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SHOULD YOU GO

ANJUM ANAND SIMPLE, FRESH AND

GLUTEN FREE? BEYON D THE FAD

FLAVOURSOME INDIAN FOOD

Lunchbox

LEGENDS

HOW TO NAIL SCHOOL AND WORK LUNCHES EVERY DAY

BUSY+ HEALTHY MEAL PREP TIPS TO SAVE YOU TIME

DELICIOUS & HEALTHY

MID-WEEK MEALS

THE MINDSPAN DIET + COOKING WITH FRESH BERRIES SUPER SNACKS FOR KIDS + THE BEST OF PALEO

VOLUME 5 NO.3 / MARCH 2017

AUSTRALIAN

AUST $6.95 INC GST N.Z. $7.95 INC GST

PUBLICATION


Blend it your way Create your very own delicious bowl at home or use this super easy Açaí Bowl recipe: Ingredients: 2 x Amazonia Acai 100g sachets s ½ Frozen banana 60ml Coconut water or almond milk m Directions: Blend until silky smooth. Decorate e with your favourite fresh fruits and crunchy granola. Serve fresh and enjoy! Visit amazonia.com for more recipe inspiration

Avaialble vai lb in Açaí Pure or Açaí Energy


Açaí Benefits Healthy Appetite:

Energy:

Nutrient-dense to keep you fuller for longer

Nutrients to support energy production

Anti-ageing:

Cardiovascular:

Antioxidants to help fight free radical damage

Source of healthy fats, Omega 3, 6 & 9

Glowing Skin:

Healthy Digestion:

Antioxidant-rich for a healthy glow

Source of fibre to aid digestion

• Antioxidants • Omega 3,6,9 • Trace Minerals • Dietary Fibre

Pitaya Benefits Anti-ageing: Antioxidants to help fight free radical damage

NEW

Digestion: Source of fibre and prebiotics to aid digestion

Glowing Skin: Rich in Vitamin C to support collagen production to keep skin plump and assist in healing

Energy: Iron is an essential element for blood production and oxygenation

Immunity: Boost immune health with naturally occurring Vitamin C

Prebiotics: Assists the growth of good bacteria for optimal digestion

• Antioxidants • Vitamin C • Iron • B Vitamins • Phosphorus • Fibre Available at all Açaí Brothers and all leading Cafe's, look for the Amazonia LOGO

amazonia.com @amazoniaco


Contents ON THE COVER In the kitchen with Anjum Anand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Cook fresh, authentic and flavoursome food with ‘the Nigella of Indian cuisine’

THIS MONTH’S FEAST... Wholefood society: is paleo for you?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Nutritional know-how and yummy recipes with Nadia Felsch

In season: raspberries and blackberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Move over, acai. Aussie-grown fresh berries are a superfood to be reckoned with.

Meal plan: busy + healthy . . . . . . .46 Tips and meal prep tricks for time-poor foodies

Featured Foodie: Caroline Griffiths . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Recipe creator, food stylist and breakfast bowl enthusiast

Buyer’s guide: convenience meals . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Who said ‘fast food’ wasn’t good for you?

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In the cellar: the spirits of Tasmania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 We visit the home of some of the best boutique tipples in Australia

GOURMET HEALTH Lunchbox legends . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 20 tips for packing lunches you (and your family) will love to eat

Gluten free: food frenemy . . . . 82 Has gluten intolerance gone too far? We ask the experts

Cultured cultures . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Beyond the trend and into the future of fermented foods

Food and memory . . . . . . . . . . . 100 What you diet has to do with keeping your brain young

TRAVEL Peru: land of contrasts. . . . . . . 106 Explore the climates and cultural influences that have shaped Peruvian cuisine.

EAT Snacks for superkids . . . . . . . . . 58 Fruit- and veg-filled goodies designed for young palates

Out the door food . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Grab and go with these nourishing recipes from Sophie Hansen

Healthy in a hurry . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Mid-week wonders with the Fit Foodie twist


Regulars Recipe index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Credits & contributors . . . . . . . 8 Editor’s letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10–14 Hot plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 #trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Meet the maker . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Food bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122

Multimedia Get more raspberry and blackberry recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 When you see this In-Site logo in the magazine, select the nourish magazine channel in the app from the channel list, hold your phone over the page and watch content come to life!

Get a copy of There’s a Beetroot in my Cake online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Watch Catalyst’s Gluten: A Gut Feeling . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Download the free app from: insiteapp.com.au

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RECIPE INDEX V=Vegetarian, VG=Vegan, GF=Gluten free, *= Option

BREAKFAST Go chia pudding (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Breakfast berry tart (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Scrambled green eggs (V, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Zucchini & spinach fritters (V, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Nutty granola with yoghurt & berries (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Mixed berry & tahini smoothie (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Sustainable omelette (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Coriander, quinoa & corn bowl with tortilla chips (V, GF*) . . . . . 54 Vanilla super protein smoothie bowl (V, VG*, GF*) . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Avocado & matcha smoothie bowl (V, VG*, GF*). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Chilli bacon & eggs with sweet potato hash (GF*) . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Overnight bircher with fruit & nuts (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Breakfast smoothie (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

MAINS Barbecued tandoori-style sea bream (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Hyderabad-style chickpea biryani (V, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chicken with fenugreek (GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Salmon patties with sweet potato chips & avocado (GF) . . . . . . 49 Minced pork two ways (GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Eye fillet steak with zucchini & brussels chips (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Roast chicken three ways (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Baked snapper with lemon, garlic & chilli (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Teriyaki tofu bowl (VG, GF*) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Leftovers + baked eggs (V, GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Japanese miso salmon (GF*) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

SALADS Charred, spiced sweet potato salad (V, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Turmeric chicken & spinach salad (GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Raspberry, spinach & Persian feta salad with salted candied walnuts (GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

SNACKS, STARTERS & SHARING Raspberry iced tea (VG, GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Raw cashew & chia bliss bites (VG, GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Chippies (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Barbecue muffins (VG, GF*) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Apple cookies (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Banana snowflakes (VG, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Frittata with goat’s curd & cherry tomatoes (V, GF). . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Super snack bar (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Fermented Tomatoes (Kvasheni pomidory) (VG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

SWEETS Chilled mango, coconut & pearl puddings (VG*, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Saffron yoghurt phirni (V, GF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Berry yoghurt swirl popsicles (V, GF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Healthy kids raspberry & chocolate slice (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Spiced pumpkin doughnuts (V) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61


CREDITS

Winsor Dobbin has been a journalist for more than 35 years during which time he has been based in cities as diverse as London, Paris, Johannesburg and Sydney. A former sports writer and foreign correspondent, Tasmania-based Winsor now writes about his greatest passions – food, wine and travel – and is a regular contributor to newspapers, magazines and websites worldwide.

EDITORIAL EDITOR Maddie Lakos Email: maddie@blitzmag.com.au EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Sam Emms MANAGING EDITOR Ben Stone

WINSOR DOBBIN

gourmetontheroad.blogspot.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Beth Anderson, Winsor Dobbin, Jaimee Edwards, Nadia Felsch, Sophie Hansen, Steph Lowe, Linda Moon, Sally O’Neil ART ART DIRECTOR Javie D’Souza GRAPHIC DESIGNERS James Steer, Diep Nguyen, Jonathan Rudolph DIGITAL & ONLINE HEAD OF DIGITAL STRATEGY Karl Nemsow ONLINE EDITOR Christine Assirvaden SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER David Ding

Sophie Hansen is a freelance food writer, home cook and fledgling photographer who lives on a farm just west of Orange, NSW. Her blog ‘Local is Lovely’ is a celebration of all things seasonal and simply delicious, and Hanson hopes her recipes will inspire more people to source their food as locally as possible. local-lovely.com

SOPHIE HANSEN

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Supplied by Hardie Grant ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL ADVERTISING MANAGER Natalie Grosso Email: natalie@blitzmag.com.au

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Silvio Morelli GENERAL MANAGER Mark Unwin CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stefania Minuti ADMINISTRATION & CUSTOMER SERVICE FINANCE Min You SUBSCRIPTIONS MANAGER & CUSTOMER SERVICE Angelina Modica MARKETING & PROMOTIONS MANAGER Frances Ricchetti Email: customerservice@blitzmag.com.au Phone: (03) 9574 8999 Fax: (03) 9574 8899 PO Box 4075, Mulgrave, 3170 Web: nourishmag.com.au

Steph Lowe has a degree in sport and exercise science and a graduate diploma in human nutrition. She specialises in sports nutrition, high performance weight loss, and teaching people how easy natural nutrition can be. She has extensive experience working with sports teams, elite athletes, corporations, schools and the public in the area of optimal nutrition.

STEPH LOWE

Nadia Felsch is the creator of the Wholefood Society and the Path to Wholefoods program, a recipe developer, writer and nutritionistin-the-making whose relatable approach to real food is about nourishment, enjoyment and, ultimately, eating freedom. nadiafelsch.com

Articles published in this issue of nourish are Copyrighted © 2017 and are published by Blitz Publications and Multimedia Group Pty Ltd under licence from Bushi Pty Ltd.

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DISCLAIMER

Please see blitzpublications.com.au/privacy-policy for location of our privacy policy.

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NADIA FELSCH

Sally O’Neil is a writer, population health specialist, self-confessed food junkie, and founder of The Fit Foodie blog: a hub for all things healthy, fit, stylish, aspirational and influential. With a passion for wellbeing and fitness, her aim is to inform and inspire people so they are equipped to feel nourished, happy and full. She is on a mission to prove that nutritious food doesn’t have to be boring.

GRAPHIC IMPRESSIONS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Opinions and viewpoints expressed in nourish do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher. Reproduction of any material without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. The acceptance of advertising does not necessarily imply endorsement of services or products.

thenaturalnutritionist.com.au

SALLY O’NEIL

the-fit-foodie.com


We’re never too busy to be healthy.. . I have the unfortunate affliction of being a ‘busy person’. You know, the kind of person who’s email inbox seems to be always on the cusp of spiralling out of control, who eats lunch at their desk and breakfast on the train to work, who’s phone may as well be the centre of the universe. After all, a magazine doesn’t just edit itself. Much like lunch doesn’t pack itself, or dinner cook itself, or breakfast remember to find its way into our bellies. Our diets, like our workload, can feel totally out of our control – especially when we’re busy. ‘There’s nothing in the fridge,’ I say. ‘So takeaway/a bowl of cereal/ something from the vending machine it is!’ Needless to say, prioritising healthy eating can be a challenge. But it’s a challenge that we ought to take on. In the face of frozen dinners and nutritionally lacklustre takeaway meals, we’re looking for new ways to making food both easy and good for us. Such as making fruit and vege filled snacks

for kids (page 59) that are so mindblowingly simple they practically make themselves. Or getting stuck into those infamously dull mid-week meals (made totally-not-dull by Sally O’Neil page 70). Or creating nutritious breakfasts you can eat solely with a spoon (page 52) – freeing up another hand for an equally important task, such as calling your mum (or answering your email, if you must). We’re also learning how to do ‘meal prep’ from nutritionist and athlete Steph Lowe (page 46) and how to pack lunches you won’t be tempted to leave at home (page 76). Take that, vending machine! This month, we encourage you to treat yourself to a new lunch box and fill it with foods that make your work day seem shorter. And, when Friday rolls around and it’s time for after-work drinks, treat yourself to an lighter, fresher vermouth cocktail (page 30) – we hear they’re as hip as they are healthy. Phew – back to it!

Maddie Lakos. Editor, nourish magazine

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THE SOURCE

EAT

Spice Saviours Love Asian food? New research has shown that it can also love you back. The American Chemical Society found two spice favourites of Asian cuisines, chilli and ginger, could work together to lower the risk of cancer. Researchers tested the effects of both capsaicin (the compound that gives chilli its heat) and 6-gingerol (the pungent compound in ginger) on cancer prevention in mice and found that a combination of both reduced the incident of cancer in mice by 20 per cent.

GOURMET HEALTH TRENDING

LISTEN

SONIC SEASONING

Wicked vegan

Think plant-based foods are only for virtuous health freaks in yoga pants? Nuh-uh. Now you can reduce your consumption of animal products (which, yes, is both good for the environment and for your body) while noshing on nourishing American-diner style food at The Alley (pictured) in St Kilda, Melbourne, set to open in March. Brisbanites can head to the new Moo-Free Burgers in North Lakes and Sydneysiders can pop into Soul Burger in Randwick or Bliss & Chips in Newtown. #notquitecleaneating

Can you really listen to your food? According to Charles Spence, a professor of experimental psychology at Oxford University, you can. In his 2005 paper titled The Role of Auditory Cues in Modulating the Perceived Crispness and Staleness of Potato Chips Spence found that, if the crunch sound of a potato chip was amplified, it tasted fresher. Turns out, this can also be done with music. Spence says that highpitched music can make things taste sweeter, whereas low-pitched music can make things more bitter. You can try it yourself with chocolate courtesy of The Sporkful podcast at soundcloud.com/sporkful

DRINK

DRY, NOT SWEET

Because we’re sweet enough already, Karma Cola (who make fair trade, organic, craft sodas that raise funds to support farmers in Sierra Leone) have released a range of refreshingly crisp, low-sugar sodas. Made with ethically-sourced fruit juices instead of straight up sugar or artificial sweeteners, each bottle contains less than a third of the sugar of traditional soft drinks. For details visit karmacola.com.au

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THE SOURCE TRY

Nice cream Move over, Messina, there’s a new [all-vegan] ice-cream joint in town. Brought to you by Laki Papadopoulos and Mark Price, the brains behind the popular Transformer and Vegie Bar restaurants in Fitzroy, Girls and Boys is a new plant-based dessert bar serving up soft serves, gelato, cakes and (fresh to the menu) spiced mylks, cold-pressed juices and thickshakes. Follow them on Instagram @girlsandboysfitzroy

GO

Maremma, Tuscany

THE FEED NEWS

WAX OFF

First Woolworths challenged our perceptions of ugly fruit with The Odd Bunch bags, now extra-shiny apples are getting the shove and are now being sold ‘as nature intended’. Food-grade wax is usually applied to replace the naturallyoccurring wax on an apples skin – also making them look shiny and presentable. “While an unwaxed apple may look duller,” says Scott Davidson, Woolworths Head of Produce, “It will still taste just as good and will contain all the nutrients that an added waxed apple has.”

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“This is a region of wide open spaces, swaying wheat fields, hills polka-dotted with olive trees, rambling vineyards baring native grapes, overgrown fig trees and rampant prickley pears, long beaches and wild animals,” says writer, photographer and Food52 columnist Emiko Davies. On the Costa D’Agento (the Silver Coast) in the southernmost part of Tuscany lies Maremma, a hotbed of unique Italian cuisine and the topic of Davies new wanderlust-filled recipe book, Acquacotta. Published by Hardie Grant books, $49.99

COFFEE CAPSULES WITH A CONSCIENCE The rise of the ‘keep cup’ might have helped us kick the disposable cup habit, and now caffeine kings Di Bella have come up with a solution to athome waste from coffee capsules. Their new capsules (filled with their award-winning organic coffee from Peru) will biodegrade within 180 days in landfill. Packs of 10 capsules can be purchased for $8.00 at dibellacoffee.com

BUY


THE SOURCE

TAS

NEWKIND FESTIVAL

MELBOURNE FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

March 17 to 20 A brand new event with a revolutionary twist, Newkind Festival is inviting the adventurous, the curious and the entrepreneurial to literally reinvent reality in the spirit of global change. Event director Erfan Daliri says, “Newkind is a social movement, disguised as a festival.” Participants will have different roles – administrators, artists, engineers, farmers, healers and scouts – each bringing a different perspective to your miniNewkind community. For more information, visit newkindfestival.com

Daniel Mahon

March 31 to April 9 Australia’s culinary capital gets a whole lot better when Melbourne Food & Wine Festival brings world renowned chefs and a plethora of foodie events to town. Some of the highlights include Thai cooking demonstrations by David Thompson and Gaston Acurio (who you can read about it this month’s travel section, page 106), World’s Longest Lunch events across the state and city-wide food crawls. For details visit melbournefoodandwine.com.au

ALIVE PLANT BASED FESTIVAL

NSW

March 25 Alive is the very first plant-based festival on the Central Coast. Designed to showcase the diverse variety of plant-based food and lifestyle choices available locally and held at the beautiful Umina Beach Markets site, the festival promises live music, vegan street food and local arts and crafts. For details visit uminabeachmarkets.com

EVENTS

VIC

THE SUMMER NIGHT MARKET CLOSING NIGHT

VIC

March 8 Celebrating the last night of the Summer Night Market season, Victoria Markets will not only have their usual host of shops and food and drink vendors (including Trapizzino by 400 Gradi, strawberries and cream in the Pimm’s Garden and a Frosé – that’s frozen rosé – bar by Cheeky Rascal) but a special tribute for International Women’s Day! For details visit thenightmarket.com.au

NSW

TASTE OF SYDNEY March 9 to 12

Taste of Sydney returns to the stunning surrounds of Centennial Park in 2017 with an all-new festival program. Fourteen of Sydney’s hippest restaurants will offer up miniature versions of signature dishes, making Taste a one-stop-shop for foodies with fine dining bucket lists. There’s also a new live music hub, pop-up bars and loads of take-home gourmet goodies. For details and tickets visit sydney.tastefestivals.com

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Feed Your Vego

Sunwarrior protein powders are the ultimate plant-based superfoods. They’re ideal for increasing athletic performance, burning fat, building muscle and repairing tissue. Choose Sunwarrior CLASSIC or the new Certified Organic Sunwarrior CLASSIC PLUS for the added amino acid balancing effect of peas, chia seeds, quinoa, and amaranth. Kasia Sitarz Sunwarrior Ambassador

Rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, Sunwarrior uses only the whole-grain of brown rice and contains absolutely no chemicals, dairy, whey, fillers or added sugar. With Sunwarrior it’s easy to make the most delicious and nutritious smoothies in a heartbeat. Available in Natural, Vanilla or Chocolate flavours at selected Coles, Woolworths, Independent Supermarkets, Health Food Stores ite.

Now in new packs


KITCHEN CHIC

The cool school Who said lunchboxes have to be drab (read: lame)? We love this classy, could-totallytake-that-to-the-office, polka-dotty ‘twin deck’ lunchbox from Kmart. $12, kmart.com.au

New Haven Dining Chair $259, ozdesignfurniture.com.au

New Haven Dining Table $1499, ozdesignfurniture.com.au

LAST DAYS OF SUMMER SURE, AUTUMN MIGHT BE ON ITS WAY. BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN WE CAN’T DAPPLE IN COASTAL TEXTURES AND PASTEL SHADES  RIGHT?

Mojito Homewards Small Cam Bowls $30 for a set of five, mojitohomewares.com.au

Hunt Homewares Handcarved Ceramic Candle in Elk Charcoal $60, available in Chai Tea and Coconut Lime fragrances, hunthomewares.com.au

Orlieu Round Coconut Cushion $75, orlieu.com Salt & Pepper Coast Platter Fish Shape $39.95, saltandpepper.com.au

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Davis & Waddell Terrain Salt/Pepper Mill $24.99 each, davisandwaddell.com.au

Lisa T Hello You Coasters $8 for a set of four, target.com.au

That’s handy…

Breville Luxe Collection Kettle in Blueberry Granita $199.95, breville.com.au

Robert Gordon Tapas Bowl $19.95 each, southwoodhome.com.au

We need this for a number of reasons: breakfasts in bed, making extra room on crowded m dining tables, creating artisticd looking cheese plates. The point is, we’re not sure why a ttray needs legs, but we like it. $69.99, davisandwaddell.com.au

WANT.

You call it a stubbie holder. We call it a kombucha cooler, a coconut water insulator and a water bottler beautifier. Whatever you call it, these chic Ubbie Co ‘things’ are available in four equally chic designs, so you’re sure to find one to suit your mood. $14.95 each, ubbie.co

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IN THE KITCHEN

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A nju m Anand WE SPEAK TO ‘THE NIGELLA OF INDIAN CUISINE’ ABOUT COOKING VIBRANT AND AUTHENTIC INDIAN AT HOME  EVEN ON A WEEKNIGHT. Words: MADDIE LAKOS Food photography: MARTIN POOL

They say that Anjum Anand is to Indian Food what Nigella Lawson is to chocolate cake. The softly spoken London local inherited a love of cooking from her Punjabiimmigrant parents, but never dreamed she’d become a professional chef, let alone a much-loved TV chef, bestselling author and an influencer in Indian cuisine. “I have always loved cooking but it was never a career option in my family and probably all other Indian immigrant families of the time,” Anand says. “It was not work for a woman and, given all the opportunities of a good education, the last thing a traditional parent wanted is for their daughter to end up in a kitchen – where women have been since time immemorial!” Anand completed a degree in business and languages, but couldn’t ignore the pull of the kitchen. “Friends started to encourage me to do more with my passion and it didn’t take a lot to convince me and I explored a different type of career,” she says. And explore she did. Anand has worked in restaurant kitchens across the world, including Café Spice in New York, the Mondrian Hotel in Los Angeles and the Park Royal Hotel’s Indian

restaurant in New Delhi. But her real love, Anand discovered, is creating honest and delicious recipes that have a place in home cook’s repertoires. Her first cookbook, Indian Every Day: Light, Healthy Indian Food, was released in 2003. “A British publisher took a chance on me after countless rejections,” Anand says. “The book was successful considering I was completely unknown and – a few years and with no new book deal in spite of a fair amount of effort, the BBC came knocking on my door and were looking for the next face of Indian food.” Thus, Anand became the host of own cooking show, Indian Food Made Easy. Her next cookbook of the same name topped the Amazon best sellers list, at the time knocking Harry Potter off the number-one spot. “People started to understand there was more to Indian food than what was in their local curry houses and slowly there was a deeper understanding of how we eat,” Anand says. “I do believe there are now two Indian cuisines, the curry house one and a more authentic version – both have their own fans.” Her latest cookbook, I Love India, is an ode to those richly traditional and authentic dishes, but not without the

modern interpretations for which she has become renowned. “I Love India is my eighth cookbook and is by far my favourite and most personal book so far,” Anand says. “All my cookbooks have been important to me and have come about with changes or events in my life. This one is no different. I have spent more time in India this year, tasting some of the countries best known dishes, wanting to eat them where they are cooked best. That saw me waiting at street food stalls, eating on the roadside, as well as being invited into people’s homes. I got a deeper understanding and had a broader education of India’s best regional fare.” She describes the recipe collection as, “the best reflection of modern India”: a mix of street food, tandoori food, curries and lots of new regional dishes, as well as east-meets-west fusion flavours. “That is what modern Indian is like and, as an Indian, I also love both the traditional and also being creative with ingredients and flavours, and to reinvent others to fit in with our modern lifestyle.” For the March issue of nourish magazine, Anand has shared a selection of these recipes with us, each with its own story. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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WE ASKED ANJUM ANAND… You say in your introduction to I Love India that your passion for Indian food surpasses all others. Can you tell us a bit about why this is?

I think the reason I love it so much is that it is one of the constant Indian things throughout my childhood – the strongest link to my heritage was the food. My mother would have many parties and I would help my mother prepare the food. She’d tell her friends that I made the samosas or kebabs and I would just beam with pride. This all stayed with me. I have always loved feeding people and love sharing stories of childhood food memories. Also, I do think Indian food is the tastiest cuisine and I continue to believe that it is one of the healthiest cuisines around – full of ingredients that are really beneficial for the body, as long as you eat them in moderation.

