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27

CONTENTS

february 2017

p136. THE FIVE-

62

SECOND LIFE HACK that’ll make you stress less, sleep better and think smarter

p148. the best

p62. workwear fashion special

natural beauty buys right now

Forget boring office clothing. We show you how you can mix business and pleasure (and still score that promotion).

It’s time to take a chill pill (literally).

54

Introducing the hardworking beauty products that prove going green doesn’t mean sacrificing results.

GWYNETH PALTROW The actress, mother and lifestyle guru chats to ELLE about finally being comfortable in her own skin.

162

ROMANTIC GETAWAYS

6

FOR NON-ROMANTIC TYPES We discover the coolest, chicest, most adventure-packed destinations for couples who prefer their holidays to be full of fun (rather than long walks on the beach).

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Xavi Gordo CREATIVE AND FASHION DIRECTOR Inmaculada Jimenez EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Laura Somoza STYLING ASSISTANT Daniela Gutierrez HAIR George Northwood MAKEUP Emma Lovell at The Wall Group MANICURE Lucero Hurtado for OPI GWYNETH PALTROW WEARS: jumper, $6,620, Brunello Cucinelli, brunellocucinelli.com; necklace, rings, all from a selection at Tous, tous.com


p42. give it some skin

You’ve seen it on wine lists, but what exactly is orange wine?

27

------

p80. we waste up to

$8 billion worth of food every year

128

Here’s how to stop it. -----p82. short fiction

By Roxane Gay.

45

FIRST LOOK p27. meet the

office rebel

p45. on the map

She’s kicking goals and kicking butt... and doing it with style.

Chanel scientists travelled the globe to develop their must-have new serum.

------

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p29. in the bag

Colourful totes to brighten up your workday.

p46. the beauty edit

We try out tropical nail colours and the ultimate makeup-skincare hybrid.

-----p130. singing the

red carpet blues

How social media changed celebrity style forever. ------

FASHION

91

Hit all the white notes, live la dolce vita in a fresh take on suiting and master the mix with this season’s deconstructed pieces.

29

-----p30. the real deal

LPA founder/all-round cool girl Lara Pia Arrobio gives life and style advice. ------

p33. all grown up

Much-loved Aussie label Mad Cortes is back – with a sexy new twist. ------

p37. on my shelf

Designer and icon Vivienne Westwood reveals the books that have changed her life.

-----p48. for love or money

Why following your dreams may not be your best career move. -----p50. happily

ever after

Inside the rise of divorce coaching. -----p52. collective thought

After an era of scones and tea, women’s clubs have a new purpose.

BEAUTY

p135. fuel gauge

Pre-, mid- and postworkout essentials to boost your fitness game. -----p139. my weekend

in products

Jodhi Meares is a big believer that beauty starts on the inside.

Heading to Laneway Festival? Don’t miss these acts. ------

p40. performance

review

Marina Abramović reflects on a life of often-controversial, always-thoughtprovoking art. ------

How to get the most feminine, flirty lashes (with no falsies in sight). ------

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p38. line ’em up

p142. wink, wink

LIFESTYLE ------

FEATURES p74. take it easy

-----p140. tête-à-tête

Casualwear is infiltrating workwear, so how do we dress for off-duty?

Aussie actress Phoebe Tonkin reveals her secrets to looking good.

-----p76. love in translation

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------

140

Language is no barrier in matters of the heart.

p156. full bloom

This florist’s home is a lesson in prettyyet-practical. -----p169. privacy notice

and more…

142


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weren’t clever enough to give it a name like “conscious uncoupling” (we just called it “trying to not be assholes”). Goop’s city guides are my first port of call when I travel  anywhere, Gwyneth’s turkey meatballs are a regular on my dining table and, you know what, I think I’d actually really like to try steaming my vagina; it sounds... soothing. Also, if Jay Z was my friend, damn right I’d name-drop him all the time. I don’t care that she occasionally seems out of touch and unrelatable, as she’s so often accused of. Why do we need our celebrities to be relatable anyway? I want them  to be eccentric and larger than life, otherwise they’re just your next-door neighbours with a private jet (annoying). Asking Gwyneth to be more in touch with the average human experience is asking her to be someone else completely – she’s the multimillionaire, Oscar-winningactress daughter of famous parents who was once engaged  to  Brad  Pitt, whose ex-husband is the lead singer of Coldplay, and who invented the lifestyle site that turned the entire world on to kale. She’s not average. And we don’t need her to be – we need her to be all those things and have access to all the crazy new stuff we’re  curious to know about but don’t have access to ourselves. We need her to make one movie a year that pays her so well that the rest of the time she can hang around at home finding new things to do with sauerkraut. I love her for that, and for putting herself out there. I love her  for being generous and not keeping all those experts and weird ideas and knowledge to herself, and for persisting with something she’s passionate about even when it made people not like her. In short, I love Gwyneth. I think she’d make a great girlfriend. I’m  so  thrilled  that  it  finally  feels  like  the  time  for  Goop-bashing is over (see our cover story on p54), but it doesn’t sound like GP ever cared anyway. And that’s exactly the kind of woman we love.

