-intensity powertraining, with an online questionnaire. 132 responses were collected and 97 individuals (73.5%) reported sustaining an injury during this type of training. Researchers found that the injury rate was 3.1 injuries per 1,000 hours of training. Region of injury: the shoulder, followed by the back.

45.1%

Bodybuilding Researchers collected questionnaires from 71 competitive and elite bodybuilders. They found that 45.1% of the subjects reported some symptoms of physical injury while training but the overall injury rate was just 0.24 injuries per 1,000  hours of training. Region of injury: shoulder, elbow, lumbar spine and knee. The researchers concluded that injury rate is low compared to other weightlifting disciplines such as Olympic weightlifting or strongman.

43.3%

Powerlifters Researches assessed injury incidence in 245 competitive and elite powerlifters from 97 incorporated powerlifting clubs by way of a questionnaire. They found that 43.3% of powerlifters complained of injuryrelated problems during workouts. However, the injury rate was 1.0 injuries per 1,000 hours of training. Region of injury: shoulder, low back and knee. Researchers found that the use of weight belts led to greater risk of low back injury.


HOW TO FIX THE PROGRESS KILLER?

1 YOU CAN’T MAKE PROGRESS IF YOU’RE SORE/INJURED

If your hip is sore (or worse, painful), then you shouldn’t be adding weights to your front squats. Listen to your body.

2 HAVE OPTIONS

The answer to improving a movement isn’t always to practice it with more reps. If a specific movement doesn’t feel right, sometimes the best way to improve it is to work around it. For example, if the strict barbell press doesn’t feel right, regress to a push press, a kettlebell press, a kettlebell snatch, and/or a TGU. If regressions and lateralizations still don’t feel right, see a physical therapist.

3 TRAIN UNILATERALLY (SINGLE ARM, SINGLE LEG)

We’re inherently asymmetrical. So when we perform bilateral tasks (walking, cycling, rowing, barbell lifts), we feed into this asymmetry. If this goes unchecked, it can lead to overuse injuries on one side and/or compensatory injuries on the other. I recommend performing at least one unilateral training day per week. If you are unable to do this, I highly recommend incorporating TGUs into your warm-up routine.

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4 EVERYTHING IS LIMITED BY THE CORE

It all starts and ends with the core. From breathing to high-threshold lifts, the core is extremely important for maintaining quality movement patterns. A common problem occurs when lifters sacrifice their core stability to complete a movement. When this happens, the shoulders and hips are forced to not only move the body, but to stabilize it as well. This “double duty” sets these joints up for an injury. To prevent this from happening, make sure your “knots” are tied to the right place and that core stability is a priority during lifts.

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5 KNOW WHEN TO PR

There’s a reason why you can’t PR (achieve a personal record) every time you workout. Improving performance is a complex system that involves many variables. If you go for it with every lift, every time, then you risk cumulating more stress than you can handle. This not only decreases performance and prevents gains, but increases the chances of becoming injured. So what should you do?  Be patient. Set specific goals.  Make a plan. Focus on PRing only a few things at a time. Work on Rules 1-6.  Listen to your body’s readiness.  

"If you’re unaware of what your physical limitations are, then a future injury will likely tell you.  It’s important to know which areas need improvement so that you can have a game plan to resolve the weak links before they cause an injury".


How Are Sports Injuries Treated? Treatment often begins with the RICE method. Here are some other things your doctor may do to treat your sports injury. Treatment often begins with the RICE method. Here are some other things your doctor may do to treat your sports injury. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Your doctor may suggest that you take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin or ibuprofen. These drugs reduce swelling and pain. You can buy them at a drug store. Another common drug is acetaminophen. It may relieve pain, but it will not reduce swelling.

Immobilization

Immobilization is a common treatment for sports injuries. It keeps the injured area from moving and prevents more damage. Slings, splints, casts, and leg immobilizers are used to immobilize sports injuries.

TAKE THE SPRAINS AND STRAINS QUIZ Sprain? Strain? The terms for these injuries sound so similar, what's the difference? Find out by taking this quiz, based on information from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

1. If you have a sprain, it means you’ve injured a ligament. A. True

2. In a strain, a muscle or tendon is involved. A. True

In some cases, surgery is needed to fix sports injuries. Surgery can fix torn tendons and ligaments or put broken bones back in place. Most sports injuries don’t need surgery.

A. True

Rehabilitation is a key part of treatment. It involves exercises that step by step get the injured area back to normal. Moving the injured area helps it to heal. The sooner this is done, the better. Exercises start by gently moving the injured body part through a range of motions. The next step is to stretch. After a while, weights may be used to strengthen the injured area.

Other Therapies

Other therapies include mild electrical currents (electrostimulation), cold packs (cryotherapy), heat packs (thermotherapy), sound waves (ultrasound), and massage.

B. False

4. A typical sprain occurs when a person missteps and lands on the side of the foot. A. True

B. False

5. One symptom of a sprain may be a popping sound from the affected joint when the injury occurs. B. False

6. You should see your health care provider for a sprain if you cannot move or put weight on the injured joint. A. True

B. False

7. The back is a common site for strains. A. True

Rehabilitation (Exercise)

B. False

3. The most common site for a sprain is the wrist.

A. True Surgery

B. False

B. False

8. A muscle spasm can be a symptom of a strain. A. True

B. False

9. You should treat a sprain or strain by putting moist heat on it right away. A. True

B. False

10. Wearing shoes that fit properly is one way to prevent a sprain or strain. A. True

B. False

How did you score out of 10? Answers: A-true (1,2,4,5,6,7,8,10) | B-false (#3,9) J A N U A RY/ F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 7 |

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HEALTH

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

What is the relationship between physical activity and breast cancer risk?