When it comes to creating spice blends, pastes and so on, how easy is it to do at home?

Really, it has never been easier. In the old days they would make blends on stone slabs with a heavy, rolling pinlike pestle. Now you can buy fantastic spice grinders and blenders everywhere as well as really good quality spices accessible in most large cities in Australia. I launched The Spice Tailor, my own brand of Indian food in 2010 as I felt there had to be something on the shelves that really reflected the truly delicious, harmonious flavours of India for those too busy to cook from scratch. What are some of the essential ingredients you should have in your pantry for Indian cuisine?

Onions, garlic, tomatoes, ginger, spices and fresh ingredients. You can cook so much with the basics. After that, I will always have some yoghurt for a raita – which adds tang and creaminess to an Indian meal – as well as lentils, which are a cornerstone of Indian food, and either chapati flour to make flat breads or rice. You can have delicious Indian food all week with these basics. In this issue of nourish, we’re talking about cooking when you’re busy. What are some of your favourite midweek meals?

Eating freshly cooked meals is important to me so I try to cook every night. Worse-case scenario would be eggs and toast and some vegetables, baked potatoes or pasta. But often I try and cook something Indian. Indian food doesn’t take as long to cook as many believe and even those dishes that seem to take 30 minutes often take care of themselves as I start sorting the children or house out. I love making Indian wraps which are easy to make or vegetable- or lentilstuffed flatbreads which take just 10 minutes. There are lots of options, you just need to think about what you are cooking in advance so that doesn’t waste time when I get into the kitchen.

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FOOD AS MEDICINE

Ayurveda, a form of traditional medicine, has a unique influence in Indian cuisine. “Ayurveda heavily influenced Indian food in the early days,” Anand says. “Spices were woven into everyday meals as ayurvedic doctors understood their medicinal values and the proportions they should be consumed in. Ayurveda is also about understanding how food affects the body and how each ingredient has subtle qualities, she says. “This knowledge was passed down so that the people understood to eat all the different food groups which are considered important to the body every day. Food had to include all the tastes – sweet, sour, pungent, bitter, salty and astringent. [Ayurvedic] doctors felt if people ate well every day, they would remain healthy and not need a doctor.” Ayurvedic medicine is based on the belief that health and wellness depend on a delicate balance between three vastly different energies (life forces, if you will) called ‘doshas’. Most people have dominant doshas – revealed by things such as body type and natural tendencies – which need to be balanced. “My dosha is kapha vata which is earth and air/ether. Mostly, I am kapha in body and vata in mind – so I have a tendency to put on weight easily but do a lot of exercise and eat light food to balance this,” says Anand. “I also do one or two detoxes a year – although ayurveda recommends doing one each season – in the form of fruit and vegetable juices, which are really easy to make or pick up and easy to slot into a busy day, and I fast once a week.”


CHARRED, SPICED SWEET POTATO SALAD SERVES 4 TO 6, AS A SIDE DISH

North India grows lovely sweet potatoes; they are white-fleshed, sweet and creamy. When in season, they are grilled whole in their skins on street stalls and served with lemon juice and the delicious spice blend chaat masala, that balances out their inherent sweetness. This is a Westernised, embellished version of that dish, made with orange-fleshed sweet potatoes. It works really, really well. It is a fusion dish but one that, for me, works better than both originals and makes an amazing summery salad.

For the sweet potatoes 2 large sweet potatoes (around 450 g in total), scrubbed Salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper A little vegetable oil ¼ small red onion, very thinly sliced 1 Indian green finger chilli, deseeded and finely chopped 1 tbsp pumpkin seeds, lightly toasted in a pan until puffed up 2 large handfuls of watercress or rocket (arugula) For the dressing 2 tsp lemon juice 4 tbsp mayonnaise, low-fat if you like 2 rounded tbsp Greek yoghurt 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil ½–¾ tsp chaat masala 1 medium-small garlic clove, finely grated ½ tsp brown mustard seeds ½ tsp fennel seeds

Cut the potatoes into large wedges: the best way is to halve them horizontally and wedge each side. Place in a large pot of boiling salted water, return to the boil and simmer until the tip of a knife goes through easily, around 8 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, make the dressing. Whisk together the lemon juice, mayonnaise, yoghurt, half the oil, the chaat masala and garlic. Season to taste. Heat the remaining olive oil in a small saucepan, tilting it so the oil collects in one area. When hot, add the mustard seeds and reduce the heat. After 5 seconds, follow with the fennel seeds and cook until the mustard seeds pop, another few seconds or so. Stir into the dressing and season to taste. Drain the cooked potatoes and, once dry, place on a hot oiled griddle and cook for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, or until the wedges have lovely grill stripes. Add them straight into the dressing with the red onion, green chilli and most of the pumpkins seeds and leaves. Toss well, garnish with the remaining seeds and leaves and serve.

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BARBECUED TANDOORI-ST YLE SEA BREAM SERVES 4

Fish is always a treat; the gentle tandoori flavour and the carom seeds here work so well with fish. I cook this on the barbecue in those hinged grills for whole fish. The result is smoky, tangy and lightly spicy. I use Kashmiri chilli powder as it has a mild heat but a vibrant colour, which somehow whets the appetite when you are eating tandoori-style dishes. These are deceptively easy to make once you are confident with a barbecue. You can also make this in the oven: I force a couple of skewers along the length of the body and place them on the edges of the baking tray so that the fish is cooked suspended, as in a proper tandoori oven. You can also make little fish tikkas with this recipe, using good firm fish pieces, under a hot grill.

For the fish 2 whole sea bream or snapper (cleaned, gutted, scaled and fins removed by the fishmonger) A few squeezes of lemon juice (plus lemon wedges to serve) Salt A little vegetable oil 1–2 tbsp unsalted butter, melted, to baste A little paprika (optional) A few good pinches of chaat masala Coriander, to serve For the marinade 4 large garlic cloves 10 g (2 tsp) roughly chopped root ginger (peeled weight) 3 tsp lemon juice 1–2 tsp Kashmiri chilli powder, or paprika for colour and chilli powder for heat 1 tsp ground cumin 2 tbsp vegetable oil 150 g (½ cup) plain yoghurt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper ½ tsp carom seeds 1 rounded tbsp chickpea (gram) flour Using a sharp knife, score each fish 4 times on each side through the skin, about 5 millimetres into the flesh. Squeeze over some lemon juice and sprinkle a little salt

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inside and out, then set aside for 10 to 15 minutes. Blend together all the ingredients for the marinade except the carom seeds and chickpea flour. I often add a little extra paprika for a good red colour. Taste and adjust the seasoning; at this stage it should taste a bit too salty and spicy, and that’s fine. Add the carom seeds and chickpea flour. Smear the marinade thickly over both sides of each fish and into the slits. Leave to marinate for 45 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the barbecue to a medium-high flame. I like to use a hinged fish rack in which I put the fish, but be careful that it doesn’t flatten it too much. (You can also use 2 metal skewers per fish.) Oil the grill rack and the fish rack. Place the fish on the heat and cook for 6 to 8 minutes on the first side, or until the underside is a lovely golden colour with some areas of charring. If the coals are too hot, rake them away slightly. Turn the fish and cook the underside in the same way. If using skewers, the fish might stick a little, so be careful before turning. The fish is done when golden on both sides; to check if it is done on the inside, you can use a thermometer which should read 60°C when poked into the thickest part of the fish. Baste both sides with the melted butter as it cooks and chars, adding paprika to the butter for a good colour, if you want. Sprinkle with chaat masala and serve with lemon or lime wedges and coriander.


HYDERABAD-ST YLE CHICKPEA BIRYANI SERVES 6

Biryani is one of India’s most elegant and elaborate party dishes, and Hyderabad is well known for her meaty version. The original biryani was made with lamb, but this soon extended to chicken (when it gained popularity much later) or seafood in coastal regions. Vegetarian biryanis were created for impoverished royalty in some states, but also to cater for India’s millions of vegetarians. This version is as delicate as any other biryani, where the rice is as important as the protein. Serve with a raita and, if you want, a vegetable side dish. I like to serve this with pan-fried aubergines with seasoned Greek yoghurt and topped with pomegranate seeds, coriander and mint leaves. For the rice 400 g (2¼ cups) basmati rice Vegetable oil, as needed 2 tbsp ghee 5 cloves 5 green cardamom pods 2.5 cm cinnamon stick 1 dried bay leaf 2 small onions, thinly sliced salt 750 ml (3⅛ cups) water

For the chickpeas 2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped 4 tbsp plain yoghurt 2 small onions, finely chopped 1 good tsp finely grated root ginger 4 large garlic cloves, finely grated ¼–½ tsp chilli powder 2 tsp ground coriander 2 tsp ground cumin ½ tsp ground turmeric 2 tsp garam masala 2 x 400 g cans chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained and rinsed 3 tbsp chopped mint leaves 3 tbsp chopped coriander (cilantro) To finish Large pinch of saffron threads* 4 tbsp hot milk* 20 g (1½ tbsp) unsalted butter, cubed Large handful of store-bought crispy Fried onions, to serve Chopped coriander (cilantro), to serve *Put the saffron in a small cup with the milk and soak while you get on with the dish. Wash really well in several changes of water, or until the water runs clear. Leave to soak. Heat a tablespoon of vegetable oil and the ghee in a large, heavy-based, lidded pan. Add the whole spices and bay leaf and cook for 30 seconds or until aromatic. Add the onions and ½ a teaspoon of salt and cook until soft, stirring occasionally, then increase the heat and cook until golden. Drain the rice and add it to the golden onions. Stir well over a high heat to dry off any water

and coat the rice in the oil for 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in the measured water, taste and season well. The water should taste a little salty, or the rice will be a bit flavourless. Bring to the boil, then cover and reduce the heat right down. Cook undisturbed for 6 minutes, then taste a grain; it should be nearly or just done. Take off the heat and set aside, covered, for 5 minutes. Spoon on to a large plate so it doesn’t overcook. Set the pan aside for the final assembly. For the chickpeas, blend together the tomatoes and yoghurt. Heat 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a large pan. Add the onions with a good pinch of salt and cook until really soft, then increase the heat and cook until properly golden. Add the ginger and garlic and cook gently for 40 to 50 seconds. Add the ground spices and a splash of water and cook until the water has evaporated. Add the blended tomato mix and cook over a high-ish flame, stirring constantly, until the mixture comes to the boil and then reduces to a thick paste. Reduce the heat a little and cook until the paste darkens. Add the chickpeas and enough water to come halfway up the chickpeas. Return to the boil, taste and adjust the salt. Simmer for 5 to 6 minutes. Add the mint and coriander, and season for a final time. There should be some liquid in the pan. If not, add a little boiling water, or reduce if needed, until you have a watery curry. To finish, place half the butter cubes in the pan. Cover with half the rice then drizzle with half the saffron milk. Pour over the chickpea masala and top with the remaining rice, saffron and butter. Cover tightly with a lid and cook over a really low heat for 20 to 25 minutes or until steaming. Scatter with crispy onions and coriander. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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CHILLED MANGO, COCONUT AND PEARL PUDDINGS SERVES 4 TO 5

Like everyone, I have friends who prefer to avoid gluten and dairy and when they come round I need to have a special think about what to serve them. This is one of the desserts I will go to when mangoes are in season; easy, tasty and lovely after an Indian or spicy Asian meal. It is based on a popular Chinese dessert we see a lot in India – simply a light mango cream with lovely gelatinous tapioca pearls, mango and freshly grated coconut. This recipe proves again that, if you have good-quality, inherently tasty ingredients, you don’t need a lot more to make a fabulous dish. This is one of my summer favourites, really refreshing. It thickens overnight, so you may want to thin it with a bit of milk (and then taste for sweetness) before serving. You can also add some chia seeds.

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60 g large tapioca pearls, soaked for 20 minutes 2 large ripe Alphonso (ideally) mangoes 125 ml (½ cup) coconut cream, or to taste 175ml (⅔ cup) whole chilled milk, plus more if needed 2–3 tbsp sugar, or to taste 5 tbsp grated fresh or frozen and defrosted coconut, chilled Optional Garnishes Crispy tapioca pearls* Crystallised rose petals Flaked roasted almonds Fresh coconut shards Mango wedges Soak the tapioca pearls for 20 minutes. Bring a large pot of water to the boil – you do need lots of water. Add the drained tapioca pearls, bring to the boil, cover and cook for 14 minutes. Take off the heat and leave to finish cooking for another 10 minutes, or until they are translucent, or almost so. You want to keep an eye on them as if they over-cooked, they become gluey. Pour straight into a sieve and place in a large bowl of cold water. Set aside. Slice the cheeks from the mangoes and scoop out the flesh, keeping all the juices as you work. Set 1 cheek aside. Put the rest into a blender with the juices. Remove the skin

from the stones and try to get as much flesh and juice off it as you can; put this straight into the blender. Add the coconut cream, the smaller amount of milk and the sugar. Blend until smooth. Add the rest of the milk if it is thick (you might even need more, it all depends on the juiciness of the fruit), until the texture is like double (heavy) cream. Add half the coconut. Taste and adjust the sweetness to your liking. Add the cold pearls to the mango cream and chill until ready to eat. When you are ready to serve, chop the reserved mango into slivers. Pour the mango cream into small bowls, pile some of the mango in the middle, top with the remaining fresh coconut and crispy tapioca pearls, if you like, and serve chilled. Or, for a more graphic look, place the tapioca in the glasses, spoon over the mango cream, swirl in a little sweetened coconut cream and garnish with any of the options. *Crispy tapioca pearls. Soak an extra tablespoon of tapioca pearls, then dry on kitchen paper. Heat 1½ tablespoons of vegetable oil in a small pan, tilt the pan to collect the oil on 1 side and add the tapioca. Cover immediately with a lid as they will try and jump out. Cook for 1 minute or until crispy, drain and place on kitchen paper to blot off excess oil. Leave until ready to use (you can make this a day ahead). I leave these unsweetened, but you can candy them as well, in the same way as you would nuts.


SAFFRON YOGHURT PHIRNI SERVES 4 TO 5

Phirni is a Northern Indian dessert made from ground rice and milk, lightly flavoured, typically set and chilled in little clay pots. The clay continues to absorb the liquid from the mixture, making the phirni even creamier. I have added yoghurt to this recipe, which gives a subtle complexity that, I feel, really adds to the dish and helps to balance the sweetness of typical Indian desserts. Make these a day in advance. You can set them in pretty little glass bowls or a larger serving dish. When Indian mangoes are in season, I chop some and add them on top; the musky sweetness really works with this dessert. 40 g (around 2 rounded tbsp) basmati rice 1 litre (4 cups) whole milk 4 tbsp sugar, or to taste ¼ tsp ground cardamom Good pinch of saffron threads 2 tbsp thick, set plain yoghurt, not too sour Chopped pistachios or almonds, to serve Soak the basmati for 1 hour in plentiful water, then drain and dry it completely on kitchen paper. Set aside. Pour 3⅔ cups of the milk into a wide, heavy-based saucepan. Add the saffron.

Place over a medium heat, then reduce the heat and gently simmer until it has reduced to 600 millilitres (2½ cups). You will need to stir the milk often; scraping the base of the pan to make sure the milk doesn’t catch and burn. If the heat is too high, the milk will rise up in the pan and spill, so keep an eye on it. Meanwhile, set aside a teaspoon of the dried rice and, using a spice grinder, grind the rest to a coarse powder. Set aside. When the milk has reduced, add the ground rice to the reserved ⅓ cup milk and stir well. Pour this straight into the reduced hot milk with the reserved whole rice,

stirring so it does not form a clump. Keep cooking and stirring for 10 minutes or so over a medium heat. Add the sugar, cardamom and saffron and keep stirring until the mixture has thickened, another 5 to 7 minutes. It will measure around 2 cups. Cool, then stir in the yoghurt. Adjust the sweetness to taste, bearing in mind that as it cools the sweetness will be less pronounced. Pour into individual bowls or a large serving dish, cover with cling film (plastic wrap) and chill overnight in the fridge. Serve sprinkled with the nuts.

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MINI PANEER K ATHI ROLLS MAKES 10 MEDIUM-SMALL OR 15 TINY ROLLS

Kathi rolls are hot Indian wraps and one of India’s favourite street foods. They come in many guises, few of which resemble cold wraps as we know them. I have probably tried most versions, buying them in bustling markets in New Delhi, exchanging money straight from the car window in Mumbai – where they are known as Frankies – and in hotels and homes as street food made its way off the street. Different places have their own versions and there are no strict rules: as long as a soft bread with a slight chew envelopes a fresh, hot, tangy filling with red onions for crunch, you are in the right zone and in for a treat. I make these often. They’re tasty, everyone loves them and they are easy to throw together. You can also substitute chicken for the paneer. If you are in a hurry, you can buy tortilla wraps and cut them in half, but homemade wraps are cheaper and tastier. For the marinade 100 g plain yogurt, not too sour 20 g (1½ tbsp) roughly chopped root ginger (peeled weight) 2 large garlic cloves Scant ⅔ tsp garam masala (fresh if possible) Scant ⅔ tsp ground cumin 1 tsp chaat masala ½ tsp ground turmeric 2 tsp concentrated tomato purée Salt ⅛ tsp chilli powder, or to taste

For the breads 125 g (1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour, plus more to dust 1 tbsp vegetable oil 6–8 tbsp water, or as needed For the rolls 240 g paneer, cut into small fingers (2 cm x 5 cm) 2 tbsp vegetable oil ¾ small green (bell) pepper, thinly sliced Good handful of thinly sliced red onion rings Freshly ground black pepper

Herb chutney (makes 200 ml) 60 g coriander, leaves and some stalks 2 tbsp lemon juice, or to taste 20 g (¾ packed cup) mint leaves 25 g (¼ cup) pistachios (shelled weight) Salt ½ garlic clove (optional) 4 tbsp water Blend together all the ingredients for the marinade. Season to taste with salt – I use around a teaspoon. Add the paneer, gently turn the pieces to coat, and leave to marinate as you prepare the dough. Put the flour in a bowl and pour in the oil, water and a good pinch of salt. Knead together well; it will be a bit squelchy at the beginning but should become lovely and soft without cracks once it is done. Cover with a damp dish towel and leave to rest for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, make the chutney. Blend all ingredients until smooth and creamy, it might take a minute or so. Taste and adjust the seasoning and tang (lemon juice) to taste. Set aside. To make the breads, place a tava or frying pan over a medium heat. Divide the dough into 10 pieces and roll each out on a work surface lightly dusted with flour into a thin, round bread around 13 centimetres in diameter. Dust any excess flour off the bread and place on the pan. Cook, turning once, until the bread has just a few light brown spots on both sides; it only takes a minute or so. Repeat to cook all the breads, stacking them on a dish towel, covering each with the corners as you go to help keep them soft. (You can also reheat them in some foil in the oven.) Now, back to the rolls. Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a saucepan, add the pepper and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the paneer and all its marinade and cook, stirring often, until the liquid has reduced and you can see oil in the pan, 6 to 8 minutes or so. You might need to add a splash of water at some point once the pan gets dry. Add the onions and cook for another minute, or until the liquid now just coats the ingredients and is still moist. Take off the heat. Working quickly, spoon a line of the filling down the centre of each wrap, top with a rounded teaspoon of Tangy Herb Chutney, wrap them up and serve hot.

This is an edited extract from I Love India by Anjum Anand (published by Hardie Grant Books, $39.99), available in stores nationally.

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HOT PLATE

Bombini chef and owner Cameron Cansdell

BOMBINI PIZZA 366 AVOCA DRIVE, AVOCA BEACH NSW bombini.com.au

Situated in the terraced area of the bombini property – two acres of tropical gardens on the NSW Central Coast – bombini pizza boasts a large alfresco undercover bar and entertaining area surrounded by lush tropical gardens. The open kitchen and impressive outdoor wood-fired pizza oven are a hive of activity, filling the sunlit space with the smell of fresh baked bread and aromatic Italian herbs. First opening in October 2014, bombini is a modern Italian restaurant located in the beachside paradise of Avoca Beach. The pizza restaurant, which opened in October last year, is the newest addition to the bombini family – a casual yet chic secondary dining option to the main restaurant with the same nutritious and seasonal flair. Chef and owner Cameron Cansdell says the bombini

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THE LATEST ADDITION TO THE BOMBINI FAMILY IS TRADITIONAL ITALIAN PIZZA MADE USING GARDEN-GROWN PRODUCE AND ORGANIC AUSTRALIAN FLOURS – ALL IN A TROPICAL BEACHSIDE PARADISE.

philosophy is inspired by its namesake: the humble bumblebee. He champions a natural and sustainable approach to food that is harmonious with nature, using produce from the property’s own fruit trees, veggie patch, chickens and beehives. “In the last two years, we have cultivated a large vegetable garden and fruit trees where I grow a lot of specialty produce according to the season and our sub-tropical climate, including bananas, lemongrass, galangal and a large number of fruit trees such as figs, citrus and stone fruit,” Cansdell says. “We also have a large prickly pear tree that is a key feature of our restaurant, and when in season, I use the fruits in my housemade gelato and sorbet desserts.” “Though often we might grow produce that is not traditionally Italian, we treat these ingredients

and serve in an Italian way. So, our climate strongly influences the dishes we prepare.” The pizza dough at bombini pizza has been crafted from organic Australian flours with naturally leavened yeasts, with an average proving time of 48 hours to slowly build character and flavour. Quality ingredients including San Marzano tomatoes, extra-virgin olive oils, herbs from the onsite garden and a custom-made salumi by Dolce Vita Fine Foods in Kogarah. It is prepared in the traditional and Neapolitan style: thinner crust pizzas, the thicker focaccia style Sardenera of Liguria pizza and al taglio – a Roman style made from spelt flour. Also on the menu is a large selection of antipasto,


WE ASKED CAM CANSDELL…

How do you source the produce that you don’t grow in your garden? There are many suppliers we contact throughout the year for specific seasonal produce, chosen because they are the best in Australia. A small selection of the resources we use to create our menu include fresh yuzu and chestnuts from Jane Casey in autumn and fresh green peppercorns in the winter from Saltt Trading. All our seafood is MSC-certified from De Costi, and we have hormone-free, grass-fed beef from Pinnacle Beef, jersey cream and milk from Fleurieu Milk and organic stoneground flour from Wholegrain Milling. What are your ‘must try’ dishes on the menu? A dessert that is a firm favourite with our guests is the ‘bombini raspberry and cream’. We like to change our menu regularly, though this is our only standing dish that has been on the menu since we launched. There would be outrage if we replaced it! It was created around my own personal love for this delicate berry, using other elegant flavours and textures that complement the raspberry beautifully. What is some of your favourite autumn produce? Autumn is an ideal time to grab fresh broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Root vegetables such as carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, leeks and beetroot are also at their best. You also get trees dropping their nuts to the orchard floor at this time. It’s fantastic to cook with fresh walnuts, pecans, macadamias, and chestnuts that have a soft, crumbly texture and an earthy sweetness.

with larger dishes driven by season and produce. “Our weekly changing menu caters to all – those who prefer an individual or shared dish. Though ultimately is best enjoyed in the shared Italian style, for a memorable experience of flavours with friends and family,” Cansdell says.