Enjoy the issue, TALK TO ME… @justine_cullen

14

ELLE AUSTRALIA

justinecullen

elleaustralia@bauer-media.com.au

Photography: David McKelvey. Hair and makeup: Jasmin Lo

Once upon a time, it was extremely popular to hate on Gwyneth Paltrow, or more specifically,  to hate on Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle site Goop. If we’re being honest, it was low-hanging fruit. A sometimes unintentionally comical site devoted to quasi food science and expensive unnecessaries for privileged blondes, its seeming total lack of self-awareness pretty  much  begged  to  be  parodied. As  for  Gwyneth  herself, they hated her for being too earnest and trying too  hard.  (Anne  Hathaway  suffers  from  the  same  apparently unforgivable sins.) They hated her for being rich and living among the trappings of that wealth, even though Kim Kardashian has made an entire career  based  off  exactly  the  same  thing  and  no-one  accuses her of being elitist. At one point, Gwyneth was even credited with being the world’s most hated celebrity, beating the evil triumvirate of Bieber, Trump and Chris Brown to the top spot. All that vitriol because of an e-newsletter filled with activated-almond  recipes and cashmere crew-necks... Can we really be that strongly attached to gluten? Personally, I’ve always loved Gwyneth and Goop – although I didn’t always love what I suspected that said about me. When the media lambasted GP for those so easily mockable quotes, I felt like I could hear the tone in which she meant them and I’m fairly sure she might actually be really funny IRL. I speak like that, too. I mean, I don’t think I’ve ever said I’d rather die than feed my children Cup-A-Soup, but it sounds like something I might say to make my point in the moment. I  definitely  declare that “I can’t live without” things way more random than Vegenaise all the time – I’m just lucky no-one reports and repeats my flippant comments to the point where they become part of my personal canon the way they do with GP. When the father of my two eldest children and I broke up, we tried hard to remain friends and in each other’s lives, too, we just


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STYLE

THIS MONTH

LOTTA VOLKOVA

SHOP

Sunglasses, $420 each, Dion Lee, dionlee.com

DION LEE EYEWEAR

We knew designer Dion Lee had incredible vision but now it’s possible for the rest of us to see the world through his eyes, or at least his new eyewear collection, Dion Lee [EYES]. Since relocating to New York last year, his eponymous label is garnering everincreasing attention, so a line of slick sunglasses was the natural next step from his architectural jackets and fierce frocks. Virtually frameless, reflective and done in cutting-edge colours, they’re the all-yearround shades you didn’t know you needed. The first capsule collection, as seen on the SS17 runway at NYFW, hits stores this month.

S

tylist, collaborator, runway model, sometimes fit-model, brains, muse: Lotta Volkova is all this and more to designer of the moment Demna Gvasalia. She’s the woman who makes the man behind the Vetements collective (and now Balenciaga) look good, real good. With her sharp bob, unique beauty and unconventional style, you could say the Vladivostok-born creative is the embodiment of where fashion is at right now. And the very definition of cool. She takes her coffee black, cultivates a killer vocal fry and wears her oversized hoodies like they were made for her, most probably because they were. THE FACTS

» Named after “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin. » Lived through the fall of the Soviet Union. » Studied art and photography at London institution Central Saint Martins. » Met Gvasalia while out clubbing. Where else? » Pulls off a thigh-high boot to perfection. » Has a brilliantly twisted Instagram account – @lottavolkova. Worth a follow.

STREET Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans; Getty Images

CUFF LOVE

While you’ll be tempted to shout, “Look, Mum, no hands,” the thought of the lecture you would get from the same mother who insisted on turning your school jumper sleeves back twice will probably stop you in your tracks. Irresponsible? Yes. Likelihood of soup stains? High. But the cool cred of the exaggerated shirt cuff cancels out all, especially when teamed with denim.