The relationship between physical activity and breast cancer incidence has been extensively studied, with over 60 studies published in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Most studies indicate that physically active women have a lower risk of developing breast cancer than inactive women; however, the amount of risk reduction achieved through physical activity varies widely (between 20 to 80 percent). Although most evidence suggests that physical activity reduces breast cancer risk in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women, high levels of moderate and vigorous physical activity during adolescence may be especially protective. Although a Crossing Out Cancer lifetime of regular, vigorous activity is “When you’ve already survived a thought to be of bilateral mastectomy, six weeks of radiation, greatest benefit, nine surgeries and various rounds of chemo, women who increase suddenly a room full of CrossFit athletes doing their physical activity after menopause may snatches and burpees isn’t as frightening also experience a reduced as it sounds”. This sentiment is echoed by risk compared with inactive thousands of women who are discovering that women. A number of studies CrossFit has helped them regain their sense of also suggest that the effect of strength and confidence after crossing physical activity may be different across levels of BMI, out Cancer. with the greatest benefit seen in By Christina Nowak BSc, MScPT, CSCS women in the normal weight range (generally a BMI under 25 kg/msquared) in some studies. Existing evidence shows a decreasing risk of breast cancer as the frequency and duration of physical activity increase. Most studies suggest that 30 to 60 minutes per day of moderate- to high-intensity physical activity is associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk. Researchers have proposed several biological mechanisms to explain the relationship between physical activity and breast cancer development. Physical activity may prevent tumor development by lowering hormone levels, particularly in premenopausal women; lowering levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), improving the immune response; and assisting with weight maintenance to avoid a high body mass and excess body fat.

SURVIVORS AMONG US

Exercise is a key part of recovery and it is important for women to know this. Being strong helps with your independence and can improve your quality of life.

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NUTRITION

GET YOUR FATS... STRAIGHT

Chasing the Truth About Cholesterol

A lot of what we are doing now in fitness and nutrition is undoing the mess that was created in the 80s, 90s and early 2000s.  One of those messes was the fear created around consuming fat, and that eating fat would make you fat.  This led to fat free everything, causing everyone to do their best to completely eliminate a very important macronutrient from their diets. Saturated fats are often lumped together with transfats as the “bad fats” to consume. Suddenly, saturated fats have become “bad” for us when they have been a part of the human diet for thousands of years. High cholesterol numbers have scared millions into taking statin drugs as a precaution to avoid heart attacks, when there is no evidence anywhere that proves statins prevent heart attacks. Statins do however lower blood cholesterol numbers, by stunting your own body’s production of cholesterol. It makes one stop and think; why take a drug that affects something that naturally occurs in the body and has so many side effects? Here’s the short story: basically, your body is made up of trillions of cells. Each cell structure is made up of — you guessed it — cholesterol. This allows nutrients to pass through the cell easily, feeding your cells, keeping you healthy and boosting your immune system.

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Eggs Scrambled with Onion, Garlic and Sweet Cherry Tomatoes Servings: 1

SUNNY SIDE UP

Egg yolks contain a rich array of essential vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamins A, D, E, B12 and K, riboflavin, folate and iron, while the whites are a source of low-calorie protein. The egg’s tarnished reputation comes from the cholesterol the yolk contains, which is why we were urged to cut back on eggs. Increased cholesterol levels are linked to heart disease, but we now know that cholesterol in yolks doesn’t influence our serum cholesterol levels, thereby removing the risk of heart disease.

BEEF UP

The USDA defines a lean cut of beef as a 3.5-ounce serving (about 100 grams) that contains less than: { 10 grams total fat } { 4.5 grams saturated fat } { 95 milligrams cholesterol }

The tastiest cuts of beef are often the ones with more fat. But when you're concerned about your health or you're trying to watch your weight, you want the leanest cuts of beef.

Sauté 1/4 sweet onion and a smashed garlic clove over medium-high heat in 1 teaspoon canola or olive oil until almost soft. Add a handful of chopped tomatoes to the pan (or any other vegetables you happen to have, such as chopped spinach, kale, mushrooms or peppers) and cook for another 5 minutes. Turn down the heat to very low. In a separate bowl, whisk two eggs. Pour eggs into the pan containing the onion, garlic and tomato — add 1 ounce low-fat cheese, if you wish. Stir continuously until eggs are cooked. Pour over toasted, whole rye bread.


EAT THE SKIN

Everyone knows that salmon is one of the most nutritious foods on the planet and is full of healthy fats, but much of those are actually stored in the skin. Omega-3’s, known to help prevent heart attacks, are found in the salmon’s fat and get absorbed by the skin during cooking.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the soy sauce, water, and brown sugar and bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat and add the lemon juice. Pour over fried crispy salmon skins.