Finish this sentence: bombini is the best place to… relax, and enjoy a sensory culinary escape. Spend your afternoon wandering the fruit and vegetable gardens, enjoy a Bellini while lazing back on the outdoor daybeds, taste delicious honest food, and drift off feeling as if you’re a thousand miles from care.

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#TRENDING

WHY WE LOVE VERMOUTH WE SPEAK TO JEREMY SHIPLEY, GROUP BAR MANAGER FOR SOLOTEL, ABOUT WHY VERMOUTHS IS PUTTING FRESHER, BOLDER AND LOWERALCOHOL DRINKS IN THE SPOTLIGHT. Words: MADDIE LAKOS, Photography: SUPPLIED

Alth A hou ugh h it was once reserved for c cktaill buffs and those passionate coc about bout ap aperiitif , vermouth has eexperienced d a rapid rise in popularity. The bitter--sw w et Negroni (a drink made with vermouth, gin and campari, pictured left) was called ‘the kale of cocktails’ by Punch (punchdrink.com) writer Leslie Pariseau, meaning that it had achieved the same seemingly unlikely popularity and presence in our diets as that leafy green we love so much. “With such an unlikely, somewhat polarising flavour profile,” Pariseau says. “How did this drink become the staple of every cocktail menu in the nation?” The same could be said for vermouths on their own, which can range in flavour from piquant and herbal to subtle and sweet. Tastes that are not exactly part of the Australian drinking tradition of crisp white wine, bold red wine and mild-tasting beer. Even so, our enthusiasm for vermouths has lead, not only to the creation of a number of Australian-made tipples

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(Regal Rogue, Maidenii and Causes & Cures, to name a popular few), but to the opening of a vermouth-based bar, Banksii, which opened in Barangaroo (Sydney) in 2016. Keen to get to the bottom of this trend, we decided to speak to Solotel bar manager, Jermey Shipley, about what has taken vermouth back to the top. Solotel is a hospitality group that manages several notable bars and restaurants across Australia, including Matt Moran’s Aria and the Opera Bar in the Sydney Opera House. “In a nutshell, I look after all beverage aspects – besides the wine – across 28 bars and restaurants here in Sydney and in Brisbane,” Shipley says. “This includes creating and implementing all cocktail menus across the venues, hosting various brand and cocktail trainings for all staff, working with our marketing team to create events, pop ups and all sorts of cool activations but also making sure our beverage offerings are on narrative, relevant and fun – I like to think of myself as the ‘social lubricator’.” Here’s what he had to say about vermouth: What is vermouth? Very simply, vermouth is a winebased product – white, red and rosé wine – infused with botanicals, herbs, fresh and dried fruits and most importantly wormwood. These botanicals, fruits and flowers can include, orris root, cassia bark, cinchona bark, gentian, rhubarb, violets, roses, coriander, nutmeg, mace and citrus peels. Frozen raspberries are also often added. Then, the various vermouth distillers marry the ‘flavoured wine’ with another spirit for fortification, most commonly brandy. What does vermouth taste like? There are several types of vermouth, each having its own flavour profile. Dry vermouth is generally pale in colour – it’s the one you make martinis with. Simply put, dry vermouth should be served chilled and it taste like a dry white wine with more stuff going on, which would be those herbs, fruits and spices working together. Sweet or Rosso [red] vermouth is a lot bolder,

BECAUSE VERMOUTH IS WINE BASED, IT WILL DETERIORATE IN ONE TO THREE MONTHS AND LIKE ANY BOTTLE OF WINE, SHOULD BE KEPT IN THE FRIDGE TO SLOW OXIDISATION. sweeter and richer in flavour. This is the vermouth you make Negronis and Manhattans with. Why do you believe vermouth is ‘trending’? It probably comes down to the trend of people wanting lighter style drinks

in both sugar and alcohol – not booze heavy cocktails. Don’t get me wrong, booze-driven drinks are great, but it’s not for everyone. It’s great to see bartenders embracing lighter style fresh drinks, to the point that specialty vermouth bars are now opening up here in Sydney, so that has had an impact to our drinking behaviour. Spritz- and aperitif-style cocktails have really taken off recently and the majority of these drinks are vermouth based cocktails. Is this trend ‘here to stay’? To be honest, vermouth cocktails have been around for many years but only recently have they become cool again. Because vermouth is wine based, it NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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3

Bold Aperitif at The Paddington Inn

VERMOUTH COCKTAILS

A handful of the fresh aperitifs available at The Paddington Inn in Sydney (managed by Solotel), paddingtoninn.com.au

AROMATIC SERVES 1 60 ml Dolin Bianco vermouth 60 ml tonic 1 dehydrated grapefruit slice 1 rosemary sprig Pour the vermouth and tonic into a glass. Fill with ice and stir. Garnish with the grapefruit slice and rosemary sprig.

RIPE SERVES 1 60 ml Regal Rogue Rose vermouth 60 ml Sicilian soda 2 lemon slices 4 fresh raspberries Pour the vermouth and soda into a glass. Fill with ice and stir. Garnish with the lemon slices and raspberries.

BOLD SERVES 1 60 ml Madenii Rosso vermouth 60 ml Cap ginger beer 1 long cucumber slice 1 orange slice Pour the vermouth and ginger beer into a glass. Fill with ice and stir. Garnish with the cucumber and orange slices.

Ripe Aperitif at The Paddington Inn

will deteriorate in one to three months and like any bottle of wine, should be kept in the fridge to slow oxidisation. I think this is where vermouth has taken a bad rap over the years – if it isn’t stored in the fridge, it can get really funky and pretty much became undrinkable. Either way, it’s a trend here to stay. Vermouth is common as an aperitif – what is the purpose of an aperitif? An aperitif drink is an excellent way to start any meal or dinner party. These should generally be low in alcohol and low in sugar, so vermouth based drinks are a perfect example of an aperitif. Generally, aperitif drinks are designed

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to stimulate the appetite, preparing our senses for the meal ahead. In my opinion, the best thing about aperitif cocktails is that they can be enjoyed at any occasion. Gin, bubbly, white and rosé wines are also great examples of aperitifs. Do you think vermouth has the same health benefits as, say, red wine? The amount of vermouth consumed in a single serve is less than say that of red wine, so that has some instant health benefits. That said, various vermouths do have added sugar for flavour and colour, so that does reduce health benefits. One brand I absolutely love is a wonderful Aussie


Aromatic Aperitif at The Paddington Inn

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vermouth called Regal Rogue. Creator Mark Ward has made a conscious decision to make his vermouth as low in sugar as possible, so mixing that with soda is a great low sugar, low alcohol alternative to a cocktail. What is your favourite way to enjoy vermouth? To be honest, I adore vermouth in all formats. I do love a simple vermouth spritz though, with tonic or soda and the addition of fresh fruits and herbs. With summer in full swing, there is nothing better then a good slug of vermouth with a splash of soda in a wine glass, packed with ice, fresh fruit and herbs. Vermouth is also great just on its own served over ice with a fresh citrus peel. That said, I’m a massive fan of classic cocktails, so Negronis, Martinis and Manhattans are dear to my heart, all using various styles of vermouth, so anyone of those will do!

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Healthy Farm. Healthy Food. ®


WHOLEFOOD SOCIET Y

PALEO for you?

Is

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FOR WHAT WAS ONLY RECENTLY CONSIDERED QUITE EXTREME, THE PALEO DIET IS NOW A MOVEMENT OF ITS OWN. THERE ARE COOKBOOKS AND BLOGS BY THE DOZEN, MAGAZINES AND EVEN RETREATS DEDICATED TO SHARING AND PROMOTING THE PALEO LIFESTYLE  NOT TO MENTION THE NUTRITIONISTS WHO SWEAR BY IT, TRAINERS WHO LIVE BY IT AND CELEBRITIES WHO CREDIT PALEO FOR THEIR SVELTE FIGURES AND GLOWING SKIN. BUT IS PALEO ALL IT’S CRACKED UP TO BE? Words: NADIA FELSCH, MADDIE LAKOS Recipes: NADIA FELSCH Photography: NADIA FELSCH, THINKSTOCK

As its name suggests, the paleo diet is based on eating as our Palaeolithic ancestors did over 10,000 years ago, prior to the arrival of agricultural farming. The diet is underpinned by the theory that our food system has evolved faster than our bodies, and – by focusing on foods supposedly eaten by our hunter-gatherer ancestors and eschewing those that weren’t – we’re returning to our healthier, more natural state. However, when we talk about the paleo diet, what we’re most commonly seeing is the modern interpretation of what our paleo ancestors ate. This interpretation includes plenty of meat and seafood protein, nuts,

seeds, oils (but not refined vegetables oils), animal fats, fruit and vegetables and little to no grains, dairy, sugar or processed foods. Generally the paleo diet contains a high-protein and low-carb macronutrient balance, but can sometimes verge on no-carb and high fat.

The history of paleo The origins of this modern-day diet are linked to an American dentist from the early 20th century named Weston A. Price. In the 1930s, Price travelled the world to observe local diets and health, and it was these observations that led him, in 1939, to publish a relatively overlooked book, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.

In the conclusion of his book, Price suggests a common theme observed the world over, that healthy “primitives” – meaning those communities without modern day processed diets – ate plenty of meat, seafood and fats. He went on to suggest that Americans would be “wise to adapt their own diets accordingly.” Weston Price’s theories were immortalised in 1999 with the creation of the Weston Price Foundation, the founders of which make it clear that the principles of paleo and the Weston A. Price Foundation diet are not one and the same. Paleo places greater restrictions on carbohydrates (specifically grains, legumes and starchy vegetables) consumed, and eliminates dairy and NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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GO CHIA PUDDING SERVES 6

Chia seeds are a great paleo alternative to grain breakfast cereals. They are naturally high in omega3s, a good fat most of us need to eat more of, high in fibre and have an amazing, gooey texture when soaked. ½ cup chia seeds (around 70 g) 2 cups almond milk Ÿ tsp vanilla powder or ½ tsp vanilla essence 2 large bananas (around 260 g) To serve 1 mango, flesh only Ÿ cup almond milk Paleo muesli, optional

BY KICKING PROCESSED FOODS AND SUGARS TO THE CURB, PALEO PROMOTES A DIET RICH IN WHOLEFOODS INCLUDING VEGETABLES AND HEALTHY PLANT FATS AND PROTEINS FOUND IN NUTS, SEEDS AND OILS.

grains completely, whereas the Weston A. Price Foundation diet does not. The specific guidelines of a paleo diet depend a lot on whom you talk to. For instance, one of the most famous names in paleo dieting is Loren Cordain, author of the popular The Paleo Diet book, released in 2001. Cordain’s diet is based on the 85:15 principle, which means you eat paleo foods 85 per cent of the time and non-paleo foods 15 per cent of the time, and allows for things like fresh seasonal fruit and even the odd glass of wine. Australia’s face of paleo, Pete Evans, believes in being 100 per cent paleo and completely eliminates alcohol and caffeine.

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Combine all pudding ingredients either in a bowl and mix well. Pour into 6 individual jars, cups or bowls Place all pudding cups into the fridge to begin setting. Combine mango and milk in a blender and pour on top of all pudding cups and set overnight. Serve with muesli, if desired.

So, is paleo for you?

 Cost

There are some things about the paleo diet that won’t suit everyone. As a nutritionist-to-be, these are my top picks:

The addition of more animal products will invariably increase weekly shopping bills and can also take a toll on the environment. A feasibility study in the US suggested that a 9.3 per cent increase in income would be required to meet nutrient targets on a paleo diet.

 Food restriction

The removal of entire food groups – in the case of paleo: grains, legumes and dairy – is not necessary for most of us to experience a healthy life. As well as leading to other complications, such as a lack of satiation and impairing the production of good gut bacteria, the nutrients removed can funnel a diet into a psychologically and nutritionally restrictive area where one consumes just a few types of food as opposed to many.

 There is no perfect diet

In spite of what some might say, human beings have such incredibly varied requirements and no one diet or way of life works for all of us. As well as the fact that there are some misconceptions about the paleo diet and how much it relates to our ancient history...


Ancient diets vs paleo To our Palaeolithic ancestors, food was all about availability and survival – totally unlike today, when we can easily pop down to the supermarket and buy free-range skinless chicken thighs by the kilo. Meat is one of the most emphasised aspects of the paleo diet, meaning that proponents of paleo eat plenty of it. However, researchers and health professionals are, increasingly, calling on us to eat less – both for our health and that of our environment. By consuming higher-calorie meat and marrow, our ancient ancestors gave their bodies enough fuel to support a bigger brain. According to paleoanthropologist Peter Wheeler,

the human brain uses 20 per cent of a human’s energy when resting, whereas an ape’s brain needs only eight per cent. However, research has shown that these ancient people only got 30 per cent of annual calories from animals – after all, you had to both hunt and kill something first in order to eat it. This means that around 70 per cent of our paleo-era calories came from plant sources. Many grains and legumes we eat today are a product of agriculture and farming – the dawn of which signalled the end of the hunter-gatherer generation (and the beginning of an industrialised food system). Modern day paleo diets eliminate legumes and grains; however, when it comes

down to what our ancestors ate, new research by archaeological scientist Dr. Christina Warriner found barley and legumes in Palaeolithic teeth remains. Suggesting they were, in fact, part of our ancient diet. Even in Price’s book, he references Maasai tribespeople who consumed animal milk, Scots who ate oats and Swiss villagers who ate mostly local milk and cheese on rye bread. Like a lot in the science world, the research on Palaeolithic ecosystems and subsequent health and nutrition is thin and also constantly evolving. In short, even the experts don’t know it all.

The best of paleo Ok, so what if modern day paleo diets don’t necessarily align with our ancient NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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diet? That doesn’t change the number of paleo diet success stories and paleo fans. At its core, the paleo diet does a few very important things right:  More real food

By kicking processed foods and sugars to the curb, paleo promotes a diet rich in wholefoods including vegetables and healthy plant fats and proteins found in nuts, seeds and oils. This is often the underlying cause of positive effects experienced by paleo-adoptees, so should not be discounted.  Less fear of fat

Fat earned significant scorn from the 50s onwards after being linked to cholesterol, and cholesterol to heart disease, and thus the low-fateverything boom began. This has since been disproved and, thanks to popular diets such as Atkins and paleo, the message is being spread. Both diets encourage eating a variety of fats (including saturated fat) found in both plant and animal sources.  Less food waste

It’s about time offal became a staple. Not all proponents of paleo emphasise this enough, but eating the whole animal is not only great for you, it’s great for the environment. The paleo diet encourages using not only the parts of the animal we’re used to seeing, also embracing organ meats (beef cheeks, tongue and liver, for example) and put bone broth on the map.  Food awareness

Anything that makes us pay closer attention to the way we eat often requires (and inspires) us to prepare it too. Most proponents of paleo encourage the consumption of ethically raised and sourced meat and vegetables, and fostering a relationship with our food.  Kitchen creativity

Slow cooked meats, zucchini noodles, cauliflower rice and nutritious desserts – we’re not saying paleo invented them, but we sure are grateful for the number of recipes that include them.

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TURMERIC CHICKEN & SPINACH SALAD SERVES 2

Quinoa is a seed, not a grain, so technically falls under the paleo-approved foods banner. However, not everyone agrees on quinoa as a healthy grain. If you’d prefer to swap it out, try adding ‘riced’ (finely chopped) cauliflower instead. Rather than the regular cut of meat you buy, you could try buying the whole animal. Such as a chicken and either using the varying parts in different ways or roasting it whole and using the bones afterwards in stocks, sauces and stews. This recipe calls for chicken breast, but any part of the bird will do. Chicken 2 sprigs fresh oregano, chopped 1 tsp ground turmeric 1 tbsp olive oil 2 skinless chicken breasts (200 g each) Salt and pepper Salad 1 heaped cup fresh parsley and mint leaves 2 tbsp almond flakes 1 heaped cup baby spinach leaves 2 tsp olive oil Combine oregano, turmeric, and oil in a bowl. Add chicken breast, toss to coat and season with salt and pepper. Heat a large frypan on mediumhigh heat and cook each side for 4 to 5 minutes or until completely cooked through. If chicken is particularly thick, butterfly the breast for optimal cooking results. To make the salad, roughly tear herbs into a mixing bowl and add remaining salad ingredients and toss to combine. Divide salad between plates and top with cooked chicken and serve immediately.


Discover a healthier you

PURE ORGANIC GOODNESS | Good for you, good for our planet boundlessorganic.com.au FREE DELIVERY for orders over $99 669A Old South Head Rd, Vaucluse NSW 2030


IN SEASON

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RASPBERRIES AND BLACKBERRIES ARE THE ULTIMATE SEASONAL TREAT. There is possibly no greater pleasure than a fresh, plump and perfectly ripe raspberry or blackberry eaten straight from the punnet. With the possible exception of a raspberry or blackberry that is the centrepiece of a salad, the finishing touch on a delicious dessert or whizzed into a delicious smoothie. While berries are known for their deliciousness and infinite versatility (and the way they pair immaculately with things like white chocolate), new information from Fresh Berries by Horticulture Innovation Australia (freshberries.com.au) is putting them in the health and nutrition spotlight.

Nutrition “Raspberries and blackberries offer a host of nutritional benefits, while also being naturally low in energy density,” says accredited practicing dietitian Emma Stirling. “We often hear about the latest ‘super foods’ being Amazonian berries or a revival of another ancient grain. However, scientific research demonstrates Australian raspberries and blackberries are super in their own right, as an excellent source of fibre, key vitamins and minerals and antioxidant activity.” If you’ve ever felt naughty for enjoying a whole punnet of fresh berries to yourself, you shouldn’t have. “The Australian Dietary Guidelines define a serve of fruit as around 150 grams, or one cup, and recommend Australian adults eat two serves of fruit a day,” says Stirling. “Australian raspberries and blackberries generally come in 125-gram punnets, which means a likely portion would be 125 grams as a snack on its own, or a smaller 60-gram handful included with yoghurt or breakfast cereal for instance.” Based on a 150-gram serve, one serving of fresh berries contains around 30 per cent of your recommended daily fibre intake, 100 per cent of your vitamin C intake and around a quarter of your daily intake of folate. With 338 kilojoules

Colourful nutrients The pretty red and purple colouring in raspberries doesn't just make them pretty; it also shows that they’re packed with phytonutrients, such as flavonoids and polyphenols. “Anthocyanins are a flavonoid responsible for the vibrant colour of raspberries and blackberries,” Stirling says. “Anthocyanins have been researched for their potential anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-ageing action. Raspberries and blackberries also have particularly high levels of ellagitannins, a class of polyphenols that are relatively uncommon in other fruits and vegetables that have powerful antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties.”

per serve for raspberries and 317 kilojoules per serve for blackberries – that’s a lot of nutritional bang for your energy buck.

Seasonality “A little-known fact is that fresh berries are available almost all yearround,” says Stirling. “However, key growing seasons span from November to April/May.” Raspberries have a slightly longer season than blackberries, and those that are available in the winter months are grown in northern NSW and southern QLD. Australian blackberries generally need a cooler climate, with majority of production occurring in Victoria and Tasmania. “One of my favourite tips is to stock up on fresh produce such as raspberries and blackberries while they’re in season, and freeze them to enjoy in later months,” Stirling says. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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Selecting and storing Raspberries and blackberries are delicate, so it’s important to know what to look for when selecting fruit. “Berries should look firm, plump and glossy, and have an even colour – indicating ripeness,” Stirling says. “Raspberries should be a light and bright red colour, while blackberries can vary in colour from a true black to a dark, glossy, purple colour.” Fresh berries should be stored in the refrigerator; they can become fragile and soft if stored at room temperature. “However, to enjoy the best flavour, allow berries to return to room temperature before eating,” Stirling says. Washing the fruit can make it ‘mushy’ – so don’t hesitate to eat them straight from the punnet. The exception is when freezing your fruit. “If you plan to freeze fresh berries, you must very gently rinse them in cool water and dry in a colander or on paper towels, Then place individual berries on a sheet of wax paper and pop in the freezer,” Stirling says. “Once frozen, transfer the berries into zip lock bags or containers – this way, berries won’t stick together and you can use them as required.” Berries can also be preserved by dehydrating them, or making a coulis (sauce) or jam.

BERRY YOGHURT SWIRL POPSICLES MAKES 8 Raspberry puree 125 g raspberries 2 tbsp caster sugar Blackberry puree 125 g blackberries 2 tbsp caster sugar Vanilla yoghurt mixture 2 cups (500 ml) Greek style natural yoghurt ¼ cup (55 g) caster sugar ½ tsp vanilla extract To make each puree, separately blend berries and sugar in a food processor, strain through a sieve, set aside. To make yoghurt mixture, place all ingredients in a bowl and whisk until combined. To assemble, pour a few teaspoons of raspberry puree into each 200-millilitre popsicle mould, do the same with the yoghurt mix and then the blackberry puree to give 3 layers. Repeat sequence to create more layers. Gently swirl the layers with a wooden skewer. Cover moulds, insert sticks and freeze for 2 hours or until frozen.

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Favourite flavours “Raspberries and blackberries are incredibly versatile, and can be enjoyed on their own or with a plethora of both sweet and savoury dishes,” says Stirling. Some of her recommended f lavour combinations include:

Raspberries with…

Blackberries with…

Rhubarb

Almonds

Thyme

Duck

Ginger

Venison

Stone fruits

Beef

Lemon, vanilla

Black pepper

Goat cheese

Cinnamon

Ricotta

Stone fruits

Kangaroo

Melon

Chocolate

Lemon

Ice-cream

Chocolate Fresh cream


BREAKFAST BERRY TART SERVES 4 1 sheet (25 cm × 25 cm) shortcrust pastry 2 tbsp apricot jam ½ cup (60 g) ground almond 25 g butter, melted 1 small mango, peeled and sliced 1 egg yolk, for brushing 1 tbsp brown sugar 2 tbsp flaked almonds 100 g blackberries Crème fraiche, to serve Preheat oven to 180°C. Place pastry on a baking tray lined with non-stick baking paper. Place jam, ground almonds and butter in a bowl, stirring until well combined. Spread almond mixture over the pastry, leaving a 2-centimetre border. Top with mango. Fold over the pastry borders to close. Brush pastry with egg yolk, sprinkle with sugar and flaked almonds. Place in oven and bake for 30 minutes. Then add blackberries to the tart and continue to bake for another 10 minutes or until pastry is golden and base cooked through. Serve warm with crème fraiche.

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HEALTHY KIDS RASPBERRY & CHOCOLATE SLICE SERVES 16 ½ cup self-raising flour ¼ cup plain flour ¼ cup cocoa ⅓ cup rolled oats ⅓ cup brown sugar ½ cup fresh dates, pitted, coarsely chopped ⅓ cup chopped walnuts ¼ cup (60 ml) light sour cream 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 tbsp olive oil ½ cup (125 ml) milk 125 g raspberries Frosting 25 g butter, softened 125 g cream cheese 1 cup icing sugar mixture, sifted ¼ cup cocoa, sifted 125 g raspberries, to decorate

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Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan forced). Lightly spray a 20-centimetre square slice tin with oil. Line base and sides with baking paper. Sift the flours and cocoa into a large bowl. Stir in oats, sugar, dates and half the walnuts. Whisk the sour cream, egg, oil and milk in a small bowl until combined. Stir into the flour mixture. Fold through raspberries. Spoon the mixture into prepared tin and sprinkle with remaining walnuts. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until cooked when tested with a skewer. Stand slice in tin for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. To make the frosting, place the butter and cheese in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat for 6 to 8 minutes or until pale and creamy. Add the icing sugar and cocoa and beat for a further 6 to 8 minutes or until light and fluffy. Spread frosting over top of slice, cut into squares and decorate with raspberries.