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

17


MAINTENANCE 92

MODEL CITIZEN Lameka Fox Her work has her travelling the globe, but it’s at home in

@lamekafox

New York where this model finds all her favourite things

BORN: Washington, DC. LIVES: New York. BACKGROUND: Irish/Italian/AfricanAmerican/Native American. CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Walking the 2016 Victoria’s Secret show. SEE HER: Making a fresh start in creamy classics on p92. Dress, $629, Rebecca Vallance, rebeccavallance.com

OUT & ABOUT

RESTAURANT: Carbone – the spicy rigatoni vodka is amazing. CHEAP EAT: Shake Shack, Five Guys and Udon West. CULTURE STOP: Whitney Museum of American Art, or the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. Bag, $2,940, Chanel, 1300 242 635

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

HAIRDRESSER: Kuki Alrawi at Amoy Couture Hair. MAKEUP MVP: Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector in Opal. SKIN SAVIOUR: Colbert MD Illumino Face Oil. SCENT: Tom Ford Tobacco Vanille. FACIALIST: I had a facial with Mzia Shiman for the Victoria’s Secret show and I definitely think it will become a regular part of my routine! NAILS: Paintbox in SoHo. SPA: I love Aire Ancient Baths.

WARDROBE

JEANS: Rag & Bone skinnies. SHOES: Gucci loafers. BAG: My Chanel bag is tried and true. SUNGLASSES: I love Chanel, but Dior has outdone itself lately. JEWELLERY: Are You Am I has cute, simple pieces. STORE: Barneys is always my go-to! BOUTIQUE: Oak, Opening Ceremony and Tokyo Joe. DATE-NIGHT OUTFIT: A good minidress and some thigh-high boots, topped off with my leather jacket. VINTAGE STORE: Beacon’s Closet, No Relation Vintage and Urban Jungle. WISH LIST: Louis Vuitton Corcovado Flat Derby boots. LUGGAGE: Goyard for timeless pieces. DESIGNER: DKNY.

CULTURE & TECH

APP: Long live my 2048 game obsession – it’s impossible to beat. WEBSITE: Man Repeller, Into The Gloss and Coveteur. INSTAGRAM: @humansofny. ALBUM: The Weeknd’s Starboy. ALL-TIME GREAT: Grace by Jeff Buckley is a masterpiece. BOOK: The Sellout by Paul Beatty. ARTIST: Damien Hirst. Tobacco Vanille, $325 for 50ml, Tom Ford, 1800 061 326

Illumino Face Oil, $204, Colbert MD, mecca.com.au

Our February contributors

SHARE THEIR VALENTINE’S DAY DOS AND DON’TS STEFANIA PAPARELLI, PHOTOGRAPHER (SEE “THE ITALIAN JOB” ON P104) DO feel free to take matters into

your own hands and make a booking at a romantic restaurant where he’s never taken you. It’s 2017 – you’ve got this! Wear a killer outfit, grab a cab, meet your love there. DON’T forget to give him the right address, unless you prefer to go home alone with Thai takeaway. MEG MASON, WRITER (SEE “FOR LOVE OR MONEY” ON P48) DO retire the “Oh,

of course I don’t want anything, it’s just a silly commercial invention” routine if you absolutely do expect professions of love in the form of flowers/diamonds/ skywriting. Those poor boys still fall for it. DON’T inadvertently wear red to the office. In my case, a tomato-red blouson, which seemed to advertise a desire for workplace romance. Never mind that I was completely oblivious to the date. And married. RACHEL WAYMAN, ELLE’S FASHION DIRECTOR DO feel free to spend the night on the couch and disregard the day altogether. There’s the rest of the year for loved-up date nights and much more spontaneous outings. It’s just a day, right?! DON’T propose on Valentine’s Day. If you were planning to – sorry, but could you be any more clichéd?

Compiled by: Amber Elias; Jennifer Kang. Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group; Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Instagram: @lamekafox. Styling: Sara Smith. Hair: Adam Markarian. Makeup: Sam Addington at Kramer + Kramer. Model: Lameka Fox at IMG

Sunglasses, $830, Christian Dior, (02) 9540 0500


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LESSONS IN LIFE, HAPPINESS & WITTY INSTA CAPTIONS FROM EVERYONE’S IMAGINARY BFF

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WHY IT MIGHT BE TIME TO LEAN OUT

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Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

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AGENDA

GLOBAL Women throughout the world are at the forefront of preventing

and adapting to climate change, proving to be some of the key movers and shakers in the fight against global warming

A

IMPACT

ccording to 97 per cent of climate scientists, humans are to blame for recent global warming. And while it’s an issue that affects all of us, it’s women, particularly those who live in lowand middle-income countries, who are more vulnerable to climate change. So acting together to improve the future of millions of women around the world just makes sense, right? Negotiated in 2015, the UN’s groundbreaking Paris Agreement on climate change saw 195 countries pledge to keep global warming well below a 2�C increase. Now female powerhouses from around the world are getting behind Women4Climate, a project launched by C40 Cities chair and mayor of Paris Anne Hidalgo aimed at galvanising greater support for female climate leaders and empowering new generations of women in the fight against climate change. Here, ELLE talks to five visionary women about inspiring projects happening in our own backyard.

