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FE B R UARY 2017

MARIECLAIRE.CO.UK

Fashion

& beauty

forecast

Biggest trends for

201 7

N ATA L I E P O RT M A N On pay packets, presidents & playing Jackie O

Incredible lives People porn The ne ew w sex bloggers bl of Tumblr

THE

‘‘Forced Fo r c ed to marry at 13, now I’m a champion wrestler’

Feel good Reset your mind, body & spirit Skin SOS 8 b e stt radiance boosters

ISSUE


ARMANI.COM


PHOTOGRAPH BY DREW WHEELER. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY ADELE SANDERSON. TRISH WEARS SHIRT, ROBERTO CAVALLI AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

Editor’s letter

7

Welcome to this special Feel Good issue. We’re putting all the downright craziness of the last 12 months behind us at Marie Claire and starting the year as we mean to go on. Kicking off is a first look at the key trends for the new season in our Runway section (page 49), and what a colourful and creative spring it’s set to be. From Miu Miu’s bathing belles to Rodarte’s super sleeves, it’s clear that designers are setting the mood to be fun, fun, fun. Meanwhile, our fashion editors have selected the looks and styles they’re personally lusting over (page 20), and let’s not forget where dressing starts – the pretty lingerie on page 34 is the perfect foundation for any outfit. As good intentions (a kinder and more realistic version of resolutions, I like to think) are high on everyone’s agenda, our Psyche special on page 68 looks at how to boost your willpower (apparently, we’re all born with different amounts of the stuff – who knew?). We tackle emotional eating, too, and why we need to switch our national obsession with nostalgia to looking to the future. As always in Marie Claire, we love introducing you to women leading incredible lives the world over. Neetu Sarkar’s story of becoming a child bride at 13, giving birth to twins at 14 and representing India at wrestling at 20 is truly remarkable (page 80). If I can channel even a fraction of her hope and determination this year, it would be a real achievement. We also profile the brilliant Ellen DeGeneres in Life Stories (page 94) and talk to the fabulous Natalie Portman about playing Jackie Onassis in the Oscar-tipped Jackie. As I have now run out of superlatives, I shall sign off and wish you a happy 2017. Let the good times roll…

TRISH HALPIN Editor in Chief @trishhalpin


ilgufo.it


TABLE OF

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S 90

120

01 C OVER STORIE S 49 Fashion & beauty forecast Biggest trends for 2017

68 The feel-good issue Reset your mind, body and spirit

80 Incredible lives ‘Forced to marry at 13, now I’m a champion wrestler’

90 People porn The new sex bloggers of Tumblr

120 Natalie Portman On pay packets, presidents & playing Jackie O

80

144 Skin SOS 8 best radiance boosters

FA SHION FIR ST 20 Catwalk looks that define me: the MC fashion team on their top runway picks

24 Shoes first: on form 26 My style 9-5 29 The one: Louis Vuitton’s teardrop earrings 30 Style spotlight: Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne for DKNY

49

34 The lingerie edit: our new year underwear update 36 Bags of style: Tory Burch’s latest collection 39 Marie Claire goes shopping 43 Little mix: trends for your mini fashionistas 49 Marie Claire Runway

154

33 Hot list


TABLE OF

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132

C 99

110

02 FEAT URE S 86 Male interview: Luke Treadaway 94 Life stories: Ellen DeGeneres 99 Reporter 147 Deluxe

86

62 Newsfeed

FA SHION 110 Let there be white: fashion goes pale and interesting

BEAU T Y 129 Beauty news 131 The edit: blush crush 132 Made up: 2017’s hottest beauty trends 141 Beauty rules 143 Hair buzz

EVERY MONTH 7 Editor’s letter 106 How to subscribe

Photograph by Matt Jones. Styled by Anne-Sophie Thomas. Hair by Maranda at Streeters. Make-up by Jo Baker at Forward Artists using Dior. Stylist’s assistant: Axelle Cornaille. Nails by Debbie Leavitt at Nailing Hollywood. With thanks to Westy Productions. Natalie Portman wears: sweater, Dior; jeans, Current/ Elliott; earrings, Diorama Précieuse Dior; ring, Portman’s own. Recreate Portman’s make-up with: Diorskin Star Foundation in Light Beige, £32.50; Diorskin Star Concealer, £22; Diorskin Nude Air Glow Powder in Warm Tan, £39; Diorshow Pro Liner in Pro Brown, £20; Dior 5 Couleurs Skyline, £43.50; Diorshow Iconic High Definition Lash Curler Mascara in Black, £25; Rouge Dior in Rose Montaigne, £26.50; Dior Vernis Nail Lacquer in 413 Grège, £19.50.


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Earrings,

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Omega , £ 1 7 , 31 5 , tch

THE FOUNDRY I N T E R N AT I O N A L AG E N TS


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PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

MARNI

Fashion first

HOT RIGHT NOW... Fashion forecast Put a sartorial spring in your step with the top new-season trends

Under wraps Slip into something super-stylish – all the latest lingerie revealed

Winning formulas Marie Claire’s fashion team share their favourite looks


Catwalk looks

that define me

my clothes to be slightly oversized and not form-fitting, so the drawstring trousers seen at Stella McCartney [below] are my idea of heaven.’

Inspiration

05

06

01 Top, £320, Sea NY 02 Jacket, £225, Ganni 03 Earrings, £24, Dose of Rose 04 Trousers, £39.50, Autograph Marks & Spencer 05 Clutch, £39, & Other Stories 06 Shoes, £90, Dune Black

LOEWE

step from my usual uniform of black, grey and white. I also like

03

STELLA McCARTNEY

and navy don’t seem too scary a

04

MARNI

As a colourphobe, khaki, camel

02

01

LOEWE

‘Utility chic is my look for SS17.

Des Lewis (senior style editor)

This month, it’s personal: from the runway trends they’re coveting to the key pieces already on hold, MC’s fashion team reveal their new-season #shoppinggoals


‘I’m a tomboy at heart and my go-to outfit is a trouser and shirt combo. I definitely look for pieces that have a more masculine shape and frills and flounces are no-gos for me. Many of the SS17 collections had a “borrowed from the boys” feel. The cut-out shirts at Monse [below] were feminine without

Fashion first

Rosie Smythe (acting senior fashion assistant)

21

07

09

being girlie and the Ellery look

08

[below] would be my perfect standout party outfit.’

11

10

ELLERY

ISABEL MARANT

MONSE

ISABEL MARANT

12

Inspiration

07 Jacket, £895, Caine London, and shirt, £145, Marc Cain 08 Skirt, £180, Ganni 09 Bag, £590, J&M Davidson 10 Shirt, £24.99, New Look 11 Trousers, £65, Dickies x Urban Outfitters 12 Boots, £170, KG Kurt Geiger


03 01 02

05

an outfit to be classic but with a twist, whether that’s a standout stripe or an exaggerated sleeve Lemaire’s layering is beautiful, because it gives minimalist style interest.’

Inspiration

04

VETEMENTS

and Vetements [below]. I like

TOGA

looks that I most identified with were from Lemaire, Toga

LEMAIRE

‘The three SS17 catwalk

01 Shirt, £310, Palmer//harding 02 Trench, £65, Next 03 Shirt, £49, Studio by Preen at Debenhams 04 Bag, £79, Whistles 05 Trousers, £205, Essentiel Antwerp 06 Shoes, £325, Stuart Weitzman

COMPILED BY DES LEWIS. PHOTOGRAPHS BY IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

06

Grace Smitham (senior fashion assistant)

Fashion first

22


Je s s i c a Ta r b a r d ( f a s h i o n a s s i s t a n t )

Inspiration

07

08 09

MARQUES’ALMEIDA

10

OFF-WHITE

‘I love to smarten up casual pieces by pairing them with more flamboyant ones. That’s why two of my favourite SS17 shows were Marques’Almeida and Off-White [far left]. I also focus on texture when styling up an outfit, so I want a sheer dress like the Simone Rocha one [far left] to wear with jeans.’

11

Inspiration

14 12 SIMONE ROCHA

‘You could describe my style as “artful minimalism” because I like simple shapes with clever cuts and interesting details. My favourite SS17 looks are from Tome and Marni [far right]. At first glance they may seem low-key, but when

Abisoye Odugbesan (acting junior fashion editor)

TOME

13

MARNI

16

TOME

you see them close up you notice the artful and skilful construction of each piece.’

15

07 Jacket, £150, Urban Outfitters 08 Dress, £35, River Island 09 Shoes, £110, Vince Camuto 10 Trousers, £115, Ganni 11 Shirt, £115, Karen Millen 12 Earrings, £130, Elizabeth and James at Net-a-porter.com 13 Dress, £149, Hobbs 14 Shirt, £175, Sandro 15 Shoes, £560, Roksanda x Malone Souliers 16 Skirt, £199, Maje

Q


24 Fashion first

#SHOESFIRST

On form Fabulous flatforms or sky-high platforms? Stop sole searching – here come the hot steppers… 01 02

E PR

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0 1 £ 28, AS OS 02 £440 , T o ga 03 £1, 315 , Salvator e Fer r agamo 04 £ 52, Tops hop 05 £ 795, Gucci 06 £ 8 35 , E l l ery 07 £390 , R o bert Cl ergeri e 08 £ 150, B imba y Lola 09 £ 169, Whis tles 10 £ 70, V agabond

COMPILED BY GRACE SMITHAM. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

09


Fashion first

26

Clockwise from top left: Fant acci wears Is abel Marant Etoile sweater, Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini skirt and S aint Laurent trainers; Valentino dress coat and bag; Joseph dress and Aquazzura shoes. All jewellery, Fant acci’s own

MY DAYS ARE SPENT JUGGLING LIFE AS A MOTHER AND BUSINESSWOMAN. I started my own company for a better work/ life balance. I love the flexibility I have now. COMFORT COMES FIRST, BUT IT’S IMPORTANT FOR ME TO LOOK POLISHED, TOO. My wardrobe is full of versatile, quality items that are current, but I don’t like looking too ‘fashion’. I CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT CASHMERE. It’s what I wear most days for ten months of the year. I reserve the most expensive pieces for work and wear the more affordable buys while running around after my daughters at the weekend. Boden, J.Crew and Chinti and Parker all do great cashmere collections. EVERY WOMAN SHOULD OWN A PAIR OF LEATHER LEGGINGS. They look amazing on virtually all shapes and sizes; the key is to style them well. I NEVER LEAVE THE HOUSE WITHOUT my iPhone and Smythson diary – I’m old fashioned and still can’t live without writing everything down. THE MOST REWARDING THING ABOUT MY JOB IS THE FEEDBACK I GET FROM READERS. Publishing our 100th issue of The Icons Update recently was a very special moment for me.

9 to 5

Laura Fantacci, co-founder of shopping site Wardrobe Icons, shares her fashion hacks 01

02 04

05

03

08 09 07

10 0 1 Sh i rt, £7 9 , Ware h ou se 0 2 S an d al s, £ 75, Kar en Millen 03 S kir t , £ 35, Mar ks & S pencer 04 Lipstick, £23, Charlotte Tilbury 05 B ag, £128, J.Crew 06 Dress, £750, Dodo B ar Or 07 Shoes, £145, Vince Camuto 0 8 Je an s, £39 .9 9, M an go 0 9 Ri n g s, £40 each, bot h Pando r a 10 S weat er, £ 280, B ella Fr eud

06

STYLED BY GRACE SMITHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS BY EVA K SALVI. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

My style


YOUR PARISIAN ZEST Cointreau and Liberty London have joined forces to design an exclusive Limited Edition gift box ‘Your Parisian Zest’ and to launch #1orange1tree project, which works to restore local biodiversity and create a social impact in the region of Senegal. Only 50 will be available in the UK, and one of the 50 “coffrets” will also hide a ticket for one lucky recipient to get a chance to visit Senegal and personally assist with the reforestation project. What’s more, Cointreau invites everyone to participate in #1orange1tree project simply by sharing a photo or video of themselves with an orange on social media using the hashtag #1orange1tree and nominate friends to do the same. For every image posted, using the hashtag, Cointreau will commit to planting one tree in Senegal. ‘Your Parisian Zest’ is exclusively available at Liberty London from mid-November for an *RRP £250

#1orange1tree Enjoy Responsibly For more info, please visit cointreau.com


Styled by ABISOYE ODUGBESAN Photograph by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

Lend an ear to SS17’s CHUNKY statement jewellery.

These TEARDROP nuggets of GOLD speak volumes

Sound bites

THE ONE

HAIR BY TERRI CAPON AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING ORIBE. MAKE-UP BY AFTON RADOJICIC AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING CHANEL LE ROUGE CRAYON DE COULEUR AND BLUE SERUM. MODEL: HAZEL GRAYE AT MILK MODEL MANAGEMENT

Ear r i ng s , £ 3 5 0 , a nd top , £1 , 4 0 0 , b o t h Lo ui s Vu i tton

Fashion first

29


STYLE SPOTLIGHT

DAO -Y I C H OW & MAXWELL

DKNY

OSBORNE FOR

Osbo r ne and Cho w t o o k o ver as cr eat ive dir ect o r s in 2015


Fashion first

WORD BY JESS WOOD. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALAMY, GETTY, IMAXTREE, JASON LLOYD-EVANS, REX FEATURES, SANTIAGO & MAURICIO

31

Jacke t, £5 9 8, DKNY

‘D K NY has a huge history with using logos,’ s ays Chow. ‘We like looking at them, s aying, “we own that,” but poking fun at it too – deconstructing it then putting it back together.’

Sw eat shir t , £298 , D K NY

The i co ni c D K NY j u m psu i t w a s fea t ur ed i n th e f i n al e , t o ‘ end w i t h som e th i n g impactful’. Osborne s ays, ‘We d i d i t i n fl o a t y n y l on , wh i ch g a v e i t a new l i gh tn e ss.’

Mo del B ella Hadid, who o pened t he sho w, was always t o p of t heir list . ‘The dr ess wit h t he plunging neckline was key and started the whole co llect ion, so we s aved it fo r her,’ s ays Cho w.

Wallet , £150, D K NY

Once upon a time, before athleisure and before anyone had even heard of Vetements (except, as you know, the French word for clothes) there was DKNY. Back in 1988, Donna Karan created what became one of the 90s most iconic brands, inspired by the energy of the New York streets. She produced urban, sports-style clothes with a younger vibe than her luxurious main line. When Karan stepped down in 2015, the challenge facing new designers Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne (the duo behind label Public School) was huge. Luxe sportswear, designer diffusions and 90s influences are everywhere now. How did it feel to take the reins? ‘Growing up in New York, everyone felt connected to DKNY,’ says Osborne. ‘We were really excited, nervous and anxious.’ So how do they distinguish between their new baby and Public School, also known for its dressed-down urban aesthetic? ‘There’s a Public School girl, who’s a lot more “street”, and a DKNY woman, who’s a bit more sophisticated,’ says Chow. Four collections in, and with critical acclaim hotting up for their new take on the label, here’s how they approached SS17… Q


2

1 10 THE

COMPILED BY ROSIE SMYTHE. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM OHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

HOT LIST

9

8

Our edit of the new high-street drops

4

7

6

3

5

1 To p , £ 2 4 .9 9, N e w L ook 2 B ag, £ 6 9, & O th er St o r ies 3 Dr ess, £ 45, R iver Island 4 B ag, £ 105, To psho p 5 S ho es , £ 4 9 .5 0, A u tograph at M ark s & Sp encer 6 B angle, £ 25, Phase Eight 7 Coat , £ 99.99, Mango 8 Je an s, £ 4 0, AS O S 9 S an dals, £ 14, Mat alan 10 Dr ess, £ 15, Pr imar k

Fashion first

33


Feature Fashionname first

34

The lingerie edit

PRETTY LITTLE THINGS Whether you opt for a burst of citrus or classic neutrals, these delicate, feminine pieces are fabulously flirty and super summery.

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

FENDI

Sheer, lace and pretty colour pops… introducing the hottest underwear for SS17

04

01

03 05

02

01 Bra, £64, and knickers, £35, both Wacoal 02 Body, £45, Somerset by Alice Temperley at John Lewis 03 Bra, £56, and knickers, £27, both Calvin Klein Underwear 04 Bra, £18, and knickers, £11, both Next 05 Bra, £42, and knickers, £24, both Intimissimi


11

PA R E D - B A C K C H I C If simple and stylish is your thing, then these modern sets fit the brief. Bras have minimal padding while still being maximum impact – perfect for an unfussy yet seriously cool girl.

12

13

15

11 B ra, £ 95, 5, and a knicker s, £ 55, bot h Ro ssell England 12 B r a, £2 9 , a nd kknicker i k s,, £ 14 4, bot h Cleo by Panache 13 B r a, £ 60, and knicker s , £3 0 , b bot h B Base e R ange 14 B r a, £ 26, and knicker s, £ 12, both Gossard 15 B Bra, £15, £1 and knickers, £8, both Marks & Spencer Collection LANVIN

COMPILED BY ROSIE SMYTHE. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS, IMAXTREE. STILL LIFES BY NOHALIDEDIGITAL.COM

FENDI

14

06

08

07

09

AFTER DARK Sexy yet elegant, standout sets are ideal for date night. Drop a hint for Valentine’s Day

10

or splash out on a treat for yourself.

06 Bra, £130, and knickers, £65, both Gilda & Pearl 07 Body, £16, Matalan 08 Bra, £34, and knickers, £16, both Freya 09 Body, £92, Triumph 10 Bra, £85, and knickers, £80, both Coco De Mer


36 Fashion first

Boho small bag, £410, and dress, £575, both Tory Burch

B A G

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We ttalk W lk star t signs, i fashion f hi icons i and d whisky hi k with ith Kate Bosworth and Tory Burch

Bag, top, and jeans, from a selection, all Tory Burch

WORDS BY JESS WOOD. TO SEE ALL THE IMAGES AND MORE OF MARGARET ZHANG’S WORK, VISIT HER BLOG, SHINEBYTHREE.COM

S T


From left: patent bag, £495 £495; beaded parrot tote tote, £740; woven n drawstring bag, £660 drawstri 60

Ta two stylish blondes – hi, Kate Take te Bosworth wo th and Tory Burch – add a cool blogger/photographer (Margaret Zhang) and a pile of bags from Burch’s Gemini Link bag collection, inspired by the star sign. The result? A filmic shoot (pictured) that’s a match made in bag heaven. Here, we hit Bosworth and Burch with our style (and life) questions… Tie-dye bag, £660, and dress, £495, both Tory Burch

“stubborn goat who knows what she wants “ I’m a Capricorn – a

Rainbow stripe bag, £495, top, £410, and trousers, £290, Tory Burch

KATE BOSWORTH What’s in your bag right now?