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RASPBERRY, SPINACH & PERSIAN FETA SALAD WITH SALTED CANDIED WALNUTS SERVES 4 Salted candied walnuts 2 tbsp caster sugar ½ cup walnuts, lightly toasted ½ tsp salt flakes ¼ tsp dried chilli flakes Salad 60 ml (¼ cup) olive oil 2 tbsp verjuice 1 tsp Dijon mustard ½ tsp caster sugar 100 g baby spinach leaves 2 tbsp chives, roughly chopped 1 lemon, coarsely zested 125 g raspberries 100 g Persian feta, drained, crumbled To make the candied walnuts, heat sugar in a medium, non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Cook, tilting and swirling the pan occasionally, for 2 to 3 minutes or until sugar melts and a light caramel forms. Working quickly, remove pan and add walnuts, salt and chilli flakes. Carefully toss to cover nuts in caramel, and pour mixture onto a tray lined with baking paper and spread out using a wooden spoon. Allow to cool. Then using your hands to snap the caramel, separate the clusters. Set aside. To prepare salad first make the dressing. Place the oil, verjuice, mustard and sugar in a small screw-top jar. Season with salt and pepper and shake well to combine. Place the spinach in a large bowl. Sprinkle over the chives, lemon zest, raspberries, candied walnuts and feta. Drizzle over ½ the dressing and serve immediately with the rest of the dressing on the side.

RASPBERRY ICED TEA SERVES 4 250 g raspberries ½ cup caster sugar (or sweetener) ⅓ cup mint, roughly chopped 6 tea bags (black tea is fine) 2 cups (500 ml) boiling water 5 cups (750 ml) cold water In a medium bowl, combine the raspberries and sugar, crushing the berries with a potato masher. Stir in the mint and set aside. Place tea bags and boiling water in a large bowl. Let steep for 15 minutes then discard tea bags. Pour tea into raspberry mixture and let stand at room temperature for 1 hour. Line a colander with a double layer of cheesecloth or kitchen paper towel, then place it over a large bowl. Pour the raspberry tea mixture through the cheesecloth and discard solids. Pour in cold water. Transfer raspberry tea to the pitcher. Refrigerate until cold. If you like your tea sweeter, add sugar as desired. Serve chilled with extra raspberries and fresh mint leaves. This tea mixture can be used to make delicious, flavoursome ice cubes to brighten up glasses of mineral water or cocktails. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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MEAL PLAN

BUSY HEALTHY

HEALTHY HABITS FOR TIME-POOR FOODIES

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MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TIME IN THE KITCHEN WITH 7DAYS OF NOURISHING MEALS AND SIMPLE, TIMESAVING HACKS. Words and recipes: STEPH LOWE (thenaturalnutritionist.com.au) Photography: SARAH CRAVEN

Being busy seems to have become a fact of life nowadays: more work to be done, more life to live, more people to please. With so much on, making your health and wellbeing your priority often comes close to last on the to do list. Now that summer holidays are behind us and life has settled back into a hub of activities, taking time to look at your schedule can make a noticeable difference to your life. Making it a priority to plan and prepare your meals can ensure that you have one foot in front when it comes to avoiding the call to drivethru for your dinner. Spending some time at the end of the week planning for the upcoming week sets the intention to eat well and exercise – making it all that much easier to do.

A busy + healthy how-to Take the time to plan out what you

are going to eat for your three main meals. It is just as important to plan breakfast as it is dinner. A good breakfast is key to fuelling you for the day ahead. Cross-reference with your pantry and write a shopping list based on your meals and snacks. Leaving room for leftovers and planning for meals that you won’t be home for ensures you are minimising food wastage. Use Saturday night as an excuse to try a new recipe and Sunday as a day to cook in bulk to make the week ahead easier. Other ways to save time later on in the week include: • Making extra portions of things like bolognaise sauces, burgers, soups and fritters and freezing these portions so that you have ready-made meals on hand in the freezer for when you are caught short. This month we have taken a kilo of pork mince and turned it

into four serves each of san choy bau and bolognaise! • Cut up your vegetable, salad and smoothie portions and store in containers ready to be used throughout the week. Either do this the night before or do it in bulk on a Sunday and mid-week. • Portion out nuts, bliss balls and other snacks so that you are able to grab and go as you leave the house in the morning. • Utilise leftovers as much as possible and get creative with them – leftover meat and greens often makes for a great omelette the next day. Our meal plan this month is a little different. We’ve shown you how you can utilise some prior planning and preparation to set the rest of the week up. We are sure that it will help you find some of those missing hours in your day. Give it a try this week and your life will change forever.

MEAL PLAN BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

SUNDAY

Scrambled green eggs

Zucchini & spinach fritters

Roast chicken & vegies

MONDAY

Nutty granola with yoghurt & berries

Zucchini & spinach fritters

Chicken abundance bowl

TUESDAY

Berry & tahini smoothie

Mason salad jar

San choy bau

WEDNESDAY

Nutty granola with yoghurt & berries

Chicken abundance bowl

Simple pork bolognaise

THURSDAY

Zucchini & spinach fritters

Mason salad jar

Salmon patties with sweet potato chips & avocado

FRIDAY

Berry & tahini smoothie

San choy bau

Simple pork bolognaise

SATURDAY

Sustainable omelette

Salmon patties

Steak with zucchini & brussels chips

SNACK

Raw cashew & chia bliss bites

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ON SUNDAY SET ASIDE TWO TO THREE HOURS AND PREPARE THE FOLLOWING: • Our TNN favourite Raw Cashew & Chia Bliss Bites are a great snack. Prepare these on Sunday, pop them in the fridge and grab one as needed. • Nutty Granola is a fabulous make-ahead breakfast. Sub in your favourite nuts and seeds and portion out a serve and you have more than a week’s worth of breakfast. Pair it with coconut yoghurt and seasonal berries. Top with some cacao nibs and flaked coconut if you are feeling extra decadent. • Zucchini & Spinach Fritters are easy to make and store brilliantly. The recipe here makes six fritters.

Cook all six fritters on Sunday and store two per serve for later in the week. You could make the side salad for Wednesday lunch and Thursday breakfast the Tuesday night. • Mason Salad Jars are a great option to prepare in advance for lunches during the week. Use leftover roast chicken and roast vegetables and prepare the jars ahead of time. • A Chicken Abundance Bowl is easy to pull together quickly, simply spiralise the carrot and zucchini noodles ahead of time, and have all of the salad ingredients prepared ready to go. • San Choy Bau is such

SCRAMBLED GREEN EGGS SERVES 1 3 eggs, free range ½ tsp turmeric ½ bunch broccolini, roughly diced 5 asparagus spears, roughly diced 1 zucchini, sprialised 20 g spinach, roughly chopped 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil Sea salt and pepper, to taste Whisk eggs and turmeric in a bowl until well combined and set aside. Heat a small frypan over a medium heat and add the oil and greens. Sauté until softened. Add spinach and continue to sauté until just starting to wilt. Gently pour in egg mixture and (using a wooden spoon or spatula) gently push the egg mixture around the greens, from side to side in the frypan. Continue doing this gently until the eggs are cooked to your liking. Season well and serve. ZUCCHINI & SPINACH FRITTERS MAKES 6 FRITTERS/3 SERVES 2 eggs, free range 1 zucchini, grated 120 g spinach, roughly chopped 1 tbsp dill, finely chopped The juice of ½ lemon ¼ cup goat’s feta, crumbled

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a simple mid-week meal; it will be on your plate in less than 20 minutes. • Simple Pork Bolognaise has always been a great meal to prepare ahead of time. Put two portions in the freezer – it’s perfect to pull out when you are short on time to avoid resorting to convenience food. Our bolognaise can also double as breakfast with the addition of sautéed spinach and a fried egg. Then, on Wednesday, while you are preparing to serve the bolognaise, chop the sweet potato for the Salmon Patties and leave in water in preparation for baking the following night.

¼ cup coconut flour, sifted 2 tbsp psyllium A dash of water, if required Sea salt and pepper, to taste Cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil, for frying To serve (per serve) 1 large handful rocket 125 g cherry tomatoes, quartered ½ avocado, sliced To a large bowl add grated zucchini, spinach, dill, feta, lemon juice, coconut flour and psyllium. In a separate bowl, beat eggs and add to the mixture. Season and combine well. Add water if required. Form medium balls, moulding each with your hands. Heat coconut oil in a frypan; flatten the fritters and shallow fry, flipping halfway through. Repeat for additional fritters, adding in more coconut oil each time if required. Serve 2 fritters on top of a side salad of rocket, cherry tomatoes and sliced avocado. NUTTY GRANOLA WITH YOGHURT & BERRIES SERVES 10 TO 12 1 cup raw almonds, roughly chopped 1 cup macadamias, roughly chopped 1 cup cashews, roughly chopped

1 cup pistachios ½ cup pumpkin seeds ½ cup sunflower seeds ¼ cup shredded coconut 60 g cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil, melted 3 tbsp rice malt syrup 1 tsp cinnamon ½ tsp sea salt To serve (per serve) 2 tbsp coconut yoghurt ½ cup mixed berries


NUTTY GRANOLA WITH YOGHURT & BERRIES

into a blender and blend until smooth or your preferred consistency. If desired, add in the ice and blend for a further minute. SUSTAINABLE OMELETTE SERVES 1 3 eggs, free range ¾ cup leftover protein, such as pork, chicken or tofu, roughly chopped (optional) 1 cup of leftover vegetables, diced 30 g goat’s feta 50 g rocket 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil Sea salt and pepper, to taste Whisk eggs in a bowl until well combined and set aside. Heat a small frying pan over a medium heat and add the oil. Pour in the egg mixture and allow to cook for 2 minutes. Scatter the protein, vegetables and feta evenly over the egg mixture and allow to cook for another 3 minutes, or until cooked to your liking. Remove the heat, season with salt and pepper and top with rocket to serve. SALMON PATTIES WITH SWEET POTATO CHIPS & AVOCADO MAKES 8 PATTIES/4 SERVES 300 g salmon 3 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil 1 tsp onion powder ½ tsp garlic powder 1 cup almond meal 1 egg, beaten 1 tbsp chives, chopped Sea salt and pepper, to taste To serve (per serve) 150 g sweet potato, cut into 5mm thick chips 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil, melted 1 handful rocket ½ avocado, mashed 1 tbsp coriander, chopped ½ lime, juiced Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 180°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix thoroughly ensuring the wet and dry ingredients are well combined. Spread the granola evenly on the baking tray and bake for 10 minutes. Check regularly to ensure that it does not burn. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. This will keep in an airtight container in the fridge. To serve place ½ cup granola into a bowl and top with coconut yoghurt and berries.

MIXED BERRY & TAHINI SMOOTHIE SERVES 1 1 cup almond milk (alternatively use coconut milk or filtered water) 1 cup mixed berries, frozen ½ banana, frozen 1 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp chia seeds 1 handful kale leaves, stalk removed ½ lemon, juiced and zested 1 cup ice, optional Combine all ingredients, excluding the ice,

Preheat oven to 180°C and line a large baking tray with baking paper. Melt a tablespoon of oil on the baking tray and add the salmon fillet. Bake skin side down for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and, when cool, remove and discard the skin. Melt a tablespoon of oil on the baking tray and add sweet potato chips. Season well and bake for 25 minutes, turning halfway. In a large bowl, break the salmon apart with a fork. Add onion and garlic powder, almond meal, egg and chives and season well. Form 8 medium balls, moulding each with your hands. Heat coconut oil in a frypan; flatten the NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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MINCED PORK TWO WAYS...

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SAN CHOY BAU SERVES 4 500 g pork mince 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil 150 g mushrooms, finely diced 1 handful kale, finely chopped 1 tbsp ginger, grated 1 red chilli, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, crushed 4 spring onions, finely sliced 1 tbsp sesame oil 4 tbsp tamari 1 iceberg lettuce 1 handful of coriander leaves, roughly chopped Sea salt, to taste Remove enough lettuce leaves to serve. Trim if required and set aside. Heat a frypan on a high heat and add coconut oil to the pan. Add pork mince and sauté for 5 minutes or until browned. Be sure to break up any lumps that form. Add mushrooms, kale, chilli, ginger, garlic, spring onions, sesame oil and tamari. Sauté for 15 minutes or until the mushrooms are cooked. To serve, spoon the pork mixture into the lettuce cups and top with coriander leaves.

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SIMPLE PORK BOLOGNAISE SERVES 4 500 g pork mince 1 onion, finely chopped 1 clove garlic, crushed 2 celery stalks, diced 2 cups chicken broth 2 tbsp tomato paste 1 tbsp parsley, chopped 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil 4 zucchinis, spiralised Sea salt and pepper, to taste Heat a frypan on a high heat and add coconut oil to the pan. Add the onion, garlic and celery and sauté for 5 minutes, until softened. Stir in the pork mince and cook, stirring and breaking up the meat with a wooden spoon, until starting to brown. Pour in the broth, stir in the tomato paste and parsley, and season with salt and pepper. Leave to simmer for 40 minutes. Whilst the bolognaise sauce is simmering, spiralise the zucchinis, 1 per person. Top the noodles with the bolognaise sauce and season further if required.

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patties and shallow fry, flipping halfway through. Repeat for additional patties, adding in more coconut oil each time if required. Serve 2 patties on the rocket, alongside the sweet potato chips. Top with avocado, chopped coriander and a squeeze of lime. EYE FILLET STEAK WITH ZUCCHINI & BRUSSELS CHIPS SERVES 2 2 x 150 g eye fillet steaks, grass fed 2 zucchinis, cut into 5 mm slices, chip style 2 cups brussels sprouts, sliced 1 fennel, sliced 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil, melted 1 tsp chilli flakes 2 handfuls rocket leaves Sea salt and pepper, to taste Preheat oven to 180°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. In large bowl toss the zucchini and brussels sprouts with the coconut oil and chilli flakes. Season well and bake for 20 minutes or until tender. At the 10-minute mark, turn the vegetables and add the sliced fennel. In the large bowl originally used, add the rocket leaves and once baked add in the zucchini, Brussels and fennel. Toss to combine.

SALMON PATTIES WITH SWEET POTATO CHIPS & AVOCADO


CHICKEN ABUNDANCE BOWL

Season steak with salt and on a hot barbeque grill cook for 4 minutes each side. Remove from the heat, cover with foil and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Serve steak alongside greens and enjoy. RAW CASHEW & CHIA BLISS BITES MAKES 12 SERVES 250 g cashews 30 g vanilla protein powder (preferably grass fed whey protein isolate or pea protein) 2 tbsp cacao powder 1 ½ tbsp rice malt syrup 1 tbsp cinnamon ¼ cup cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil 2 tbsp chia seeds ¼ cup water Soak a tablespoon of chia seeds in the water for 10 minutes. Blend the cashews, protein powder, cacao, rice malt syrup and cinnamon. Transfer to a large bowl, add melted coconut oil and chia seed and water and mix well to combine. Using a spoon as a guide, form approximately 12 balls and roll in the additional chia seeds. Chill in the fridge. (These are best eaten directly from the fridge.)

ROAST CHICKEN THREE WAYS

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ROAST CHICKEN WITH ROAST VEGETABLES SERVES 6 1 x 2 kg chicken, free range 1 lemon, halved 2 tbsp parsley, roughly chopped 2 tbsp thyme 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 2 sweet potatoes, cut into 3cm chunks ½ pumpkin, cut into 3cm chunks 6 baby beets, quartered 3 carrots, cut into 3 cm chunks 3 zucchinis, cut into 3 cm chunks 2 red capsicums, thickly diced 1 tsp chilli flakes 1 tbsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil Sea salt and pepper, to taste Preheat oven to 180°C and line 2 roasting dishes with baking paper. Stuff the chicken with lemon, fresh herbs and season generously. Score the drumsticks with a paring knife and rub olive oil over entire chicken. Place the chicken in a roasting pan and roast for 75 minutes, or until crispy golden brown on the outside and juices run clear. In a large bowl, combine the vegetables with the melted coconut oil. Add chilli flakes and season well. Toss to combine and then transfer to a baking tray and roast alongside the chicken for 45 minutes or until tender. Serve a single portion of chicken with roasted vegies. Reserve the remaining 5 portions for the Chicken Abundance Bowl and both the chicken and vegetables for the Mason Salad Jars.

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MASON SALAD JAR SERVES 2 2 mason jars with lids 200 g roast chicken breast, finely diced Reserved roast vegetables, roughly chopped 60 g goat’s feta ¼ cup quinoa, uncooked 2 tbsp pumpkin seeds ½ avocado, diced fresh on day of serving 2 handfuls spinach, roughly chopped

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Dressing ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil The juice and zest of 1 lemon Sea salt and pepper, to taste

60 g halloumi, sliced 5mm thick

To cook quinoa, bring ¾ cup of water to the boil. Add the quinoa and cook until the water has evaporated. Fluff with a fork halfway through cooking for extra volume. To make the salad dressing: whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice and zest and season well. Divide the dressing into the 2 jars. The dressing should always be the first ingredient into the salad jar. Add a cup of reserved roasted vegetables to each jar, followed by half the goat’s feta and half the chopped chicken to each jar. Divide the cooked quinoa into each jar followed by a tablespoon of pumpkin seeds to each. Finally add the spinach and screw the lid closed. Store in fridge for up to 5 days. To serve, shake the salad onto a plate, add ¼ diced avocado and toss to combine. Season further if necessary.

1 lime, juiced

CHICKEN ABUNDANCE BOWL SERVES 2

200 g roast chicken breast, reserved, diced 2 zucchinis, spiralised 2 carrots, spiralised 1 corn cob 8 florets of broccoli 250 g cherry tomatoes, quartered 1 cos lettuce, roughly chopped ½ tsp cold-pressed extra-virgin coconut oil 2 tbsp coriander, roughly chopped Sea salt and pepper, to taste Bring a saucepan of water to the boil and lightly steam corn and broccoli until slightly softened. Remove corn kernels from the cob and set aside. Heat a fry-pan over medium heat and melt the oil. Fry halloumi for 2 minutes on each side, or until golden. Spiralise zucchini and carrots into noodles. Take 2 bowls and place the chicken in the middle of each bowl. In segments place the remaining ingredients in the bowl: zucchini and carrot noodles, corn kernels, broccoli, lettuce and halloumi. Scatter coriander and squeeze the lime over the bowls. Season well.

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FEATURED FOODIE

A FOOD WRITER, RECIPE DEVELOPER, FOOD STYLIST AND FOOD EDITOR – CAROLINE GRIFFITHS IS YOUR GOTO EXPERT WHEN IT COMES TO COOKING. WE CHAT TO HER ABOUT HER NEW BOOK BREAKFAST BOWLS, WHAT A HOME ECONOMIST REALLY DOES AND HOW TO ‘PLATE UP’ LIKE A PRO. Recipes: CAROLINE GRIFFITHS Photography: CHRIS MIDDLETON

CAROLINE Griffiths 52

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Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your culinary career?

I am a mum of two gorgeous boys (my eldest is starting secondary school this year, my youngest starting grade two) and live with my boys and husband in Melbourne. I love to create recipes that are fresh, flavoursome, nutritious, creative and achievable – and delicious, without question. My culinary career began in earnest at the age of eight. When, snowed in while on a skiing holiday with my family, I prepared scones for about 20 people. I realised the power of food and how you can make people happy by preparing something delicious. My nanna and dad were both great cooks and I learned a lot from them. Nanna was a great baker, hence how I knew how to make scones, and my dad was an adventurous cook. I went on to study food and nutrition and I hold a Bachelor of Applied Science in Consumer Science – Home Economics. I love that my degree gave me a strong foundation in food science, as well as culinary skills. I have over 25 years’ experience across many facets of the food industry, including publishing, corporate [test kitchens] and as a freelancer. Can you describe the role of a home economist in professional recipe development?

While there is a lot of instinct and experience involved in being a good cook, my training gave me a strong foundation in food science and sound cooking skills, as well as an understanding of families and their needs. To be successful as a recipe developer, you need to be able to not only cook and have creative flair but also be able to communicate that recipe in an effective, efficient and accurate way. It does sound a bit dry when I put it that way, but if a recipe is not well written it is next to useless. How does this, combined with your passion for health and nutrition, shape the recipes you create?

‘Everyday’ food should be healthy food and a joy to eat. The key is

preparing whole foods simply and from scratch. Unless the recipe is specifically for a ‘sometimes food’ – and I do love desserts and salty/crispy savoury foods when the time is right. It is my natural way of thinking to leave out any unnecessary extra ingredients. I believe variety and balance is the key. As per the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, it is important to enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from the five main food groups, including: vegetables, legumes and beans; wholegrain cereals; lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds; milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or alternatives to dairy, and fruit – unless, of course, you have food allergies or intolerances. I would also include healthy fats. Many recipes in your latest book, Breakfast Bowls, cater for a variety of different nutritional needs, including gluten free, vegan and grain free. Is there a particular nutritional philosophy that you prefer personally and/or when creating recipes?

There are many food philosophies that people follow for personal or health reasons. In Breakfast Bowls, including options for the variety of nutritional needs people may have is a way to make it easier to identify recipes that may suit them, as well as offering ideas for modifications. My food philosophy is simple, and as above, I believe variety and balance is the key.

MY CULINARY CAREER BEGAN IN EARNEST AT THE AGE OF EIGHT. WHEN, SNOWED IN WHILE ON A SKIING HOLIDAY WITH MY FAMILY, I PREPARED SCONES FOR ABOUT 20 PEOPLE. I REALISED THE POWER OF FOOD AND HOW YOU CAN MAKE PEOPLE HAPPY BY PREPARING SOMETHING DELICIOUS. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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What are some of your favourite breakfast bowl ingredients?

In warm weather, I love smoothie bowls with the fruit that is in season. I am on a bit of a mango marathon at the moment, topped with local blueberries. Smoothie bowls always make me feel joyous! When the weather starts to cool down I enjoy bircher muesli made with a variety of whole grains. I truly adore traditional porridge, i.e. oatmeal or porridge made with steel-cut oats for more ‘bite’ to the texture. You can let your imagination run wild with the toppings from stewed fruit with a sprinkle of nuts and seeds or cacao nibs. My current fave is natural yoghurt swirled with lemon-spiked coffee syrup. It sounds a bit out there, but is super delicious. On weekends especially, I enjoy comforting breakfast bowls from other cuisines such as chicken congee and pho.

HOW TO MAKE AMAZING BREAKFAST BOWLS With Caroline Griffiths

Serving in a bowl is an opportunity to make, with relative ease, something that is not only nutritious and flavourful, but also colourful and beautiful to look at – and to take a snap of for Instagram! There’s something inclusive, personal and comforting about holding a bowl and there is an ease and uncomplicated nature to eating with a spoon. Breakfast bowls give you a chance to add extra nourishment to your morning, where otherwise it may have been a little ho-hum. They are a great replacement for the standard toast with a spread, or bowl of packaged cereal

Follow Caroline on Instagram at @carolines_food_stuff

CORIANDER, QUINOA & CORN BOWL WITH TORTILLA CHIPS MAKES 4 Refined sugar free | Vegetarian

This is a hearty, yet light and nutritious breakfast bowl that will get your day off to a flying start. The freshness of the coriander (cilantro) quinoa, the toasty corn, crunchy tortilla chips and creamy guacamole make for a killer combination.