“Women are more vulnerable to climate change”

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

“So many environmental drains are invisible to us” JESS SCULLY

creative industries advocate, public art curator and City of Sydney councillor Recently, the City of Sydney backed a trial run by Closed Loop Environmental Solutions that tackled the impact of Australia’s coffee cup addiction on landfill. Bins for takeaway coffee cups were placed in three office buildings in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, with more than 4,000 cups collected in one month in just one office alone, making a strong case for a dedicated takeaway coffee cup recycling facility. When you start doing the maths on how many coffees you drink a day and a week, you start to realise that, actually, it is a monumental problem. All those discarded cups can have massive environmental impact with the average cup taking 50 years to decompose. So many of the things that are huge environmental drains are actually invisible to us. But the solution isn’t always about creating another product – sometimes the solution is a service. That’s what is clever about this pilot program. It’s not about designing another keep cup – as much as that’s helpful – it’s about having a system in place that takes into account how people actually behave. Not robots, but real people. Most of us do grab a coffee on the run and, like everyone, I’ve stood confused at the recycling bin,


wondering whether my cup can actually be thrown in since the thin plastic film inside stops them from going into paper recycling. A more nuanced approach to recycling makes sense; it can work in a different way, and the outcomes are really extraordinary. With all the work I’ve ever done, my big-picture goal is always about changing the economy. At the moment, Australia’s economy is based to a large extent on things we pull out of the ground, the non-renewable resources that we mine and export as raw material, but thankfully it’s shifting to a knowledge economy. Rethinking waste is all part of the move away from an extraction economy to one that’s about inventing better ways of living and exporting those ideas to the world. Whether we’re exporting film, creative talent, fashion or the design of a new system, that to me is Australia’s future. It’s a sustainable long-term vision.

NATALIE ISAACS

founder of 1 Million Women, an Australian-based, global-reaching movement of women and girls acting on climate change I used to be a cosmetics manufacturer – my life was all about over-packaging. I wasn’t engaged in climate change at all. Sure, I’d talk about the issues around the dinner table, and then carry on with business as usual. But then I had this epiphany. I realised climate change was actually all about me and my family and my friends, so I decided to do something about it. The first thing I did was get our home electricity bills down by 20 per cent. That was the defining moment for me. I sold my cosmetics company and started 1 Million Women in 2009 because I knew there must be a million women like me out there who are disengaged, for whatever reason. Women have extraordinary power to transform society in the way they live. In Australia, we make 85 per cent of the consumer decisions that affect the household’s carbon footprint – we can influence through every dollar we spend and every choice we make. We’ve been focused on this from day one and the organisation numbers half a million women now. We’re about

engaging women and girls who live privileged lives by global standards to act on climate change. The world needs a lifestyle revolution. It’s easy to sign a petition or march on the streets, which we have to do, but we can’t do that on the one hand, then live our lives with overconsumption on the other. It’s about bite-sized changes: check household energy, buy quality not quantity, cut your meat consumption by half. If a million of us did it, imagine the result. Wherever you are on your journey, whether you just want to get started or you’re way down the track, what’s important is that you act.

CAROLINE VU

chief impact officer at Impact Investment Group, Australia’s first funds management certified as a B Corporation (which recognises corporations that use the power of business for social and environmental good) Impact investments are investments that are made with the intention of generating financial return alongside social and/or environmental impact. There are two key parts: the duality of return (making money but also making a positive social and environmental impact) and the intention. It’s the next step in the evolution of ethical or socially responsible investment (a practice that developed around three decades ago by screening out things like tobacco and weapons), which is not just about pinpointing things you don’t want your money invested in, but also thinking about what world we want to create, what world we want our children to inherit, and proactively seeking to create that through our investments. The first step is to do a health check on where your money is actually invested – where is your superannuation? For most people in Australia, the biggest single investment they have is probably their super. None of us see it as particularly exciting, that is, until you frame it in terms of what that big pool of money is actually contributing to, or detracting from, in this world. Future Super, a super fund and one of our investors, is Australia’s ]

“We must think about what world we want to create”

“It’s about bite-sized changes”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

21


first super fund to be 100 per cent fossil-fuel free. Other examples of like-minded super funds include Australian Ethical and Local Government Super. When you start thinking about what your money is actually doing there are some fairly straight-forward and easy things to do to start transitioning your money. Everybody has a vision of the world they want to see and work towards. The empowering thing is: you can do good and you can do well.

“Renewable energy is cheaper and has more benefits for the planet”

Building renewable energy will be cheaper and have significantly more health benefits for the planet than coal or gas. It just makes sense. We’ve just seen the worst bleaching event that we’ve ever had on the Great Barrier Reef. There’s only been three on record and all three have happened in the past two decades. The latest saw 22 per cent of coral cover dying. And it’s all happened with the earth warming 1˚C above pre-industrial levels – we can only imagine what another half or one degree will do to places like the GBR, let alone other parts of nature, as well as hotter days, more floods, more fires that will have significant impacts on the community. It’s everybody’s issue.