Glossier balm, iPhone, Chanel lipstick, wallet, notebook, Montblanc pen, Tory Burch sunglasses and an apple. Favourite thing about Tory’s Gemini Link collection?

It’s got a 70s vibe that I love so much. I’m particularly partial to the oversized rainbow version – it personifies California cool meets East Coast classic. And Tory herself?

I admire her and the brand she’s built – she is always true to herself. I appreciate what this collection represents. It’s about duality in women. Do you have two sides to your personality?

On set, I’m focused. At home, I’m very relaxed, usually drinking whisky and having fun with my husband! What’s your star sign?

Capricorn – I’m a stubborn goat who knows what she wants. TORY BURCH What’s in your bag right now?

Sunglasses, iPhone, Blackberry and gummy candy. Tell us about the idea behind the Gemini Link collection

We were thinking about duality. It’s a graphic take on our logo that embodies balance and symmetry.

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What’s your star sign?

Gemini! And I have twins. I’m a mother and an entrepreneur, I have a creative side and a business side, and I’d be equally happy on a farm or in the city. How did you first meet Kate?

We met at the Met Ball years ago and she is beautiful – she has a timeless, classic look. When did you first fall in love with clothes?

My parents had impeccable style. I remember watching my mom throw on a Zoran gold lamé top. Divine. Wardrobe must-haves?

Tunics and vintage pieces – everything from sculptural earrings to a ruched Norman Norell dress. If you could own anyone’s wardrobe, whose would it be?

My mother’s. She has gorgeous vintage pieces. The Gemini Link collection is available now at toryburch.co.uk and Tory Burch Westfield, Unit 1128, Ariel Way, London W12


F a s h i o n | B e a u t y | L i f e | F i t

O n s a l e e v e r y T u e s d a y o r h e a d t o l o o k . c o . u k f o r y o u r d a i l y s t y l e f i x @lookmagazine

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@lookmagazine

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1 COURT ORDER Tap into the tapestry trend with these hot ‘Hummingbird’ heels, £95, from Dune. They’re guaranteed to put a spring in your step.

marie claire

GOES SHOPPING The hit buys and luxury launches

2

TRES CHIC

DECADENT DIAL

We love the new line

Omega’s ‘Planet Ocean’’

of sleek accessories

timepiece is at the top

by super-stylish

of MC HQ’s wish list

French brand Sandro.

right now, thanks to its s

Our must-have?

rose-gold casing and

The gorgeous

rich-brown leather strap. rap.

‘Lou’ bag, £235.

It’s a whopping £14,200, 200, but it screams premium.

MODERN ART Artist Jason Martin has

4

given fashion’s iconic tote

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an art-over with the Dior Lady Art collection. The

medium tote costs £4,200 and comes in three swoonworthy metallic shades.

OPTICAL FIBRES Do not adjust your set: Marina Rinaldi and Stella Jean have teamed up to launch a graphic capsule collection statement dressers will love. From £69.


6

TWO-STEP TEP Fashion meets function in Geox’s latest line. With

7

DESIGNER SHADES Max Mara’s new range of sunglasses, from £139, are straight off the catwalk. Ju ust add sunshine.

smart, breathable tech and a cool urban aesthetic, the brand’s luxe brogues and leather trainers cover all bases bases. Brogues Brog gues c cost £120; 0; trainers , from m £95..

LITTLE GEMS Queen of bridalwear

8

SNAP HAPPY

Jenny Packham is a woman of many talents: cue her new jewellery range for Goldsmiths. These 18ct white-gold

Aspinal of London’s

beauties from the Gloria

elegant collab with

Collection ion cost £1,200. £1,2

Michelle Dockery ticks all the right boxes. Go mono with the ladylike ‘Dockery Snap’ tote, priced £795.

9

10 BOLD SHOULDER Super-stylish Alexa Chung is fronting AG’s new denim campaign, and this off-the-shoulder ‘Harley’ dress, £210, is hot on our radar. Q

COMPILED BY TANYA PHILIPSON

Fashion first

40


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KIDS SPECIAL

Fashion F a s hion first

Little mix Kit your kids out in these spring fashion ion nh hits its

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Jean genie

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0 1 D ung a r ees , ab ou t £ 17 1 , Si m on e tt a 0 2 Jack e t, £ 22, Mat alan 03 S hir t , abo ut £ 55, Levi’s 04 S ho es, £ 94, Lit t le Mar c J a co b s a t H o us e of Frase r 05 Sh orts, £ 6 0, Ti m be rl and at Ho use of Fr aser 06 S hir t , £ 15, Next 07 Jacket , £ 65, So meday S o o n 0 8 J ea ns, £ 22 .9 9 , M an go 0 9 Je an s, f rom a select io n, D S quar ed2 10 Jeans, about £ 123, Simonet t a 11 Jacket , abou t £ 11 8 , Il G u f o 1 2 To p, £ 60, Pepe 13 Dr ess, £ 80, Kenz o


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0 1 Tr a i ner s , £ 4 0 .99 , Pri m i g i 0 2 Swe ate r, £ 17 .9 9 , H&M 03 Skir t , £ 219, B onpo int 04 Jacket , £ 433, B o npo int 05 Dr ess, £ 6 9 , B i l l i eb l us h at Hou se of Frase r 0 6 Trai n e rs, £ 3 2, Vans at Schuh 07 B ackpack, £ 69, Kar l Lager feld Kids at Ho use o f F r a s er 0 8 S k i rt, £ 6 0, Zad i g & Vol t ai re at Ch i l dre ns alo n.co m 09 Skir t , £ 73, Lit t le Mar c Jaco bs at House of Fr aser 1 0 J a ck et , £ 1 4 , M at al an 11 B ag, £ 1 4, Bi l l i e b l u sh at Ho use of Fr aser 12 Dr ess, £ 340, Ar mani Junio r 13 Jeans, £ 36, Bi l l y b an di t at Hou se of Fr aser 14 Sho es, £ 49.90, Lelli Kelly

Fashion first

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Shine on

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0 1 J ump s ui t , £ 1 4, N e x t 0 2 Trou se rs, £ 7 3 , Hu go B o ss at House of Fr aser 03 Waist coat , £ 110, Ar mani Kids 04 T- shir t , £ 3 6 , K a r l La ge rf e l d at Hou se of Frase r 0 5 Jack e t , £ 99, Diesel at Childr ens alo n.co m 06 B oo t s, £ 24.99, H&M 07 Jacket , fr o m a s ele c ti on , D ol c e & G ab b an a 0 8 Sh orts , £ 41, Lit t le Mar c Jaco bs at House of Fr aser 09 S hir t , about £ 253, D o l ce & G a bb an a 1 0 Top , £ 37 .5 0 , Pe ti t B ate au 1 1 Tr o user s, about £ 109, Paul Smit h 12 Dr ess, about £ 84, Tar t ine et C ho co l at 13 Jack e t, £ 5 5, D i e se l at Ch i l drens alon.co m 1 4 S ho es, £ 15, Next 15 Hat , about £ 87, Simonet t a

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Fashion first

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Butterflies 18ct gold and diamond

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Pretty, powerful, printed… SS17’s trend game is strong


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Fashion Week, with colour-block combos like Gvasalia’s Balenciaga clashing tights and DELPOZO

tops and Gucci’s pink and green fringed dream. Too much? Take baby steps, one colour

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at a time. We’re backing pink, white or yellow.

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Are you off to Coachella in boho Philosophy ruffles or Bang Face in Marc Jacobs’ striped hoodie and

R O B E R TO C AVA L L I

pastel dreads? Either way, let the good times roll.

COACH

COACH

MARC JACOB S

MARC JACOB S

SACAI

P H I LO S O P H Y D I LO R E N Z O S E R A F I N I

F E S T I VA L DOUBLE ACTS


FA SH ION F L A SH! Sporting bold 60s prints with 3D floral caps on their heads, Miuccia Prada’s all-star line-up of bathing beauties shows us how to make a splash this season. Miu Miu, Palais d’Iéna, 5.10.2016

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LO U I S V U I T TO N

SAI NT LAU R E NT

PREEN

WORKING (80s) 9-5 Anthony Vaccarello’s debut at Saint Laurent sets the tone for evening

GUCCI

with Dynasty-style cocktail dresses, but huge Claude Montana-esque power shoulders are stomping back

ISABEL MARANT

CELINE

for day, too. Work it, Melanie Griffith!

SAI NT LAU R E NT

BALE NCIAGA

KENZO

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JACQU E M US

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drawstring dresses are works of art. #Winning.

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DKNY’s hoodies are sheer and crafted from tulle, while Marni’s pleated

The athleisure influence gets ever more high-fash this spring – even

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L g rie is bored of being all low-key. Now it Linger N

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wants to be retro-print (bonjour, Miu Miu);

it wants t to be embellished (ciao, Prada PJs); it

wants to be layered over a shirt (hi… Fendi).

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56 Runway

IN THE MIDDLE Did plank practice fall P H I LO S O P H Y D I LO R E N Z O S E R A F I N I

by the wayside over party season? Well, you might want to restart, because the midriff is the new shoulder

M U LB E R RY

JOSEPH

ALE XAN D E R WAN G

PREEN

top that isn’t cropped.

PRADA

there’s barely a SS17

MONSE

For day, for night,

V I C TO R I A B E C K H A M

(sartorially speaking).

FLIRT WITH A SHIRT Savile Row called and it wants the bottom half of its shirts back. Designers from Alexander Wang to Monse took scissors to the

it for you. ‘We should all be feminists’, says Maria Grazia Chiuri at Dior (we are). ‘Shut up!’ says Haider. Or, spread the ‘Love,’ says Michael Kors.

SACAI

STE LLA MCCARTN EY

MAISON MARGIELA

M ICHAE L KOR S

Because your top can do

DIOR

DON’T SPEAK

HAIDER ACKE R MAN N

wardrobe classic, slicing, adding frills or elongating it for a deconstructed, Comme des Garçons-homage new take on shirting.


S O F T, S T R O N G & (Q U I T E ) L O N G Dare to bare? Luckily you don’t have to. From Maria Grazia Chiuri’s big briefs DIOR

and corsets at Dior to Molly Goddard’s cutaway tops and wide-leg trousers, there’s nary a look that doesn’t come with

M O L LY G O D D A R D

MARQU ES’ ALM E I DA

S HAR O N WAU C H O B

C H R I S TO P H E R K A N E

SIMONE ROCHA

PRADA

FENDI

a top layer of tulle for spring.


MARCO DE VINCENZO GIVENCHY

PRADA

M ICHAE L KOR S

MIU MIU

SPORTMAX

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pretty, ditsy, pastel patterns – but, er, not this year. in shades of tobacco and forest green, modernist zigzags and waves or big, block-colour stripes – do not adjust your set.

BALE NCIAGA

Think 70s wallpaper florals

B O T T E G A V E N E TA A

Spring is often a time for

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GRAPHIC DESIGN


RODARTE C H LO E M A R Y K AT R A N T Z O U

UP YOUR SLEEVE The Princess Di puff, the XL leg o’ mutton, the multigathered poet sleeve – attention-grabbing Warning: may need own carriage on the morning commute.

GIVENCHY

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arms are where it’s at.


60 MICRO BAGS

D O LC E & G A B B A N A

MAJOR EARRINGS Park your curated stud collection and tiny single hoops – embrace the return of the matching pair of shoulder-sweepers, instead.

Is that an embellished matchbox? Oh no, sorry, it’s your bag. Overflow

CHANEL

D O LC E & G A B B A N A

VALE NTI N O

tote definitely required.

M A R Y K AT R A N T Z O U

Runway

EXTRA, EXTRA!

JEREMY S C OTT

D O LC E & G A B B A N A

B U R B E R RY

RODARTE

PRADA

COMFORT VS CRAZY Ah, pool slid es. We’re glad they’re not

DELPOZO

In the othe her corner, the heel has reached n new heights – literally. Saint Laurent’s come in at over 11cm.. Taxi! Q

NO. 21

ROCHAS

MARNI

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS, IMAXTREE

SAI NT LAU R E NT

acquired so ome serious embellishment.

MIU MIU

A LT U Z A R R A

PROENZA SCHOULER

going anywh here, but they seem to have


FA K E N O T H I N G

I

n the beginning were the gemstones, and the gemstones became our

Our gem explorers focus on artisanal sources in Thailand, Madagascar and

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feed

NE WS

WORLD WOR L D IN PICTURES PICTU RES

The girl with the fishtail tattoo Young g Māorii women are reasserting their identity through the sacred practice of moko kauae

D esign f or life: Cat her ine, a law yer f r om Ahipar a in Nor t hland, New Zealand, says t he pat t er n of her t at t oo t r aces her her it ag e

‘I am at a time in my life where I am ready to make a clear statement that this is who I am,’ announced Nanaia Mahuta in August. The New Zealand MP became the first woman in parliament to wear a moko kauae, a traditional Māori chin tattoo, in a high-profile reclamation of a practice that was long suppressed during European colonialism. Younger Māori women are increasingly wearing chin tattoos to express their whakapapa (genealogy), identity and pride in their culture. Ahipara-based lawyer Catherine THE

WORLD’S

HEALTHIEST

COUNTRIES*:

(pictured), who was tattooed at 30, says her delicate design traces her heritage, with the tail of the fish representing the part of New Zealand’s North Island where she is from. ‘Having a tattoo on your face is a big statement, a sacred thing,’ she says. ‘It’s what people see first when they meet you. What comes out of your mouth comes from the tattoo, so you need to be deserving of your moko kauae.’ Catherine’s tattoo embodies her values and purpose in life: devotion to her people, integrity and courage. 1.

ICELAND

2.

SINGAPORE

3.

SWEDEN


WONDER WOMAN Alva White, 32, is a communications manager for Médecins Sans Frontières, working on a search-andrescue ship in the Mediterranean

TALKING POINT

Dating: where it all began From debutante balls to swiping right on Tinder, Nichi Hodgson charts the game’s curious history

Inspiration ‘S o far, 3,000 people have died making this crossing. Nob ody risks their lives without good reason. The women I speak to tell me of kidnap, rape, beatings, enforced prostitution. When you see people packed on to these dangerous b oats, their eyes filled with fear, you question the world.’

Wanted: a suitable husband (17561830) During the Georgian era, women could not vote or gain custody of their children after divorce, so finding an upstanding husband was crucial. If you couldn’t afford to attend debutante season – where eligible men scouted glamorous balls for a potential wife – you could place a lonely hearts ad in The Times. Women relied on male friends to retrieve replies from their mailboxes, held in coffee houses in London’s Fleet Street.

MAIN STORY WORDS BY VERONIQUE MISTIAEN AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY MALIKA SQALLI. ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALAMY, FERRY SCHIPPERS. COMPILED BY TRACY RAMSDEN

Motivation ‘The people we rescue are so courageous. One woman was kidnapped by Boko Haram and raped repeatedly for two months. When she escaped, she was caught by another man and sold into prostitution. She told me that the day we pulled her from the sea was the most beautiful of her life.’

Return on investment (1856-88) In Victorian times, women dumped before reaching the altar could sue their wouldbe husbands for damages. By the 1850s, female fraudsters were using ‘breach of promise’ legislation to make money, so lawyers ferociously interrogated women’s morals in court, which put off many genuine claimants. Breach of promise still exists in the US – in 2013, Georgia resident Christopher Ned Kelley was ordered to pay his former fiancée $50,000 (about £40,000) for breaking their engagement.

H i g h l i g ht ‘Two healthy babies have been b orn on our ship, which wouldn’t have happened on the floor of the b oats they were rescued from. Around 88 per cent of the under-18s we rescue are travelling alone. To show them humanity, treat their wounds, give them dry clothes and see them sleep soundly gives me hope.’ Visit msf.org.uk

4.

ANDORRA

Going steady (1958-65) The sexual revolution actually preceded the 60s, with 50s books such as Leonora Eyles’ Sex For The Engaged offering advice on premarital relations. By the end of the 50s, the US was trying to woo British consumers with the ‘going steady’ ring – a band that could be 5.

UK

6.

FINLAND

7.

SPAIN

part-traded for an engagement ring within six months. It never caught on. Kee p i n g u p w i t h t h e B ra d s h a ws (1998-200 4) From the popularity of the Rampant Rabbit to the arrival of speed dating, Carrie and co spearheaded a new honesty around sex and relationships (US scientists called the dramatic rise in visits to sexual-health clinics the ‘Sex And The City effect’). Even the on-screen incarnation of Bridget Jones alluded to her experience of anal sex. Helen Fielding and Candace Bushnell’s creations gave thirtysomething women the right to not have their shit together – and to own it. The future is female (2012 onwards) In the post-Tinder world, dating apps, such as Bumble and HerSmile, put women in control of who and how they date. The sex and pleasure industry has finally brought transgender, disabled and non-white consumers into the picture, and the traditional boy-meets-girl trope is breaking down. As our lives become busier and technology gets faster, we are seeing increasing use of bespoke dating concierges – basically, personal trainers for our love lives. Could the future mean outsourcing dating altogether? The Curious History of Dating by Nichi Hodgson (£12.99, Robinson) is published in January 8.

NETHERLANDS

9.

CANADA


N E WS feed

C lockw ise f r om r ight : imam Sher in Khankan; t he M ar iam mosque in Copenhagen; a feminist br unch at t he Inclusiv e Mosque Init iat iv e; t he I M I in London

REPORT

Inside the feminist mosques A bold new movement is challenging patriarchy within Islam. Fiona Cowood meets the trailblazers It’s Friday afternoon and prayers are under way at the Mariam mosque in Copenhagen. The sermon is being delivered by Sherin Khankan, a female imam, to a crowd of women, some wearing headscarves, many not. Later, Khankan will conduct a marriage ceremony and sign people up for seminars on meditation and domestic abuse. Welcome to feminist Islam. Scandinavia’s first women-led mosque, Mariam is one of just a handful in the West. It is open to all – except on Friday afternoons, when only women may visit. ‘The Mariam mosque is about promoting progressive Islam,’ says Khankan. ‘We also want to try to challenge growing Islamophobia. It’s difficult to hold on to the narrative that Muslim women are suppressed when people can see them taking the lead.’ Mariam was created not only to challenge male dominance in mosques, but also to meet a practical need. ‘There are many cases where a woman would prefer to speak to a female imam,’ says Khankan. ‘And we have men who would prefer to speak with a female imam, too.’ Around the world, Muslim women living under oppressive regimes are denied the same rights as men, yet Khankan insists she’s not promoting anything new. ‘Muslim women at the time of the prophet were warriors, teachers, scholars. They were also imams,’ she explains. In the UK, the Muslim Women’s Council is fundraising for a female-led mosque in Bradford, although prayers will 10.