2 tsp olive oil

2 corn cobs, husks and silk discarded 2 tsp olive oil 50 g cotija cheese or feta, crumbled Micro herbs, to serve

To make the coriander quinoa, put the quinoa and 500 millilitres (2 cups) water in a large saucepan and bring to the boil over medium heat. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 to 12 minutes or until most, if not all, of the water has evaporated and the grains are tender. Remove from the heat, drain if required and transfer to a large bowl to cool slightly. Stir in the coriander, spring onion, lime zest and juice and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and set aside until required. The quinoa may be served warm or cool. Meanwhile, heat a chargrill pan over high heat. Rub the corn lightly with the olive oil, sprinkle with a little salt and chargrill for

Coriander quinoa 200 g (1 cup) red and white quinoa, rinsed Large handful coriander leaves 1 spring onion (scallion), chopped Zest and juice of 1 lime 1 tbsp olive oil Tortilla chips 2 small flour tortillas

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Guacamole 1 avocado, stone removed 1 small tomato, chopped ½ small red onion, finely chopped 2 tbsp natural yoghurt Lime juice, to taste 1 tsp chopped chipotle chilli in adobo sauce (optional)

12 to 15 minutes, turning occasionally, until charred and cooked. Remove from heat and set aside to cool slightly. Cut each cob into six slices. For the tortilla chips, preheat the oven to 160°C (fan-forced). Brush the tortillas lightly on both sides with the olive oil and cut into long thin triangles. Place on an oven tray and bake, turning halfway through, for 8 to 10 minutes or until lightly browned and crisp. Remove from the oven and cool on the tray. To make the guacamole, cut the avocado into cubes and place in a bowl. Roughly mash the avocado with a fork, being careful to retain some texture. Stir in the tomato, onion, yoghurt and lime juice. Season with salt and pepper, and, if you like, stir in the chipotle chilli in adobo sauce. Serve the quinoa into bowls and top with the corn, tortilla chips and guacamole. Scatter with the cheese and micro herbs. OPTION: To make gluten free, omit the tortillas, or use corn tortillas instead.


STYLING YOUR BREAKFAST BOWL Fresh foods are inherently colourful, beautiful and nutritious so it’s not a hard task to make bowl food look gorgeous! If you have variety in ingredients, there will be differences and contrasts in textures, which will add to the visual appeal. Think about: Ä‘   Ä? base ingredients with substance, such as blended fruit for a smoothie bowl, oats or other grains for a comfort bowl, homemade muesli or granola for a classic bowl. Ä‘   Ä? something smooth and silky or creamy, like yoghurt and nut butter plus a bit of something crunchy like nuts and seeds. Ä‘      Ä? fresh edible owers, a sprinkling of petals or herb leaves makes anything look better! Texture is my thing, along with being natural and loose, as opposed to ‘placed’ – let things fall where they will. Mastering a good swirl, dollop and drizzle can certainly add to the presentation of just about any bowl!

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VANILLA SUPER PROTEIN SMOOTHIE BOWL MAKES 2 Refined sugar free | vegetarian | gluten free | grain free

This smoothie bowl is a full-on protein hit, great before heading to the gym or to help with recovery after a tough workout. For an extra boost, add a couple of teaspoons of maca, acai or mesquite powder with the whey protein. 250 g (1 cup) natural yoghurt or 250 ml (1 cup) milk kefir 60 g (½ cup) crushed ice 2 peeled bananas, frozen and roughly chopped 2 tbsp vanilla whey protein isolate (WPI) powder 1 tbsp chia seed oil 2 tsp natural vanilla extract Honey, to taste (optional) To serve Cacao and black tahini Granola Blueberries Bee pollen Whiz the yoghurt or kefir with the ice, banana, whey powder, oil and vanilla extract in a high-speed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl if required. If the

AVOCADO & MATCHA SMOOTHIE BOWL SERVES 2 Refined sugar free | vegetarian | dairy free | gluten free | grain free

This bowl was inspired by my travels in Vietnam, where avocado is often used in delicious smoothies. Avocado is an intriguing and totally underrated ‘sweet’ ingredient. Here it lends a lovely silky texture and great nutty flavour. 125 ml (½ cup) tinned coconut milk or coconut water 60 g (½ cup) crushed ice 2 peeled bananas, frozen and roughly chopped 1 avocado, stone removed 2½ tsp matcha (green tea) powder 1 tsp natural vanilla extract Pinch of sea salt flakes Lime juice, to taste Honey, to taste To serve Sliced or cubed avocado Flaked coconut or shaved fresh coconut Raw cacao nibs Lime wedges Mint leaves

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Whiz the coconut milk or water with the ice, banana, avocado, matcha powder and vanilla extract in a highspeed blender or small food processor until smooth. Scrape down the inside of the blender or processor bowl if required. If the mixture isn’t moving well in the blender, add a tbsp or two of water or milk, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste the smoothie and add a pinch of salt, a squeeze of lime juice and a drizzle of honey to balance the flavour to your liking. Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls and top with avocado, coconut, cacao nibs, lime wedges and a few mint leaves. OPTION: To make vegan, swap the honey for rice malt syrup, pure maple syrup or a couple of drops of liquid stevia.

mixture isn’t moving well in the blender, add a tbsp or two of water or kefir, being careful not to add too much liquid. Taste the smoothie and, if necessary, add a drizzle of honey to adjust the sweetness to your liking. Spoon the thick smoothie mixture immediately into two chilled bowls and top with granola, blueberries and bee pollen. OPTION: Alternatively, use a pea protein powder instead of the whey protein isolate. To make vegan, also swap the honey for rice malt syrup, pure maple syrup or a couple of drops of liquid stevia, and leave out the bee pollen. To make dairy free, replace the yoghurt or milk kefir with a non-dairy alternative and use a pea protein powder instead of the whey protein isolate. To make vegan, also swap the honey for rice malt syrup, pure maple syrup or a couple of drops of liquid stevia and leave out the bee pollen.


CHILLI BACON & EGGS WITH SWEET POTATO HASH MAKES 4 Refined sugar free | gluten free | grain free

Cooking bacon pieces with a little water helps make it super crispy. I love the way the sriracha splatters like graffiti over the sunny eggs in this bowl. Sweet potato makes a nice alternative to regular potato, plus it has more fibre, vitamins A and C, and is lower in carbohydrates and kilojoules (calories). 200 g thickly sliced smoky bacon or kaiserfleisch, cut into 1 cm pieces ½ red onion, cut into thin wedges 2 orange sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1.5 cm pieces 2–3 tbsp olive oil 4 free-range eggs

1 avocado, stone removed, sliced To serve Labneh Fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves Finely sliced red or green chilli Sriracha or other hot sauce Combine the bacon with 80 millilitres (⅓ cup) water in a large heavy-based frying pan over medium–high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally until the water evaporates and the fat renders from the bacon. Cook for a few more minutes until the bacon is very crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Reduce the heat to medium and add the onion to the pan, cook for 1 to 2 minutes or until slightly softened, then remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and drain. Add the sweet potato to the pan along with a little olive oil if the pan is becoming

dry. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, but not too often, as you want a crust to form on the sweet potato. When the sweet potato is tender and well browned, return the bacon and onion to the pan to heat through. When the sweet potato is almost done, heat another frying pan over medium heat with a splash of olive oil. Carefully break the eggs into the pan and cook for 2 to 2½ minutes until the whites are crispy around the edges, but the yolks are still runny (or until cooked to your liking). Serve the sweet potato hash into bowls and top with the avocado and fried eggs. Add a dollop of labneh, a scattering of coriander and chilli and, if you like, a squeeze of sriracha. OPTION: To make vegetarian, leave out the bacon.

Recipes from Breakfast Bowls by Caroline Griffiths, published by Smith Street Books, $29.99. Out now.

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EAT

FOR SUPERKIDS (PACKED WITH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES)

Words: MADDIE LAKOS Recipes: JUDY MOOSMUELLER, JENNIFER LECKEY

It’s no secret that kids have some of the toughest palates to please. When it comes to taste, texture and aesthetics, there’s no blindsiding a child who knows what they like and likes what they know – which tends to be especially true when it’s fruit or vegetables on their fork. “The little people that join us on our journey are born with minds of their own, taste buds that take time to evolve, and personalities to boot – one of the reasons why we love them so dearly. So occasionally – well,

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actually, quite regularly – we have to think a bit more creatively about how and what we will be serving for dinner in order to achieve ‘empty plate’ status at the same time as providing the nutrition their growing bodies need,” says Judy Moosmueller who, with fellow mother Jennifer Leckey, created There’s a Beetroot in my Cake – a recipe book filled with ideas for adding more plants and ‘supercharged’ foods to kids plates. Here’s some of their fruit- and veg-filled snacktime favourites.


Grab your copy of There’s a Beetroot in my Cake online DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE IN-SITE APP & SCAN PAGE

FRUIT AND VEG FOR KIDS According to Healthy Kids (healthykids.nsw.gov.au), children aged two to three need to eat one serve of fruit and two-and-a-half serves of vegetables each day. At age four to eight, they need one-and-a-half serves of fruit and four-and-a-half of vegetables per day. By the time we’re nine years old, we need to eat the same amount of fruits and vegetables as an adult (two and five respectively). A single serve of fruit is 150 grams, equal to a medium-sized apple or two apricots OR a cup of canned or chopped fruit OR 1½ tablespoons dried fruit. One serve of vegetables is 75 grams, equal to ½ cup cooked vegetables OR ½ medium potato OR 1 cup of salad vegetables OR ½ cup cooked legumes.

CHIPPIES You’ll find everyone lingering around the oven when these are cooking. Snapping a photo of them wasn’t easy as they are always snatched away in minutes! Celeriac is a seriously underrated vegetable. Granted, it may not be the prettiest of plants, with its hairy, knobbly exterior but you should never judge a book by its cover. Behind that rhino-tough skin is a pearl-coloured flesh with a flavour that’s too good to ignore. If you haven’t already, give Mr Celeriac a chance with these crispy baked sweet potato and celeriac root chips. Dust with semolina for a bit of extra crunch – delicious. Chips 1 sweet potato 1 celeriac root 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 2 tbsp of Mexican/Taco seasoning (1 tsp smoked paprika, 1 tsp coriander, 1 tsp cumin, 1 tsp chilli) 3–5 tbsp semolina Salt and pepper, to taste Avocado dip 70 g (½ cup) cashews, soaked in lemon juice overnight 60 ml (¼ cup) water 2 ripe avocados 1 lemon (zest and juice) 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

1 garlic, minced 1 tbsp coconut nectar Salt and pepper, to taste Preheat the oven to 180°C. Cut sweet potatoes and celeriac root into long sticks. Toss in olive oil and spices and then transfer onto a lined tray and spread out evenly with space between the chips. Dust with semolina – this increases the crispiness. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden and cooked through. To make the dip, add one ingredient at a time to blend in a high-speed food processor. Start with the cashews and mix until creamy. Continue adding other ingredients until you have a smooth, creamy paste. Serve alongside chippies.

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BARBECUE MUFFINS There is nothing more Australian than a ‘barbie’ (barbecue). As soon as summer arrives, we are either hosting or going to a barbie and the process is simple: Get the meat, make a salad, maybe a little dessert and then it’s drink, cook, eat, talk, laugh, play and relax with the kids, friends and family. These muffins encapsulate not only the flavour but also the vibe of a super fun afternoon barbecuing. Best thing is you can take them anywhere to have a little taste of all the above. And, by the way, they are easy to make, gluten free, nut free, low in fat and full of protein and veges. 70 g (1 cup) oats 70 g (½ cup) corn 1 egg 150 ml (½ cup) barbecue sauce 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp coriander salt and pepper 50 g (1 cup) black/green lentils (cooked) 1 large carrot 1 small onion 1 clove garlic

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Preheat the oven to 180°C. In a large bowl mix the oats, corn, egg, barbecue sauce, spices and half of the lentils. Roughly grind the carrot, onion, garlic and the other half of the lentils in a food processor until smooth. Mix the two batters together (by hand) and let it sit for 10 minutes. Bake in a greased muffin or loaf form for 15 minutes. Then coat with a little barbecue sauce and bake another 5 minutes until done.


SPICED PUMPKIN DOUGHNUTS APPLE COOKIES An apple a day keeps the doctor away, right? The perfect ‘throw-together’ snack for a last-minute play date when there’s no time to pop to the shops. Four ingredients, which can be substituted as your pantry allows, and a few minutes to assemble is all that’s needed to make rumbling tummies happy. 1 apple ¼ cup peanut/nut butter ¼ cup granola A few chocolate bits Remove core of apple and slice into even rings. Spread with peanut/nut butter and top with granola and chocolate bits. You can also use coconut flakes or any seeds you have handy.

Who would ever think that the mammoth pumpkin could ever feature in a sweet treat like this one? Baked not fried, these doughnuts have been tried and tested (many, many times) and approval was finally given by our pint-sized judges who recommend this version! Doughnuts 60 g cold butter 1 large egg 60 ml (¼ cup) maple syrup 1 tsp pure vanilla extract 2 tbsp gingerbread mix/Chinese 5-spice (¼ tsp ginger, ¼ tsp cloves, ¼ tsp star anise, ¼ tsp cinnamon, ¼ tsp coriander, ¼ tsp cardamom, ¼ tsp nutmeg, ¼ tsp all spice) 130 g (½ cup) roasted pumpkin, puréed* 60 g (½ cup) light spelt flour 60 g (½ cup) plain flour ½ tsp baking powder ½ tsp baking soda Frosting 50 g (¼ cup) natural cane sugar, finely ground into powdered sugar 1–2 tbsp milk (cow’s or almond) 1 tsp maple syrup Pinch of cinnamon

Preheat oven to 180°C. Mix butter, egg, maple syrup, vanilla extract and spices with an electric mixer until well combined. Add the pumpkin puree. Sieve the flour and combine with baking powder and baking soda then fold into pumpkin batter. Grease the doughnut pan wells and fill them almost to the top. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden (they should bounce back when you poke them). Transfer to a cooling rack. Prepare the frosting by mixing all ingredients in a bowl. The consistency should be thin enough to drip. Apply at once to cooled doughnuts for a little gloss or multiple times for total coverage. *Make your own pumpkin puree: Preheat oven to 200°C. Cut slits in the pumpkin so it can breathe while roasting and place in a baking dish with about 3 centimetres of water. Bake for about 1½ hours or until skin is easily pierced. Remove skin, seeds and add pumpkin flesh into a high speed food processor and puree until smooth.

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BANANA SNOWFLAKES Good things don’t have to be complicated. Our girls love snowflaked banana, and we love it because the turnaround time is less than a minute. Some days need an extra sparkle and a quarter of a teaspoon of sprinkles does the trick. Plus it adds a little colour. 1 banana 25 g (½ cup) desiccated coconut ¼ tsp sprinkles (optional) Slice banana and roll in coconut and sprinkles (if using). Yes, it’s that simple!

ABOUT JUDY AND JENNIFER

Judy Moosmueller is a designer by trade, and Jennifer Leckey is a teacher. Between them, they have three girls under the age of five – all of which have been the taste-testers and approval-givers for There’s a Beetroot in my Cake. Moosmueller says, “Our main aim is to simplify – it’s all about everyday dishes that are stripped back, free from artificial ingredients, and turned into delicious healthy alternatives.” Moosmueller draws on her Bavarian influences (she was born in Germany) but also by Ayurvedic and Chinese nutritional medicine. Leckey is driven by homely family favourites and, of course, simple snacks for school and when you’re on the road. “No matter what stage of the food journey you find yourself on, be it starting the weaning adventures with a small baby or trying to encourage healthier eating habits in an older, more stubborn eater, we hope you will find a few dishes here that you will eat together with delight.”

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EAT

OUT-THE-DOOR

food

BREAKFAST IS, AS WE ALL KNOW  THE EASIEST MEAL OF THE DAY TO SKIMP ON, SKIM OVER OR EVEN SKIP. AND BREAKFAST, AS WE ARE ALL TOLD, IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL OF THE DAY. SO HERE ARE FOUR MAKEAHEAD, DELICIOUS, NUTRITIOUS BREAKFAST IDEAS THAT YOU CAN GRAB AS YOU RUN OUT THE DOOR AND GO INTO YOUR DAY FEELING FULL AND LOOKED AFTER.

Words, recipes and photography: SOPHIE HANSEN (local-lovely.com)

OVERNIGHT BIRCHER WITH FRUIT & NUTS SERVES 4

This is such a great way to start the day, creamy, delicious and absolutely chock full of goodness, make up a week’s worth and swap around the toppings to taste. 1 cup oats 2 tbsp chia seeds 2 tbsp pumpkin seeds 1 tbsp flaxseeds 1 cup liquid (we used unsweetened apple juice here but you could go with milk or nut milk – your choice) 1 tbsp maple syrup (or to taste) 1 Granny Smith apple, unpeeled and grated 1 cup natural Greek yoghurt, plus extra to serve 1 pinch ground cinnamon 1 pinch ground ginger ½ cup pureed seasonal fruit (we used whole peaches, de-stoned and simply blitzed in a blender. Or you could use poached apples or pears). 4 tbsp roasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well. Decant into jars or little bowls, cover and place in the fridge overnight. Before you leave for the day, add a little puree, another blob of the yoghurt, some of the nuts and you’re off!

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FRITTATA WITH GOAT’S CURD & CHERRY TOMATOES SERVES 4

Frittatas are the ultimate breakfast food - full of protein and goodness and super easy to make ahead then slice up in wedges to eat on the run. Please feel free to swap the tomatoes and curd for your favourite fillings - wilted spinach and feta would be beautiful, and if you have any leftover roasted vegetables, in they go too! 8 fresh eggs ¼ cup pouring cream ½ cup grated cheddar cheese ½ cup goat’s curd 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 1 tbsp thyme leaves 2 tbsp parmesan, grated

and sprinkle with the thyme and parmesan. Bake for about 30 minutes or until just cooked through and the top is golden brown.

Preheat oven to 180°C and grease a 4-cup capacity baking dish. Whisk together the eggs and cream in a large bowl and season to taste. Add the cheddar and mix together. Pour mixture into the oven dish, top with the tomatoes, goat’s curd

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BREAKFAST SMOOTHIE SERVES 2

This tangy, beautiful smoothie tastes super fresh and will fill you up for a big morning ahead. You can make this a few hours in advance, just give it a good shake to fix any separation. 1 orange ½ ripe banana (or avocado if you prefer) 1 cup raspberries (frozen are fine if that’s easier) 2 cm piece ginger, roughly chopped 1 cup water, milk or nut milk A few ice cubes 2 tbsp natural almonds Combine all ingredients in your blender and pulse until smooth.

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SUPER SNACK BAR SERVES 6 (ABOUT 12 PIECES)

Keep this bar in the fridge for whenever you get need something to nibble on, but especially in the morning when it’s sweet, nutty goodness will see you right through to lunchtime. Base ⅔ cup hazelnut pieces, roasted 1 cup wholemeal flour 1 ½ cups oats ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup shredded coconut A pinch of salt ½ tsp ground ginger 225 g unsalted butter 130 g honey

Topping ¼ cup sunflower seeds ¼ cup linseeds ¼ cup pepitas 2 tbsp chia seeds ¼ cup flaked almonds 1 cup jam (we used homemade strawberry jam) Preheat oven to 180°C and lightly grease and line a 20 x 30 centimetre slice tin. For the base, combine the nuts, flour, oats, sugar, coconut, salt and ginger until coarse

and transfer to a large mixing bowl. Melt the butter and honey together and add this mixture to the dry ingredients and mix well. Press ⅔ of the mixture into the base of your tin and pop the remaining ⅓ cup of the mixture in the fridge. Bake the base for 15 minutes or until golden brown; remove from fridge and let cool. Combine the topping ingredients, except for the jam, in a large bowl. Add the remaining base mixture and mix to combine. Spread the baked base with the jam, sprinkle over the seedy mixture and return to the oven for a further half an hour. Leave in the fridge for at least 4 hours, or overnight to set before slicing into bars.

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P ROM M OT OTIO I NAL L RE

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RAW MANGO CHEESEC C AKE SERVES 4

Base ⅓ cup raw almonds 4 dates, pitted 1 tbsp Norbu 2 tbsp desiccated coconut ⅛ tsp vanilla extract 1 tbsp coconut oil, melted pinch salt Filling 1 mango ½ lime, zested and juiced ½ cup cashews soaked overnight 3 tbsp co oconut oil 3 tbsp Norbu 2 tbsp coconut cream a or milk 1 tbsp fresh mint ½ tsp vanilla extract Pinch salt

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Blend together all crust ingredients except the coco o nut oil, until crumbs form. Add the oconut oil and stir thorroughly. c ust mixture evenly into Press the cr 4 circular dishes (we used large cookie cutters on top of bakin ng paper, but you o could use ma s ingform tins) and set aside spr e. nts Blend the filling ingredien together until creamy. Pour over v crust bases and then place e in freezer for at least two hours to set. To serve, remove from freez ee er and let sit for o 5 inute ut s to make them easier to remove e from moulds. Garnish h wit w h lime and fresh mintt le eav s.

Norbu Norbu is a 100 % natural, low calorie alternative to sugar and artificial sweeteners. Using the natural sweetness of monk fruit, Norbu tastes just like sugar but with 96% less calories and none of the bitterness of other sweeteners. Its Low GI and fructose free and you can use Norbu just like you’d use sugar, making it’s easy to cut sugar from your diet. It is your sweet secret to health!

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EAT

hurry

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, U WANT TO DO IS STAND IN THE KITCHEN COOKING FOR HOURS. YOU’RE HUNGRY, AND YOU NEED SOMETHING FAST. RATHER THAN REACHING FOR A BOWL OF CEREAL WE’VE ALL BEEN THERE YOU CAN WHIP UP SOME SUPER HEALTHY MEALS IN A FLASH WITHOUT COMPROMISING ON FLAVOUR. HERE ARE SOME OF MY TOP PICKS FOR SUPER SPEEDY SUPPERS  MINIMUM EFFORT, MAXIMUM TASTE. Words, recipes and images: SALLY O’NEIL (@thefitfoodieblog)

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BAKED SNAPPER WITH LEMON, GARLIC & CHILLI SERVES 2

Buying a whole fish is often more economical than buying the fillet. It also makes it a cinch to prep! Ask your fishmonger or supermarket to clean and scale it for you, then throw it on a baking tray, add some simple flavours and you’ve got one tasty, nourishing meal in less than 30 minutes. 1 small fresh snapper (around 700 g) ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and pepper 1 lemon, thinly sliced 1 small red chilli, chopped 6 garlic cloves (skin on, to save time) Preheat the oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper and lay over the fish. Using a sharp knife, score the fish on both sides. Drizzle with olive oil and season. Lie over the lemon slices over the fish and sprinkle with chilli. Arrange garlic cloves around the fish. Bake for around 15 to 20 minutes depending on the size of your fish. Once cooked, the flesh will be opaque and flake easily with a fork. Once cooked, squeeze out the cooked garlic cloves over the fish. Serve with rocket leaves and dress with any remaining lemon juice.