Cooking tip: A quick and easy method to cook salmon skin is to slice it into 4-inch by 3/4" wide lengths, toss some oil into a cast iron skillet or fry pan on med-hi heat, and fry on each side till crispy, bubbling and golden. Sprinkle on a little sea salt on top if you want a saltier taste. The result should be hot crunchy, savoury, pieces of glory. Add some flavour: • 3 tablespoons soy sauce • 2 tablespoons water •2  tablespoons firmly packed golden or light brown sugar • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

COO COO FOR COCONUTS

Coconut oil is one of the few foods that can be classified as a “superfood.” Studies show that coconut oil improves important risk factors like Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, which may translate to a reduced risk of heart disease. * Sugar— the true enemy. 71.4% of adults consumed more than 10% of calories from added sugar in their diet, excluding naturally occurring sugar found in fruits.

*Load your veggies with butter, coconut oil or olive oil for better absorption of the vital nutrients in your veggies. 

GO NUTS

Nuts are packed with heart-healthy fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals. The lowestcalorie nuts at 160 per ounce are almonds (23 nuts; 6 grams protein, 14 grams fat); cashews (16 to 18 nuts; 5 grams protein, 13 grams fat); and pistachios (49 nuts; 6 grams protein, 13 grams fat).

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MIND

1 BABY STEPS

We have to crawl before we walk and walk before we make a mad dash for the finish line. Consider your ultimate goal as the result of a series of smaller accomplishments. Triumph those more achievable goals and you’ll eliminate feeling overwhelmed by the big one.

W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

4 FROM THE ROOFTOPS

Share your goal to succeed with people who will make your success their goal too. Whether it be your partner, a best friend, your children, your social media friends or even a group of likeminded individuals on a fitness-focused web forum, make your intentions known. Having to report back to them on your progress AND pitfalls will increase your motivation to stay the course; especially on days when you might want to detour off route.

2

BY JARAD STIENBERG

RELEASE THE ANCHOR

5 SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT

Having a visual reminder not only of what you’ve committed to but also what you’ve already achieved will make it impossible to ignore just how capable you are. Charts and stickers are child’s play. Grab two glass jars and fill one with a marble for every pound you plan to gain or lose. For weight loss, mark one jar “Going” and the other, “Gone”. For each pound lost, transfer one marble from the full jar to the empty one. On those days when you just can’t see your progress in the mirror, jar #2 will be there to prove how far you’ve come.

5 Tips On How To Stay Motivated When You’re Ready To Quit:

ALWAYS A PARTY

You don’t need to wait until the big finale to enjoy a big celebration. To that list of smaller milestone accomplishments, be sure to attach coordinating rewards. Looking back at your entire process, you’ll be left with great memories and looking ahead at the finish line, you’ll see so much fun to be had.

3 PAY TO PLAY

The simplest way to make something feel valuable is to invest in it. Taking on a coach or a nutritionist, signing up for a package of fun fitness classes or even a bootcamp at your local park is likely to keep you feeling engaged and on the line. 38

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DOPE SOLUTION Understanding where motivation comes from makes it easier to recognize what you need to do when it’s missing. And as it turns out dopamine’s true effect may be motivation. Dopamine has a biological connection to our motivation to achieve. If there’s anything we can do to increase the flow of dopamine like reinforcing positive feedback through incremental progress, embrace it.


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Pro Talk

JARETT PERELMUTTER Jarett “JP” Perelmutter is the owner of the iconic line of gyms called BRICK. After transitioning from the MMA realm into the functional fitness space, JP has been regarded as a forward thinker and owner that helps elevate other box owners as they pursue to build their gyms.

BY DAKARI WILLIAMS

systems or operational systems in place.

HOW WERE YOU INTRODUCED TO CROSSFIT? JP: I have six years of functional fit ownership and another ten of MMA and kickboxing ownership. I was in the fight game most of my adult life and had a bunch of commercialized locations where I also trained competitive fighters. There was a private [CrossFit] gym behind one of my locations and I would always see this ex-collegiate football-player-gone-firefighter doing these crazy workouts in the parking lot. I’m a big fan of crazy, so asked him about it and we started training for some of my later fights. That was in 2008.

WHAT WERE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BEING A BOX OWNER AND RUNNING A STANDARD GYM? JP: One of the original things that was a clear difference, something that I wanted to change, was that unlike the martial arts world, there was very little protocol and discipline in the systems and operations of CrossFit gyms that I was entering in 2009-2010. They were very freeform, very rudimentary style businesses, that were similar to what you saw in martial arts back in the late ‘80s and ‘90s. There was a lot of discipline and respect once you stepped on the floor, but there weren’t any business

TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORK WITH JASON KHALIPA? JP: We’ve formed our own real-life seminars, with 2 days of stories with lessons. We’re not necessarily telling you how to do it, but we’re giving you all the lessons we’ve learned and the insight using what we’re doing. We’ve created two days of storytelling to help you not to make the same mistakes. And if you’re already making them, giving you the opportunity before you go broke to change your means of handling your business. What we are doing is 100% not for profit. We donate every dollar outside of basic expenses to operate the seminar. We don’t include any pay for Jason or myself, we do them for free. As of 2016, we’ve raised over $100,000 towards pediatric cancer. What Jason and I do is out of pure passion for the industry. We don’t do it for any profit for ourselves.

WHAT ARE THE TWO MOST COMMON ‘AHA’ MOMENTS AMONG

ATTENDEES?