KELLIE CAUGHT

national manager of climate change policy at WWF-Australia Nature is a critical part of our economy, our food, our health, our leisure and, ultimately, our survival, and I’m passionate about protecting it for future generations. It’s criminal that we wouldn’t do that. I have a daughter who has just turned eight. Recently, she said to me, “Why did you born me into this world where there are so many bad things?” I told her I think we have the solutions to these problems and that she can be part of that solution. I said, “One day you could grow up to be a scientist or an innovator, or even a politician who drives the change, or you can do what Mummy does and go out there to influence those decision-makers.” We engage primarily with federal government but increasingly with state government to implement ambitious and science-based policies to transition our economy to zero carbon pollution by 2050. That goal means that, in the interim, we have to set targets to make sure we’re on track. We already have the technology to shift our electricity sector from coal to 100 per cent renewable by 2035. We’ve got wind, we’ve got solar – Australia has, per capita, the most number of PV solar power systems on houses in the world – we now just need governments to set the framework to help investors build more wind and solar farms.

DEBORAH DAVIDSON

co-founder of dsquared Consulting, an award-winning, environmentally sustainable design consultancy Traditionally designed buildings tend to use a lot of energy and, as a result, have high running costs. They can be okay places to work or to live in, but they’re not necessarily very healthy or good for the environment. We ask people to stop and have a look at things more from an environmental perspective and what’s most beneficial from a health and wellbeing point of view as well. Often when you look at lowerenergy buildings, they have more access to daylight, natural ventilation and fresh air so they’re actually nicer places to live and work, as well as being more energy efficient. Buildings account for one-third of greenhouse gas emissions globally. But by making small changes to the way a building is designed, we can bring energy consumption and emissions down by about half. It’s welldocumented that people are more productive, happier and healthier in sustainable buildings. It’s about the triple bottom line: sustainable design is good for the environment, saves money in the longterm and, on the social side, is better for the occupants. A lot of cities and communities around Australia are committing to becoming carbon neutral and I think that’s something all buildings and organisations should be working towards. That way we’re minimising our footprint on the environment for future generations. q

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Compiled by: Genevra Leek

“People are more productive in sustainable buildings”


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ELLE YOUR

FIRST LOOK

ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO EVERYTHING WORTH KNOWING IN STYLE,

CULTURE AND BEYOND

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Sonny Vandevelde

AMAZING GRACE

If ever there was a case for the coming together of old-school elegance and a modern attitude, it was laid down at Christian Dior. The set: a grand British country home. The clothes: proper rebel spirit. There were skirts over pants and skirts over skirts, puffed sleeves, clashing fabrics, chunky gilded heels, bold jewels and a line-up of bags so delectably practical it would have been easy to snatch their artfully folded straps straight from the models’ hands, if it hadn’t been the unladylike thing to do. There were lessons to be learned from the collection that blended classic tradition with cool kickassness. Mind your manners, yes. Hold your tongue? Never. q


Watch, $7,500, Tiffany & Co, tiffany.com.au

TREND HERMÈS

Heels, $1,700, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

MARNI

MEET THE OFFICE REBEL

We also know you’re probably not considering running for next President of the United States (unless, Michelle, you’re reading this). And we’re not suggesting you invest in a wardrobe of colourcoded pants suits either (though there are some very slick options She’s the one kicking goals, taking on p62). But you may well be charge and making herself heard in the running for president of your company (or partner, or programmer, or maybe you’re eyeing he’s also every woman who off that plum EA role) and there’s one ever realised that keeping her surefire, immediate, universal way to head down, working hard let people know what you, a woman and playing by the rules excelling in her field with everything to wasn’t necessarily going to offer, are all about: style, with a twist. nab her the corner office, a seat at Letting your personality show in the the boardroom table or access to the way you dress is no longer a workplace OneWorld first lounge. Getting ahead no-no. And while corporate dress in the workplace means getting noticed, codes may differ from the guidelines for the right reasons. And while smarts (or lack of them) laid down in more will get you so far, schmick personal creative industries, the same styling style will always help you seal the deal. tricks apply, irrespective of profession: Yes, we know. The argument goes introduce an injection of your favourite that appearances shouldn’t matter. But hue to neutrals via a polished skirt and did Hillary Clinton snag the popular leave them in no doubt you’re vote to be leader of the free world (although, sadly, not the presidency) a confident leader; opt for a statement in drab, uninspiring threads? N-O. She bag that says you’re an ideas person; wore colour. She wore pants suits. introduce a ruffle or a floral that makes it clear you view your femininity as She wore tailoring so impeccable her one of your most powerful assets. The worthiness for the job seemed to be message: be true to yourself, be stitched into the very lining of her comfortable in your abilities, then jacket. Think of it like the formatting whip out that presentation and show on a pivotal PowerPoint presentation them who’s boss. q – you may have come up with the answer to world peace somewhere Bag, $4,010, Prada, between slide four and slide nine, but (02) 9223 1688 without a dynamic font and the appropriate highlighting, the shared plate of Arnott’s Assorted Creams will likely be getting all the attention.