TERIYAKI TOFU BOWL SERVES 2

This is one of my favourites for a Meatless Monday meal. Add a base of greens to a bowl, and top with all your favourite veggies from the weekend, and add a palm-sized portion of protein. I use firm tofu in this recipe for a plant-based meal, but you can add chicken, eggs, or whatever you have lying around. This bowl is all about eating up the tastiest things from your fridge. ¼ tsp sesame oil 170 g extra firm tofu, cubed ½ tbsp arrowroot flour 1 tsp ginger, minced, divided 1 tbsp garlic, minced, divided 5 drops liquid stevia or 1 tsp honey ½ tbsp rice vinegar 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 cup salad greens ½ cup pre-cooked brown rice 1 cup leftover roast veggies ½ cup cherry tomatoes ½ avocado 1 small cucumber, sliced Handful of herbs, such as coriander Fresh chilli (optional) and lemon to dress the bowl.

Add the tofu to the pan, cooking for around 2 minutes until browned, then turn, and brown the other sides of the cubes.

In a shallow frying pan, heat the sesame oil over a medium heat. In a bowl, add the arrowroot flour and stir in the tofu until well coated. In a separate bowl, whisk together the ginger, garlic, stevia, vinegar and soy sauce.

Top with healthy fats such as avocado or cashews, then top the whole bowl with your tofu and a handful of herbs.

Remove the tofu and add the sauce, cooking for 1 minute until it begins to thicken. Add the tofu back to the pan and stir, then remove from the heat and set aside. Meanwhile, prep your salad bowl by adding your favourite greens. I used spinach for the base, and added a handful of spiralised zucchini. Divide the rice between two bowls. If you don’t have leftover rice, a pack of brown microwave rice will do the trick. Then pile on any leftover roast veggies – here I used pumpkin and sweet potato – but just use what you have lying around to make it quick! Raw veggies work just as well – grate some carrot and chop some cucumber. Cherry tomatoes and radish make tasty additions too.

To serve, drizzle with lemon juice, top with chilli then season to taste with salt and pepper. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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LEFTOVERS + BAKED EGGS SERVES 4

Doesn’t sound very sexy, but adding all your leftover veggies and meat or seafood to the bottom of a shallow dish and adding eggs on top makes for one of the simplest, tastiest meals around. At the end of the week I often have some greens that are past their best and they work great in this dish. This is a great opportunity to reduce waste, so gather all your odds and ends and get dinner in less than 30 minutes. Winning! 2 cups leftover veg – I used zucchini, kale and chives. Any leftover meat, fish (optional) 8 large organic eggs 2 tbsp leftover pesto (optional) Sea salt and pepper Leftover herbs to garnish Preheat the oven to 180°C. In a shallow baking dish, add the leftover veg and any cooked meat/ seafood, spreading to cover the base of the dish. Crack over the eggs, ensuring the whites spill to cover your leftovers. If using, dollop on the pesto and swirl through the eggs. Season with salt and pepper and cook for 20 to 25 minutes (depending on how you like your eggs). Enjoy immediately with a side salad and some avocado for heart-healthy fats.

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JAPANESE MISO SALMON SERVES 1

I love Japanese food; it always seems to pack in heaps of flavour with relatively little cooking time. The timeless combination of sesame, ginger, garlic and chilli make this simple dish pack a real punch without spending hours in the kitchen. The perfect healthy after-work dish that’s quicker than a takeaway. 1 tsp sesame oil 1 salmon fillet, skin on 1 head baby bok choy 1 small daikon (white) radish 1 small bunch enoki mushrooms 1 tbsp red or white miso (organic, nonGMO preferable) 5 thin slices fresh ginger 1 small garlic glove, finely chopped 1 tsp black sesame seeds 1 tbsp fresh edamame beans 1 tbsp spring onions ½ tsp chilli flakes Preheat the open to 180°C. Heat sesame oil in an ovenproof frying pan, and add the salmon, skin side down. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the skin begins to brown and crisp then add the frypan into the oven to finish cooking the salmon. For medium-rare in the middle, cook for around 5 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small pan mix together the miso paste with a cup of water and bring to the boil. Add the garlic and ginger to flavour the broth, simmering for a few minutes. Steam the bok choy for a few minutes until tender. Grate or spiralise the daikon. In a bowl add the daikon, bok choy, enoki and crispy salmon (skin side up). Pour the miso broth being careful not to pour over the salmon skin – you want to keep it crispy. Top with sesame seeds, chilli flakes, edamame and spring onion. Enjoy!

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NUTRITION TO LIVE BY

5Ŀ½ , ) T LIFESTREAM SPIRULINA NATURE'S ENERGY BOOST Long lasting natural energy, vitality and stamina boost High source of protein High concentration of vitamins & minerals Easy to absorb iron Nutrient dense plant based wholefood

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Always read the label and use only as directed.


PROMOTIONAL RECIPES

TUMMY CLEANER SMOOTHIE SERVES 1 GLUTEN FREE, NUT FREE AND GOOD SOURCE OF FIBRE

Stress and poor diet can take a toll on the gut system. This smoothie has a source of fibre for cleaning the tummy and smoother elimination. It also contains prebiotics and probiotics to help support long term health and give our gut a stronger fighting power. 2 tsp Lifestream Bowel Biotics Fibre+ Enzymes Powder 2 tbsp Lifestream Biogenic Aloe Vera Juice 1 tsp Lotus Organic Black Chia 1 cup Lakewood Basics Reward juice (coconut milk, banana, passionfruit, apple and cinnamon) 2 tbsp organic yoghurt ½ cup organic frozen banana Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender then serve straight away.

BOOST YOUR SMOOTHIES LIVER DETOX SMOOTHIE SERVES 1 DAIRY FREE, VEGAN AND NUT FREE

The hardest working organ in our body deserves our very best attention. When the liver is working overtime it may not excrete toxins properly and you may run into some trouble. This smoothie has all the basics to maintain the performance of our liver. 2 tbsp Lifestream Biogenic Aloe Vera Juice 1 tsp Lifestream Ultimate Greens Powder 1 cup Lakewood Basics Rebuild juice (beet,

pomegranate, purple carrot, apple, cranberry, camu camu) 1 tsp Gourmet Organic Herb Turmeric ⅓ cup coriander

Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender then serve straight away.

Lifestream is one of the original superfoods brands with an extensive range of nutrient dense, plant based wholefood products. Made from premium quality ingredients to help you detox this summer. Call 1300 762 025 or go to lifestream.co.nz to find out more. Follow us @lifestreamwholefoods These recipes are proudly brought to you by Lifestream – it’s nutrition to live by. lifestream.co.nz Detox smoothies by Valentina Mora


GOURMET HEALTH

LUNCHBOX

legends Words: BETH ANDERSON Photography: THINKSTOCK

SICK OF EATING THE SAME OLD SANDWICH EVERY DAY? ADD PIZAZZ TO YOUR LUNCH AND CUT BACK TIME SPENT IN THE KITCHEN WITH 20 TOP TIPS FROM OUR EXPERTS. 76

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OUR EXPERTS BELINDA SMITH is a mother, health and wellness coach and the creator of the Mad Food Science program and the 5-minute Healthy Lunchbox System. Through her business The Root Cause (therootcause. com.au), Smith has worked with over 10,000 children and parents in the last 12 months. She is a Jamie Oliver Food Revolution Ambassador, and was dubbed “The Lunchbox Vigilante” by Channel 7 Sunrise.

ALOYSA HOURIGAN is an accredited practising dietitian in a private practice in Brisbane and has co-authored two Nutrition Australia publications that focus on childhood nutrition The Lunchbox Book and Fun not Fuss with Food. She has a great passion for food and for all things associated with the social pleasure of eating and its impact on health.

PLAN AND PREPARE

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Do your shopping and basic preparation on weekends says Smith. “My number one tip is to give it a bit of thought ahead of time rather than opening the lunch box in the morning and wondering what to put in it,” she says. “If you know you’re going to make chicken sandwiches, roast a chicken then pull it apart. By the time you come to pack lunch each morning or night, it really is just a matter of following a road map.”

MEG CAMPBELL is a personal trainer and wellness coach who is passionate about helping people bring wellness into their lives by changing their perspective and developing a healthy, nurturing relationship with themselves and with others. She has over 18 years’ experience working with a diverse range of people in all sorts of roles, including facilitating corporate wellness workshops.

“Wholegrain crackers, baked beans, canned fish, raw nuts, dried fruit: they can sit there safely for weeks, just use them before their expiry date,” says Hourigan.

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Consider adding fruit and vegetable smoothies to your lunchtime menu, says Campbell. She recommends preparing ingredients on the weekend and storing them in zip-lock bags or glass containers in the freezer. “All you have to do in the morning is blend and go,” she says.

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Look for recipes that are suitable for freezing, advises Hourigan. “Zucchini slice and other egg-based dishes can be frozen in single portions, then defrosted each day and served with salad,” she says. Keeping your freezer well stocked with homemade goodies such as protein balls will likewise ensure you always have healthy snacks on hand. Visit nutritionaustralia.org or healthyfoodhealthyplanet.org for recipes.

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You can reduce prep time at home, Hourigan continues, by taking food to work at the beginning of each week, then throwing it together at lunchtime. “That way, you’ve got the ingredients ready and don’t have to think about what you’re going to eat each day.”

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Keep a store of long-lasting items at work so you have a fall-back option on those days when you lack time (or motivation) to prepare lunch.

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COOKING FOR KIDS

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If you need to prepare lunch for children as well as yourself, minimise your workload by making the same food for everyone. “If you’re packing a nourishing lunch for your children, there’s no reason you can’t pack exactly the same for yourself, but just change the quantity for your own appetite,” says Smith.

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Involve your children in the process, she continues. “Get your kids to identify at least one fruit and vegetable that they like, as well as a good-quality protein. They’re the three main staples that you should always include in their lunch box.

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Keep in mind that kids don’t always have a lot of time to eat their lunch. When touring schools around

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Australia, Smith sees many children prioritise play over eating during lunchbreaks. She therefore recommends parents include as much finger food as possible in lunch boxes: items that are easy for children to pick up and eat quickly before they go out to play.

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Leave store-bought foods such as biscuits and sweets at home, Smith advises. “What we put in children’s lunch boxes needs to nourish their bodies and brains,” she

explains. “A lot of store-bought products are full of sugars, additives and preservatives that can affect childrens’ abilities to behave and concentrate. My suggestion is to bake at home with your kids, then have a couple of days each week when you include these homemade goods in their lunch box.”

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If your child suffers from allergies, or their school bans common allergens such as nut products or egg, Smith believes it’s best to go back to basics. “If you pack a fruit and a vegetable, it’s unlikely that those foods are going to impact another child’s health.”

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Play it safe and choose healthy snacks that don’t contain nuts, Hourigan adds. “If you can’t include nuts in your child’s lunch box, give them veggie sticks and dip, or fruit and yoghurt, or crackers with cheese instead.”


GET CREATIVE WITH LEFTOVERS

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There are so many incentives to turn dinner leftovers into lunch: it saves money, reduces cooking time and prevents food wastage. Hourigan recommends thinking each week about what you’re cooking for dinner and making extra for the next few days. “It could be a roast, a stir fry or a salad: put some aside, then add a can of fish and a bread roll the next day, or put it into a toasted sandwich.”

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You don’t always have to serve leftovers in their original form; instead, look for recipes that will transform them into a different meal altogether. “If we have spaghetti bolognaise for dinner, I turn it into spaghetti bolognaise muffins for lunch,” says Smith. “If we have goodquality sausages for dinner, I cook extra so I can cut them up and put them into our lunch boxes. If I roast a chicken, I make sure there’s enough to put into rice paper rolls or wraps.”

TOOLS OF THE TRADE

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Never underestimate the importance of a good-quality lunch box, Smith advises, adding that there are a number of washable and reusable products available for adults and children alike.

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Japanese-inspired bento boxes are also useful, Campbell explains, as their compartments keep items separate and negate the need for plastic wrap. “Inevitably, if you have lots of containers with separate lids, you will spend time trying to find the matching lids, which is time wasted!” says Campbell. “Bento boxes also allow you to see which food groups you have covered, making it easy to ensure that you have packed a balanced, nutritious lunch.”

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Don’t be afraid to think outside the box when packing your lunch, either. Jars are another environmentally friendly (and attractive) storage option. “Purchase a glass mason jar with a lid and pack it full of your favourite salad ingredients,” Campbell suggests. “I tend to layer my jar with olive oil or homemade dressing at the bottom, followed by heavier ingredients, then the lighter salad greens on top. That way, nothing gets soggy and I can make a few jars in advance for the week. When you are ready to eat, you can tip the salad into a bowl or eat it straight from the jar. I also whip up a smoothie each morning and take that to work in a jar.”

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GET INSPIRED

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Many of us get stuck in a lunch rut, taking the same type of sandwich or soup into work each day. “Typically, people use sandwiches or bread-based items for lunch,” says Hourigan. “But you can mix things up just by changing the type of bread you put something on: a wrap one day, a bread roll the next and a sandwich after that. You can also change the nature of the protein filling. Instead of ham, use lean roast meat or a hard-boiled egg. And you can use different spreads – adding hummus or avocado, or a vegetable-based dip like beetroot to a sandwich gives it a whole new flavour.”

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If you’re in need of new menu ideas, check out what the professionals are cooking. “Next time you have a favourite dish from a café, eat it slowly and mindfully, paying attention to the flavours and ingredients,” Campbell suggests. “Even if you can’t recreate it, you can be inventive with similar ingredients and flavours.

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Use your own imaginative powers as well, Campbell continues. “Try to tap into your intuition about what your body really needs and don’t be governed by what someone else says you ‘should’ do. Sometimes I come up with the craziest combinations, throwing all sorts of nutritious things together. Mix it up and make it fun.”

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If you ever need to remind yourself why you pack (rather than purchase) lunch, think of the nutritional benefits – not to mention the money you’re saving. “Keep a tab of how much money you spend purchasing food for a week,” Campbell proposes. “Multiply that by 48 [the average number of weeks spent working each year] to get the total money spent on takeaway lunches. Making lunch can cut this in half!”

WASTE-FREE LUNCHES

Plastic wrap, aluminium foil, food wrappers and water bottles: lunch-related packaging is a massive contributor to landfill. Follow these steps to reduce your environmental footprint and keep food fresh. • Pack food items in reusable bags or containers • Store drinks in a thermos or flask • BYO reusable utensils • Steer clear of store-bought packaged food • Avoid plastic storage products that contain Bisphenol A (BPA), which can negatively impact health

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FRESHEN UP YOUR FAMILY FAVOURITES... Use ingredients you know your family already love in new, exciting ways. Freshen up your family favourites and expand your recipe repertoire with new nutritious, tasty meals to make your weekly menu something to shout about. Call (03) 9574 8460 or visit our online store at www.subscribeandshop.com to order your copy


GOURMET HEALTH

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MORE PEOPLE ARE GOING GLUTEN FREE THAN EVER BEFORE  BUT IS IT FOR THE RIGHT REASONS AND, IMPORTANTLY, IS IT HEALTHY? Words: LINDA MOON Photography: THINKSTOCK

‘Gluten free’ is possibly the most popular health claim of the past decade. According to the Australian Health Survey (2011 to 2012), gluten intolerance is the second most prevalent self-reported food intolerance in Australia. As a result, the number of gluten-free foods and products has expanded rapidly. Wander down the aisle of your local supermarket and you’ll see all kinds of things – from sausages to cake mix – with gluten free labels. On the upside, yummy gluten-free grains such as buckwheat and quinoa have

found their place on menus and in everyday dishes, and it’s now possible to find gluten-free bread that doesn’t look and taste like a dried out sponge. On the downside, it looks like we have more things to worry about than ever when it comes to eating healthy. A 2015 survey of 1,000 people by the CSIRO suggested one in 10 adults (about 1.8 million Australians) were avoiding or restricting wheat products from their diet. While 1.1 per cent avoided wheat because of coeliac disease, the majority (equating to about seven per cent of the Australian population) claimed they did so because of health problems they associated with it. While the gluten free product boom is both a result

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of increasing prevalence of gluten intolerance and a need to provide better options to those who suffer from it, it also caters to a growing legion of people convinced glutenfree products are healthier. But do we know for sure that they are? In truth, expert opinion is divided – with some believing that the true villain behind some peoples gluten sensitivity is (quite possibly) something else entirely.

What is gluten? Gluten is a compound of proteins and is found naturally in many grains including wheat, rye, barley, bulgur, semolina, triticale and oats. Add water and it becomes elastic, giving products like bread and cakes fluffy texture. It also occurs as a hidden ingredient in many processed foods including sauces, seasonings, processed meats, canned soups and thickeners. Eat out for a week with anyone suffering from coeliac disease and you’ll soon understand how common it is.

Is gluten unhealthy? In the one per cent of the population who have coeliac disease, even tiny amounts of gluten can be toxic. According to Peter Gibson, professor of Gastroenterology at Monash University and the Alfred Hospital Melbourne, people with coeliac disease experience a specific immune reaction to a component of gluten. This causes inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine, the part of the digestive tract responsible for most of our nutrient absorption from food. Symptoms including fatigue, brain fog, diarrhoea, constipation, cramping and bloating can range from severe to mild, or none at all. Longer term it can lead to malnutrition, thinning bones and other serious complications, he says. For anyone concerned about their perceived reaction to gluten, Gibson says it’s vital they determine whether they have coeliac disease or not. Diagnosis is straightforward and involves a simple blood test. “With coeliac disease it’s important to stay on a gluten-free diet,” he says. “Whereas,

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GLUTEN IS A COMPOUND OF PROTEINS, GLUTEN IS FOUND NATURALLY IN MANY GRAINS INCLUDING WHEAT, RYE, BARLEY, BULGUR, SEMOLINA, TRITICALE AND OATS. ADD WATER AND IT BECOMES ELASTIC, GIVING PRODUCTS LIKE BREAD AND CAKES FLUFFY TEXTURE.


if you don’t have coeliac disease it’s not so imperative that you remain absolutely gluten free for your health. We have no evidence that non-coeliac gluten sensitivity causes the problems that coeliac disease does.” Many people report similar FOR ANYONE CONCERNED ABOUT symptoms to coeliac disease when THEIR PERCEIVED REACTION TO consuming gluten-containing GLUTEN, GIBSON SAYS IT’S VITAL foods without actually having the disease or an allergy (measured THEY DETERMINE WHETHER THEY by a specific immune response). HAVE COELIAC DISEASE OR NOT. Health professionals label this condition gluten intolerance or noncoeliac gluten sensitivity. Gibson says there’s very little knowledge on the mechanism of action and no diagnostic test or biomarkers for measuring gluten intolerance. Sufferers are diagnosed on the Want more info? basis of improved symptoms Watch Catalyst’s after removing gluten from their Gluten: A Gut Feeling diet. But, according to Gibson’s DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE research, there’s little evidence IN-SITE APP & SCAN PAGE that gluten is to blame.

If not gluten, then what? “It’s not in their head. It actually is food that is triggering these symptoms, but it’s probably, in the vast majority of people, not to do with gluten,” Gibson says. “Gluten was blamed because gluten is the component that causes coeliac disease – some people are now calling it ‘non-coeliac wheat sensitivity’ – we don’t know what it is in wheat that is causing it.” Giselle Cook, a Sydney-based, holistic practitioner, with thirty years experience as a medical practitioner, warns people to beware the trend to self-diagnose. “If you try to give yourself some permanent dietary advice you might miss something. The chances of hitting on the right diagnosis are pretty slim.” Many health complaints can mimic the symptoms of gluten or wheat intolerance, Cook says.

BAD GRAIN, GOOD GRAIN

World-renowned gastroenterologist, Dr Alessio Fasano, professor and director of the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital believes we’re not evolved to eat wheat. On Catalyst in November 2016, Fasano says, “For the 2.5 million years of evolution, 99.9 per cent of our species has been gluten free. Gluten came into the picture only 10,000 years ago, with the advent of agriculture; it’s perceived by our immune system as a component of a bacterium or virus and unleashes the same weaponry that we use when we're under attack by an infection.” But does this mean we should cut wheat from our diet? “The vast majority of people can deal with that and clean this problem without any clinical consequences,” Fasano says. However, there are other arguments that put wheat in the firing line. Spelt, an ancient form of wheat, contains three per cent gluten compared to 50 per cent in standard bakers flour, Cook says. “The more evolved the grain is, the more man has bred species that have higher gluten content, because it kneads better.” Perhaps that’s part of the problem. “We’re getting far too much gluten for the amount of grain we’re eating,” Cook says. Experts have also attributed perceived wheat intolerance to glyphosate, the key ingredient in herbicides, routinely sprayed on wheat. NOURISHMAG.COM


These commonly include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic parasites, inflammatory bowel diseases, endometriosis, congestive dysmenorrhoea, candida and gut dybiosis (gut flora imbalances), chronic constipation and food allergies and intolerances of other kinds – FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols), for example. Gibson believes fructans, a type of FODMAP, could be to blame for the global rise in gluten intolerance. “FODMAPs are short chain

carbohydrates – in other words little chains of sugars – that are very slowly absorbed from the small intestine or not digested at all.” He says they’ve been proven to cause water in the bowel, gas production, and bowel distension. “These are major triggers of gut symptoms in people with IBS. Fructans are one type of these FODMAPs and one of the big sources of it is wheat.”

So, are gluten-free foods healthier? They certainly are for anyone with coeliac disease. However, Cook says

BREADY OR NOT If you think bread is a catalyst for gluten intolerancelike symptoms, there may be other reasons why. Most supermarket breads contain multiple additives including yeasts, bread improvers and bleaches. “There’s all sorts of different things you could be

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that some gluten-free options can be highly refined and lacking in fibre. “It’s used as a marketing term these days,” she says. “People order glutenfree when they’ve got no idea if they need it or not,” she says. However, many wholesome grains and pseudo grains used in more wholesome gluten-free products – such as whole corn, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and teff – have a more diverse nutritional profile than wheat. These grains also tend to be less GMO affected, less allergenic and lower GI, Cook says.

reacting to in there,” Cook says. She recommends choosing grains as original, fresh, varied, unprocessed, whole and additive free as possible. Breads without leavening agents, like roti (an Indian flatbread) may also be better tolerated by some.


GOURMET HEALTH

BEYOND THE FERMENTED FOOD TREND

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FERMENTED FOODS ARE MORE THAN JUST A FAD – THEY’RE A PRODUCT OF ANCIENT WISDOM Words: JAIMEE EDWARDS (@fermentingprojects), MADDIE LAKOS

I don’t need to tell you that fermented foods are having their time in the sun – one can hardly walk into even a mainstream supermarket without spotting kombucha or, increasingly, kraut. Our growing enthusiasm for health foods and functional foods (that is, foods that boast bonus health benefits) has seen the rise and fall of a plethora of ill-fated products and ‘superfood’ ingredients over the years (you can’t be #trending forever), but fermented foods and beverages won’t be one of them. Even if they disappear from supermarkets and trendy cafés, fermentation is as much a way of connecting with food as it is a healthy food choice.

Every culture and cuisine around the world produce fermented foods. The process is essentially the action of the yeasts and bacteria already present on the surface converting sugars into lactic acid. The result of this alchemy is some of the most wonderful foods ever created, including chocolate and miso. While krauts and kombucha are getting all the attention there are a rich variety of fermented foods to be consumed. Even lesser known products such as kimchi, tempeh and kefir are just the tip of the iceberg – you could spend a lifetime trying to exhaust the range of fermented foods.