JP: One is the customer service component. Many gyms have a front desk but nobody managing it, it’s just a desk. Or some don’t have it at all. And many box owners don’t have a voicemail or it’s just them answering their own cell phone. Customer service is imperative if you’re going to keep up with market demand. The second ‘aha’ moment comes when we do a really good job of trying to get people to open their eyes to their own brand. Sometimes they are blind to see and realize that their own brand is off-putting, condescending, or insulting. Just because you think it’s cool and awesome, doesn’t mean everyone thinks it’s cool and awesome.

ARE PEOPLE QUICK TO CHANGE OR IS IT A GRADUAL SHIFT OF MINDSET? JP: My mentor used to say to me, “If you’re so certain about what you’re doing that you refuse to change, I just ask, How is that going for you?” If you’re sitting in one of our seminars, probably not very well. If you’re on the verge of going broke, it’s time to change.

WHAT DO YOU SEE IN THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS EMERGING TRENDS ON THE CROSSFIT HORIZON? JP: Box owners shouldn’t brand their gym as a box anymore. A box is something you put on a shelf and forget about. We’re not a box, we’re a business. The product on the floor that you’re delivering has to be professional. Coaches need to deliver quality and a professional product. Is your music in check? Is your music censored, to appeal to the masses? How is your appearance? Are you owning the responsibility of everyone that walks through the door? Is your location right for proper growth? It might not be conducive for good energy; it might not have certain amenities that people in the area want, because you didn’t do research on what they want. You have a lot of hurdles to hop over. If you don’t plan ahead, it’s just a matter of time until you go broke. Jason and I are trying to educate people and help them to realize they need to ride the tide, because if they don’t they’re going to sink and drown.

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W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

COMPETITION COMPETITION IS A GOOD THING. IT FORCES US TO DO OUR BEST. Nancy Pearcey Team competition in particular, is a great way to foster morale and cooperation skills. It’s exciting for fans to watch teams pull together, bring out their best and want to lay it all on the line for their teammates. The Reebok CrossFit Invitational gives fans the unique opportunity to see great individual athletes bring their ‘A’ game to the field and experience competition at it’s finest. Inside the Leaderboard p. 45 Feature p. 50

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W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

Inside the leaderboard

AH, SWEET VICTORY The 2016 Reebok CrossFit Invitational

From the four corners of the globe, elite CrossFit athletes from Canada, the USA, Europe and the Pacific, converged under the roof of the Tribute Communities Centre in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. Spectators from around the world filled the stands to watch the special team competition called the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Invitational. The live competition was action-packed, with each event pushing the limits of the elite athletes. Impressive feats brought roars of appreciative fans to their feet as the competition heated up. It was neck in neck all the way to the final event. The Europe Team was the statistical favourite going into the competition, and lived up to their expectations, taking the winning title for the first time ever in the Invitational 5 year history, after coming out on top of the winner-take-all final event. Never veering from the spectator sport experience, every event posed some serious challenge for each of the four teams.

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Inside the leaderboard

nada Ca

TEAM PROUD TO BE CANADIAN

The opening event of the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Invitational was a classic couplet containing deadlifts and burpees over the bar. But as expected, there was a catch, with each team learning that they’d have to fit all four teammates onto one bar. It was an opening event that couldn’t have gone better for Team Pacific. They finished the event with a solid 10-second lead on the next team, Europe, and the USA and Canada Teams were left trailing behind heading into Event 2.

THE VENUE

2 The guys got the easy out on this event as the women were left to do work! Event 2, allowed each team’s heavy hitters to shine. Kara Webb was expected to put up big numbers on the snatch, and she did just that, putting Team Pacific in second place with 200 pounds– just two points ahead of Canada. Letendre got a standing ovation as she hit 198 pounds, and the reigning Fittest Woman on Earth was a model of grace under pressure as she out-lifted Webb by two pounds, successfully completing a new PR snatch at 202 pounds. The two pound lead proved fleeting, though, as Katrin Davidsdottir took the floor for her second round. Pearce’s teammate, Brooke Wells, put up 247 lbs., and the second Canadian athlete, Carol-Ann Reason-Thibault, put up 232 lbs. The USA Team finished the event in fourth place, and the Canada

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RICH FRONING

PHOTOS: ©2017 CROSSFIT INC. USED WITH PERMISSION FROM CROSSFIT INC.

1


W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

Team closed it out in third. Sara Sigmundsdottir had a successful clean and jerk at 240 lbs., but that wasn’t enough to hold onto the lead for Europe. In the end, Olympian Tia-Clair Toomey took over the top spot for the Pacific by matching Wells’ 247-lb. lift.

STANDINGS: Team Pacific 9 points; Europe 6 points; USA 2 points; Canada 1 point. 

3 The women continued to be the centre of attention for event three. While Davidsdottir was the favourite for this event, Team USA walked this one out of the park, beating Europe by amost 19 seconds and taking their first event win of the comp.

Usa

TEAM MICHELE LETENDRE

USA TEAM

TEAM PACIFIC TEAM

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4 Event 4 was the halfway point and was the longest event with three rounds of four movements: bar muscle-ups, rowing, biking, and Pig flips.  The race was tight as the teams completed the first three movements and then distance between the teams began with the Pig flips. By the end of round 2, the USA had taken the lead in what looked like a second event win when Team Europe made a move and ultimately took the event to the top of the leaderboard.