AUSTRALIA

*THE

LANCET;

FIGURES

BASED

still be taken by men. And in London, the Inclusive Mosque Initiative (IMI) brings all genders together for prayers led by women, men and transgender people. Naima Khan runs monthly feminist brunches for the IMI, where topics such as parenting are discussed. ‘At one brunch, we asked: “What would Islamic scholarship look like through an anarcha-feminist lens?” We broke it down and made it accessible and chatty,’ she says. Like Khankan, Khan doesn’t see herself as a ‘reformer’, but as promoting something that already exists. ‘Much of what Muhammad did was about equality and challenging injustice,’ she explains. ‘We are going back to what is in the texts – stories that perhaps men haven’t always perceived.’ Dr Shuruq Naguib, co-chair of the British Association of Islamic Studies, says the majority of Muslims disagree with the approach of inclusive mosques, but they are opening up debate. ‘It has made some sections of the community reflect on the problems we have in some mosques in Britain, such as not having space for women,’ she adds. ‘That’s why we’re seeing more mosques appointing women as directors.’ Taking on hundreds of years of Islamic patriarchy is a brave move. Khankan has faced criticism from conservative Muslims and even death threats from the Danish rightwing, yet she remains sanguine. ‘When you challenge patriarchal structures and change the power balance, people naturally oppose you. You just have to be prepared for it.’ Q ON

THE

UN’S

SUSTAINABLE

DEVELOPMENT

GOALS


M I N D, B ODY & SPIRIT

R E S E T YO U R

FOR 2017


69 Words by POLLY DUNBAR

New Year is a time for fresh starts and good intentions, but what governs our ability to see them through? In this seven-page special, we explore how we can put a positive spin on the way we eat, think and live – starting with the science of willpower Every year, I make the same resolution: to go to the gym three times a week and finally transform my fitness levels. And every year, I manage it for four weeks before I slip back into my usual routine of the occasional spin or yoga class, disappointed in myself for not doing more. I’ve lost track of the times I’ve looked enviously at friends who seem blessed with a single-minded determination – friends who decide to run a marathon, then actually train and go through with it – and wondered why I can’t stick to my goals. Willpower is a mysterious quality. Some people appear to have it; others seem to have little or none. It’s having the self-control to carry out our decisions, even in the face of temptation – whether to slob out on the sofa with a glass of wine in front of Netflix (instead of doing that evening class) or light another cigarette (when you’ve vowed to quit). The ability to use this kind of selfdiscipline has a profound effect on our lives. The iconic ‘marshmallow test’, created in the 60s by psychologist Walter Mischel, involved children being offered a choice between one marshmallow immediately, or two if they could resist eating the first one for 15 minutes. The children who exercised control later went on to perform better at school and were deemed to be healthier and more popular. Why? Because people who can control their minds using ‘cool’ (or calm) strategies are generally more adept at solving problems than those who use ‘hot’ (or emotional and impulsive) strategies, making ‘cool’ thinkers more likely to be successful. However, despite knowing the rewards this strength of character can bring, many of us find our willpower deserts us when we need

it. A recent poll revealed that 63 per cent of those who had made a New Year’s resolution last year had broken it, with 43 per cent of respondents lasting less than a month. If it feels as though some of us simply have less resolve than others, it’s because we do. ‘The amount of willpower we have is down to a combination of factors, including a small genetic component,’ explains clinical psychologist Dr Jessamy Hibberd. ‘Our upbringing plays a large part, too. If [our parents] gave us what we wanted, whenever we wanted it, we would never learn that there are benefits to waiting, and [as a result], we wouldn’t develop willpower. It’s also affected by the events that shape us throughout our lives. If we become used to seeing a reward when we defer our gratification – for instance, when we work hard on a long-term project – our brains get used to focusing on the goal and we’re less likely to give in to the primitive part of us that wants results now.’ This battle between the part of our brain that is governed by impulsive desires and the part that is more considered, is where willpower should come into play. It’s often thwarted by the fact that as much as 40 per cent of our behaviour is habitual, which means we do it routinely, often unconsciously. Habitual behaviour is difficult to break because we don’t pause before doing it. By pausing, we allow the brain a chance to compare the long-term goal to the short-term kick – giving up smoking for the sake of our health, for instance. Without this pause, willpower never has a chance to kick in. Bad habits plague the majority of us, even those who show excellent resolve in other parts of our lives. Most people have at least one area in which they wish their willpower was stronger; perhaps they’re extremely successful at work, but struggle to stick to a diet. Psychologists believe this could be because willpower actually comes in limited supply. ‘It’s like a muscle that gets tired,’ explains Ben Fletcher, professor of


“Studies show being

occupational and health psychology at the University of Hertfordshire. ‘If we’ve been using it all day to avoid distractions and focus on work, we’re more likely to give in to our impulses later.’ Pouring a glass of Merlot and ordering a take-away seems like a good option when we get home. Our friends, partners and colleagues also have a significant impact, making us more or less likely to stick to our resolutions. ‘If you have a set of goals but the people around you are doing something different, it’s obviously a lot harder to succeed,’ says Dr Hibberd. ‘Studies have shown that we’re much less aware of our own goals when we’re with someone else, which is why it’s more difficult to do Dry January if your partner isn’t on board, too.’ But there is good news. ‘Conversely, being around people who are self-disciplined can help our own levels of control. So much of willpower is linked to self-awareness and how aware we are of the choices we make. Anything that helps us pay more attention to what we’re doing and monitor whether it’s helping us to achieve our long-term goals, improves our motivation and, in turn, our willpower.’ However, regardless of our childhoods or the people around us, the instant-gratification culture we live in has put intense pressure on even the most iron-willed of us. After all, waiting is no longer part of our collective vocabulary. If we want something – whether it’s the latest season of Orange Is The New Black, a new dress before pay day or even sex – then we can get it; if not instantly, then in a matter of hours. Social media has also had an impact. Being bombarded with seemingly perfect bodies and lives on Instagram actually has a demotivating, rather than inspiring, effect. ‘Comparison to others triggers stress, a direct obstacle to willpower,’ says Dr Hibberd. ‘Self-criticism makes us feel less motivated, while studies show being kinder to ourselves increases our chances of sticking to something. We have constant distractions now, which make it harder to have the self-awareness we need to exercise willpower.’ So if we think our own resolve is lacking, what can we do? Well, it turns out we can boost willpower with practice. Studies show that when volunteers are given small, regular self-control challenges for a week or two – such as sitting up straight when they catch themselves slouching – their willpower increases. Meditation is believed to help, too – research shows that after three days of practising meditation for ten minutes, the brain is able to focus better on goals. However, some psychologists believe self-control is a red herring when it comes to making real changes to our lives. Professor Fletcher has developed a system called Do Something Different to help people break old habits and form new ones. He believes focusing on willpower just increases our stress and frustration when we fail, and says the key to changing our behaviour lies in what we actually do.

He suggests spending 15 days making small changes, such as sleeping on the opposite side of the bed or taking a different route to work, to challenge our unconscious behaviour and force us to make conscious decisions. ‘It’s important to tackle all your habit patterns, not just the core thing you’re trying to change,’ he says. ‘You’ll stop living on autopilot, which will make bigger changes much easier. It works because it breaks your associations. For instance, if you change the first thing you do when you get home, it breaks the pattern of your whole evening, so you’re less inclined to pour that glass of wine or eat that cheese.’ New research in the US suggests that when people believe their willpower is limitless, they’re far more likely to pursue personal goals. So perhaps the key isn’t how strong our resolve really is, but the way we think about it. Q

KINDER to ourselves

increases our chances of STICKING to something

B OOST YOUR WILLPOWER IN 4 STEPS Struggling to stick to your goals? Dr Hibberd reveals the hot hacks she teaches her clients 1. Focus on why, not how Instead of compiling a list of your goals, write down the reasons you want to achieve them. For example, ‘I want to feel stronger and have more energy’, instead of ‘I must go to the gym three times a week’. Recognising your motivation helps you commit to the positive outcome, rather than concentrating on the hard work it might take to get there. 2. Try a new route to work Introducing small changes to your daily routine disrupts your unconscious habit patterns, shifting you out of autopilot and forcing the brain to start making conscious decisions about what you want. 3. Keep a ‘choices’ diary Being aware of the choices you make each day is key. To stay on track, maintain a log, noting down which decisions helped you to reach your goal – and which didn’t. This will help to identify your behavioural triggers and correct them. 4. Don’t be too hard on yourself Studies show self-criticism can lead to less selfcontrol, so boost willpower by being kind to yourself, especially when you’ve failed.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY LOUIS FISHAUF

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Psyche

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How to shred emotional EATING HABITS Feeling down? Pass the crisps. Bad day at work? Have a chocolate fix. Stop! says Anita Bhagwandas, who explains how to break the cycle of emotional hunger There are two very definite kinds of people in this world – those who eat for fuel and those who eat because of feelings. Studies suggest a whopping 70 per cent of us go through phases of emotionally triggered eating at some point, and more women are affected than men. For some, this torturous routine can become part of daily life. In her new book, How To Feel Differently About Food, therapist Sally Baker argues that emotional eating is finally being recognised for the complex issue it is. ‘The newest government health guidelines finally see emotional hunger

as just as important as physical hunger, which is vital when it comes to changing nutritional and behavioural habits,’ she says. ‘We know what we’re meant to be eating, so the reasons we don’t do it need to be tackled.’ Clinical psychologist Dr Mark Winwood agrees, ‘When we emotionally eat, hunger is never fully satiated. This hyper response to food suggests a stronger emotional connection to it than is healthy.’ The key to transforming your relationship with food this year, say experts, is identifying your emotional triggers. Here’s how to do it.


Psyche

74 THE ANXIOUS/ANGRY EATER The definition: Stress and anxiety undoes all your healthy eating. A work deadline approaches, you chomp through it. Fight with your partner? There’s a bag of Doritos for that. Essentially, with any kind of situation that causes you stress, your immediate thought is to use food to calm yourself. The craving: ‘Anxious eating can be tracked back to childhood,’ says Baker. ‘This is why stress eaters tend to veer more towards childhood foods like chocolate and crisps.’ Nutritionist Alex Jamieson, author of popular podcast The Crave Cast, agrees, ‘As women we often feel unsafe expressing anger or frustration, in case we’re labelled a bitch. So we take aggression out on crunchy foods instead.’ Crisps top the list of foods for anxious, angry types. We overproduce cortisol as a result of stress, resulting in salt cravings to gain adrenal balance. High-calorie foods also gives us a ‘happy hormone’ dopamine hit. ‘Then we associate that food with “managing” stress and it creates a neurological pathway that’s hard to break,’ explains Dr Winwood. What to do: Baker says the first step is to identify the intensity of the craving. Drink a glass of water. If hunger persists and you have a tense feeling (rather than stomach rumblings) or believe you must have the item you’re craving, there is emotion and anxiety attached to it. Remember this is just a thought and distract yourself for at least five minutes. ‘When it’s passed, emotionally reward yourself for dealing with it. That builds up your resilience and makes you feel like you control your cravings, rather than the other way around.’ Jamieson advises crunching on carrot sticks to get that satiating angry crunch you’re craving – and hitting the gym for some kind of martial arts-based exercise, which works off some of your anxiety and frustration.

THE COMFORT/REWARD EATER The definition: You eat when you’re sad and when you’re

happy. That’s because food has become a comfort and is a source of reward when anything happens. Your emotions and diet are chaotic, and you feel out of control much of the time. The cravings: Carbs with a side order of carbs. ‘They produce serotonin, which boosts your mood and has a calming effect. In other words, some people “drug themselves” with cheap carbs – the foods they associate with childhood comfort,’ says Baker. When there’s an excess of serotonin in response to stress, it can make your mood swing from high to low, then you’re back reaching for carbs to perk you up. What to do: ‘Look out for feelings of guilt when you’re eating – that’s a sign it could be triggered by a sense of comfort or reward,’ says Baker. Make a list of five non-food rewards you can give yourself, and keep the list visible – in your bag or on the fridge. ‘You need to break the cycle of food as comfort, but it takes time,’ says ElShafie. Take baby steps, advises Baker. ‘If you tend to reward at home, make a point of going out for meals with friends more often – that puts an immediate restriction on how much you can eat.’

Crisps top

“ THE LIST

of foods for ANXIOUS,

angry types

THE PERFECTIONIST EATER The definition: ‘Perfectionists have an all or nothing approach to life in terms of unrealistic goals. That means dieting, then falling off the wagon repeatedly,’ says registered dietician and emotional eating expert Hala El-Shafie. Such eaters have often lost touch with their own internal hunger cues, focusing instead on fad diets and rules. The cravings: ‘Fatty, dairy-laden foods like cheese and cream are often ‘binge’ foods for perfectionists,’ says Baker. ‘That’s because they tend to follow very low-fat diets which can deprive the brain of essential nutrients like vitamin A – found in full-fat yogurt and butter – so crave them on a binge.’ What to do: There’s a self-critical element to perfectionist eating that comes from childhood, explains Dr Winwood. ‘Most often the critical voice prompting a “binge” session is an adult from our childhoods, like a parent or teacher scolding us. Try to work out whose voice it is – is it male and female? – and why it makes you feel so bad,” he says. Watch your dialogue around food, too, adds El-Shafie. ‘Using the words “good” and “bad” to describe yourself and the foods you eat is part of the all-or-nothing mindset you should be trying to escape.’ Nobody is good 100 per cent of the time – cut yourself some slack and aim for moderation.

THE ZOMBIE EATER The definition: You’re always sleep deprived and have become

a master of existing on six hours’ sleep. You graze all day on caffeine and sugar to keep you going, which then keeps you awake at night. You’re on autopilot and rarely have the energy to recognise the emotional triggers behind your eating. The cravings: ‘Even one night of poor sleep can cause a cascade of hormonal imbalance that leads to sugar and caffeine reliance,’ says Jamieson. ‘Lack of sleep upsets insulin levels, resulting in spikes and crashes of blood sugar. Since your brain is the top consumer of glucose in the body, you’ll crave more sugar and caffeine to get through the day and to focus. If we’re sleep-deprived, we don’t produce as much leptin in our fat cells overnight. That’s the hormone that tells our brains we’re full. We can consume about 300 more calories a day following bad sleep,’ says Dr Winwood. What to do: Understand why you behave the way you do. ‘You’re ruled by subconscious snacking and crashing,’ says Baker. ‘Keep a food diary to log the strength of your hunger from one to ten. Stop mindless grazing and aim for genuine hunger of nine or ten before you eat. Write down whatever comes into your mind the moment you reach for a snack. Repeat it each time you have a craving to understand what’s motivating your eating. Before long you start doing that instinctively.’ To tackle sleep issues, download an app called Sleepio (iTunes), which uses CBT to help you fall asleep. Q


Since 1953, the same Astral formula has been used by all kinds of women for all kinds of things. There’s just been a tweak to the packaging. A ST R A L - CR EA M. CO.U K


Words by CORINNE REDFERN

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77

HAVE YOU GOT EARLY- ONSET NO STALGIA? If you find playing Pokémon Go, mainlining Craig David and binge-watching Friends intensely comforting, it’s hardly surprising in this uncertain world. But can it go too far? And how can you turn pining for the past into a positive experience? Most of us would admit to being somewhat floored by recent events – Brexit, Trump, a background of doom caused by war and relentless change fuelled by the Internet. Every day there is something new and often frightening to digest. So how are we dealing with it? Well, for therapist Beth McKenzy, 35, the answer has been to take a break from the present day. By the time her wife, Sarah*, comes home from work at 8pm, Beth is invariably wrapped in a blanket, dog-eared JK Rowling in hand. Together, the couple cooks against a soundtrack of Radio 4. Potatoes, carrots, chicken – cosy, safe, familiar foods. ‘I just needed to retreat from the present day for a little while,’ says Beth. ‘Last year threw me off course, and I still feel completely disillusioned with society. I guess I’m in mourning for simpler times.’ Brexit may have been the trigger, she adds, but the US election was the bullet that tore through her faith in humanity. On 10 November, Beth sought solace in a copy of The Famous Five. Now she’s working her way through Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets.

If last year taught Beth (and the rest of us) anything, it’s that a) just when you thought the worst had happened, the world can still surprise you, and b) when it comes to dealing with the consequences of unhappy events, it’s often much easier to look to the past than face the future. Horror at the news of Syria or sadness over David Bowie’s death can be softened, we’ve learned, by Craig David’s comeback and an impending reboot of Disney’s Beauty And The Beast.

HOW WE FELL IN LOVE WITH THE PAST Nostalgia’s influence is clear. Less than a month after the EU referendum on 23 June, Pokémon Go was downloaded by 13 per cent of the UK adult population. When blogger Hannah Gale, 27, wrote a listicle entitled, ‘42 Things All Noughties Teenagers Will Remember’ it got over 3 million views (more than twice her average number). Faced with newsfeeds of political crises, global disasters and a sense of impending catastrophe (house sharing at aged 95, anyone?), we’re throwing back to last Thursday in a


Nostalgia helps us to transition from a period of fear to o n e o f a c t i o n . W h a t ’s k e y i s t h a t y o u e x t r a c t s o m e t h i n g from the past to help you move forward

millennial trend that’s been dubbed ‘early-onset nostalgia’. ‘People typically feel nostalgic when they experience disruption or setbacks,’ explains Dr R Tim Wildschut, associate professor of psychology at the University of Southampton. Perhaps this is why so many people voted for Brexit, and Trump’s continued rhetoric about taking his country back to the simpler times before large-scale globalisation resonated with millions. Maybe it tapped into our sense that things were somehow better in the past. ‘Nostalgia is an emotion that affects every generation,’ confirms Dr Wildschut. ‘But young people are particularly susceptible to it now, because socially we’re going through a period of huge political and economic change that they’ve probably never experienced before.’ Still, he’s not concerned – while historically nostalgia was seen as a sign of mental illness, research now consistently reaffirms its positive influence. ‘Reminiscing about days gone by has been proven to lower stress levels in times of crisis,’ he adds. ‘One of our studies even revealed that nostalgia can elevate your body temperature during winter.’

HARNESS THE POWER OF NOSTALGIA So looking back, it seems, isn’t all bad if it’s used to propel us forward. ‘Nostalgia is the one emotion that helps us to transition from a period of fear to one of action,’ says Dr Wildschut. By focusing on better times, you can find the strength to withstand the challenges ahead.’ Yes, your memories are probably rose-tinted, he adds, but accuracy isn’t important. ‘What’s key is that you extract something from the past to help you move on.’ For Bryony Kimmings, a 35-year-old politically-inspired performance artist focused on using creativity as a means of inspiring social change, progression is crucial. ‘I do understand the temptation to reminisce, but if that just means talking about how much better things were a year ago, we’re not achieving anything,’ she says. ‘We need to act on the lessons we’ve learned from the past.’