DIFFERENT KINDS OF FERMENTING By Maddie Lakos

LACTO FERMENTATION

This kind of fermentation involves encouraging naturally occurring lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillaceae, if you want to get technical) to feast on the naturally occurring sugars in food – fruit, vegetables or dairy for example. In the right environment (like your fermentation crock) Lactobacillaceae convert these sugars into lactic acid, which gives lacto-fermented foods their characteristic tang. Lactic acid bacteria in foods are known to have a variety of health benefits. Research in the Journal of Applied Microbiology says that “Many probiotics fall into the group of organisms known as lactic acid-producing bacteria and are normally consumed in the form of yoghurt, fermented milks or other fermented foods”. A sample of the perks of consuming lacto-fermented foods cited by this study includes improving intestinal tract health, enhancing the immune system, synthesising and enhancing the bioavailability of nutrients, reducing symptoms of lactose intolerance and reducing risk of certain cancers.

YEAST FERMENTATION

Yeast is a lively little micro organism that also loves to eat sugar. But instead of producing lactic acid, yeast produces carbon dioxide (which is what causes your bread to rise) and, in the right environment, ethanol. Yeast is a crucial ingredient in the wine and beer making process – eating up the natural sugars in grapes or barley malt while simultaneously making the product alcoholic. Yes, this means bread can have trace (teeny tiny) amounts of alcohol in it, but most of it is lost in the cooking process.

ACETIC FERMENTATION

Acetic fermentation is a process where acetic acid bacteria convert alcohol (ethanol) into acetic acid, i.e. vinegar. These naturally occurring bacteria thrive in air-filled environments, which is why an open bottle of wine will go sour while a sealed one won’t. Vinegar is frequently praised for its digestionsupporting and 'cleansing' health benefits. A 2016 review of the health benefits of vinegars published in Food Chemistry said that vinegar contains various bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, micronutrients and

antioxidants that contribute to their pharmacological effects. “Among them, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, antioxidative, antiobesity and antihypertensive effects,” the research says. A 2005 study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that women consumed fewer calories on days where they ingested vinegar as part of their morning meal, which – it is thought – is because vinegar reduces the glycaemic index of food. Neat, huh?

MIXED FERMENTS

Now we’re getting into fascinating fermentation territory. Mixed ferments combine different kinds of fermentation to create a different product. Many mixed ferments use what is called a SCOBY, i.e. a symbiotic community of bacteria and yeast. When you look at kombucha (fermented black tea) as an example, this means that the yeast will first eat sugars to excrete ethanol and carbon dioxide, which then feeds acetic acid bacteria, resulting in a relatively non-alcoholic fermented beverage that’s a little bubbly and packed with good bacteria and some of the benefits of vinegar too. Mixed fermentation is also used when making kefir. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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Fermentation culture Fermentation carries with it an accumulation of nutritional wisdom. Whether people have used fermentation for food preservation, or to detoxify produce that has trace amounts of toxins before eating as Indigenous Australians of the Kakadu region do – this is a method that dates back to before refrigeration, nutritional panels and ‘best before’ dates. This means that fermenting has benefited from a long history that discovered, through daily practice rather than laboratory research, that methods such as lacto fermentation produces more than 200 times more vitamin C and higher levels of vitamin B in sauerkraut than in raw cabbage. Hence, sauerkraut was traditionally stored for the winter months when these vitamins play a key role in immune defence. This is the true nature of food knowledge in which food is considered as integral to our holistic health. The Japanese have traditionally eaten fermented foods to accompany soy foods to make them more digestible. This is the same reason that, in Eastern European cuisine, fermented condiments are served with rich meat dishes. Both cultures have always practiced what modern science is

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just turning its attention toward: that fermented foods aid digestion and improve nourishment.

Healthy taste-makers Improved digestion is not fermented foods greatest contribution to your diet. Rather, it is the phenomenal range of flavours they bring to a meal. Fermented foods are exciting and complex – as well as being functional ‘superfoods’. Rather than being smuggled into smoothies or gulped down like tonics, fermented foods are often used to compliment and/ or contrast contract elements of a meal, or even act as palate cleansers. Take, for example, the prolific use of kimchi in Korean cuisine as both a condiment and an ingredient. While some fermented foods do boast a little bit of a ‘funk’ factor (looking at you, natto) that can take a little bit of getting used to, many others – such as everyone’s favourite, kombucha, and delicious yoghurt drink kefir – have been accepted with open arms. But why stop there? All lacto-fermented foods contain probiotic bacteria shown to be beneficial for gut health, and any kind of fermenting helps break down the carbohydrates and sugars in foods (such as soybeans in tempeh and natto and lactose in kefir and yoghurt), making them easier to digest.


THE FERMENTED FIFTH TASTE

Fermented foods are a great source of what is described as the ‘fifth taste’ – a delicious, savoury, mouth-filling flavour known as umami. What we taste when we taste umami is actually an amino acid called glutamic acid. “Glutamic acid is found in vegetables such as capsicum, potato and tomato; many fungi, such as field mushrooms, porcini and oyster mushrooms, are good sources of it,” says food writer Richard Cornish in his 2016 book My Year Without Meat. “Many fermented products, such as kimchi and salami, are high in glutamates, not only from the smaller amounts in the body of the substance being fermented but also from the little yeast cells that are doing the fermentation.”

Food that loves you back In all my fermenting workshops and classes I repeat the same joke: fermenting is not for the relationship phobic. Attention to detail, interaction and care reap the kind of rewards in fermenting that you get with human interaction – and therein lies the greatest power of fermenting. Fermented foods take time for fermentation to occur, years in the case of miso, and they are subject to a range of influences like weather and location – bonds become forged during the long haul. To really understand food is to give it your attention, know that no two cabbages will ever taste exactly the same, that the location where they grew will affect their size and colour and flavour. When you are fermenting you are forced to consider all of the above. But here’s the pay off: this is food that loves you back. A properly prepared and cared for jar of kimchi as part of a balanced diet can heal a troublesome gut, balance hormones and stabilise moods. But let me repeat that last statement: as part of a balanced diet. Nothing can do all that by itself – there are no silver bullets in

health and wellness. However, what is exciting about the attention that fermented food is currently getting is that it emphasises the importance of food as fortification for living well. If we are to understand that feeding others and ourselves is an act of care. Nourishment is an obligation to our bodies, and fostering a deeper and ultimately more pleasurable

relationship to food is the only way to attain good health. What fermented foods offer, whether you are preparing them yourself or buying them at the market, is a level of consideration and intimacy with food that is lacking in most food today. What comes from eating and preparing fermented food is a relationship that is lasting and well beyond the whims of trends.

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FERMENTED TOMATOES(KVASHENI POMIDORY) These are a staple pickle on European tables. At Cornersmith we love to eat them over the spring and summer months, they are great on a cheese plate or sliced in a salad. They have even been described as vegan ‘salami’! MAKES 2 X 500ML JARS 1 kg tomatoes, quartered (choose tomatoes that are just turning from green to red) 200 g celery stalks and leaves chopped ½ tbsp caraway seeds ½ tbsp black peppercorns ½ tbsp Olson’s macrobiotic salt

Toss all ingredients into a bowl. Set aside for at least an hour to draw moisture from the tomatoes. Pack all ingredients into 500-millilitre jars including liquid. Press down as you pack to release more liquid. If tomatoes aren’t sufficiently covered with liquid after packing, top with water. Place jar in a cool dry place for 2 days. This is the period of fermentation. In this time you will notice your tomatoes will bubble and some juice may escape. Simply wipe jar down. After 2 days, place jars in refrigerator. These will last for 6 months in the fridge.

Jaimee Edwards is the

co-founder of the Cornersmith School – a place where you can learn life skills such as fermenting, pickling, preserving, bread-making and more. Edwards’ specialties are fermenting and pickling, and in her classes you’ll not only learn how to make your own sauerkraut, kimchi and fermented vegetables, but also the amazing health benefits of fermentation and principles and processes of this traditional method of preserving. For details visit cornersmith.com.au

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PROMOTIONAL RECIPE

SALTED DARK CHOCOLATE BALLS 3 cups raw nuts (almonds & macadamias work well) 1 p pitted dates irgin coconut oil tbsp ext i tsp vanilla extractt 1 x 55 g Murray River Gour t lted Chocolate bar, grat tbsp cocoa powder

Grated zest of 1 orange ½ cup desiccated coconut Extra desiccated coconut or cocoa powder for rolling Process the nuts until they resemble fine breadcrumbs. Add all remaining ingredients and continue processing until smooth and the mixture starts to form a ball.

Taste and adjust any flavours or textures if required. You do not want the mixture too wet as the balls won’t hold their shape, or too dry as the mix won’t stick together. If the mix is too dry add coconut oil and if the mix is too wet add more desiccated coconut. Roll into balls and then roll in coconut or cocoa powder. Store in the freezer or fridge.

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Conveniently FRESH FOOD CONVE NUTRI

AS A NEW LOOK: FRESH, CED AND EVEN HOMEMADE.

Convenience food is, by definition, something that has been created so that you need to do as little as possible to turn it into a meal – usually par-cooked, pre-prepared, frozen and/or boasting an alarmingly long shelf life. For these reasons, ‘convenience’ isn’t usually associated

with ‘fresh or nutritious’. However, there’s a new breed of deliveredto-your-door food services that are changing that. Nope, we’re not talking about takeaway. We’re talking about quick and easy eats with emphasis on fresh ingredients and balanced nutritional profiles.

Is convenience important? Of course! Some might play the the virtuosity card and say ‘there’s nothing quite like a homemade’ or ‘everyone has time to go to the grocery store’. But shopping for and cooking healthy and nutritious meals for yourself (and your family) isn’t always as easy as it should be. In fact, the search for convenience in the kitchen is one that’s been going on for decades. Back in the 50s and 60s, ready-made foods were marketed as helping women ‘free themselves’ from the confines of the kitchen. Fast-forward to today – where busyness could be regarded as part of the 21st-century human condition – and the notion is still the same. According to Roy Morgan Research, at least 17 per cent of Australian’s believe that their time is better spent doing things other than cooking, and around 23 per cent are disinterested in cooking, eating out or even grocery shopping and around 9.5 per cent eat a frozen ready-made meal on a weekly basis. Plus, when it comes to making healthy choices when not eating at home, new stats from Galaxy Research suggest that we’re not always comfortable with our choices. Around 61 per cent of women and 48 per cent of men surveyed said they felt guilty about the food they eat when dining out. Maybe you work long days, late nights or crazy shifts, maybe you’re trying to slot time in for your hobbies in around your other hobbies (not to mention your family’s hobbies), maybe you’re trying to eat healthier, eat less takeaway or just seriously sick of meals that could be defined as ‘what I could find in the cupboard’ – whoever you are, there’s no reason you shouldn’t eat healthy and delicious food, homemade or otherwise.

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Feed me…

HelloFresh hellofresh.com.au

Currently serving up around a million meals a month across Australia, HelloFresh is about more than just easy meals, it’s about nutritionally balanced eating based on fresh seasonal produce. Each menu is overseen by 2011 MasterChef finalist Tom Rutledge, who’s passionate about getting more Australians into the kitchen and cooking healthy, weeknight meals from scratch. What they do…

HelloFresh offers a flexible weekly subscription service that delivers farmfresh ingredients and easy-to-follow recipes straight to your door.

THR1VE thr1ve.me 

THR1VE has more than 25 options for delicious, nutritionist-developed meals that are gluten free, contain no preservatives and cooked using healthy fats. Each meal is designed to give you more energy, brighter skin and a better body, but if you’re after specific results you can opt for a Light and Lean, Wellbeing or Strength and Conditioning meal plan. What they do…

Ready-made meals with detailed nutritional information that can be delivered to your door or picked up at one of their 10 locations across Australia. You’ll love it if you…

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Are training or into fitness Are grain free, gluten free or paleo Want to eat healthier or lose weight Want to pick up your food rather than have it delivered

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Meals and snacks cost between $9.95 and $13.95 individually and meal plans start at $129 per week.

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You’ll love it if you…

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Kits are priced from $64.95 (two people) and $109.95 (four people) for three meals per week.


Convenience gone gourmet

Marley Spoon marleyspoon.com.au

Dietlicious dietlicious.com.au

With meals cooked by restaurantexperienced chefs and nutritionally informed by celebrity dietitian Joanna McMillan, Dietlicious prides itself on making meals that are as delicious as they are nutritious and convenient. With options for cleanses and caloriecontrolled plans as well as traditional menus, there’s something for everyone. What they do

Dietlicious home delivers premium meals made with fresh ingredients and then flash frozen to lock in goodness and flavour. You’ll love it if you…

• Want breakfast, lunch and dinner taken care of • Are looking to lose weight • Hate counting calories • Want low-fructose, glutenfree, dairy-free, vegetarian or vegan options

Marley Spoon is about more than just convenient food. It’s about cooking smarter, getting creative with fresh ingredients and finding time to sit with your loved ones and enjoy a nourishing meal. Marley Spoon gives you choice of 16 new meals every week so you can curate your own menu including plenty of healthy choices and vegetarian options. What they do

Marley Spoon is a relatively new meal kit subscription service that sources local, fresh ingredients and delivers them to your door along with six-step, chef-designed recipes that make weeknight dinner so much easier. You’ll love it if you…

• • • •

Want a full fine-dining experience at home? In Melbourne, you can. In November last year, the likes of MoVida (Frank Camorra), Pei Modern (Mark Best), Lee Ho Fook (Victor Liong), Thirty Eight Chairs (Mirco Speri), Tokyo Tina and Saigon Sally (Adrian Li) began delivering a handful of signatures dishes through new gourmet delivery service Endulj. Delivered in treefree recycled sugarcane and bamboo packaging – used to maintain heat and quality – the experience is completed with matched wines, recommended by inhouse Sommelier Ainslie Lubbock, and Anthony Femia cheeses. Mains start at a very reasonable $16 and wines at $22. The Endulj experience is currently limited to only a few Melbourne suburbs, for details visit endulj.com

Want to cook sustainably Love locally sourced fresh produce Don’t love grocery shopping Want lots of variety

Cost

Boxes are priced at $69.90 per week (for two people) and $114 per week (for four people)

Cost

Meals start at $9.90, with cleanses starting at $110, five-day lunch and dinner menus starting at $130 and calorie-controlled plans starting at $175 per week excluding delivery. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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GOURMET HEALTH

Memory FOOD AND

Words: MADDIE LAKOS Photography: THINKSTOCK

WE TAKE A LOOK AT HEALTHY EATING HABITS THAT HELP ‘KEEP YOUR BRAIN YOUNG’ WITH BIOLOGIST PRESTON ESTEP. 100

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You only need to forget your keys once to realise that memory is a very important part of our lives. While the costly nuisance of an after-hours call out is one thing, the niggling feeling that your brain isn’t quite what it used to be can be more than a little concerning. The cognitive decline we experience as we age is well documented, and it’s often regarded simply as a fact of life. “Some say nothing can prevent or substantially slow the decline. Others say that cognitive decline can be stopped and even reserved by some implausible miracle cure. Both are wrong,” says biologist Preston Estep, author of The Mindspan Diet. Memory loss or the onset of Alzheimer’s, Estep says, is a product of both our genes and our environment, and it is the latter that counts when looking to maximise your memory. “Currently we cannot change our genes, but we can change how they behave with a few potent factors: exercise and physical activity, sleep, drugs and even our state of mind,” Estep says. “But diet exerts the most profound and lasting effect. Most experts agree that the contribution of genes explains between 20 and 35 per cent of their extreme longevity, that means environment is responsible for the remaining 65 to 80 per cent of the longevity equation, and diet is a major component of the environment.” Most modern diets take into consideration our waistlines or our fitness goals, our digestive health or our energy levels – but almost never the brain. While any program that maximises your health long term will have benefits for your mindspan (“Optimal health and longevity of the body come baked into the recipe for achieving maximum mindspan,” Estep says) there are a few particular tweaks you can make to fuel your cognitive fire.

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Diets of the best memories in the world In Mediterranean France and Italy, it is not unusual to live to more than 100 years old. It’s even less unusual in Okinawa, Japan, which is said to lave the largest population of centenarians and supercentenarians (ages 110 and up) in the world. As a result, the Mediterranean and Okinawan diets have been the subject of numerous studies in longevity that seek to understand the dietary and lifestyle factors that contribute to longer, healthier lives. National Geographic fellow Dan Buettner notably refers to these areas as ‘Blue Zones’; due to their notably low rates of dementia, Estep

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calls them the Mindspan Elite. “The cuisines of the Mindspan Elite of Mediterranean Europe and Asia differ greatly and feature vastly different flavours, aromas and ingredients. No two countries exemplify this contrast better than France and Japan,” Estep says. “Among European nations, France consumes the most fat and farabove-average quantities of alcohol, cheese and butter. The Japanese eat low to moderate amounts of fat, only small amounts of meat and dairy, and moderate amounts of fruits and vegetables. [They also] drink a lot of green tea – the French do not – and drink substantially less alcohol than the French.”

But even with diverse (almost opposite) characteristics, the Mediterranean French and Okinawan diets do have some things is common. • Less red meat • Less added sugar • Less milk • Moderate to fairly high amounts of fish and seafood, typically not deep-fried • More beans and other legumes • Fat consumption varies. If it is high, then it is mostly monounsaturated fats • Alcohol consumption varies but is routine (usually with meals) and is not extreme among the longest-lived


PHOTOGRAPHY: RACHEL JANE TWOLOVESSTUDIO.COM

FOOD HACKS BE A PART OF THE NOURISH CONVERSATION • Abundant dietary phytochemicals, such as polyphenols and tannins, consumed with meals and present in fruits, vegetables, red wine, coffee, and tea (including herbal teas, like mint, pennyroyal, chamomile) • Fermented, pickled and preserved foods, such as vinegar and dried fish (mostly bonito in Japan and cod in the Mediterranean Rivieras) • Greens – key Mediterranean cuisines feature an abundance of greens and herbs, including Swiss chard, borage, escarole, purslane, basil, thyme, marjoram (oregano), and many more. In Japan, sea vegetables (seaweed, kelp, etc.) are found in many meals

The relationship between meat and memory Red meat is a rich source of iron, a mineral essential to a healthy body. But too much iron (especially as we age and our need for iron decreases), Estep says, can actually be harmful. “Certain parts of the brain and nervous system

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are especially sensitive to iron,” he says. “In youth, iron is a critical nutrient for proper brain development. However, high body iron stores in adulthood – due to gene variants, diet, excessive supplementation or a combination of all three – increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.” A 2015 study by the University of Technology, Sydney, also linked Alzheimer’s to iron. They studied a protein called transferrin, which helps ferry iron around the body. In the case of Alzheimer’s, they theorised that transferrin fails to transport iron efficiently, which may cause iron to accumulate in the brain, where it contributes to the build-up of ‘plaques’, which impede the transmission of signals among brain cells. As to how this translates to what we eat, Estep says, “In last 2015, a study of people who ate a Mediterranean-style diet (characterised mainly by less meat and more fish) had larger brains and key brain structures and less atrophy than frequent meat eaters. The differences between the two groups that ate the most and least meat was equivalent to five years of brain aging.”

MINDSPAN DIET BASICS By Preston Estep

1 2

Limit red meat. Red meat is the primary dietary source of bioavailable iron (heme iron), and is high in the amino acid methionine. Heme iron synergistically promotes absorption of non-heme iron.

Eat good carbs and good fats. Mindspan champs of the world eat lots of healthful carbs. Get most of your carbs from vegetables and LIGIR (low iron and glyceamic index refined) carbs, such as pasta, white rice and sourdough bread – be wary of iron enrichment of grain products. Mindspan Elite also eat a good balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats. Good carbs should be about 45 to 60 percent of the diet, and good fats about 25 to 40 percent. If you have metabolic syndrome or prediabetes, limit iron even more strictly and eat on the higher end of this fat range until your blood glucose and insulin normalise. With low body iron stores, you’ll greatly reduce your risk of diabetes, and you won’t have to fear saturated fats and PUFAs—but limit animal saturated fats if your LDL is higher than 110 mg/dL.

3

Ditch the milk (if you can digest lactose). It might sound counterintuitive, but only consume lactose if you cannot digest it, which allows it to be metabolised by microbes in the gut. Cheese, cream, sour cream, butter, and other dairy products with trace amounts of lactose are fine in moderation for most people.

4

Feed your brain. Mindspan leaders of the world eat more fish and seafood than most others, but most don’t overdo it. Japanese eat a fair amount of fish, but 95 percent eat fish once or less a day and avoid eating large quantities in a single meal. Eat a few small to moderate servings of fish a week. If you are vegetarian or vegan, take a DHA and EPA supplement made from algae.

5

Drink coffee, tea, or red wine with meals. These beverages inhibit the absorption of iron (and other minerals, so don’t overdo it). Relative to tea, coffee, cocoa and other common inhibitors, red wine is a weak inhibitor of iron absorption. But other forms of alcohol actually promote iron absorption, so it is a better choice overall. It’s higher inhibitory activity explains why it is more beneficial for lifespan and mindspan than other types of alcohol.

6

Drink alcohol in moderation. If you drink alcohol, limit yourself to two drinks a day (less if you are small) and spread out your drinking. Red wine is best; drink it slowly with meals. If you don’t drink, don’t start.

7

Limit sugar. Cut back on table sugar, and when choosing between a sweet fruit and a non-sweet one (squash, tomato, cucumber, bell pepper, etc.), choose the latter. The problem isn’t the carbs – it is fructose, a primary ingredient in table sugar and fruits.

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The Mindspan Diet by Dr Preston W. Estep (Nero) is out now. $29.99


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L AN D O F CONTR A S TS WHILE ‘SUPERFOODS’ DOMINATE THE WESTERN INTERPRETATION OF MANY PERUVIAN INGREDIENTS, AS A DESTINATION, PERU IS BECOMING INCREASINGLY EPICUREAN. Words: WINSOR DOBBIN Photography: GETTY, THINKSTOCK, WINSOR DOBBIN

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Local food While our love affair with quinoa began with superfoods salads, in Peru it’s often consumed as a drink or fermented as chicha, a rustic beer. Maca – a vitamin-rich native fruit grown at 4000 metres above sea level, popular for its caramel-like flavour – is known as the Peruvian natural Viagra. At its core, our appreciation of these foods is the same, although the methods are vastly different. Among the many unfamiliar superfoods on offer is muña, pronounced ‘moon-ya’. This plant grows all over the Andes and is used to treat everything from headaches to altitude sickness, and is often served

Corn of may many colours

WINSOR DOBBIN

Peru is one of the most diverse landscapes on earth, from snow-capped mountain ranges to the smothering tropical humidity of the Amazon jungle to milder, drier climes on the coast. The country’s varied climate means a plethora of different produce can be grown locally – including 3000 types of potatoes. But Peru is about more than just potatoes. It is the home of ceviche, the pisco sour and exotic ingredients such as quinoa, maca, lacuma and blue corn – foods that were once unknown outside of South America that are fast becoming world-renowned. But a wide range of local ingredients still exist outside the spotlight. You just have to know where to find them.