STANDINGS: Europe Team 14 points; Pacific Team 11 points; USA Team 9 points; Canada Team 2 points

6

5 Now it was the men’s turn to do work. Canada pulled in a win for the snatch portion with Brent Fikowski bringing fans to their feet with a hit of 285 pounds. Then teams took to the floor for the clean and jerk event. Patrick Vellner filled Canada with hope to pull off an event win with his incredible 355 pound lift, but it was the Fittest Man in History, Rich Froning, who stole the show in the clean-and-jerk. He got the event win for the USA with a 365 pound lift.

THE FANS

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BRENT FIKOWSKI

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The top three teams were in a tight race. Rob Forte developed a quick lead at the beginning of the men’s handstand walk, but Froning closed the gap with Vellner not far behind. The Pacific Team took the win but the USA kept in the race for the top spot leading into the finale. Canada held third place keeping Europe in fourth.

STANDINGS: Europe Team 15 points; USA Team and Pacific Team 14 points each; Canada Team 5 points.


W W W. S W E AT R X M A G . C O M

7 With such a close race, it was winner take all for this event. The USA was powering through to try and take their third-straight Invitational win. Europe was equally hungry to take the victory of what would be their first ever Invitational win. Europe quickly found their rhythm and began to take the lead. USA Team tried to bring on the pressure but got overpowered by Canada in the interim. The energy of the moment filled the arena as it became obvious that indeed, Europe was going to bring it home and win the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Invitational.

EVENT 7 RESULTS 1 Team Europe - 9:24.16 - 6 points 2 Team Canada - 9:27.59 - 4 points 3 Team USA - 9.38.87 - 2 points 4 Team Pacific - 9:38.97- 0 points

FINAL STANDINGS

1

1 Team Europe - 23 points 2 Team USA - 16 points 3 Team Pacific - 14 points 4 Team Canada - 10 points

The Europe Team celebrated a well-earned victory!

rop Eu e

TEAM EUROPE TEAM

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That’s PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARREN MILLER BY DAKARI WILLAMS

San Francisco CrossFit

MobilityWOD’s

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a

Kelly Starrett

Stretch In today’s modern tech-savvy world you have information at your fingertips—literally. From lifting techniques to training methodology, you can surf the net and find a plethora of advice. Up until 2010, looking for information on mobility was the wild west in the CrossFit space. From novices to experts, it was really hard to tell who to listen to and trust. But when 2010 rolled around, a physical therapist started making daily videos with tips of the trade and suddenly athletes and coaches started to take notice. Everyday this guy would be in his garage using lacrosse balls and teaching about how to make an athlete move better. Fast forward to now and the name of Kelly Starrett or ‘K-Star’ is synonymous with CrossFit and mobility.   J A N U A RY/ F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 7 |

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SF Starrett began his practice in performance-based physical therapy and continues to focus on performancebased Orthopedic Sports Medicine with an emphasis on returning athletes to elite level sport and performance. His clients come from a diverse range of athletic fields including Olympic champions, Tour de France cyclists, world-class Olympic Lifting and Power athletes, CrossFit Games competitors, ballet dancers, and military personnel. Now, Dr. Starrett is a well-respected and sought after physical therapist, author and speaker. He co-owns one of the most long-standing CrossFit gyms in the world – San Francisco CrossFit, with his wife Juliet, giving him not only the expertise of his chosen profession, but the intimate knowledge and experience of working within the sport of CrossFit. And his  mission of changing how people move and train has had a lasting effect on the functional fitness space. We got the chance to speak with Dr. Starrett and get some insight into his impact on athletes and their performance.

WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND AND EXPERTISE?

I am a physical therapist and strength and conditioning coach. My wife and I founded San Francisco CrossFit, and we’re in our 12th year of business. We are now the 21st gym on the planet. We’ve spent the better part of the decade talking about force optimization, human performance, injury prevention and resolution. We’ve also spent a lot of time talking about how we can improve position and mechanics, and we’re having a good time doing it!

HOW DO YOU HELP AN ATHLETE GET BETTER?

Anytime you get people off a fixed object, we can expose a lot of motor control and stability problems. People can’t generate the stability at the hip or shoulder as effectively, and this is why we do dumbbell training and gymnastics training.

AS YOU’VE GROWN FROM 2010 UNTIL NOW, WHAT ARE ONE OR TWO PIECES OF ADVICE YOU WOULD GIVE YOURSELF? Remind ourselves as coaches that people are caught up in the system. And often when people come into the gym, they are

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For more info visit his site:

SO WE HAVE TO GIVE THEM THE TOOLS TO LEARN PHYSICAL LITERACY.  WE NEED TO MAKE SURE WE ARE CONJOINING PHYSICAL POSITIONING DR. STARRETT has taken his to educate and help athWITH TRAINING.  desire letes of all levels improve their

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strength, mobility and endurance., and brought that knowledge to the product development level. K-Star told us about how his desire to help athletes tap into their potential and maximize their performance was the genesis of creating a tool that addresses those needs—the Duo Trainer. Kelly shares, "The Duo allows us to access this quickly so we can add an element of stability and complexity in very simple movements. In traditional fitness systems, people aren’t really comfortable doing hanging or pull-ups, so the Duo has put that back on the menu.” Check out our product review on the TRX Duo Trainer with Kelly Starrett – page 79.

really earnest and have good intentions but just haven’t been trained. So we have to give them the tools to learn physical literacy. We need to make sure we are conjoining physical positioning with training. Also, people today are really sophisticated but still need a model and template. One thing we do [at MobilityWOD] which is really powerful is a daily follow-along video which gives people the opportunity to follow along live. We take you through the nuances of the movements and this really helps people pick up on the subtleties. Our approach may seem aggressive, but it’s very progressive. One thing we’ve done a complete 180 degrees on is now we would much rather an athlete be consistent than heroic. Early on, we got excited about big heroic outputs; now we’re more impressed by the person that can do something six days a week rather than someone who can do two days, blow themselves out and have to take time off.