GET INSPIRED If history has taught us anything, it’s that a politically uncertain future can actually bring greater opportunities to make an impact. It’s an invitation to imagine a bigger and better society, then discover new ways to realise it – be that by joining a political party, participating in a protest or just picking up a paintbrush. ‘Art – theatre, music, fashion and everything in between – is always more powerful when it stems from a struggle,’ adds Bryony. ‘Just look at Sam Cooke’s 1964 anthem for equal rights, A Change Is Gonna Come. When times are tough, it’s always up to artists to decipher and articulate the world’s troubles.’ The post-electoral social media backlash doesn’t have to mean ditching all things digital, though. While Beth

has cut back on tweeting, Bryony is keen to point out that technology can still be an incredible catalyst for change – just as long as we stop mistaking Facebook posts for political acts. ‘I feel like the power of video is often being underestimated,’ says Bryony. ‘Online streaming sites such as Netflix can reach some of the most diverse audiences out there and give us access to documentaries way outside the perimeters of our own experiences.’ Producer and social activist Catrin Cooper, 32, feels so strongly about this that she’s already working on producing her own video series of ‘activist Ted Talks’. ‘So much is riding on our response to the current political climate,’ she says. ‘I had to be proactive.’ When I suggest this to Beth, she agrees. ‘I do believe that individuals can make a difference, but sometimes, when life gets a bit much, there are a lot of positive messages to take from Harry Potter. After all, if you can overcome Voldemort, you can overcome anything.’ Q

5

WAY S TO ST OP LIVING IN T HE PAST

We asked Alla Davies, psychologist and Harley Street psychotherapist, for her top tips

1

Accept your limits Instead of panicking about the future, take a deep breath and realise that there are some things you can’t change. Otherwise, you’ll feel so overwhelmed that you’ll forget about the smaller issues you do have influence over.

2

Train yourself to think differently Grab a piece of paper and illustrate the world you want to see – and the goals you need to achieve in order to get it. This process allows your brain to begin to think differently.

3

Create a positive social environment We are the people we surround ourselves with – and our social context is our support mechanism. Seek out those who care about the same issues as you. Together, you’ll feel strong and optimistic.

4

Make forward-thinking a habit If you’ve been running away from the present day for a while, regularity is key to successful change. Rather than forcing yourself to talk to new people all the time, start a conversation with a stranger every Monday .

5

Express yourself freely One reason people reminisce about the past is because they believe they were less constrained during their youth. Stop worrying about others’ opinions and do one thing every week that makes you feel good.

PHOTOGRAPH BY GETTY IMAGES. *NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED

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Words by HELEN ROBERTS Photographs by FAISAL MAGRAY

FROM

child bride to female

WRESTLING

champion


Global report

81

Forced to marry at 13 and a mother of twins by 14, Neetu Sarkar – now 22 – has defied the odds to become one of India’s most successful wrestlers


Feature name

82

Seco nd husband S anjay (abo ve r ight , wit h his mo t her and family) is suppo r t ive and shar es do mest ic dut ies, so Neet u can t r ain (belo w r ight ); Neet u wit h her t wins and mot her - in- law befor e she began wr est ling (belo w)

I was raised in a traditional Hindu family in rural Haryana, northern India, and I was 13 when my childhood changed forever. I had arrived home from school, dumped my bag and changed into my ‘play time’ salwar kameez [trousers and tunic] when my mother told me to sit down. I knew it was serious when my father came into the room. ‘You’re getting married,’ my mother said, her eyes blank. I stared at her in disbelief. I knew of child marriages; everyone did. My parents were married as children, as were their parents before them, but I’d assumed – or hoped – they wouldn’t make me follow suit. I valued my education and dreamed of becoming a teacher. No girl in India gets excited about getting married. Five days later, my mother dressed me in a red sari for my wedding day. I was determined not to cry. There were no protestations from me and no gentle kisses or apologetic whispers from my mother, who thought this was the best for my future. I did not blame her. I was marrying a 43-year-oldman from our village – he was older than my father. As is customary, a local matchmaker had connected our families based on caste, salary and respect in the community. My father met his father and the arrangement was made. When I saw my husband for the first time I couldn’t look at him, so I stared at my feet. It was no grand occasion, just a simple Hindu ceremony where we walked around a fire seven times and made seven promises to each other, a process called the saat phere. Then we went to my husband’s home – my new home – where he lived with his parents. That night, shortly after sunset, I was ushered on to a thin mattress and my new husband raped me. I’d never had a boyfriend and no one had told me about sex. There’s no sex education in school and our parents never sit us down to

explain. I knew the biology of making babies from my class in school, and that people had babies once they were married, so I concluded that my husband would want to consummate the marriage. When he did, I sobbed quietly in agony. My new home was sparse. We had two bedrooms and a simple sitting room attached to a kitchen. My family life had always been simple, as my father was a farm labourer so this was no different. My father struggled when my new husband expected a dowry for our marriage, but he coped. For me, the days passed as I cleaned and helped my mother-in-law in the kitchen, hiding tears as I chopped vegetables or swept the floor. Every night I laid in bed desperately trying to take my mind elsewhere as my husband took his pleasure.


One afternoon, very early on in our marriage, I was in the house alone preparing dinner when my father-in-law arrived home. We had never spoken because it’s respectable in our culture for a daughter-in-law not to engage with her father-inlaw. But I felt him brush past my clothing, then he crouched down to touch me inappropriately. I sat frozen on the floor, a bowl of potatoes and onions in front of me, knife in hand, as he sexually molested me. It lasted a few minutes before he stepped outside for a cigarette. My instinct was to run but, nauseous and terrified, I returned to chopping the onions. The next morning, I woke early and ran the short distance to my parents’ home in the same village. I collapsed at my mother’s feet and begged: ‘Please don’t send me back,’ telling them what had happened. My father was angry that my husband’s family had disrespected ours, but he didn’t comfort me. I feared they would send me back, but they stood by me. My father visited the local ‘kangaroo court’, a group of locally elected village elders known for solving disputes and attempting to maintain order. Within a few days, the elders decided we could annul the marriage on the condition we never told the police. My father agreed, and I went home. It was when I asked my mother about returning to school that I was hit by another blow. Marriage will always be more important than education or jobs for girls in India. Within three months, I was to be married again. This time to a man who was seven years older than me. At the ceremony, my second husband, Sanjay, whispered in my ear: ‘I’ll give you a good life. I’ll look after you.’ I desperately wanted to believe him.

I was weak, but determined to

grow as strong as any man

Global report

83 My new family was very affectionate. I lived with my husband, who turned out to be lovely, his mother and his younger sister – his father had passed away. I was elated there were no other men in the house. My mother-in-law – a warmhearted woman – and I bonded over cooking and recipes. I wasn’t surprised when I discovered I was pregnant at 13, having started my periods a year earlier. Tests confirmed I was carrying twins, which ran in my husband’s family. The doctor told my husband he was worried about my young body coping with the burden of twins and suggested we should consider abortion, but my mother-in-law refused. ‘If I could do it, she can do it,’ she said to Sanjay. I had to obey my mother-in-law. By the end of the pregnancy I could barely move. I felt uncomfortably full, lost my appetite and was bedbound. Despite this, my motherly instincts kicked in – I had two babies growing and desperately wanted to protect them. In September 2008, my eighth month, I underwent an emergency caesarean for the safety of myself and my babies. I kissed my husband goodbye. ‘You’ll be great,’ he reassured me. We had two beautiful boys, Prince and Ayush. At 14 years old, my life revolved around babies, cooking and cleaning. I was a good wife and mother, but I desperately missed my studies. I felt grateful to have kindness in my family, but I was living the life of a 30-year-old while only a teenager. In 2010, the Commonwealth Games came to New Delhi, and were on TV. One afternoon, my attention was caught by an event – young, muscular women fighting in a ring. I became captivated by the female wrestlers – their strength, their bodies and the crowds of people cheering and applauding them.


In 2015, I represented India in the World Championships in Brazil. I attempted to qualify for the Rio Olympics but I didn’t make the team. As I watched my training mate Sakshi Malik take the Olympic bronze medal for India, I was so happy for her. It was like a message to all women: we can be as strong as men. I’m now focusing all my training on Tokyo 2020. I knew nothing about wrestling as a child but I now feel strength in a way I didn’t before. There is not a single boy let alone a girl, who is an athlete in my village and that makes me proud. I want to tell all parents in India to believe in your little girl and educate her. Let her live her own dreams, not yours. Q

PHOTOGRAPHS BY COVER ASIA PRESS/FAISAL MAGRAY

I knew there was an akhara (wrestling ring) nearby, so I decided to visit. I turned up to see the place full of huge, sweaty men, stayed a few minutes, then left feeling embarrassed. The next day I went back and watched the men fight. ‘Do you train women?’ I asked an instructor. He looked at me as though I was crazy and asked me to leave. ‘We don’t allow women in here,’ he said. Two days later, I felt compelled to return. Each visit built my confidence and something grew inside me. My whole life had been based on decisions made by other people – this was something I wanted for myself. ‘I’d like to become a wrestler,’ I said to one of the trainers. He told me to go home to my husband, but each week I returned asking the same question. ‘OK, you win,’ he said after two months. I bounded home and told my husband. He was supportive and even suggested I cut my hair so it wouldn’t hinder my training. Each day, I woke up at 3am to run 10km and go to the gym for weight training before my family got up at 7am and would need me to cook for them. My first training match was nerve-racking. I pulled on my bright red wrestling boots and tied the laces as I waited ringside for my session to begin. My opponent was male – double my strength – and it was unusual for a girl to be so intimate with an unmarried man. I was very weak at first, but determined to grow as strong as any man. By 2011 I was training seriously. I changed my diet and was pulling weights and doing cardio for up to 17 hours a day at the akhara. My husband began to help with the duties at home. I was steadily bulking out. By 2012 my trainer thought I was ready to compete and began to prepare me for the 2014 Senior National Championship. Competing in the 53kg category, I felt a combination of nerves, excitement and determination. It was my first competition and I won bronze. I was buzzing. Seeing female wrestling on TV inspired Neetu to become an athlete (right). It was the first decision she made for herself. She’s already b r ou ght home a cluster of medals (top) and hopes to compete at Tokyo 2020

Global report

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‘I never kiss and tell’ Words W d b by LUCY PAVIA


Returning this month in cool arctic drama Fortitude, Luke Treadaway talks climate change, bad headlines and why we should all be kinder to each other

I interrupt Luke Treadaway on a little break in Canada. At the tail end of the press tour for A Streetcat Named Bob, he’s flown from the movie’s New York premiere to visit his girlfriend, actress Ruta Gedmintas, in Toronto where she’s filming psychological thriller The Strain. It was decided that the transatlantic promotional trip would be a little too much for his co-star Bob, the stocky ginger cat who plays himself in the true story of James Bowen (Treadaway) whose life of addiction and homelessness was turned around by the arrival of a small, furry shadow. ‘Bob was ready for a little chill out after all the press in London,’ says Treadaway, where he was greeted at the premiere by the Duchess of Cambridge. ‘I think [Bob and his owner] will be doing Berlin, though. I missed him in New York.’ Treadaway’s next project is a gear change from the feel-good vibes of Bob, as he returns in season two of suspenseful Sky Atlantic drama Fortitude, all bleak arctic landscapes and a cast peppered with Scandi-noir veterans (hello, Sofie Gråbøl). Treadaway plays British scientist Vincent Rattrey, sent to the isolated arctic town of Fortitude to research a worrying trend of cannibalism in polar bears. But then dead bodies start turning up in mysterious

It is useful to

date someone who understands the

strange nature

of this job

circumstances and no one is quite sure why. With so many subtle twists and turns in the plot, even Treadaway found it hard to keep up. ‘It was tricky to work out what was actually going on at the time,’ he says. A chunk of filming was done on location in the tiny, isolated town of Reyðarfjörður in eastern Iceland. Dennis Quaid has joined the cast for season two (presumably to fill the ‘recognizable US actor’ slot after the unfortunate demise of Stanley Tucci’s character DCI Morton) and with little to do besides bracing walks, they found creative ways to pass their free time. ‘Richard Dormer, Dennis [Quaid] and myself made up a ukulele band. We played one night at the crew pub... Dennis was brilliant. He’s a lovely human being and great on the guitar and piano – what’s not to love?’ Although there appear to be supernatural elements at play, the show relays a message about global warming, too – a particularly potent subject with a climate change denier unpacking in the White House. ‘Members of [Trump’s] energy team are just terrifying,’ agrees Treadaway. He’s not so sold on the UK situation, either. ‘Andrea Leadsom [was] in charge of energy in this country and she was the one connected to the people who are fracking. We voted in Parliament against it and it was [David] Cameron who said, “We’re going to do it anyway.” I fear massively for the planet really.’ Treadaway grew up in Devon. He and his twin brother Harry (also an actor) made their professional debut together in a mockumentary called Brothers Of The Head, about a pair of conjoined twins who become rock stars. Twelve years later, aged 32, the brothers have forged successful but separate paths in the industry. Luke indicates that he’s more than a little bored of the whole ‘sibling rivalry’ shtick. ‘It’s quite rare that it comes up now, which is really pleasing, because I don’t have much to say.’ Treadaway has been referred to as the National Theatre’s ‘million-dollar man’ thanks to leading roles in War Horse and The Curious Incident Of The Dog in the Night-Time (which won him an Olivier Award for Best Leading Actor in 2013), two shows that have vastly contributed to the British theatre boom of the last ten years and – Treadaway believes – help bolster the case against Arts Council funding cuts. ‘They’re

Interview

87


Interview

88

“ I literally

can’t wait to work with

Imelda Staunton

nature of this job.’ But, unlike a lot of unmarried couples in their early thirties, he insists they’re not suffering the wellmeaning wedding bells enquiries from friends and family. With 2016 turning out to be a car crash year in many ways, has Treadaway got any big hopes for the New Year? He says he’d like to see certain papers stop writing ‘f**king horrible headlines’ for one (he’s supportive of the Stop Funding Hate campaign, which is gathering momentum when we speak), and thinks we could all do with being a ‘bit kinder’ to each other. ‘Think about the fact that in 50 years or so we’ll all be dead – we can’t take our money with us. If everyone had that in their heads when it came to running governments and energy policies, then surely there would be a better outcome for the planet? Surely? Well, that’s my theory anyway.’ Q Season two of Fortitude starts on Sky Atlantic and Now TV in January. It will also be available to watch on Sky Box Sets

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAUL FARRELL

“ both productions that would very rarely get produced in private theatre, because the two years or so of development and the weeks and weeks of workshops [they require] isn’t necessarily what a commercial theatre is going for.’ After a four-year hiatus, he will be returning to tread the boards in March in a new production of Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf ? opposite Imelda Staunton, Imogen Poots and Conleth Hill (Game Of Thrones). The play will include a passionate kiss between Treadaway and Staunton (‘I never kiss and tell,’ he jokes. ‘Also I can’t, as we haven’t started rehearsals yet.’). He ‘literally can’t wait to work with [Imelda],’ he says. ‘I haven’t done a play like it before that’s set in real time in a living room with four people, so it’s exciting.’ Off stage, Treadaway began his relationship with Gedmintas in 2011. Dating another actor is handy, he says, as ‘it’s useful to have someone who understands the strange


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Dossier

91 The fact it’s

considered TABOO to show yourself having sex enhances the THRILL

Running parallel to the selfie phenomenon has been the rise of the new porn movement. Unlike the homogeneous, usually white, heterosexual, maleorientated and often sexist arena of mainstream porn, the new wave is as nuanced and diverse as the users creating it. These aren’t professional pornographers or photographers, but people who long to see sex that feels relatable to their race, sex, gender or orientation – and their relationships. Central to the rise of this porn movement is Tumblr, the image-based microblogging platform where users can curate and share content. It’s free, anonymous and permissive, and while some stick to sharing conventional pornography, others are creating their own original content – with couple’s erotica being the latest trend. For many, the rise in ‘real couple’s porn’ is a reaction to the outdated, one-dimensional mainstream industry and there’s a feminist agenda at play. ‘[In mainstream porn] where are the women’s orgasms? Where is her pleasure other than being of use to his?’ asks relationship and sex therapist, Beth Wallace*. ‘Women want to see “real” people and “real” sex reflected. I want to know that those in the porn I’m watching are being fairly treated.’ One in three women watch porn at least once a week and 64 per cent of female viewers are aged 18-34**, so there’s a lot of young women struggling to find something for them. ‘I find the “porny-ness” of the women [in mainstream porn] really unsexy; the fakeness of the tits, the hair, and the orgasms,’ says Emmy, 27. ‘I prefer porn that I can identify with, at least a little bit.’ A recent survey by Ann Summers revealed 96 per cent of women have watched porn with their partner and 40 per cent have made a DIY sex tape. ‘I’ve shared x-rated videos of myself online,’ says Ella, 38. ‘I find the thought of anonymous people around the world getting off to the sight of me really hot. The fact it’s considered taboo to show yourself having sex enhances the thrill for me. The high you get from watching your viewer count rise is similar to the rush you get from retweets or Facebook likes.’

For introverts, you don’t have to create your own erotica to benefit from this new wave of diverse porn. ‘Tumblr has given people a way to express themselves sexually,’ says Elle Chase, sex educator and owner of Lady Cheeky, an award-winning, 146k-strong Tumblr account. ‘It’s taking an idea around sex that’s hard to articulate and making a collage of pictures that you’ve reblogged or created, and saying, “This is my sexual aesthetic.”’ Like a Pinterest-style board for porn, curated by you. The recent rise of erotic podcasts – predominantly made by women, for women – indicates a move away from subjective, visual porn towards something more personalised. The People Of Kink, Hot Sex Stories and The Kiss Me Quick’s Erotica by Rose Caraway offer an audio alternative that allows more room for fantasy. Elsewhere, Guys We Fucked and New York magazine’s Sex Lives cater to an ever-growing curiosity of other people’s sex lives. Sharing details of your sex life may feel exciting, but you must consider the consequences, warns Chase. ‘Do not make yourself recognisable unless you want to be,’ she says. ‘That means your face, tattoos, moles or any obvious bedroom details should be Photoshopped out.’ For more cautious couples, a shared erotic Tumblr, where you each have a password and access to upload images, is an option. ‘It’s an upgrade from sexting and great for making suggestions of new things to try,’ says Chase. ‘It opens doors to deeper intimacy with each other.’