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans; Sonny Vandevelde. Styling: Emma Kalfus

S

Dress, $950, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au

Sunglasses, $199, Pacifico Optical, pacificooptical.com

Heels, $230, Ziera, zierashoes.com

Top, $139, Marcs, marcs.com.au

Skirt, $395, Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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THE PIECE

IN THE BAG

Can a carryall help you stop dreading Mondays? Totes!

F

Bag, $4,370, Prada, (02) 9223 1688

irst, pick a bright base – your favourite colour from your childhood works well. Next, choose a distractingly playful detail (try knots, embossment, pleating or studs). Finally, ensure it’s big enough to carry stuff, because no-one has time to worry about downsizing on a Monday morning. Our favourites? The four investment bags on this page, which are so cheerful, they’ll brighten the prospect of a Sad Desk Salad any day of the week – and for years to come. q

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Pete Daly. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano

Bag, $2,550, Acne Studios, acnestudios.com

Bag, $1,450, Salvatore Ferragamo, ferragamo.com

Bag, $2,215, Tod’s, (02) 8203 0901

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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FASHION FILE

Dress, $720, LPA, lpathelabel.com

It’s a clothing collection that hopefully makes women feel cool, confident and sexy.

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

invaluable piece of clothing A leather jacket I’ve been breaking in since 2005 – I bought it when I was 18 and had just moved to New York.

your style as a movie title Home Alone 3.

label you wished you owned the most of Philosophy Di Lorenzo Serafini.

latest purchase

THE TASTING KITCHEN

Jumper, $320, LPA, revolveclothing. com.au

Thigh-high patent leather boots from Valentino. I pair them with one of my LPA sweaters to play down their intensity.

Coconut oil for everything.

NYC versus LA style

ELLE AUSTRALIA

last thing you did on your phone

In New York, it’s impossible not to be inspired. People are a bit more put-together because you never know where the day is going to take you. In LA, I’m in my car a lot, so generally I wear Outdoor Voices workout gear to the office.

I texted my mother saying, “PAY ATTENTION TO ME.”

Jacket, $1,808, LPA, revolveclothing. com.au

date horror

The dude saw me walk into the restaurant and got up and left before I sat down.

last thing you watched

advice to your teenage self

The Leonardo DiCaprio documentary Before The Flood, based on the world basically ending.

Everything is the best and don’t get tattoos.

instant mood boost

favourite scent

A delicious meal with my friends at Sunset Tower Hotel or The Tasting Kitchen in LA, or Lucien in New York. Or funny animal compilations on YouTube.

Anything gardenia.

Gardenia Rattan, $175 for 50ml, Aerin, esteelauder.com.au

decor MVP

A beautiful mid-century dresser that’s travelled with me for years. I bought it at Billy’s – an institution in New York that’s now closed.

Leotard, $131, APC X Outdoor Voices, matchesfashion.com

@piaarrobio

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beauty must-have

favourite spot at home

There’s nothing better than sitting in front of the fireplace.

high-rotation song

Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams”.

Compiled by: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans; Instagram: @piaarrobio

LPA defined

When ex-Reformation designer Lara Pia Arrobio launched LPA last year, cool girls around the world flocked to the edgy label – Erin Wasson, Emily Ratajkowski and Lena Dunham included. But they don’t come cooler than Arrobio herself

WITH EMILY RATAJKOWSKI

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI

THE REAL DEAL


©2016 COACH®


E L L e | EVENT

For more information, visit VAMFF.COM.AU Tickets* on sale now TICKETEK.COM.AU/ VAMFF *Includes gift bag valued at over $100

PREMIUM RUNWAY 2 9pm, Wednesday March 15 Royal Exhibition Building Presented by ELLE Australia and Supported by Priceline Pharmacy

YOU ARE INVITED... To join ELLE Australia for their edit of the season’s best trends at the 2017 Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival. Witness the nation’s leading designers – including Morrison, LIFEwithBIRD, alice McCall, Michael Lo Sordo, Bec and Bridge, Kaliver and Acler – on the Festival’s world class runway.