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Eating for life Funky Thai Recipes p. 56 Smoothies for Fuel p. 62

TANTALIZE YOUR TASTEBUDS THAI RECIPES FOR QUICK TASTY MEALS

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Thai food masterfully walks a delicate line between salty, spicy, sour, and sweet, perhaps no better demonstrated than in the classic dish Pad Thai. Undeniably the most ubiquitous and often ordered dish in Thai restaurants. While it's a North American favorite, there are a lot of other sleeper hits waiting to be discovered on your local Thai takeout menu. We got the lowdown from some culinary experts and asked for them to offer up a few recipes that you can whip up at home. Believe it or not, you don’t need a kitchen full of exotic, hard-to-find ingredients to make delicious Thai food at home. Most large supermarkets carry all of the Thai pantry staples — like fish sauce, coconut milk, sweet red chili sauce and curry paste — in the Asian foods aisle. Fresh ingredients commonly used in Thai cooking, like ginger, garlic, limes and fresh herbs are always available in the produce department. Stock up and enjoy these fresh, fast and flavorful Thai-style recipes! 56

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1

SOBA THAI NOODLE BOWL

This 20 minute Thai noodle bowl is so easy to whip up and is packed full of sweet and spicy Thai flavor! PREP TIME 12 MINS COOK TIME 8 MINS

INGREDIENTS • 18oz package Soba noodles • 1/4 c. vegetable or canola oil • 1 1/2 tsp. sesame oil • 5 tbsp. soy sauce • 2 tsp. rice vinegar • 1/2 tsp. Sriracha (more to taste)* • 1/4 c. peanut butter • 2 tbsp. honey • 2 cloves garlic,

TOTAL TIME 20 MINS

PREP TIME Yield: 4 servings

minced • 1 green onion, minced • 1/2 red bell pepper, thinly sliced • 1 carrot, julienned • 1/3 c. cilantro, chopped • 1/2 c. dry roasted peanuts, chopped and whole • 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes • 2 tbsp. sesame

DIRECTIONS Bring a large pot water to boil with 1tsp of salt. Add Soba noodles and cook till al dente. 1. Meanwhile, in a small mixing bowl, combine the vegetable oil, sesame oil, soy sauce, rice vinegar, Sriracha, peanut butter, honey, minced garlic and minced green onion. Whisk vigorously until smooth. 2. Drain the noodles and return to the same large pot. Add the sauce, red bell pepper, carrot, cilantro, peanuts, crushed red pepper flakes and sesame seeds. Toss until combined, serve and garnish as desired. TOPPING SUGGESTIONS • 1 cup shelled edamame • 2 green onions, cut on a diagonal • 1 carrot, cut into 2 inch matchsticks • 1/2 English cucumber, cut into 2 inch matchsticks • 1/2 cup daikon radish, cut into 2 inch matchsticks • 1 red pepper, julienned • 1/4 cabbage, julienned • 1/4 cup roasted almonds, chopped NOTES *Add more Sriracha if you like spicier noodles!

Whether you always choose lean chicken breasts, make a beeline for super-flavorful thighs, or simply love a crispy-skinned whole bird, there's no denying that chicken makes a truly satisfying meal. There are so many ways to prepare it, and the leftovers are sometimes even better than the main meal.

TIP: Leaving the skin on the chicken, when cooking it, helps to hold in juices, which increases tenderness.

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EASY THAI CHICKEN

So sticky, so tender, so moist and just packed with so much flavor. And it’s an easy peasy weeknight meal, made in 30 min or less! PREP TIME 10 MINS

TOTAL TIME 40 MINS

COOK TIME 30 MINS

PREP TIME Yield: 8 servings

INGREDIENTS • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter • 8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs • 1/4 cup peanuts, chopped • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

sauce • 2 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 1 tablespoon fish sauce • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger • Juice of 1 lime • 1 teaspoon Sriracha, or more, to taste

FOR THE SAUCE • 1/2 cup sweet chili

DIRECTIONS • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. • To make the sauce, whisk together chili sauce, soy sauce, garlic, fish sauce, ginger, lime juice and Sriracha in a small bowl; set aside. • Melt butter in a large oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. Add chicken, skin-side down, and sear both sides until golden brown, about 2-3 minutes per side. Stir in chili sauce mixture. • Place into oven and roast until completely cooked through, reaching an internal temperature of 165 degrees F, about 25-30 minutes. Then broil for 2-3 minutes, or until caramelized and slightly charred. • Serve immediately, garnish with peanuts and cilantro, if desired.

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THAI BOWL FAVES

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FIVE SPICE STEW WITH HARD-BOILED EGGS AND PORK (Kai Pa-Loh)

TOM YUM SOUP

PANANG CHICKEN CURRY

RED CURRY PANANG CHICKEN

M

(RECIPE NOT SHOWN)

AYBE IT'S BECAUSE THE SWEET, sour, spicy, salty and savoury flavours of Thailand are such popular ways to fill a bowl. They’re seductively addictive, always well balanced and one of the world’s great cuisines. They’re also easy to prepare! Here we show you four of our favorite dishes and serve up two of the recipes along with the staple of coconut rice. It's your perfect starter to a Thai feast.