Dossier

92

‘It expresses things that conventional porn can’t’

Three porn bloggers tell Dorothy Black what it takes to create your own erotica

‘People want to find something that they can relate to’ S W E E T H O N E Y A N D C I N N A M O N : Always

careful to protect their anonymity, SweetHoneyN-Cinnamon have published personal erotica on Tumblr for about a year. ‘Sex, erotica and pornography still have a stigma we would like to avoid,’ says Cinnamon. ‘It’s silly that almost everyone engages in some form of sexual activity, yet publicly associating with it is widely regarded as unacceptable.’ Their popular site, sweethoneyncinnamon. tumblr.com, plays with glamour-type photos of SweetHoney, pretty nudes, videos and gifs of them having sex. The two, in their late twenties and early thirties, have been together four years and were in a long-distance relationship when they started the blog. It was Cinnamon’s idea. ‘I was hoping to just capture some of our sensual moments to share with Tumblr,’ he says. But there was another reason for dipping their toe into the erotic collective. ‘I noticed the lack of people of colour within the erotic Tumblr blogosphere,’ says Cinnamon. ‘I followed quite a few couples’ blogs and none of them reflected my relationship. I wanted to create something that showed a couple I felt were underrepresented on Tumblr.’ Cinnamon talks about the democratisation of porn, a term often used in reference to social media and open platforms like Tumblr. ‘People want to find something that’s real and that they can relate to. We’re in an era where people want [pornography] they can imagine themselves in.’

HOLDEN

A N D C A M I L L E : Now in their late forties, Holden and Camille have been in a relationship for ten years and been shooting porn together for five. ‘Every happily married couple has a thing they share,’ says Holden. ‘This is what we collaborate on.’ The couple ventured down the road of Tumblr erotica in 2011 after taking profile photos for a swingers’ site. The swinging life wasn’t for them, but they were hooked on taking photos and signed up to Tumblr. They’ve since moved to their own site, holden-and-camille.com, and while their pseudonyms remain intact, the camera reveals more of the couple these days. Parts of their faces, tattoos and house are now visible in their photos – titbits most newbies are warned against revealing if they’d like to preserve their anonymity. ‘It was a huge deal when we started, because it felt so sneaky and subversive,’ explains Holden. ‘But the more people you come across who are doing the same things you are, the more comfortable it becomes.’ ‘It’ is a range of stylish images of the couple, together or individually. Ejaculation, oral and penetration (from a distance) are regular features. Although the photos are retouched, the real people remain. It’s raw, but there’s nothing gritty about it. It expresses things that conventional porn can’t – intimacy, trust and enjoyment. ‘One of the compliments we get the most often is that it’s just real,’ says Holden. ‘The love we share gets conveyed in these photos.’ Holden insists it only works because the couple trust one another. ‘I would be really hesitant for new hook-ups to go into this because we see those cases all the time with revenge porn,’ he says. But with Tumblr, the power is in your hands. ‘If something is off limits to you, don’t do it.’ The couple take up to 100 photos every three weeks or so, of which maybe 20 will make it to their site. With more than 3,000 images, Holden says the process of taking the photos is the sexiest thing they do. ‘We still get turned on by it. She still pretends to be a model and I still pretend to be a photographer. There’s not a single photo session that doesn’t end with us in bed.’


COMPILED BY TRACY RAMSDEN. *BETHWALLACE.ORG **ACCORDING TO PORNHUB. MY DAD WROTE A PORNO INTERVIEW BY TRACY RAMSDEN. DOWNLOAD MY DAD WROTE A PORNO ON ACAST AT ACAST.COM

‘I know what women want, and what men want to see’ T A N Y A D A K I N : ‘Everyone knows what I do,’ says erotic model and photographer Tanya Dakin. ‘If you’ve found my erotic photography, it’s because I put it out there.’ In 2012, Dakin started a couple’s erotic blog, called Tanya’s Daddy. At the time, Tumblr went nuts for it, and the site had 8,000 followers within a year. Dakin curated every aspect of the retro erotica-style site, coming up with ‘different kinds of themes, looks and feels, moods and lighting, and pulling together wardrobes depending on the place we were going to be or rent – essentially creating a set.’ It was very romantic, the way it played out, she says. ‘I know what women want, and what men want to see.’ When the relationship came to an end, so did Tanya’s Daddy. Letting strangers into your sex life online comes with its own set of problems. Like the time someone stole a picture from her site and posted it to Facebook, where someone recognised ‘Daddy’s’ hand tattoo – and tagged him with his real name. Then there are the people who fixate on you. Dakin now has a private Tumblr account. ‘My new boyfriend is not on social media and I respect his privacy. Our Tumblr account is for us to post our nude photos, our doggie pictures, our videos, love letters, but it’s just between us.’ You form a bond when you’re creating erotic content together, says Dakin. ‘When you sit back and look at yourself in that way and know that you did it because you wanted to do it, it’s very powerful. And it’s contagious.’

“ We get TURNED ON by the process. Every single photo session ends with us in BED

How NOT to

write a porno THE MAN BEHIND THE HILARIOUS PODCAST MY DAD WROTE A P ORNO SHARES HIS ADVICE ON HOW NOT TO WRITE EROTICA

When Jamie Morton’s dad wrote an ‘erotic’ novel called Belinda Blinked, he and his friends, Alice Levine and James Cooper, set about reading each excruciating chapter aloud. The resulting podcast, My Dad Wrote A Porno, has had 18 million downloads. Yes, Morton is an expert on bad porn…

#1 Cho os e a p en name readers will take s eriously My dad writes under the nom de plume of Rocky Flintstone. Surely the whole point is that you want to get people excited and turned on? I don’t think Rocky Flintstone does that, so he was on to a losing streak before he’d even written a word.

# 2 D on’t compa re f ema le a na tomy to f ru it or ve g ‘Belinda looked at Giselle who nodded and, in a leisurely fashion and with a big hint of tease, unbuttoned the rest of her blouse. Her tits hung freely like pomegranates.’ When you’re writing an erotic novel, your primary purpose is to turn people on. Pomegranates aren’t doing that. Nobody wants to imagine hanging fruit when they’re thinking about breasts.

#3 Don’t forget the names o f your characters ‘“That was interesting Belinda,” said Donna.’ This ‘Donna’ is actually Bella. Call me a traditionalist, but I think characters should have continuity. But not for my dad – he called her Donna for a few sentences before reverting back to Bella.

#4 Make s exual des c riptions physically p ossible ‘It only took Peter Rouse 25 seconds to remove his clothes and position himself beside Belinda on the bed. He grabbed her cervix.’ If you’re writing a sex scene, make things possible in the real world. Grabbing a cervix is not only very painfulsounding, it is also categorically impossible – we asked a doctor.

#5 S et your b o ok in a s exy world ‘“Peter, could we position some of our pots and pans in your supermarkets?’ “Absolutely,” Peter replied. “We’ve just ordered 3,000 units of your Oxy Brillo range.”’ I think Rocky really wanted to write a business and leadership manual. He chose the world of pots and pans when he could have set his book somewhere remotely sexy like, I don’t know, lingerie sales. But, no. Q


ELLEN

D EG ENERES


Life stories

95

She’s the highest paid chat-show host on US TV and was recently honoured by Barack Obama for campaign work for the LGBT community. But it hasn’t been an easy rise to the top for one of Hollywood’s first openly gay women In the summer of 1980, Ellen DeGeneres moved out of the New Orleans home she shared with long-term girlfriend Kat Perkoff after an argument. A few nights later, on 26 June, Perkoff tried to make amends when they ran into each other at a gig. But DeGeneres, an aspiring comedienne, ignored her. ‘She was trying to get me to come home,’ DeGeneres recalls. ‘I acted like I couldn’t hear her because the music was too loud.’ That night was a pivotal moment in DeGeneres’s life, because it was to be the last conversation the pair would have. Travelling home later that evening, the comedienne, then 22, passed a wrecked Mercedes at the side of the road. The following morning she discovered that Perkoff, a 23-year-old poet, was in the car when it crashed and had been killed. ‘I should have gone home with her… I should have stopped… [I thought] all kinds of things,’ DeGeneres said afterwards, admitting to feeling ‘a lot of guilt’. The event sparked a dramatic shift in her career: while grieving, DeGeneres wrote a comedy monologue about mortality called Phone Call To God. In it she pretends to be on the phone to God, chatting about the surreal qualities of death. It would go on to propel her to stardom. Today, the 58-year-old is the highest paid female talk-show host on US TV, even out-earning Oprah Winfrey. She’s also the highest profile lesbian in the entertainment industry, and was recently praised by US President Barack Obama for her influence on the gay rights movement, receiving the Medal of Freedom – the country’s highest civilian honour. She was born Ellen Lee DeGeneres on 26 January 1958 in Metairie, Louisiana. Her father, Elliot, was an insurance agent and her mother, Betty, a speech therapist. They divorced when she was 13 and her brother Vance was 17, and it was in the aftermath that DeGeneres discovered her talent for comedy. ‘My mother was going through a tough time and I made her laugh,’ she said. ‘It was a powerful thing [to discover].’ DeGeneres knew from an early age that she was gay, but waited until she was 20 to tell her family. ‘This was the biggest shock of my life and the last thing I had ever expected to hear,’ her mother Betty later admitted in her 2013 memoir Love, Ellen: A Mother/Daughter Journey.

Clo ckwise fr om above left: DeGeneres as a child; per for ming o n Th e To n ig h t S h ow S tar r ing Jo h n n y Car s o n; wit h ex Anne Heche and mum B et t y

Immediately accepting of her daughter’s sexuality, she was concerned for DeGeneres’s well-being ‘given society’s prejudiced and negative attitudes’. By then DeGeneres was living in New Orleans and doing stand-up in clubs. Her softly spoken goofiness and tendency to self-deprecate for laughs masked a burning ambition to succeed. ‘I wanted to have money, I wanted to be special, I wanted people to like me, I wanted to be famous,’ she said. In 1982 – two years after Perkoff ’s death – Showtime named DeGeneres the Funniest Person in America following a city-to-city search for new comedy talent. Her big break came in 1986 after performing her ‘talking to God’ routine on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Other comediennes had performed on the top-rated programme before her, but DeGeneres was the first to be invited by Carson to sit on his sofa and be interviewed afterwards. The footage demonstrates what a big deal it was – DeGeneres is clearly taken aback as Carson beckons her across the studio, while the audience erupts. ‘It catapulted my career,’ she later acknowledged. More TV appearances followed, along with roles in adverts and sitcoms. Then, in March 1994, DeGeneres, aged 36, was cast as the lead in a new Seinfeld-esque sitcom called These Friends Of Mine. Her character, bookshop owner Ellen Morgan, was so liked by audiences that when the show was retitled after the first season to avoid confusion with Friends,


‘I got punished for coming out. I was so angry’ it was named Ellen. By season two, it was one of the highest rated comedies on US TV (in the UK it aired on Channel 4). With success came scrutiny, however, and the tabloids started digging into DeGeneres’s private life as rumours about her sexuality began to surface. Her family and friends knew she was gay, but she wasn’t ready to come out to her fans. ‘I was very insecure and depended on the validation of people who watched my show or my stand-up – validation I felt I’d lose if everybody knew who I really was,’ she said. But as the tabloids became more persistent, DeGeneres began to change her mind. It was a risk – she was a primetime TV star in a predominately conservative country, working in an industry full of people too scared to admit their sexual orientation – but she felt she had no choice. She persuaded the network, ABC, to out her character after she announced her own sexuality on The Oprah Winfrey Show, and on 30 April 1997 a staggering 44 million viewers sat down to watch Ellen Morgan come out as a lesbian. That same week, DeGeneres appeared on the cover of Time magazine with the headline, ‘Yep, I’m Gay’. ‘It was a watershed moment,’ said Trish Bendix, former editor-in-chief of AfterEllen.com, the popular US culture and entertainment website for lesbians that was launched in response to DeGeneres coming out. ‘It challenged viewers to consider that someone they loved and respected was doing something they assumed was morally wrong. For many people it was the first moment they “knew” someone was gay.’ Sadly, the overall response wasn’t positive, and detractors labelled her ‘Ellen DeGenerate’. Companies withdrew their adverts from Ellen and, spooked by the backlash, ABC began to air parental advisory warnings before each episode. ‘Initially [my coming out] was celebrated and I thought that

this was the greatest thing, because finally I was free too,’ said DeGeneres. ‘But then it just turned, and I mean turned.’ The storm only intensified when she went public with her first high-profile relationship with a woman. That summer, she began dating 27-year-old Donnie Brasco actress Anne Heche. ‘It was a lot for people all of a sudden,’ DeGeneres reflected. ‘They hadn’t seen two women holding hands, or with their arms around each other on a red carpet.’ The ratings for Ellen suffered, and in May 1998 ABC pulled the plug. In the months that followed, DeGeneres discovered that doors were slammed in her face, and yet opened for others. On 21 September that same year, Will & Grace, featuring two openly gay male characters, launched to a great fanfare on another network. ‘I came out, which was good for me, and ultimately it was the only thing I could do, and then I got punished for it. I was so angry,’ she said. Meanwhile, her relationship with Heche was imploding under the strain and in August, 2000 they split. Ugly headlines followed when the police found Heche in a disorientated state on a stranger’s doorstep in LA, saying she was waiting for a spaceship. She later confirmed she’d had a breakdown. With her romance over and her career tanking, DeGeneres hit rock bottom and went back to stand-up comedy. Then, to her surprise, salvation came in the form of a little blue and yellow fish. Scriptwriter Andrew Stanton was working on a Pixar film called Finding Nemo about a clownfish searching the ocean for his missing son, but was struggling to develop


Life stories

97

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, SCOPE FEATURES, STARSTOCK, XPOSURE

O p p o s i t e, fr o m le ft : t he 2014 Oscars selfie t ha t b r o k e Tw i t t er. C o mi ng o ut o n Th e O p r a h Win fr ey S h ow in 1 99 7; i n t he s a me we e k D eG ener es w a s o n t he c o v er o f Ti m e C lock w i s e fr o m t o p : M i ch e l l e O b a m a a nd M a d o nna o n Th e E l l en S h ow; recei v i ng t he P re s id ent i a l Medal of Freedom; with Portia de Rossi a t t h e U K premiere of Finding Dory

the dad’s sidekick, Dory. Then he caught a rerun of Ellen. ‘Her character tended to ramble, and when she changed the subject matter five times in one sentence, a lightbulb went on,’ said Stanton. ‘I wrote Dory with only Ellen in mind.’ Finding Nemo was the second biggest-grossing film of 2003 after Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King, taking £681 million at the box office worldwide. Thanks to Dory and her short-term memory loss, DeGeneres’s career was resurrected. In September that year, she returned to TV with The Ellen DeGeneres Show, and her amiable probing of A-list guests made it an instant hit. It was nominated for 11 Emmys in its first season and won four, including Best Talk Show. It has since won 38 in total. During its fourth season, DeGeneres was asked to host the 2007 Oscars, the second female after Whoopi Goldberg. She hosted again in 2014 when she memorably broke Twitter by posting an all-star selfie. It wasn’t just her career that was soaring again. DeGeneres had dated photographer Alexandra Hedison (now Jodie Foster’s wife) between 2001 and 2004, but didn’t know she had another admirer – actress Portia de Rossi, who played Nelle Porter in Ally McBeal. The pair were friends, having met at an awards show, but de Rossi hadn’t yet come out.

‘I was closeted and afraid that if I talked about being gay it would be the end of my career,’ said de Rossi. ‘So I wasn’t about to then date the most famous lesbian in the world.’ In late 2004, she told DeGeneres the truth. Four years later, on 16 August 2008, they wed at their Beverly Hills home after the same-sex marriage ban was overturned in California. Her chat-show success and the public’s acceptance of her marrying a woman must seem like validation to DeGeneres after everything she went through when she came out. Last year, Hollywood trade paper Variety named her as the person who has done more than any other celebrity or public figure to influence Americans’ attitudes to gay rights. ‘Her impact on modern culture is immeasurable. Her coming out and her success as a person and a TV personality have directly contributed to how the world sees gays and lesbians,’ Bendix told Marie Claire. ‘She’s often cited, mentioned and thanked by other out celebrities and public figures who praise her for having done so when it was at peak difficulty. She blazed a trail for others to be able to do so with less fanfare and negative focus. She’s a hero for LGBT people.’ One such celebrity was Glee’s Jane Lynch, who said to DeGeneres: ‘It made it so much easier for me, what you did.’ Her success shows no signs of waning: last summer she voiced Finding Dory, which has made £772 million worldwide to date; The Ellen DeGeneres Show was recently renewed to run until 2020; her personal wealth is estimated at £300 million. But if she ever hits rock bottom again, DeGeneres is prepared. ‘You have no idea where the darkest times of your life might end, so you just have to keep going,’ she has said. ‘I know that I’m strong enough to come back.’ Q


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Reporter

101 GIRL OF THE MOMENT

Hermione Corfield Th e Halcyon, your n ew sh ow, is being compared to Downton . I s t h at fai r ?

‘The Halcyon has more action and it feels more modern, but there are similar ideas behind it. You’ve got the aristocratic family who own the hotel and the staff behind the scenes.’ Your c h aracter, E m m a Garlan d, h as been described as th e Lady M ary of t h e ser i es...

‘I quite like that! She starts as the receptionist, so she’s not part of the family, but she’s also not fully part of the staff.’ A lot of dram as are about World War I I . H ow i s t h i s d i f fe re nt?

INTERVIEW BY HOLLIE BROTHERTON. PHOTOGRAPH BY CAMERA PRESS/RACHELL SMITH

‘It’s set in a five-star hotel, so you don’t just look at the battleground. It’s about how the war affected lifestyles in London and how everyone carried on, even during the Blitz. It’s not what people will expect from a period drama.’

You’ve worked with so m e huge sta rs. . . ‘With Tom Cruise [in Mission: Corfield stars with Steven Mackintosh in The Halcyon

Impossible – Rogue Nation], I had to pretend he wasn’t a huge star so I didn’t get nervous. He was great to work with and put me completely at ease. I never felt overshadowed – it was like a joint effort.’ W h o e l se h a s m a d e you wa nt to p i n c h you rse l f ? ‘I did an

advert with director Kathryn Bigelow and Penélope Cruz, which was brilliant. Penélope is so gorgeous and glamorous. She’s really lovely.’ Tell us about xXx: Return of Xan der Cage, your film w it h Vin D i ese l . ‘It’s a continuation

of the 2002 film, xXx. I think it’s one of those things everyone will love. I was meant to do a big scene at the end, alongside Ruby Rose, but because of The Halcyon production dates it had to be cut.’ W h o wo u l d yo u g i ve a n Osca r to t h i s year? ‘Ken Loach. I, Daniel Blake was brilliant.

It’s one of those films that really makes you think.’ Th e Hal c yon is on I TV 1 now

H ow wou l d you d esc r i b e you r sty l e? ‘When I don’t have to dress up

I’m tomboy-ish, but if I go out I’ll attempt to be chic. I love Stella McCartney and Burberry. I wear my Alexander McQueen leather jacket almost every day.’ H ow d o yo u j u g g l e u n i ve rs i ty a n d a ct i n g? ‘I deferred my third year

studying English when I found myself finishing the last essay of term in my Halcyon dressing room, but they mostly thread into each other quite nicely.’