Pisco sour

as a tea. Maiz morado, the Spanish term for Peruvian purple corn, is used to make a sweet drink called chicha morado. The purple corn is boiled with pineapple, cinnamon and cloves to produce a deep purple, aromatic beverage that’s antioxidant and a natural anti-inflammatory. For the adventurous of palate there is also the chance to sample a local delicacy, guinea pig (many families keep a few dozen for special occasions and they are usually served on a skewer) and even alpaca, which is

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Anticuchos

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served in a variety of ways, but often as part of the local dish lomo saltado – a kind of Peruvian stir fry, traditionally served with both french fries and rice. This unique contrast of Chinese/ Cantonese is known as chifa, brought to Peru after large Chinese settlement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Dishes that visitors will almost certainly find as they traverse this very large country include ceviche, raw fish marinated in citrus juice, a firm favourite in the capital, Lima.


There’s also causa, a cold casserole of potatoes and avocado; aji de gallina, a creamy chicken stew made with aji amarillo peppers; skewers of marinated meats (usually beef hearts) known as anticuchos and stuffed peppers called rocoto relleno that are a speciality of the second city of Arequipa. Peruvian cuisine tends to be tasty rather than spicy, and prices are generally low – so it’s always worth experimenting. Pisco is the national drink. This potent ‘grape brandy’ is shaken with citrus juice, egg white, sugar syrup and prodigious amounts of pisco to make the popular pisco sour cocktail – a must try.

Central chef Virgilio Martinez

CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP/Getty Images

At the core of Peru’s fine dining scene is a unique mishmash of influences from ancient Inca culture to the

CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP/Getty Images

Fine dining

A cook places final touches on a dish created by Peruvian nikkei chef Mitsuharu Tsumura

culinary undercurrents leftover from They also bottle their own ozonated and Peru’s colonial past. Spanish rule purified water on site. (from around 1532 to 1821) made a Central has been the top restaurant significant mark on Peru’s food scene, in South America for the past three as has the aforementioned settlement years, with Maido the runner up. of Chinese. However, it’s not unusual Ranked 13th in the world, Maido to see elements specialises in of African, nikkei cuisine Japanese and – a blend of THEY’RE CALLING IT A Italian cuisine as Japanese and “CULINARY EXPEDITION well. Peru’s wide Peruvian. The THROUGH PERU’S range of fresh 15-course nikkei ECOSYSTEM, FROM THE and often unique Experience ingredients that AMAZON TO PACIFIC COAST” menu explores can be grown Peru’s unique locally has seen biodiversity, combined with rare the capital of Lima transformed into a ingredients and cooking techniques culinary hotspot, with three Peruvian from the Amazonia jungle. restaurants listed in the World’s The last jewel in Peru’s world50 Best Restaurants in 2016. This ranked restaurant crown is Astrid y includes Central (ranked at number Gaston. In 2015 its founding father, four) where chef Virgilio Martinez Gastón Acurio, returned to the is known for a menu that fuses local kitchen after several years “flying the flag” for Peruvian cuisine in ingredients with modern culinary restaurants around the world. Astrid y techniques. They’re calling it a “culinary Gaston is known for fusion food, with expedition through Peru’s ecosystem, an increased focus on produce sourced from the Amazon to Pacific coast”, from the wider Lima area. He also has with their tasting menu beginning at affordable offshoots called ChiCha in 20 metres below sea level and travelling Cusco and Arequipa. all the way up to 4100 metres above. NOURISHMAG.COM.AU

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Six Top

Destinations in PERU

From ancient Inca civilisations to the rainforest jungles of the Amazon, to the desert wilderness of high-altitude Andean villages and the colonial Europeanstyle architecture in cities like Lima and Arequipa, Peru is a world in one country. Photography: THINKSTOCK

Machu Picchu

Lake Titicaca Well worth a long trip, this huge lake straddles the border between Peru and Bolivia in the Andes and is one of South America’s largest lakes. It is regarded as the world’s highest navigable body of water. Take a charter boat from Puno to the ‘floating islands’, as the Uros Islands are known. These are man-made islands constructed out of reeds where villagers take the many visitors on short canoe rides and try to sell them locally-made goods. Further into the lake you’ll find the small hilly island of Taquile, where there are no cars and people still live a traditional lifestyle.

The spectacular and well-preserved UNESCO World Heritage site is one of the most famous icons of the former Inca Empire. Dating back to the mid-15th century and completely awe inspiring, it is one of the most famous and spectacular sets of ruins in the world. It is best to arrive early in the day (stay overnight in Cusco to be just a short bus ride away) to avoid the crowds. And come well prepared as there is a considerable amount of walking and climbing involved.

Cusco This spectacular city, high in the Andes, is one of South America’s treasures with its many colonial buildings and Inca treasures like the Temple of the Sun and Sacsayhuaman Fortress. A tourist hotspot, Cusco is packed with high-quality hotels like the fabulous JW Marriott, recently named as one of the finest on the continent. The PeruRail Vistadome train from Cusco to Aguas Calientes, gateway to Machu Picchu, is a lovely experience with great views and fabulous service, which included an impromptu fashion parade by train staff on our return journey.

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Arequipa Peru’s second city is often overlooked in favour of more tourist-oriented destinations. That’s a huge pity as Arequipa is a wonderfully cosmopolitan and elegant city with colonial buildings reminiscent of some the finest cities of Europe. There are superb squares and alleyways with influences of Spain and Paris, excellent eateries (try ChiCha and La Benita) and magnificent viewpoints – a great city for strolling and/or chilling out for a few days. Red onions, corn, alfalfa, garlic and, of course, potatoes, all thrive in the desert environment.

Colca Canyon A couple of hour’s drive outside Arequipa, this is one of the world’s deepest and most spectacular canyons and one of the best places on earth to observe condors and other birds of prey, which use the thermal currents to soar and dip. The Cruz del Condor is where we saw five condors and several hawks. En route, you’ll see wild vicunas, the siblings of domestic alpacas and llamas, and will pass several traditional villages, as well as Lagunillas, a lagoon packed with Andean flamingos.

Good to know… Pisac Market Every Sunday, members of the tribes of the Sacred Valley of the Incas descend on the small, dusty town of Pisac for the regional market. Many walk long distances to reach the market, and wear traditional costumes. The market specialises in fruits, vegetables and meats, along with ceramics and items made of alpaca wool. It is a riot of colour and well worth a visit.

With 40 years of experience, Contours Travel is Australia’s most experienced and longest running Latin American travel wholesaler and agency, specialising in tailor-made, small group itineraries and special interest tours in Mexico, Cuba, Antarctica, South America, Central America and the Caribbean Islands. contourstravel.com.au LATAM operates daily flights from Sydney to Santiago, Chile, via Auckland, with onward connections to Lima. LATAM also offers non-stop flights between Sydney and Santiago four times per week in a codeshare partnership. latam.com The writer was a guest of Contours Travel

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Hartshorn Distillery - Grandvewe Cheeses

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TOURISM TASMANIA AND ROB BURNETT

IN THE CELLAR


TASMANIA WHETHER YOU WANT BOUTIQUE BATCHES OF WHISKY, GINS MADE WITH NATIVE BOTANICALS OR AN AUSTRALIAN TAKE ON CALVADOS, THERE’S NO BETTER PLACE TO SAMPLE TO SPOILS OF THE AUSTRALIAN SPIRTS BOOM THAN ON THE APPLE ISLE.

Words: WINSOR DOBBIN Photography: SUPPLIED

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of McHenry Distillers and Rex Burdon at Nonesuch, both on the Tasman Peninsula. Now there are close to a hundred artisan distillers in Australia, with a disproportionately high number in Tasmania. From whisky to gin and vodka, along with an Australian version of calvados (apple brandy) currently maturing, the tiny island state is one of the leaders in the field, drawing on clean air, some of the purest water in the world and pristine fruit where needed.

NEW WORLD WHISKY

e’s gentleman nh k f hair and wh s h ppy to be k at r. Not only did Bill L k revive the craft of art di ling in al couraged of e who have oo . It is now tL anaged ators to amend the Distillation Act of 1901, reducing the size of stills previously needed under an ancient act and paving the way for cottage industries. In Tasmania, Lark was the first person to obtain a licence to distil spirits since Governor John Franklin prohibited distilling in the state in 1839. “Where previously it

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was thought you needed to be an industrialist with huge financial backing, the amendment to the act opened up the industry to many wonderful craft distillers since that date in 1982,” Lark says. “Now we see lots of small distillers crafting spirits with passion and invention.” Lark is the founder and current ambassador for Lark Distillery, which has a tasting facility in down town Hobart, one of several to have popped up over the quarter of a century. He has assisted 10 start-up distilleries in Tasmania alone and has helped grow a hugely successful premium craft spirit industry in Australia. He is often quoted as saying, “A rising tide lifts all boats.” Among those he has advised are Bill McHenry

TOURISM TASMANIA & KATHRYN LEAHY

Bill Lark

It was Lark who, one day when fishing in the Central Highlands of Tasmania, realised that his island home was perfectly suited to distilling malt whisky. The Apple Isle has rich fields of barley, an abundance of pure soft water, highland peat bogs and the perfect climate to bring all the ingredients together. Once the old-fashioned law had been changed, Lark began making whisky, liqueurs and gins, as well as a trendsetting gin flavoured with pepperberry. The industry was on its way and Lark soon developed disciples and imitators. Lark Distillery began as a family affair with his wife Lyn and daughter Kristy all playing a key role. The distillery now operates an 1800-litre copper pot still, along with a 500-litre spirit still and a large range headed by the flagship Lark Single Malt Whisky and Forty Spotted Rare Tasmanian Gin. In 2015, Lark, was inducted into the Hall of Fame at the World Whisky Awards in London, becoming the first distiller in the southern hemisphere to receive the honour.


Nonesuch Distillery - Sloe Gin.

Other Tasmanian distillers operating alongside Lark are Overeem, now under the same business umbrella, and multiple award winners Sullivans Cove, Hellyers Road (one of Australia’s larger boutique distilleries and the only one in northern Tasmania), Nant, Belgrove and Shene Estate; and, of course, McHenry Distillery and Nonesuch. Paddockto-bottle whisky maker Redlands Distillery recently moved into new digs in the town of Kempton, just north of Hobart, where it is situated in a historic 1840s colonial inn. Turn the clock back 12 years and Bill McHenry was a very stressed high-flyer in the pharmaceuticals industry. He had an epiphany when he drove through a red light in busy Sydney traffic one day, so engrossed in his business issues that he had completely forgotten what he was doing. “I didn’t hit anyone but it shocked me what I had done,” he says. “I went back home and decided on big change. I wanted my own business and I’ve got Scottish heritage, so distilling seemed a natural fit.” These days McHenry and his family are very much at home in slow-paced Tasmania. The distillery

HE HAD AN EPIPHANY WHEN HE DROVE THROUGH A RED LIGHT IN BUSY SYDNEY TRAFFIC ONE DAY, SO ENGROSSED IN HIS BUSINESS ISSUES THAT HE HAD COMPLETELY FORGOTTEN WHAT HE WAS DOING. “I DIDN’T HIT ANYONE BUT IT SHOCKED ME WHAT I HAD DONE,” is situated on 100 pristine acres on the Tasman Peninsula, just outside Port Arthur “and it has its own natural springs – and pure water is essential for distilling”. Rex Burdon, the man behind the still at Nonesuch, spent decades in the superannuation industry before throwing himself into the gin fray three years ago. Based at Forcett, on the road from Hobart to Port Arthur,

Nonesuch has only three products in its portfolio; a sloe gin, a dry gin and a unique sloe malt spirit. “I had long wanted to produce a drink, alcoholic or not, utilising unique Tasmanian native botanicals, and had been experimenting with flavouring spring waters,” he says. “Then a chance meeting with Bill Lark led us to discussing the fact that Tasmania was blessed with rows of blackthorn

Overeem Distillery

OSBORNE IMAGES

The spirit family

KATHRYN LEAHY

OSBORNE IMAGES

Overeem Distillery

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TOURISM TASMANIA AND ROB BURNET

Hartshorn Distillery - Grandvewe Cheeses

Weird and wonderful While there are plenty of Tasmanian distillers dedicated to upholding traditional methods and flavours, youthful innovation is alive and well here, too. At Hartshorn Distillery, south of Hobart,

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Ryan Hartshorn is making vodka using sheep’s whey, which is an unused bi-product of cheese making from his family’s dairy. Hartshorn says his creation is designed to challenge the preconception that vodka should be neutral and flavourless, instead aiming for texture and flavour. “It’s a huge educational thing,” he told Executive Style. “A lot of people don’t know that there are different styles of vodka. They expect the spirit to be neutral,

and the more times you distil it, the better. I don’t filter my sheep whey vodka at all to leave as much flavour in the final spirit as possible.” At the Willie Smith organic cider brewery in the Huon Valley, a stateof-the-art copper still is being used to produce top-class apple brandy (known as calvados in northern France) was installed in April last year. It’s believed to be the country’s first locally made alembic still, modelled

TOURISM TASMANIA & ALASTAIR BETT

bushes and hence sloe berries. Bill, in his inimitable way, encouraged me to change direction somewhat and instead of flavouring spring water, start making sloe gin.” The first batch of sloe gin was actually made at McHenry Distillery, now – with a 300-litre copper pot still is in place – the range has expanded from one product to three. Burdon is full of praise for the encouragement both Lark and McHenry have given him – this is a very friendly rivalry. Sloe gin, Burdon says, is truly artisanal, with each batch subtly different. “We believe that the magic ingredient is time,” Burdon says. “Allowing time for the natural process to colour the gin and for the exchange of juice and gin to happen slowly and not rushing to bottle it is our touchstone. We determined that we would bottle only when we decided it was ready to drink and not work to a budget-imposed time frame.”

THE FIRST BATCH OF SLOE GIN WAS ACTUALLY MADE AT MCHENRY DISTILLERY, NOW  WITH A 300LITRE COPPER POT STILL IS IN PLACE  THE RANGE HAS EXPANDED FROM ONE PRODUCT TO THREE. BURDON IS FULL OF PRAISE FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT BOTH LARK AND MCHENRY HAVE GIVEN HIM  THIS IS A VERY FRIENDLY RIVALRY.

Bill McHenry


SS FOUR TASSIE SPIRITS TO T SAMPLE

ALICE HANSEN

Willie Smiths’ AppleShed

A classic Tasmanian gin from Bill McHenry, one of distilling’s driving forces. This perpetualmotion man is based on the Tasman Peninsula and this is his take on a classic London Dry gin, made using a neutral canespirit base. This is so soft and silky it can be enjoyed straight as well as in cocktails. $75

LARK SINGLE MALT WHISKY CASK STRENGTH

This is the high-octane version of Lark’s pioneering whisky with 58 per cent alcohol by volume (ABV) and available in 500 ml and 100 ml bottles. Smooth, with richly malty alcohol and palate sweetness, this has been aged in small casks and is one for sipping and savouring. $55 to $160

McHenry Distillery

on the early sixteenth-century vessels used in France. Willie Smiths expects to soon launch its first apple brandy under the Charles Oates brand and visitors to The Apple Shed ciderhouse can sup on the distillery’s apple schnapps, made from Willie Smiths Organic Apple Cider. Pear schnapps and cherry schnapps are on their way. Another unique idea has seen Nonesuch Distillery on the Tasman Peninsula and Tas-Saff saffron from the Huon Valley come together to create the new Grower’s Own Saffron Gin. Saffron,

TOURISM TASMANIA & JONATHAN WHERRETT

MCHENRY CLASSIC DRY GIN

described as ‘the most soughtafter spice in the world’ and grown in one of the coolest parts of Tasmania, is added to the Nonesuch still to produce a stylishly packaged drink. Grower’s Own is the only saffron gin produced in Tasmania and uses saffron threads not only in the distillation but also as a later infusion for the pale golden colour. Keep an eye out for new names, too. Two new labels have been launched earlier this year: Abel Gin from Launceston and The Splendid Gin from the East Coast.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? Luke McCarthy’s recent book The Australian Spirits Guide, takes an in-depth look at over 50 of the leading distillers, big and small, across Australia, along with cocktail recipes. He describes his book as “two parts drinks culture and one part global trends, served with a dash of critical assessment”. It costs $39.99 and is published by Hardie Grant Books.

HARTSHORN SHEEP’S WHEY VODKA

Young Ryan Hartshorn thinks outside the square, as is evidenced by his own take on vodka; Australia’s first made from sheep’s whey that was first unveiled in 2015 and has taken off in a big way (pardon the pun). Every 700 ml bottle is hand-painted and written by the distiller himself. $120

GROWER’S OWN SAFFRON GIN

A collaboration between Nonesuch Distillery and TasSaff, Tasmania’s leading artisan saffron producer. Produced in a smart 500ml bottle, it is made in tiny quantities and is a distinctive golden colour. The saffron threads are in the distillation and also as a later colour infusion. $88

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MEET THE MAKER

MILDURA'S CHOCOLATE CHAMPIONS

THE MOTTO AT MILDURA CHOCOLATE CO IS, “YOUR DAY IS ONLY AS GOOD AS THE CHOCOLATE YOU EAT.” WE CHAT TO COORDINATOR MELISSA TUCKER ABOUT WHAT MAKES THEIR CHOCOLATE SO SPECIAL AND THEIR NEW COLLABORATION WITH MURRAY RIVER SALT Photography: SUPPLIED

While fine artisan chocolate is part of what they do, Mildura Chocolate Co is also a branch of the Christie Centre, a not for profit disability support organisation. “Our aim is to provide a place of supported employment and training for people with a disability in Northern Victoria,” says Tucker. “We want to create a workplace that people love to come to, not only so they can contribute to their community by being part of the workforce but create a product they love and are proud of while having fun.” Tucker became involved with the Christie Centre when taking a break from winemaking after the birth of

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her son. “A staff member asked if I would be interested way back in 2011, and here I am,” she says. Like with any social enterprise, it’s a challenging business to run. But the people she works with are what makes it special. “Who else can say they look forward to coming to work every day, knowing

there will always be a smile there waiting for you?” Tucker says. “I’m still loving the challenge of turning a social enterprise into a profitable small business whilst loving the people I work with.” Mildura Chocolate Co produces a range of chocolates, including bars,


Mildura Choc Co 2016 team

slabs and chocolate-coated products. The raw product is sourced from boutique chocolate producers Kennedy and Wilson, based in the Yarra Valley. New to their range is a collaboration with Murray River Salt, a Mildurabased company that specialises in mineral-rich pink salt. “We commenced producing salt in 1983 using saline aquifer [underground water] brine,” says Murray River Salt co-founder Jan Thompson. “We discovered that the brine was highly mineralised, which gives the salt a more appealing flavour than traditional refined white salt.” The combined luxe of Mildura Chocolate Co’s chocolate and Murray River Salt’s unique pink salt flakes is something to write home about, Tucker says. “Balance, it’s all about balance: smooth, rich dark chocolate melts first then you get kicks of that beautiful, sweet salt with a crunch – I love it,” she says. “For me Murray River Salt is all about texture and its unique and subtle flavour. It has such a sweet, soft finish in contrast to the bitter, hard finish of some.”

But it’s not just lovers of sweetsavoury flavour combinations that are going to get a kick out of the collaboration. It has been an important partnership between two regional product superstars. “The positive outcomes from our joint venture have been wide reaching,” says Tucker. “Our staff at Mildura Chocolate Company love the interaction they have with the Murray River Salt employees, fulfilling the need to be part of an inclusive workforce. We’re also happy to be associated with such a highly regarded company and our lift in sales over the past year has reflected this.” For more information about the Mildura Chocolate Co visit mildurachocolatecompany.com.au

Murray Ri er Salt’’s e S ted e Chocolate range includes Salted Chocolate Bars ($6 for 55 grams) and Salted Chocolate Sauce ($9 for 605 grams), both made with premium 70% dark chocolate. For more info and to purchase products visit murrayriversalt.com.au

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FOOD BITES A stylish and beautiful range developed right here in Australia, the Organic Choice dream team includes dishwashing liquids, air fresheners, cleaning sprays and candles. Born from the belief that products can be both effective and sourced from sustainable, natural ingredients, Organic Choice delivers a little luxury to your everyday. The inclusion of certified organic aromatic essential oils provides a relaxing and calming tranquillity to your home. Candles $15, Cleaning Sprays $5.50 Dishwashing Liquid $5.00 and Air Fresheners and Linen Spray $5.00, awareenvironmental.com.au Boundless Organic Coconut Flower Nectar is naturally sweet and highly nutritious. Derived from the liquid sap of the coconut flowers, coconut flower nectar has a very low glycaemic index (35) and contains vitamins, minerals, amino acids and a range of other nutrients. Boundless Organic have nicknamed their coconut flower nectar ‘joy in a j Use as an alternative to honey jar’. or maple syrup in a range of dishes. $14.95, boundlessorganic.com.au

Orgran Vegan Easy Egg is a revolutionary product that lets you enjoy your favourite egg dishes sans animal products. Experience scrambled eggs, quiche, frittata and omelette recipes with our vegetable-based alternative that’s cholesterol free and low in fat. Each pack is equal to 15 eggs and, as a good source of fibre and with 7.5 grams of protein per serve, they’re sure to become a healthy family favourite. $4.50, orgran.com

Boomers Whey Protein Isolate is the easiest way to increase your daily protein. Its mild flavour makes it extremely versatile – it can be used in sweet or savoury meals! Boomer’s goal is to bring you products that are as close to their natural state as possible. Their whey protein isolate is made from the milk of grassfed cows grazing only on healthy pastures in New Zealand and using it is a cold and delicate process that protects the amino acid profile meaning you get the most out of every scoop! $60, wheyprotein.com.au

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Aqui-Live Premium Mineral Water comes to the surface naturally from an aquifer on the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria. This ancient aquifer is 900 meters deep in the Earth’s crust. Hydrologists estimate this pre-historic water catchment to be at least 600 million years old. A vast body of water, cradled deep in the earth for millenniums, has created water that resonates with the Earth’s energy. $5.99 for a 750 ml bottle, $4.99 for a 475 ml pouch and $55 for a 10-litre cask, aqui-live.com.au

Lifestream Mini Blue Spirulina is a high strength spirulina supplement that is designed to boost energy levels, vitality and stamina – ideal for people who are exercising. High in bioactive phycocyanin, Lifestream Mini Blue Spirulina supports stress and muscle recovery and is a natural source of iron. $29.95, lifestream.co.nz

Norbu is the 100 per cent natural, fructose free and low-GI alternative to sugar and artificial sweeteners. Derived from monk fruit, a small sweet melon native to the remote mountains of Southern Asia, it tastes just like sugar but with 96 per cent less calories and none of the bitterness of other sweeteners. And you can use Norbu just like you would use sugar in tea, coffee and baking! Available in 40 stick packs from Coles supermarkets, $5.00 for 200 g. For more information, visit norbusweetener.com.au

Healthy Essentials Liver Detox – excessive eating, entertaining and last minute rushing around can really take its toll on our health and wellbeing. So Healthy Essentials has created a premium quality Liver Detox formula containing milk thistle that is traditionally used in Western herbal medicine to help maintain liver health and function. CHC72040-118 From $21.95, healthyessentials.com.au

Not just a detox tea. Ingredients in Your Tea Tiny Tea have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to assist with bloating and indigestion; the warming blend aims to nourish and heal the gut, helping to assimilate nutrients from your food. Meaning, a cup of Tiny Tea may be just what you need after a big (delicious) meal. #winning. Packs of 42 teabags are $35, yourtea.com


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Nourish - March 2017