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FIVE SPICE STEW WITH HARD-BOILED EGGS AND PORK (KAI PA-LOH)

This recipe takes little preparation time, about 30 minutes, when using readymade Tofu Puffs. Total cooking time is a little less than 1 1/2 hours. INGREDIENTS • 3 eggs • 2/3 lb (300 grams) pork with fat and rind or pork shoulder with some fat • 3 cloves garlic, peeled • 1/2 tblsp Thai White Pepper Powder • 1 package (140 grams) fried tofu (hommade or store bought) • 4 tsp Thai Light Soy Sauce • 1 tsp Thai Black Soy Sauce • 5 tsp Palm Sugar • 1 tsp Chinese Five Spice Blend (Pa-loh), Lobo brand • 1 tsp cooking oil • 3 cups water PREPARATION • Hard-boil the eggs. Once cooled, remove the shells and set aside. • Prepare pork by cutting into large chunks approximately 2 " x 2 ". • Pound garlic and peppercorns in a mortar (or electric spice grinder) until pulverized. • In a heavy-bottom small stock pot, heat oil until almost smoking, then add the garlic- pepper paste and stir-fry until fragrant, about 1 minute. • Add the pork and cook until no longer pink. • Add the pa-loh spice and black soy sauce. Then add the peeled boiled eggs and water. Bring to a boil and add the light soy sauce, stir well, then lower the

heat to low and simmer for 45 minutes. • Add the palm sugar, turn up the heat and boil to dissolve, stirring. Add the tofu puffs, lower the heat again and simmer another 30 minutes. Remove from heat and serve over steamed jasmine rice.

PANANG CHICKEN CURRY

"Panang curry with chicken represents the diversity of Thailand's southern region. Panang refers to the island of Penang in Northern Malaysia bordering southern Thailand. Use 4 tablespoons curry paste from a fresh curry paste recipe or 5 tablespoons pre-made curry paste if time does not permit making your own paste" PREP TIME 25 MINS TOTAL TIME 25 MINS YIELD: 8 servings INGREDIENTS • 1/2 cups canned unsweetened coconut milk, divided • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Thai red curry paste • 8 kaffir lime leaves • 1 1/2 cups thinly sliced onion • 2 large leafy sprigs Thai basil or regular basil • 1 1/2 pounds skinless boneless chicken breast halves, cut into 1/4-to 1/3 - inch-thick slices • 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 2x1/4-inch strips • 1 8-ounce can bamboo shoots, drained • 4 teaspoons tamarind paste • 2 teaspoons fish sauce • 1 teaspoon sugar • Steamed rice

PREPARATION Heat 1/2 cup coconut milk, Thai red curry paste, and kaffir lime leaves in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir until mixture thickens, about 2 minutes. Stir in remaining 3 cups coconut milk, onion, and basil sprigs; bring to boil. Continue to boil until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add chicken, bell pepper, bamboo shoots, tamarind paste, fish sauce, and sugar. Simmer until chicken is cooked through, stirring often, 6 to 8 minutes. Serve with steamed rice.

THAI COCONUT RICE

Creamy coconut combined with a little bite from red pepper flakes and ginger, create a delicious rice dish to accompany a wide range of entrees. PREP TIME 10 MINS COOK TIME 30 MINS TOTAL TIME 40 MINS

INGREDIENTS • 1 cup uncooked basmati rice or 1 cup jasmine rice • 1 (14 ounce) can coconut milk • 1⁄4 cup water • 1⁄2 teaspoon salt • 1⁄2 teaspoon sugar • 1⁄2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes • 1⁄8 teaspoon turmeric • 1teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger • Finely chopped crystallized ginger (optional) • Sliced almonds (optional) DIRECTIONS • Combine all ingredients in a saucepan, except the crystallized ginger and sliced almonds. • Stir well to combine. • Cook over medium high heat, stirring until mixture comes to a low boil. • Immediately reduce heat to low. • Cover and cook for about 18 minutes. • Fluff with a fork. • The cover, and let sit for 5 more minutes. • Garnish the finished rice with the candied ginger and the sliced almonds.

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Blend on Trend Smoothies are more popular than ever, but that doesn't mean you should let them get predictable. Here are some recipes that go way beyond the usual suspects like banana and strawberry. And the great thing about smoothie recipes is, the instructions are almost always simple: combine ingredients in the blender and let 'er rip! Recipes by Claire Saffitz

FOR ALLDRINKS

Using smoothie or ice crush setting, purée ingredients with 1/2 cup ice in a blender until smooth.

AVOCADO, KALE, PINEAPPLE, AND COCONUT SMOOTHIE YIELDS 2 1/2 cups INGREDIENTS • 1/2 ripe avocado, pitted, peeled • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped Tuscan kale • 1/2 cup frozen pineapple chunks • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped coconut meat • 1 cup coconut water or iced green tea • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice • Matcha (green tea powder) • 1 tablespoon light agave nectar •Pinch of kosher salt

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BERRY, BEET, MINT, LIME, AND CHIA SEED SMOOTHIE YIELDS 1 1/2 cups INGREDIENTS • 3/4 cup almond milk • 3/4 cup frozen strawberries and/or blueberries • 1/4 cup grated beet (from about 1 small) • 1/4 cup mint leaves • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice • 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds • 1 tablespoon honey • Pinch of kosher salt *The liquid is really up to you. Nut milks add body and protein, but if you prefer something sweeter, try juice. Less heavy? Go with coconut water.