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HOT TICKETS Make the most of the awards season gold rush with our movie critic’s hot tickets 01 La La Land ***** The year’s Oscar favourite, This marvellous musical stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as LA lovers. It’s a real triumph. Contender for: Best Film, Best Director (Damien Chazelle)

Old-fashioned filmmaking at its best. Contender for: Best Actor (Andrew Garfield) 04 20th Century Women **** Annette Bening and Greta Gerwig lead in this superb 70s dramedy. Contender for: Best Actress (Bening), Best

02 Manchester By The Sea **** Casey Affleck and

Supporting Actress (Gerwig)

Michelle Williams play exes ripped apart by tragedy.

05 Rules Don’t Apply **** Warren Beatty is

Contender for: Best Actor (Affleck), Best Supporting Actress (Williams) 03 Hacksaw Ridge **** The true story of pacifist WW2 soldier Desmond T. Doss.

magnetic as billionaire eccentric Howard Hughes in this splendid comic treat. Lily Collins co-stars. Contender for: Best Actor (Beatty)

By James Mottram

T H E (A LT E R NAT I V E) MARIE CLAIRE MOVIE AWARDS

B E S T O N - (A N D O F F - ) SCREEN CHEMISTRY Alicia Vikander and Mi ch a e l Fa s sb e n d e r i n The Ligh t Be tween Oceans

BEST EXCUSE FOR PUTTING TWO AW E S O M E P E O P L E IN ONE FILM Pa s s e n g e rs , s t a r r i n g Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt

AWARDS SEASON BY NUMBERS...

BE ST AMATEUR PERFORMANCE Bob the cat in A Stree t Cat Named Bob

BEST HARDBALL STAND - OFF WITH A SHARK Blake Lively in The Shallows

1,200

TH E N U M B E R O F K U MAM OTO OYSTE R S S E R VE D TO G U E STS AT TH E 2 0 1 5 O S CAR S

BEST CHARACTERISATION OF A TAC O

BEST 70S C O S T U M E/FAC I A L HAIR COMBO

Salma Hayek as Te r e s a t h e Ta c o i n S a u s a g e Pa r t y

Ryan Gosling in The Nice Guys

BEST CROWD PLEASING ENDING

BEST DONALD TRUMP JIBE

The conclusion of B r i d g e t J o n e s ’s B a b y

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U M B R E L L AS O N STAN D BY AT TH E BAFTAS I N CAS E IT RAI N S

The charmless magnate ‘mentioned as a future p r e s i d e n t ’ i n Fa n t a s t i c B e a s t s A n d W h e r e To Find Them

19

TH H E N U M B E R O F TI M E S M E RYL ST STR R E E P H AS B E E N N O M I NATE ATE D FO R AN O S CAR


HOW TO WIN A BEST ACTRESS OSCAR

I WA N T TO T H A N K T H E A C A D E M Y. . .

What sort of roles helped the previous core a little gold go man? 88 winners score

Public-speaking coach Hilary Lyons on how to deliver a knockout Oscar speech (because, well, you never know)

14 4.4 4i % The role r l is sett more h e than 50 years ars ago

25 % 16 1 6. 7 % From top: Gwyneth Paltrow’s emotional speech in 1999; Julia Roberts ignored the time limit in 2001; Cate Blanchett praised her fellow nominees in 2014 and Matthew McConaughey was ‘all right, all right, all right’ in 2014

Remember it’s not about you

‘An acceptance speech is the winner’s moment to thank all the people who have put them there. While it’s good to show emotion, breaking down completely is a little self-indulgent – focus instead on the people you’re meant to be thanking.’ Hook them with a great opener

‘One of the reasons I loved Robin Williams’s Oscar acceptance speech in 1998 for Good Will Hunting was the opener. “This might be the one time I’m speechless,” he joked, which worked well for him because he was normally so outgoing.’

COMPLIED BY LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, LANDMARK MEDIA, REX FEATURES

Use the power of three

‘Matthew McConaughey opened his 2014 Best Actor speech with “thank you, thank you, thank you” and ended it with “all right, all right, all right.” It’s a powerful technique that helps your message sink in with the audience.’ Avoid ‘paper’ thank yous

‘I’ve watched Oscar speeches where the winner has pulled out a piece of paper at the point where they want to make a long list of thank yous. It’s a bit of a downer for the people being thanked as it implies the winner doesn’t remember who they

15,872

TH E AMOU NT OF R E D CA R P ET, I N S Q UA R E F E E T, L AI D FO R TH E S C R E E N ACTO R S G U I LD AWAR D S EAC H YEAR

The character demands a physical h i l transformation i n

The ep part is a b g ra biog o ne bi aaphical hi l one

43.9 43. 9% The film is based d on a book boo ok or play

are! If you must use notes, use them all the way through or not at all.’ Make it personal

‘It’s always good to add something thoughtful into each thank you, as Meryl Streep did in 2012 when she thanked J. Roy Helland, the hairstylist and make-up artist who had worked with her on every one of her movies since Sophie’s Choice.’ Finish on a high

‘Sandra Bullock’s 2010 Best Actress speech was a great one as she talked about trailblazers at the beginning and then brought the message home that women and mothers everywhere are trailblazers. It showed that even in a minute-long speech you can still have a really powerful ending.’ If the music starts...

‘It’s best to say “that’s my cue!” and get off stage. The funny exception is Julia Roberts, with her line to the orchestra conductor when she won Best Actress for Erin Brockovich in 2001: “Sir, you’re doing a great job but you’re so quick with that stick. So why don’t you sit cos I may never be here again!”’ Hilary Lyons is a coach at the Speakers Trust, speakerstrust.org

2017’s (predicted) Best Actress frontru n n e rs Nat alie Port man ( J ac k ie) Rut h Neg g a ( Lovin g ) Annet t e B ening (20th C en tu ry Wom en) Amy Adams ( Arrival ) E mma S t one ( La La Lan d) Th e M a ri e Cl a i re ve rd i ct I f we’ re g oing purely wit h t he dat a ab ov e, t he women most likely t o walk away wit h a lit t le g old man c ome February are Nat alie Port man for J ac k ie or Rut h Neg g a for Lovin g , as b ot h roles t ick off t he hist oric al and biog raphic al c at eg ories t he Ac ademy seem t o lov e. B ut of c ourse it ’s nev er t hat simple. Port man has already won an Osc ar for Blac k Swan in 2011 while Neg g a mig ht be c onsidered t oo g reen t o win one just y et . There’s also a hug e amount of buzz surrounding E mma S t one’s role in La La Lan d and ( anot her big fac t or), she hasn’ t won an Osc ar y et . The same is t rue for Amy Adams in Arrival . Annet t e B ening c ould easily t ake t hem all out and win for 20th C en tu ry Wom en. S he’s been nominat ed four t imes before but has never won. Right now for us it’s looking like a dead heat between Annette Bening and Emma Stone.

9 , 0 0 0 G LAS S E S O F M O ËT & C HAN D O N

4 5 S E C O N D S – TH E M AX I M U M

G R AN D VI NTAG E B R UT 2002 S E RVE D AT TH E 2 0 1 5 G O L D E N G LO B E S

L E N GTH O F TI M E S ET BY TH E ACAD E M Y FO R EAC H AC C E PTAN C E S P E E C H

Reporter

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MY WORLD

Everyone in my family works, so it’s

I’ve got a rescue dog – a poodle mix

Hayley Hasselhoff

hard to get a clear schedule to see each other. Dad [David Hasselhoff] usually does a panto at Christmas. Last year it was in Glasgow, so we did Christmas in LA with my mum, then got on a flight to Scotland to see my dad.

called Curly. He was badly abused and is still skittish, but he’s also the sweetest thing.

The model on tanning salons, solo cinema trips and why she loves sleeping in silk When I was 13, my parents got divorced and I was like, ‘I want to

make my own money. I want to get a job.’ It’s not legal to work at that age, but I found a position in a tanning salon and got away with it because I looked older than I was. The whole thing was weird as I’m so pale! I’m based in London right now and the thing I miss most about LA is driving.

Hayley (right) with dad David and siste sister Taylor Ann Hayley Hasselhoff

I could drive endlessly; it’s my clear space. I told my friend this recently and she said, ‘I know you do that because if it’s the end of the day, you’ll take an hour to get to my house.’

I always ask for the same thing for Christmas – classes.

I love learning anything creative, so in the past I’ve asked for lessons in sculpting, painting and sketching. I can always pick out clothes myself, so classes mean more.

I’m really eally y into crystal y l alignments, nts,, pu u utting

all your energyy into i the crystal and letting ting it flow through you. I carry little ones with me everywhere.

One of my fondest childhood memories

Hayley Hasselhoff x Elvi Collection

Sleeping in silk is the best.

Wearing a cotton T-shirt and pyjama bottoms in bed just doesn’t make me feel good. So I wanted to include silks when I designed my collection for Elvi. The Hayley Hasselhoff x Elvi Collection is available now at elvi.co.uk

I’m not somebody who lies out in the sun. I tan fast,

is the holidays we took to Costa Rica. We’d have the same house and I was always overdressed. I’d be in heels five miles behind everyone else on a hike, but I’d get there. Cost a Rica Bridget Jones’s B aby

but lying by a pool just isn’t my thing. I use a product by Hungarian brand Éminence to protect my skin.

There’s something quite nice about going to the cinema alone. I’ve been doing it a lot

while I’ve been living in London. The other day I saw Bridget Jones’s Baby. I’ve also picked up British phrases like ‘bits and bobs’ and ‘crummy’, which show I might have been here too long!

INTERVIEW BY LUCY PAVIA. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ISTOCK BY GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, DAVE KING/GETTY IMAGES, MAGES, GETTY IMAGES MAG

Reporter

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Of f e r is ope n to new s ubs cri be rs onl y. £ 1 2 .9 9 ever y 1 2 mo nt hs by D i r ect D ebi t wi t h t h e p r ic e g u a r a n te e d f or th e f ir s t 1 2 m on th s. Dir e c t De b it of f e r is a v a ila b le to U K s u b s c r ib e r s on ly. A d ig it al v e rsio n com e s fre e wi th th e pri n t e di t i o n o f yo ur subscr i pt i o n a nd i s a va i l a bl e st r i ct l y o n a tr ia l b a s is . Tim e I n c . ( U K) L td re s e r v e s th e r ig h t to w ith d r a w f r e e a c c e s s to th e d ig it a l v e r s ion a t a n y tim e. Th is o f f er i s a va i l a bl e i n th e U K on l y. Thi s o ffer i s fo r t he t r a vel - si z ed ver si o n o f M a r ie Clai r e. I f y ou w ou ld p r e f e r to r e c e iv e th e s t a n d a r d s iz e , p le a s e s e le c t th is op tion w h e n or d e r in g . Th is of f e r is f o r a minimu m te rm of 1 2 m onth s a n d re funds ca nno t be i ssued dur i ng t hi s i ni t i a l per i o d. Fo r e n q u ir ie s f r om th e U K p le a s e c a ll: 0 3 30 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 , f or ov e r s e a s p le a s e c a ll: +4 4 ( 0 ) 3 3 0 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 ( L in e s ar e o p e n Mo nda y-Fri da y G MT, 8:30a m -5 :3 0 pm ex. B a nk Ho l i da ys) o r e- ma i l : hel p@ma ga z i ne s d ir e c t. c om . Th e c los in g d a te f or th is of f e r is 2 6 Ja n u a r y 2 0 1 7 . Ple a s e a llow s ix to e ig h t w e e ks f or d e liv er y o f y o u r f i rs t pri n t s u bs cri pti on i s s u e. The a nnua l subscr i pt i o n r a t e o f M a r ie Cla ir e i s £ 4 3 . 2 0 ( 1 2 is s u e s ) a n d in c lu d e s P& P. I n or d e r to of f e r th is s a v in g on th e c ov e r p r ic e f or s u b s c r ib e r s , th e f ree c o v e rmo un t gi fts wi th the m a ga zi ne a r e no t i ncl uded a nd a r e news- st a nd pr o mo t i o ns o nl y. Th e R e w a r d s s ch e m e is a v a ila b le f or a ll a c tiv e p r in t s u b s c r ib e r s of m a g a z in e s p u b lis h e d b y Tim e I n c . ( U K), f ree o f ch a rge . It i s a l s o a va i l a bl e to di gi t a l subscr i ber s a s l o ng a s t he subscr i pt i o n ha s b e e n p u r ch a s e d d ir e c tly th r ou g h th e p u b lis h e r s a t m a g a z in e s d ir e c t. c om . O n ly th e r e c ip ie n t of th e s u b s c r ip t i o n is e nt it le d to a c ces s R ewa rds . Wh i l e mo st o ffer s a r e o nl y a va i l a bl e i n t he U K , so me wi l l b e op e n to s u b s c r ib e r s b a s e d ov e r s e a s . Fu ll te r m s a n d c on d ition s a r e a v a ila b le a t m y m a g a z in e r e w a r d s . c o. u k .


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Fashion STYLED BY JAYNE PICKERING. PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID ROEMER. WHITE DRESS, £1,795, P R E E N BY TH O R NTO N B R E GA Z Z I

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y

Spring’s sartorial white-out starts here. Plus, Natalie Portman gets cosy in knitwear and talks politics, Oscars and supporting Hollywood’s sisterhood


Let there Classic, cool, contemporary, these directional pieces are leading the way for spring

be white Styling by JAYNE PICKERING Photographs by DAVID ROEMER


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T hi s p a g e: white leather top and white silk tulle dress (worn underneath), both from a selection, Dior; white canvas and leather shoes, about £360, Céline. Opposite p a g e : belted leather jacket, £1,080, and leather skirt, £660, both Marni


T his p ag e: cotton shirt, £830, and viscose trousers, £890, both Dion Lee; canvas and leather shoes, about £360, Céline. Opposite p a g e : ivory tweed and feather jacket, £3,340, Lanvin

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Th i s pag e : white jersey-mix jacket, £455, and white jersey-mix dress, £500, both Max Mara Opposite page: silk jersey dress, from a selection, and leather and canvas shoes, about £360, both Céline


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T hi s p a ge : tweed top, £11,970, and tweed skirt, £8,575, both Chanel. Opposite p a g e : hand-stitched paillettes dress, £1,795, Preen by Thornton Bregazzi; leather shoes (just seen), £335, Martiniano


HAIR BY KEITH CARPENTER FOR KERASTASE AT THE WALL GROUP. MAKE-UP BY CHRISTINE CHERBONNIER FOR MESSAGE ORGANICS AT THE WALL GROUP. NAILS BY JINI LIM USING CHANEL LE VERNIS IN BALLERINA AND BODY EXCELLENCE HAND CREAM. MODEL: EMILIE EVANDER AT STORM MANAGEMENT. SET DESIGN: DONNIE MYERS AT DEFACTO

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T his p ag e: white linen dress, £595, Joseph; leather and canvas shoes, about £360, Céline. Opposite p a g e : cotton and silk tulle jumpsuit, £7,660, Chloé


First lady Her mesmerising performance in political biopic Jackie has thrown her into the Oscars race, but there’s more to Natalie Portman than Hollywood success. Here, she talks pay gaps, presidents and why she’s proud to be an activist Photographs by MATT JONES Styled by ANNE-SOPHIE THOMAS


T his p ag e: sweater, Dior; jeans, Current/ Elliott; earrings, Diorama Précieuse Dior. Opposite p a g e : shirt, Charvet; earrings, Diorama Précieuse Dior; scarf, Nat alie’s own

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Sweater, Leetha; coat, Dior; earrings, Diorama PrĂŠcieuse Dior


123 Words by MICKEY RAPKIN

In early November, two days after Donald Trump is named president-elect of the United States, the mood in Los Angeles is… strange. Traffic is light. Voices are low. This is an unlikely morning to meet anyone for the first time, let alone Natalie Portman, and I’m not surprised when she tells me she tried to cancel. She’s straining to describe the feeling in town today. ‘Someone said to me that it felt like it had snowed in LA.’ I don’t ask who she voted for, but I have a pretty good guess – she’s just finished a hike with a girlfriend whose tank top reads: ‘The future is female.’ Hallelujah! It’s fitting that we’re meeting to talk about Jackie – a stirring, poignant film about Jackie Kennedy set in the week following JFK’s assassination – because at its core, this is the story of a nation mourning a dream. Directed by Chilean Pablo Larraín, Jackie premiered to standing ovations at the Venice Film Festival in September, catapulting its star into the Oscars race. While Portman certainly looks and sounds the part, what’s so remarkable about her performance is its humanity. Jackie is centred around an interview the first lady gave with a reporter for Life magazine one week after her husband’s death. In a clip that will surely be played at every awards show, ‘Jackie’ gives a moment-bymoment account of the assassination, revealing details like how beautiful Jack’s eyes and mouth looked even as he slumped over into her lap. As Jackie, Portman pauses to light a cigarette, regaining her composure as she coolly stares down the reporter, commanding: ‘Don’t think for one second I’m going to let you publish that.’ Jackie was a fashion icon, but she was also a woman who modelled her husband’s grand funeral on Abraham Lincoln’s burial. A woman who, in the face of impossible grief, had the presence of mind to help a nation heal while forever securing her husband’s legacy. Portman is seated before me out on the patio of The Trails cafe in Griffith Park, LA, not far from where she lives with her husband, the dancer and choreographer Benjamin Millepied, and their five-year-old son, Aleph. Portman is predictably gorgeous but unassuming – make-up free, razor-sharp bone structure and very pregnant, a black cotton tank top stretched over her belly, trainers on her feet. If she’s been chilly with reporters in the past, there’s no trace of that today as she tucks into a vegan breakfast sandwich. Jackie never wanted fame. She said, ‘I became a Kennedy.’ The same is true of Portman, who started acting at 12 and had fame thrust upon her. Born in Israel but raised on Long Island in New York by her father, a fertility specialist, and mother, a homemaker who acted as her agent, it was a simpler time, and one she’s grateful for. Having made her debut in Luc Besson’s Léon: The Professional and graduated to the Stars Wars prequels,

she was able to enrol in Harvard before the advent of camera phones; before social media was a thing. Portman has largely been absent from screens since her Oscar for Black Swan in 2011. While she made her directorial debut in 2015 with A Tale of Love and Darkness (a gorgeous period Hebrew-language piece), her highest profile acting role has been the love interest in Thor. Now, at 35, she’s on the precipice of a new chapter. After a two-year stint in Paris where Millepied ran the famed Paris Opera, the couple moved back to LA in July. She’s due to give birth to their second child and will return to work ‘as soon as possible’, she says, playing another iconic woman – the ‘Notorious RBG’, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Portman insisted the film be directed by a woman. Yes, she too is frustrated by opportunities for women in Hollywood. You’ll never guess how much more Ashton Kutcher was paid on No Strings Attached. But more on that later. I’m wondering if her move back to LA was prompted by a desire to act more, or to send her son to school in the US. The truth is more mundane: her husband chose to leave his job at the opera (reportedly because the storied institution was resistant to his creative changes), so they came home to where they’d met. ‘It’s just life,’ she says. ‘You live your life and look for things that fulfil and interest you.’ She admits taking on Jackie Kennedy was daunting – maybe even misguided. ‘In the wrong hands,’ she says, ‘that is a very bad decision.’ But after meeting Larraín, whose 2012 film No was nominated for the Best Foreign Language Oscar, Portman felt she was in good hands and began preparing in earnest, spending four hours a day with a dialect coach and tearing through biographies of the former first lady at night. She and Larraín would send each other YouTube links of Jackie’s interviews – including a 1962 hour-long TV documentary, A Tour of the White House with Mrs John F. Kennedy – noting her famously breathy voice, her posture and mannerisms. Portman also found an additional, surprising way into her psyche, recalling how Jackie and her sister, Lee Radziwill, took a trip to Europe in the summer of 1951, when Jackie was 22 and Lee was 18. Their letters home were published as an illustrated book, One Special Summer. ‘Jackie was really fun and really naughty – still elegant, but she was like a coquette smoking cigarettes in the bathroom at school, getting in trouble with her friends and going out with guys. That was so interesting to me. To have this public image…’ She pauses. ‘The dichotomy the public had – that Jackie is the one you marry, but Marilyn is the one you want to fuck or whatever. That difference between how you are and your awareness of how the public perceives you, that friction between those things was super interesting.’