NEED TO KNOW Top, $680, Mad Cortes, madcortes.com

At least as humble as French lace, soft silks and couture-like detail can be. There’s a fresh new energy to her innovatively shaped dresses, draped blouses and sweet shorts done in a simple palette of black and white, blush and pale, pale blue. Vukovic describes Mad Cortes 2.0 as a bit more mature; effortless with a “beautiful edge”. And, in good news for irreverent women everywhere, there’s a cool, empowered kind of sexiness coming through, too. “That’s the one thing I gained. When I was younger, I had a better body but I was all covered up. I wish I had worn more open clothes back then! Now, when I’m designing my dresses, I actually think about the person who likes to show off a little skin. I’m making up for This season sees the much-anticipated what I didn’t do before.” return of a much-loved Australian Focusing on quality over quantity is Vukovic’s icon – and a sartorial coming-of-age modus operandi – keeping things exclusive, unique and true to her newly honed vision. “I was women can get behind a little afraid of the reaction I was going to get but ention the words Mad Cortes to any it’s been really good so far,” she says. “You put style insider or Australian fashion buff your heart and soul out there and I knew it was and inevitably you’ll be met with good, but I was a little worried people would a warm recollection of the playfully judge it against what it used to be. But then, times frilled tops and just-this-side-of-edgy have changed, labels have changed.” Most significantly, the designer’s outlook has dresses that influenced a certain way of dressing changed, in part thanks to the eye-opening here in the ’00s. Until 2008, when the GFC axe fell experience gained working for and financial backing was unceremoniously other fashion companies in withdrawn from the Sydney-based brand, “Vukovic describes it was an important player on the fashion- Mad Cortes 2.0 as the interim. “I did my own week schedule, and the label’s feminine, a bit more mature; label straight after college forward-thinking designs still hang, treasured, and I don’t know if it was brave effortless with in wardrobes and the National Gallery of or stupid. But it kind of needed to Victoria alike. So imagine our reaction a ‘beautiful edge’. happen. I always had in the back of when we discovered designer and founder, And, in good news for my mind that I wanted to do it Sarajevo-born Mira Vukovic, was reviving her irreverent women again, it just needed to be the right label for 2017. Pleased as punch. And that was time. It needed to feel right.” q everywhere, there’s before we saw the new collection. While Vukovic has close to a thousand of a cool, empowered FRESH START Mad Cortes her original designs carefully folded and kind of sexiness is bringing vacuum-packed away in her inner-city home, coming through” sexy back, with she’s not once looked back at her former work an elegant edge in the development of her new 20-piece collection. “I hope moths haven’t eat them,” she laughs. “I don’t know why I’m still holding onto them. I guess I’m hoping my girls [twin Shorts, $440, Mad Cortes, madcortes.com daughters Lola and Milla] will wear them one day. But, it’s a new era. This collection is called Chapter 1, which is kind of like a new beginning. It’s really just a humble, ‘Hey’.”

ALL GROWN UP

Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

M

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33


← “Picnic-table gingham feels fresh in the form of an oversized shirt (with a blown-out buckle, cuffs and collar). Balance the volume with streamlined trousers or jeans.”

FOR THE FRILL OF IT ↑ “The generous cut of this high-neck, balloon-sleeve blouse says super-luxe, so it’s a thrill to know it’s from a chain store – H&M to be exact.”

← “The perfect mix of pretty, cool and flattering, an exaggerated ruffle skirt is the staple you never knew you needed. Pair with a crisp shirt for work and a coloured tee for play.”

Ruffles, volume and colour-clashing: these are your new neutrals. ELLE market editor Claudia Jukic picks out the looks that have us committed to the “go big or go home” cause

→ “How Shorter Girls Can Wear Volume, Exhibit A: a cropped style and cinchedin waist keeps you looking longline and ladylike.”

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

↑ “Layer floral prints like you would black or white and you’ll discover a whole new lease on your wardrobe’s life.”

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

→ “Embroidered slippers are hot property this season (see here and far right). Play up the boudoir vibes by pairing with pyjama pants.”


STREET STYLE

← “A dreamy frilled gown (or any ‘special piece’ in your wardrobe) can be dressed down with a bustier and a DGAF spirit.”

→ “A band tee looks so chic when worn with paper bag-waist trousers in a contrasting colour. Just keep the hair rock’n’roll cool.” ↑ “Tucked into highwaisted pants, this is the freshest way to wear a boxy floral shirt.”

← “The designers behind Italian label Attico, Giorgia Tordini and Gilda Ambrosio, embody how we want to dress right now: maxed-out sleeves, clever panelling and a subtle hint of the ’80s (we see you, stirrup pants).”