This power-breakfast smoothie will be extra smooth if you soak the nuts and oats in water overnight; drain before proceeding.

BANANA, COFFEE, CASHEW, AND COCOA SMOOTHIE

TROPICAL CARROT TURMERIC, AND GINGER SMOOTHIE

YIELDS 2 cups

YIELDS 2 cups

INGREDIENTS • 1 banana, preferably frozen • 2 Medjool dates, pitted • 1/2 cup cold-brew coffee • 1/4 cup raw cashews, preferably soaked overnight • 3 tablespoons old-fashioned oats, preferably soaked overnight • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder • Pinch of ground cardamom • Pinch of kosher salt

INGREDIENTS • 1 blood or navel orange, peel and white pith removed • 1 large carrot, scrubbed, coarsely chopped • 1/2 cup frozen mango chunks • 2/3 cup coconut water • 1 tablespoon shelled raw hemp seeds • 3/4 teaspoon finely grated peeled ginger • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated peeled turmeric Pinch of cayenne pepper Pinch of kosher salt

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training

DOING THE WORK WILL ALWAYS BRING RESULTS

SURGE of Ambition with Lauren Facey p.66

PHOTO: SCOTT BRAYSHAW

Rock Climbing and CrossFit p. 72

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A SURGE OF AMBITION BY MELISSA MEAD

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S C O T T B R AY S H A W

LAUREN FACEY

Few of today’s top CrossFit Athletes can say that they were first introduced to the sport at the ripe age of 9, or that they started getting serious about CrossFit by age 13. Up and coming CrossFit athlete Lauren Facey may only be fifteen years old, but she sure means business. In the past year, Facey placed 25th in the world at the 2016 CrossFit Open, leaving her only fifteen spots away from qualifying for the Games. Facey also took 3rd place at USA Weightlifting’s Youth National Championships. Qualifying for the CrossFit Games is certainly noted in Facey’s aspirations, and she is beyond motivated to do so.

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training Lauren Facey first got introduced to CrossFit when her aunt and uncle opened CrossFit Surge in Northglenn, Colorado in the spring of 2010. She recalls not being too fond of CrossFit for the first two years she tried it. That was until her thirteen year old eyes witnessed 18 year old Lauren Fisher compete in person. It was then, that Facey realized that she didn’t need to be older to be good at CrossFit. Motivated and excited, she soon found herself training 5-6 days a week in the adult classes, instead of three days a week in the kid’s class. When you’re a teenager, things change quickly. Body, mentality, and not to mention strength. Facey admits, “when I started to love CrossFit and apply myself, I started seeing my max weights go up, my body start to thin out, and my hard work paying off.”

Facey quickly found that CrossFit would challenge her mentally and physically, which she loved. Once she began applying that mindset to things outside of CrossFit, she started to truly believe that there would be no challenge that she couldn’t overcome. “CrossFit is something I’ve always been able to turn to when I am going through rough patches or bad days,” says Facey. Between the incredibly supportive community at her gym, and the workouts themselves, Facey can’t ever recall a time where she left the gym feeling worse than when she walked in. Despite the fact that they are 5-10 years older than her, some of Facey’s best friends are her training partners, with whom she shares this passion for fitness. “If it weren’t for the people I’ve trained with, and all of the support I’ve received over the past few years, I wouldn’t be half the athlete or person that I am today,” exclaims Facey. Nowadays, Facey trains six times a week for around two-three hours. When she’s not crossfitting or in school, Facey enjoys drawing and snowmobiling. Aside from her goal of competing in the Games, Facey plans on becoming a physical therapist after attending college. She also wants to obtain her Level I CrossFit and her USA Weightlifting Coaching Certification, so that she can continue sharing her passion with others. Guess Facey can also thank her aunt and uncle for their fortitude in opening up the CrossFit Surge affiliate. That’s what a little ‘surge’ of ambition will get you at the ripe old age of nine!

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PULL-UPS

12 MINUTE AMRAP 4 Clean and Jerks 8 Pull-Ups 12 Kettlebell Swings

TIP: For the pull-ups, if you are kipping or doing butterfly, make sure you have the strength in your shoulders to safely complete the movement without crashing down. If you are working on building strength, scale the number down and do strict pull ups, or use a band. 

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LAUREN’S WOD

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4

CLEAN AND JERKS 155/105 LBS

TIP: For the clean and jerk, the weight should be heavy but also something you can be able to move for the 12 minutes. Make sure your back is set for the clean and stay tight for the jerk to help make sure you can have a successful lift without injury. 

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training

“WHEN I STARTED TO LOVE CROSSFIT AND APPLY MYSELF, I STARTED SEEING MY MAX WEIGHTS GO UP, MY BODY START TO THIN OUT, AND MY HARD WORK PAYING OFF.”

12

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KETTLEBELL SWINGS 55/35 LBS TIP: For the KB swings be sure to use your hips and maintain control of the kettlebell to avoid it going backwards over your head or crashing to the ground.

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Sweat RX - Jan/Feb 2017