‘I feel energised to be an activist; our art is more important than ever’


124

‘We have a clear issue with women not having opportunities’ Portman acknowledges she too faces a disconnection between her public and private selves. Yes, she’s a serious person who directed and starred in a film about the birth of Israel that she adapted herself from an Amos Oz novel. But, a few days ago, she also voted in favour of legalising marijuana in California. (‘If you see the examples of the states where it’s become legal, people are actually smoking less,’ she explains. ‘It means fewer jail sentences for those who are nonviolent offenders. It doesn’t really hurt anybody.’) The face of Miss Dior perfume has a delicious sense of humour that even her friends sometimes forget. Darren Aronofsky (the Oscar-nominated director of Black Swan) recently sent her a YouTube video of orthodox, Hasidic Jews appearing to freestyle rap. ‘Someone put dirty hip-hop over it and I was like: “That was so funny.” Darren was like, “Oh, I’m glad. I thought I might have offended you.” I was like, “Who do you think I am?”’ It seems a safe bet that Portman will find herself back at the Oscars again while pregnant. When she won for Black Swan, she wore purple, custom Rodarte, offthe-shoulder that proudly displayed her bump. She hasn’t thought about what she might wear this year, though she says with a laugh, ‘It’ll be some sort of moo moo [US slang for sack or sheet], I guess. I don’t know.’ Anne Hathaway recently revealed she’d faked her reaction when she won for Les Misérables. She wasn’t feeling whatever it is you’re supposed to feel when you’re wearing millions of dollars worth of jewellery. Portman didn’t go that far, she’d just rather talk about the work that leads up to the award than the thing itself. The next step in her career involves exciting directors (Xavier Dolan, Terrence Malick) and using her clout to help women. Of the RBG biopic, she says, ‘Despite being top of her class at Harvard Law and Columbia, Ginsburg couldn’t get hired. Some firms didn’t hire Jews; some didn’t hire women. She was a law professor because she couldn’t get hired. Then she argued landmark Supreme Court cases that were the foundation of women’s rights and gender equality law in the US.’ Mimi Leder, who directed Deep Impact and episodes of prestige TV dramas like HBO’s The Leftovers, will be helming this one. Portman insisted on a woman. When it comes to directors, she says, ‘I don’t think women and men are more or less capable, we just have a clear issue with women not having opportunities. We need to be part of the solution, not perpetuating the problem. As this story is specifically about gender discrimination, I was like, how dare we not hire a female.’

The problem is systemic. Jennifer Lawrence, Charlize Theron and Gwyneth Paltrow have all spoken about the wage gap in Hollywood and now, for maybe the first time, Portman has too. ‘Ashton Kutcher was paid three times as much as me on No Strings Attached. I knew and I went along with it because there’s this thing with “quotes” in Hollywood. Your quote is the highest you’ve ever been paid. His quote was three times higher than mine so they said he should get paid three times more.’ Was she angry? ‘I wasn’t as pissed as I should have been! I mean, we get paid a lot, so it’s hard to complain. But the disparity is crazy. I remember talking to Ruth Bader Ginsburg about it. Compared to men, in most professions, women make 80 cents to the dollar. In Hollywood we are making 30 cents to the dollar.’ There’s an added gravity to Portman’s thoughts today. Perhaps it’s because she’s about to welcome a second child or maybe it’s because Hillary Clinton is at home in Chappaqua, New York, while president-elect Donald Trump is in the Oval Office for his first sit-down meeting with President Obama. We’ve largely avoided the election, but she will say this: ‘I feel energised to be an activist; that our art is more urgent than ever. It’s more important than ever to be as good a person as you can be in your community and to be really active in helping people who need more help now than ever.’ Who knows what tomorrow will bring. If only we could predict the future, I think, reminding me of the second film Portman showcased at the Venice Film Festival this year – Planetarium, in which she plays a psychic and acts mostly in French. Has she ever had an experience she can’t explain? She laughs and launches into a story about a trip she took to Rajasthan, India, last year with Planetarium director Rebecca Zlotowski. ‘We had this rickshaw driver,’ Portman recalls. ‘He told us, “There’s a psychic all the locals go to. None of the tourists know about him.” He takes us into this back room downstairs in a jewellery shop to see a psychic who proceeds to tell me all this stuff that makes me really emotional. I was like, “This guy just saw into me.” He had these stones. He was like, “Wear this moonstone and it will open your throat chakra and give you your voice.” I bought the necklace, in tears. The next day I told someone the story and showed them the stone.’ You can see where this is going. Apparently, it wasn’t a moonstone at all. It was just some rock. ‘The guy was a total charlatan!’ C’est la vie. Moonstone or not, her voice is coming in, loud and clear. Q Jackie is in cinemas nationwide from 20 January


Sweater, Dior; jeans, Current/ Elliott; earrings, Diorama PrÊcieuse Dior; ring, Nat alie’s own Assisted by Axelle Cornaille. Hair by Maranda at Streeters. Make-up by Jo B aker at Forward Artists using Diorskin St ar Foundation in Light Beige; Diorskin Nude Air Glow Powder in Warm Tan; Diorshow Iconic High Definition Lash Curler Mascara in Black; Palette 5 Couleurs Skyline; Rouge Dior in Rose Mont aigne, all Dior. Nails by Debbie Leavitt at Nailing Hollywood. With thanks to Westy Productions


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V I C TO R I A B E C K H A M

Beauty

F A C E PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS

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129 Fresh and pretty – this is all we want for spring. At Burberry, foundation was eschewed in favour of highlighter to create luminous skin. First, apply Topshop Glow Prime And Finish in Supernatural, £12 (left, centre), on the tops of cheekbones and the Cupid’s bow. Then, sweep Clarins Face Contouring Palette, £36 (left, bottom), under cheekbones and along the bridge of the nose for soft definition. Finish with a single layer of Burberry Liquid Lip Velvet in Fawn Rose, £26 (top).

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When your eye cream just isn’t cutting it any more, reach for this hi-tech mask before bed. It creates a protective barrier, which allows potent ingredients to sink in deep for optimum repair and hydration during the graveyard shift. Here comes the science… * The mask comes in a s achet with t wo chamber s. Squeeze to break t he seal and dispense on to the dr y pad. Place under your eyes o nce a week t o make t hem lo o k fr esher in ten minut es flat .

From left to right: Michael Kors Sexy Blossom E D P, £82 for 100ml; Diptyque Eau Dominotée Multi-Use Fragrance, £55 for 200ml; Tom Ford Velvet Orchid Lumière E D P, £108 for 100ml

* It co nt ains no fewer t han nine ant i- inflammat or y ingr edient s, including lady’s thist le and whit e bir ch, which help t o soo t he t ir ed, puffy eyes.

* Ther e’s also a heft y do se of moist ur er allying hyalur onic acid t o plump up skin and r educe fine lines.


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the edit

Blush crush Fast-track your way to a perkier complexion with a shot of pink, peach or crimson Words by ABBIE SKLIARSKY 02 01

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01 Chanel Coco Code Creation Exclusive, £49 Meet your o ne- st op shop for spr ing: a peach- hued beige, mat t e car amel, sat in ho ney highlight er and mat t e vibr ant r ed t o mimic t he gent le flush o f a lit t le sun.

05 Diorblush Colour Graduation in Pink Shift, £32.50 Wit h it s pr et t y packaging, y o u won’t want to use this cool rose shade – unt il you r ealise t ha t it makes you look like you had eight ho ur s’ sleep o n o nly fo ur.

02 By Terry Glow-Expert Duo Stick in Peachy Petal, £38 The double- ended wand gives ‘fr esh- faced’ a who le new meaning. On o ne end is a cor al blush and highlight er duo , and on t he o t her is a handy br ush t o blur away har sh lines. We’r e sold.

06 Too Faced Papa Don’t Peach, £25 The or iginal peachy blus h is back wit h somet hing ext ra : an addict ive fr uit y scent . I t s pun- t ast ic name is (almo s t ) as brilliant as the glowy warmth it impar t s t o wint er skin.

03 Nars Pop Art Collection Sheer Pop Multiple in Côte Basque, £29 (selfridges.com) The per fect ant idot e t o hungover skin, it s r adiancebo o st ing, pear lescent finish belies all of last night ’s ant ics.

07 Hourglass The Luminescent Flush Ambient Strobe Lighting Blush Palette, £59 Form an orderly queue, make-up mavens. T wo new shade s – br illiant nude and euphoric fusio n – have been added t o t his cult palet t e t o r amp up t he ‘lit fr o m wit hin’ effect .

04 YSL Baby Doll Kiss & Blush Duo Stick, £26 T ake cont o ur ing up a gear with this ombre blusher. Simply sweep o ver cheeks – t he dar k shade o n t he apple, t he light just above. Hello, cheekbo nes.

08 Guerlain Lip & Cheek Tint, £23.50 (harrods.com) A t int t hat hydr at es an d w o n’ t vanish? Loo k no fur t her t ha n t his silky pink gel sho t t hr o ug h wit h glycer ol. It ’s like a drink fo r par ched cheeks and l ip s . 09 Laura Mercier Joie De Vivre Windflush Colour Powder For Cheeks And Eyes, £29 Ther e co uld har dly be a m o re apt ly named blusher . I t inst ant ly makes skin lo o k a liv e, as if yo u’ve been fo r a bris k walk alo ng a windy beach.

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10 Tom Ford Shade And Illuminate Cheek Palette, £56 These pink and t er r acot t a blushes ar e a no- br ainer fo r t he make- up shy. B lenda b le and buildable, t hey have a lo w shimmer fact or fo r a next - t o- nat ur al flus h.

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MADE UP From flash-mob pouts to skinny plaits: introducing SS17’s showstopping trends 02 01 MA

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01 Urban Decay Full Spectrum Eyeshadow Palette (in Calvera and Jones), £43. 02 Too Faced Sketch Marker Liquid A rt L in e r i n C a na r y Yel l ow, £17 . 03 YS L Be au ty R o u ge Vo lu p t é S hi ne i n O r a ng e Tou rn o n , £2 6

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Could there be a happier colour combo than peach, orange and yellow? They’re the shades of hot sunshine, a reminder of summer’s first Aperol Spritz. Fashion East ramped up that carnival feeling with orange merging into yellow for eyes like sunsets. Missoni’s more wearable take on the trend saw burnt oranges blended up towards the brow line. And consider the orange lip to be the summer-ready alternative to your classic red – we’ll be pairing Mary Katrantzou’s tango pout with a tan.

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Go bold or go home was the message of the season, as a sea of aqua shades from deep petrol to bright sky blue (and everything in between) swept across the runways. Arctic lips popped on models at Thom Browne, while a swoosh of elongated shadow at Victoria Beckham nearly caused a Twitter meltdown. If you fancy dipping your toe into the big blue, try a navy cat-eye flick à la Chromat, or apply a simple slick of liner just above the eyelid crease for an edgy Westwood-inspired look. 0 4 G i v enchy E ncr e A Ci l s Masc ara Top Coat, £21 . 0 5 D i or Colour Gr aduat io n Eyeshado w Palet t e in B lue Gr aduat io n, £ 42.50. 0 6 Ur b a n D eca y Vi ce Vi n t ag e L i p sti ck i n UV-B, £ 1 5 . 0 7 L or d & B er r y S upr eme in S mar t - B lue # 0111, £ 12. 08 & Ot her St o r ies Ey e Penci l i n Ar chi l La pi s, £7

09 TO RY B U R C H

09 Hershesons Clear Snagless Hair Bands, £6.50. 10 Redken Wind Blown 05, £ 13. 11 Michael Van Clarke 3’’’ More Inches No 1 Brush Medium, £24.50

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ZAC POSE N TO RY B U R C H

You might be thinking, ‘This one’s easy, I’ve been pulling my hair into a half bun or ponytail ever since school gym class.’ And you would be right – it’s just a bit more directional for SS17. Whether you tease the heck out of your hair at the crown, as seen at Dion Lee and Zac Posen, or add texture with curling tongs and volumising spray like at Tory Burch, all you need is an invisible hair tie and a few minutes. Simply sweep it back, pull out a few face-framing tendrils and secure. What’s not to love?

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Dark art Ditch the liquid liner – eyes have had a 90s grunge-over. We saw heavily pencilled waterlines on the Rag & Bone catwalk, while at Prabal Gurung it was smoked out with shadow. At Coach, shadow was smudged under the lash line for a slept-in look. Two words: sex kitten. 12 Lord & Berry Kajal Stick in Orient al Black, £ 12. 13 B ourjois Volume Reveal Mascara in Ultra Black, £9.99 (Fabled.com)


The glitterati

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Every season, we think we’ve reached the limit of what you can do with lipstick. And then make-up artist Pat McGrath blows our minds again. At DKNY, she pressed loose glitter over a matching shade of lipstick for spring’s most Instagrammable pout. But if you’re not Blue Peter-level crafty or are worried about ingesting ten teaspoons of glitter, try patting a loose metallic eyeshadow on top of lip balm instead. We know this is never going to be a safe, officeappropriate look, but it can be incredibly cool for a night out when paired with nothing but squeaky-clean skin and a cat-eye flick on the lids. 16

1 4 G l i t t er Li p s i n R uby Sl i pp e rs, £ 12 .5 0. 1 5 M AC Gl i tter in Go ld, £ 16. 16 B ar r y M F ine Glit t er Dust in Cr imso n, £ 4.59

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The monotonyy of nude nails has finallyy been broken! The beautyy world is busting g out the big g guns g with metallic-toned manis,, as seen at Mimi Wade and Philipp pp Plein,, where mirrored g gold g gave a whole new meaning g to shinyy nails. But the trend we’re trying, y g, shown here at 3.1 Phillip p Lim,, is a shimmeryy segue g into full-on summer metallics. Madeline Poole,, Sallyy Hansen’s g global colour ambassador,, randomlyy swiped p Miracle Gel in Buffalo Nickel over an opaque, p q , neutral base. ‘Starting g with a layer y of white or nude is a trick manicurists use if theyy want to brighten g a metallic,, or make it look more distressed,’, she says. y 1 7 O P I N a i l La cq uer i n Ch am p ag n e For Bre ak f ast, £ 1 2 .5 0 (Fabled.co m ). ) . 18 Jessica Phenom Vivid Color C in Go G ld Ver meil , £ 13.50. 0 1 9 J a mb er r y M i r r o r ed Me t al l i c Gol d N ai l Wraps, £ £1 5.. 2 20 S ally Hansen Mir acle Gel in B uffalo Nickel, £ 9.99

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21 S ilver - plat ed Swar o vski cr yst al and pear l hair slide, £ 215, Alex ander McQueen at Net - A- Po r t er.com 22 Flower clip, £ 99 , Colet t e M alouf at Fenw ick 23 The Silke hair t ies, £ 21, S ilke Lo ndo n 24 Emoji metallic hair pony pack, £ 3.50, Accessorize

of t e c a he F

We all know the power of a clip or a slide to detract from ‘really should have washed it yesterday’ hair. Now take your inspiration from low ponytails wrapped in belts at Tibi, whimsical swatches of lace at Rodarte, slogan slides at Ashley Williams and hair bobbles that wouldn’t be out of place on the 80s club scene at Chanel. Girlie hair accessories just got a cool-over.

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Cara had better watch her back, there’s a new bushy-browed model on the block in the near-perfect form of Denmark’s Line Brems (@lineobrems). She tore up the runway at some of the hottest shows this season – think Vuitton, Dolce and Saint Laurent.


137 Beauty

Baby braids OK, plaits for summer are hardly revolutionary. But what’s new is that they’re skinnier than ever – whether you opt for Cavalli’s sleek face-framing pieces, French plaits worn high on the head as seen at A Détacher, or the tiny, wispy braids that Eugene Souleiman, Wella Professionals’ global creative director, created at Preen by Thornton Bregazzi. ‘Instead of basic low braids, I used several different styles, from twisted rope to threestrand braids, randomly placed to add another level of interest,’ he says. Piece of cake, right? Q

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2 5 O ni ra O rg a ni cs Th e O il , £ 4 2. 2 6 Wel la P ro fes s io n al s E I M I Dr y Me Dr y Shampoo , £ 12.90. 2 7 Tres emmé Kera t in S mo ot h S hi ne O i l , £7 . 4 9 . 2 8 D o v e Ad vanced Hair Ser ies Regener at e No uri s hment Se rum- I n-O il , £ 6 .9 9

E TA A D

WORDS BY FIONA EMBLETON AND CHARLOTTE CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS, ALAMY, INSTAGRAM/SAM MCKNIGHT. STILL LIFE BY PIXELEYES

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L I N D S A Y

L O H A N

The actress on learning to embrace her freckles, her go-t0 Topshop lipstick and, er, erotic yoga

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I love creat ing my ow n sce nt by m i x i n g f ra g ra n ces. I’ll layer Dior’s

Hypnotic Poison on top of a perfumed oil like Child by Susan D Owens. That way the smell stays on your skin for longer. If I want to feel sexy, I’ll wear a men’s cologne like Bleu de Chanel.

INTERVIEW BY CHARLOTTE CLARK. PHOTOGRAPHS BY GETTY IMAGES, ISTOCK BY GETTY. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

W h en I was at sch o o l , I was rea ll y self-conscio us abo ut my freckles. They made me stand out

and look different to other kids, so I hated them! But now I’ve definitely grown to love them and don’t cover them up. I just wear something light like Charlotte Tilbury’s Wonderglow Face Primer.

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‘Be i n th e m om ent’ h a s to b e my m otto. Meditating helps and

it’s a big part of my life. I try to do it every day, even if it’s just for a couple of minutes. I can practise it anywhere – when I’m flying or in a car. I’ve also got this great sleep app by Glenn Harrold, which is all about waking up with a new intention. There are loads of different options to give you the incentive to exercise, eat healthily or detox. You can just pick what you need.

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I ’ ve b e e n m o d e l l i n g s i n ce I was a k id , so I’ve got a pretty good idea of

what make-up works for me. I apply it myself for most events and the red carpet. I even did my own when I was performing in Speed-The-Plow in the West End. For day-to-day, I’ll just create a natural look with MAC’s Coppering and Texture eyeshadows, and contour with Anastasia Beverly Hills Pro Series Contour Kit. Then I’ll finish off with a natural pink lipstick like Pillow Talk by Topshop. For a night out, red lippie is a real confidence booster. I usually wear MAC’s Lady Danger and add natural Ardell lashes to help create a cat-eye effect. My skin care regim e i s pre t ty sim ple. I do love a face wipe – the

Neutrogena ones are great. Then, I’ll

use iS Clinical Cleansing Complex and its serum, too. Clinique’s All About Eyes Serum De-Puffing Eye Massage is a great little roller ball that’s really easy to apply and fits in your purse. My beauty luxury is La Mer’s moisturiser – it’s expensive, so I don’t buy it often, but I do love it.

I h ate t re a d m i l l s, b u t l i ke g o i n g for a r u n i n th e p a r k. I’m a big fan 09 10

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of S Factor classes, too. They’re like an erotic form of yoga with poles and fast music and stuff! It’s really good for your core and the whole workout is done in the dark with red lighting, so you never feel self-conscious. My h air h as been so m a ny different colours. At the moment,

I’m back to my natural red. To keep it in good condition, I use Show Beauty shampoo and love the leave-in conditioner by Unite. It stops your hair getting too dry and the coconut smell is gorgeous.

01 iS Hydra-Cool Serum, £48 02 MAC Eye Shadow in Coppering, £13 03 Chanel Bleu de Chanel EDP, £58 for 50ml 04 Topshop Lips in Pillow Talk £8 05 Ardell Baby Demi Wispies, £5.49 06 Neutrogena Hydro Boost Cleanser Facial Wipes, £4.99 07 iS Clinical Cleansing Complex, £34 08 Unite 7Seconds Condition Leave In Detangler, £17.95 09 MAC Lipstick in Lady Danger, £15.50 10 Show Beauty Pure Moisture Shampoo, £28 11 Charlotte Tilbury Wonderglow Face Primer, £38.50

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BEAUTY RULES


01 Sebastian Professional Gel Forte, £21.40 02 Wella Professional EIMI Shape Me, £13.30 03 John Frieda Luxurious Volume Core Restore Protein-Infused Shampoo, £6.99 04 Bumble And bumble BB Strong Finish Hairspray, £22 05 L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni.Art Full Volume Extra Mousse, £10 06 Babyliss Pro Ceramic DialA-Heat Curling Tongs 13mm, £35

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Words by FIONA EMBLETON

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HAIR BUZZ

Glamour curls PHOTOGRAPH BY JASON LLOYD-EVANS. STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

Perms are making a comeback! Here’s how to get the look with the wave of a wand It’s confirmed: we’re rekindling our love affair with Carrie Bradshaw’s dropped-out perm circa 1998 after spotting this on-trend version at Topshop Unique. To recreate the look – dubbed the ‘new wave glamour’ by hair maestro Duffy – work mousse through towel-dried hair. And if there’s one thing this catwalk show taught us, it’s that size is everything – at least when it comes to tongs. Using slim tongs, work your way around your whole head, curling half-inch sections at a time. Leave these tight coils to drop a bit, flick your hair to one side and slick down the other side with gel. Finish with a light mist of hairspray to avoid the dreaded crunch.

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144 Beauty

Words by FIONA EMBLETON

SKIN SOS

Best in glow Want to feel like you have your own personal lighting team? Take your skin’s radiance potential off the scale with these brightening must-buys P et er T hom a s R ot h Pu mpk in E n z y m e M a s k, £ 38 N e e d a r a d i a n c e f i x ? Th is mas k s e n ds i n t h e f o o t so l d ie rs : A HA s , p um p k i n e n z y m e s a n d aluminium oxide cryst als a l l l i ft a w a y d e a d c e l l s . Th e ‘ g o o d e n o ug h t o e a t ’ smell will make you

I nsti tut Esthederm Radi ance, £ 57 This is packed w it h hor se-chest nut ext r act , w hich b oost s communicat ion bet w een cells, so scaliness get s v et oed and a healt hy g leam is r est or ed.

s m i l e e v e r y time you use it, too.

Nar s Radi ance Pr i mer S P F 35/ PA +++, £27 A hint of shimmer in t he

Aur e l i a B r i g h t e n i n g B o tan i c a l Esse n c e , £ 42 Wh e n y our c ompl ex i on h a s t h e l us t r e of Ry v i t a , m ist t hi s s ouped- up m ix o f 1 2 br i g ht eni ng e sse n t i a l oi l s ,

f ormula inst a nt ly light s up your f ace, while t he pla nt ext ra ct evodia rut a ec a rpa c a lms inf la mma t ion a nd st ops sk in f rom looking 50 sha des of grey.

in clu d i ng g er a ni um a n d d et ox i f y i ng m a g n es i um s a l t s , o v e r cl ea ns ed s k i n.

Aveda Tul asara Weddi ng M asque O verni ght, £ 48 Indian brides have long used

Su p er m ood Yout h G l o L u xu r y P e e l , £ 33 G i v e y o u r sk i n ’s n a t u r al

t ur mer ic as a r adianceb oost ing mask. We can’ t pr omise a r ing , but this

e x fol i a t i n g e n z y m e s a nu d g e

modern version contains

w i th th i s AH A- r i ch p e e l.

500, 000 r epair ing plant

L a c ti c a c i d a n d c i t r i c acid

st em cells t o ensur e a

from g r a p e f r u i t a l so c l e ar

bright future for your face.

Let’s just put it out there – wintry temperatures are like kryptonite to a glowing complexion. The cold causes skin to develop a sallow quality by drying out the top layer and making blood vessels contract, which reduces circulation. And as if that wasn’t depressing enough, when it’s dry, the enzymes responsible for sloughing off dead cells slow down, too. ‘Your skin only looks radiant when it’s smooth enough to reflect light,’ explains facialist Kate Kerr. ‘Cold weather causes dead cells, which are flat in shape, to pile up on the surface where they absorb rather than reflect light.’ Nothing an old-school grainy scrub can’t fix, right? ‘Given that when skin is dry its outer barrier is weaker and more prone to irritation, you actually want to avoid harsh scrubs,’ warns Kerr. To truly boost radiance and your skin’s self-exfoliation, you’re better off using gentle acids such as salicylic and AHAs instead. You should also look for natural heroes, such as liquorice and turmeric in products, which brighten and reduce dark spots. Think of this face regime as Red Bull for sloth-like skin – you’ll look perkier in no time.

o ut p o re s a m a z i n g l y. G i venchy L e Soi n Sk i n R e n e w i n g C r ea m, £ 4 9 Ko re a n r ed g i ns eng and a n t i - i nf l a mma t or y m a n u ka honey s t op

Noi r & Bl anc Hui l es Or i gi nel l es, £280.50 One of these oils contains liquorice extract to help fade sunspots; the other uses

win t e r - w ea t her ed

algae extracts to speed

sk in lo ok i ng ‘ bl a h’.

up cell renewal. Catnip for face-oil buf f s.

STILL LIFES BY PIXELEYES

Ki e hl ’s Pu r e Vi t a l i t y


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147

Deluxe Spring forward

PHOTOGRAPH BY HANS BLOMQUIST AND DEBI TRELOAR

Floral accents for your home, the body-balancing brekkies nutritionists swear by, plus meet our cool new culinary columnists


@ Ja ck so n a n d Le vine

It’s the beginning of a new year and the start of a brand-new w column. Welcome, come in, please excuse the pyjamas an nd the Quality Street wrappers, we’ve not quite accepted that the holidays are over yet. We are Alice (left) and Laura, keen eaters, home cooks and firm friends. We set up our supper club Jackson&Levine three years ago, transforming Laura’s flat into a makeshift restaurant. A whole lot of washing up and failed lemon tarts later, we find ourselves here writing about our food experiences for you. And we couldn’t be more thrilled about it. Like many of you reading this, we spend a lot of time in the kitchen but would never call ourselves chefs. We just love cooking and eating, so every month on this page we’ll be bringing you a roundup of what’s going on in the world of food and drink, from the best recipes to our little black book of must-visit new openings and places to shop. So happy New Year one and all – here’s to a great 2017. Now pass the Alka-Seltzer.

S h oo tin g o u r new book

Th e m o s t I n st a g r ammab le p u m p k i n s e ve r?

SOD DRY JANUARY If you’re going to break the rules, you might as well do it in style

TARQUIN’S GIN Will Power? Nope, we don’t know him either (Sorry, too much time at home, the Dad jokes are catching). Replenish your barren bar after the Christmas pillaging with a bottle of

We lo ve to h o s t supper clubs in Laura’s eas t Lo nd o n fla t

F u t ure

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTOPHER FENNER (MAIN), ALAMY, INSTAGRAM. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY CATHY ENNIS

Marie Claire’s brand-new columnists reveal the big 2017 food trends to follow, and why January is way too bleak for a detox

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WHAT HAT’S S ON OUR RADAR RAD R VEGETABLE YOGURT T Bear Be with us here. This is not intended as a re replacement for the pot of peach and passion fruit in your lunchbox. Instead, these new flavours – carrot, beetroot, tomato – can be used to accompany anything from meat to roasted vegetables. Just think of it as sour cream with a twist. POKE When it comes to the street-food sensation du jour, these Hawaiian raw fish salad bowls are in. A sushi-ceviche hybrid, poke bowls combine great flavours and textures, from black rice to pickled vegetables. SAINTLY SPIRIT If you do insist on going teetotal for January, try Seedlip, the world’s first non-alcoholic spirit. Our favourite iss Original Spice 94 – a blend of cardamom, oak k and citrus. It makes being the designated d driver a little bit more attractive. er WATERMELON WATER Move over w coconut water. Beyoncé is all over this new H20, and where she goes, Instagram follows.

quintessentially Cornish gin, Tarquin’s. Each bottle has its own batch number handwritten in fountain pen. Something to savour by the fire.

CYNAR This artichoke-based bittersweet spirit is enriched by an infusion of 13 herbs and plants – a refreshing alternative to all those sweet festive

cocktails. Enjoy with soda on the rocks for a truly sophisticated tipple.

STELLACELLO A personal favourite of ours, this liqueur is made just down the road d from us in east London. Inspired by Italian recipes, you might say this is a modern grapefruit twist on traditional limoncello. Ideal as an aperitivo.

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Lifestyle envy...

@ Al i c e L e v i n e @ I a mL a u r a Ja ck s on

with Alice Levine & Laura Jackso Jackson

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@ C L E A N _ E AT I N G _ A L I C E

BODY SHOTS 2017’s health-hack books in one sentence

@TH E FOODE FFECTDR

FOOD

THE ACID WATC H E R D I E T

@SG_NUTRITION

@AMAN DANOU R ISH

eat for breakfast

Kick-start your day like a health pro (even if you end it with wine) Maria Mekhael Breakfast: ‘I love a breakfast I can prepare the night before. I often make “overnight oats” by layering oats, unsweetened Greek yogurt, mixed berries, some flaked almonds and a sprinkling of sunflower seeds in a bowl like a parfait and then leaving it in the fridge overnight so the oats absorb the yogurt.’ Why: ‘The yogurt provides protein and probiotics, the oats give a healthy dose of complex carbohydrates and fibre, plus you have some antioxidants from the berries and a sprinkle of essential fats thanks to the nuts and seeds. Making sure you eat some protein, fat and fibre with your carbohydrates helps balance blood sugar and regulate your insulin levels, preventing a mid-morning energy crash.’ Thediettherapist.com

Alice Liveing Breakfast: ‘Eggs on rye bread with greens, such as spinach or courgette, on the side.’ Why: ‘Eggs are a rich source of protein and essential nutrients such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, selenium and choline, while rye bread is great for slowrelease energy, as well as having a high fibre content. The added greens make sure I’m getting a hit of micronutrients to start the day.’@clean_eating _alice

Amanda Hamilton Breakfast: ‘A smoothie made with baby spinach, almond milk, a chunk of banana, some kind of boost from powdered greens and a drizzle of maple syrup.’ Why: ‘I love the kick that comes from the green veggies while bananas are a great probiotic to help nourish the gut. If I get hungry around 11am I’ll have slow-release oatcakes with a protein topping such as nut butter.’ @amandanourish

Sandra Greenbank Breakfast: ‘Protein pancakes made with bananas, eggs and coconut flour topped with blueberries and Greek yogurt.’ Why: ‘I like to make sure my breakfast is high in fats and protein but low in carbohydrates.’ @sg _nutrition

Dr Michelle Braude Breakfast: ‘A hearty bowl of porridge with fresh or frozen blueberries, a dollop of peanut butter, a sprinkling of cinnamon and a drizzle of agave syrup for sweetness.’ Why: ‘This combination is bursting with nutrients and provides a balance of complex carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats, as well as plenty of vitamins and minerals.’ @thefoodeffectdr

by Faj ah L ourens (£ 16.99, Yel l ow Ki te) I n a nutshel l : Pr o t ein- base d meals and wor ko ut t ips fr o m a Dut ch healt h gur u.

by B ee Wi l son (12.99, 4th Estate) . In a nutshell: To be healthier, we need t o r et hink t he eat ing habits we picked up at birth.

by Terence Keal ey (£ 12.99, 4th Estate) I n a nutshel l : This biochemis t believes skipping br eakfast co uld be bet t er for yo u. (See left if yo u don’t agr ee).

TWEATS: THE HEALTHY FOOD YOU’D HAPPILY NEVER SEE AGAIN? WE ASKED, YOU ANSWERED...

35% Kale 2 7% Quinoa

24% Chia anything 14% Cacao

WORDS BY LUCY PAVIA, HOLLIE BROTHERTON

@TH E_DI ET_TH E RAPIST

FIRST BITE: HOW W E L E A R N TO E AT

What nutritionists

TH E KI LLE R BODY PLAN

by Dr Jonathan Avi v (£ 12.99, Hay House) I n a nutshel l : A diet based ar o und eat ing low- acid fo o ds fo r a healt hier body.

BREAKFAST IS A DANGEROUS MEAL

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Table lamp, £7 9 , Heal’s

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COMPILED BY CAROLINE GARLAND

Pendant , £ 75, Habit at

S o ft past els r ocked t he S S17 r unways. B r ing t he lo o k ho me wit h a linen updat e

F loo r lamp, £ 469, Amar a

Sam Hood Fo under o f Amar a ‘Layering lighting will make your space bright and welcoming.’

The pro hacks For all your home needs…

NEW-SEASON REFRESH Prepare for spring with pretty pastels, beautiful blooms and lots of light

Niki Brantmark Myscandinavian home.co m ‘You can also use t he foliage found on your doo r st ep t o br ing nat ur e indo o r s. It’s amazing how calm a few plants can make you feel!’

Ta k en fro m Mo der n P a s t o ra l by Niki Br a n tm a rk (£19.99, R yl a n d Peter s & S m a l l )

Fo r a q u ick fl o w er f ix , c u sh i o ns ha v e y o u co v er ed

Thro w, £ 1 2 9, He a l’s

Anu u Tammiste

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A chinoiserie wallpaper is a timeless style choice

Take n fr om In The Moo d Fo or Col o ur by Hans Blo m q u istt (£ 19.99, R yland Peterr s & Small). Ph o to g r ap h y by H ans B lom q u ist an d D ebi Tr ello arr

C us h Cu Cus hio io o n, n, £ 72 72, 2 , Hea He e a l’s l ’ss Hot wat er bo t t le, £ 49, Amar a

Foun der d of Dec r dot s.co m Deco ‘Keep p some of your throw ows and winter textile e es out for cool spring g evenings.’

Cushion, £ 27, Oliver B o nas

Make a flor al wall hanging wit h fabr ic and M D F

R ug, fr o m £ 35, Ver y


Shore THING Give your space a fresh-over with a classic coastal look. Bright and energising, it will blow those winter blues away

Side plates, £3 each, mug, £3.50, platter, £10, milk bottle, £6, runner, £12, and stripe throw, £18, all Sainsbury’s


Promotional Feature At this time of year we all yearn for long, light-filled days. Waiting for them isn’t easy, but you can bring sunshine into your life with a living space that’s fresh and fabulous. Cue the Shore homeware collection from Sainsbury’s. With its chic edit of contemporary, coastal-inspired pieces, it will transport you to sunnier climes. Think sand-toned ceramics, sea-inspired motifs, nautical stripes and glittering glassware – all of which help to create a laid-back look that’s pure bliss and the perfect antidote to the cold and grey outside. Happy days.

Side plate, £3, nibble bowls, £2.50 each, and stripe hi-ball glasses, £1.50 each, all Sainsbury’s

The new Shore homeware collection is available at selected Sainsbury’s stores from 1 January 2017. To see more of the new collections and to find your nearest store, visit sainsburyshome.co.uk


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It’s all about

The spice rack Fire up your look in mustard, paprika and turmeric tones – hot stuff 01 Sandals, £430, Tod’s 02 Dress, £295, Joseph; earrings, £55, The Branch; bag, £780, Isa Arfen 03 Bag, £460, Longchamp 04 Sunglasses, from £280, Chanel 05 Coat, £999, Isa Arfen; shirt, £275, Palmer//harding; trousers, £500, Aalto; earrings, £80, Kate Spade New York; bag, £1,025, Pierre Hardy 06 Dress, £926, Tibi; bag, £1,497, Givenchy; earring, £155, Elizabeth And James 07 Dress, £1,200, Creatures of the Wind; bag, £1,675, Loewe

HAIR BY TERRI CAPON AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING ORIBE. MAKE-UP BY AFTON RADOJICIC AT STELLA CREATIVE ARTISTS USING CHANEL COCO CODE AND BLUE SERUM. MODEL: HAZEL GRAYE AT MILK MANAGEMENT

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Photographs by ISAAC MARLEY MORGAN

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Marie Claire - Feb 2017 UK