→ “Ground florals and frills with classic black accessories. JJ Martin (of online vintage store LaDoubleJ) is an absolute pro.” q ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Photography: Getty Images; Jason Lloyd-Evans. PEN E-PL8 Camera, $899, Olympus, camerahouse.com.au

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READ STONER

ON MY SHELF

Fashion designer and environmentalist Vivienne Westwood shares the books that have shaped her life

THE GRAPES OF WRATH by John Steinbeck

This beautiful and monumental book follows the people who were ruined by the Dust Bowl – a period of severe drought and dust storms in the US during the ’30s. Steinbeck travelled and lived with the migrants and wrote the novel within six months. It tells you so much about the US at that time, the suffering of the people and how they were exploited. I love the characters. The protagonist Tom Joad is a real hero: he’s willing to sacrifice everything for the people because he sees how they’re being treated and he believes in democracy. The lesson I take from it is the potential to grow with your experience, to be open to it and up for it, and to stick your neck out.

THE DEVILS OF LOUDUN Words: Bibby Sowray; Samantha Wong. Photography: Getty Images

by Aldous Huxley

To me, Huxley is the greatest English writer of the 20th century. I would never have become the person I am or have the mind that I have, had I not read his work. This is a riveting account of politics in 17th-century France – anybody who wants to know what Europe is about should read it. You have to be a fit reader but don’t let that put you off. Often when I’m reading I don’t quite absorb the message, but I carry on and try to work it out.

by John Williams

This book was written in the ’60s but unexpectedly became a bestseller in 2013. Some people say it’s sad the protagonist, a farm boy who goes on to have an undistinguished career as a teacher, doesn’t recognise his full potential, but he does because he was true to himself throughout his life. It’s the most amazing account of a human being and I’ve never seen such a testimony to the genius of the human race. It’s incredibly profound.

THE STORY OF THE STONE by Cao Xueqin

This was my most important reading experience. It’s as if I’ve lived two lives – my own and those of the characters. It’s one of China’s Four Great Classical Novels and was written in the 18th century. It charts the decline of an illustrious Chinese Buddhist family. At the centre is Jia Baoyu, who was born with a magical jade in his mouth, but it also contains probably the most romantic heroine of all time, his love interest Lin Daiyu. The things they say to each other and the things they do!

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Book of the Month

The Girl Before by JP Delaney ($32.99, Quercus) A story of one man’s obsession gone awry, the book delivers twist after twist, telling the tales of two women in tandem and how their lives become chillingly entwined after moving into One Folgate Street. Following the hype of other psychological thrillers like Gone Girl, The Girl Before stands over and above the crowd as Delaney breathes new life into the genre and proves that, sometimes, the pursuit of perfection should be a path less taken.

by Mikhail Bulgakov

This is the last full book I read. It has a Faustian theme to it, which I enjoyed because I want to rework Faust to explain climate change – how Mephistopheles, the fabled Faustian demon, would be in the media – so at the moment my reading is focused on that. It’s about a time in Russia when people disappeared without a reason and nobody asked where they went. It’s also about magic and the devil; it’s stunning but hilarious as well. q

This is our latest instalment of the ELLE Book Club, a place where each month we recommend one brilliant read we know you will love and want to talk about endlessly. Get involved by liking our Facebook page, @elleaus, or visit ELLE.com.au/ bookclub

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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LISTEN

LINE ’EM UP

How to not waste a single second at this year’s

Laneway Festival

Your cut-out-and-keep guide to the artists not to miss

FLOATING POINTS CLAMS CASINO SAMPA THE GREAT JULIA JACKLIN NAO WHITNEY

Dreamy vocals, synths and super-tight drummachine beats. Think the ’80s, without the high hair and fluoro windbreakers. Lush, layered electronic music you can stroke your hair – and equally, jam out – to. Like being in a fever dream. When the sound is on, everything is really slow, echoey, dare we say a little scary. But when it’s over, you just want to go back. Inconceivably smooth flows over warm, dusty samples. And Australian to boot. Indie-meets-country music from this unavoidably likeable Sydney artist. You won’t be able to wipe the smile off your face when you hear her blend of folk tunes. Try not to bounce off your fellow mosh-pit attendees while listening to this catchy, beatific East London lyricist. It’s impossible. Sweet lofty vocals, washed-out guitars, trumpets and arm-in-arm melodies... Their sound is very New-Age-big-band-playing-in-your-living-room.

ROLAND TINGS

It’s like tropical house that evolved into something way more fun, unique and dance-inducing.

TASH SULTANA

An incredible multi-instrumentalist whose industry status went mainstream in 2016; undoubtedly the best one-woman show in town.

THE IMPORTANT BITS: Brisbane – January 26 Sydney – February 4

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

Melbourne – January 28 Perth – February 5

Adelaide – February 3 lanewayfestival.com

TWO MINUTES WITH JESS KENT, LANEWAY ARTIST AND THE BRAINS BEHIND 2016’S CATCHIEST TRACK “GET DOWN” Who do you cite as musical inspiration? The Police, MIA, Jamie T, The Beautiful Girls. How do you know when you have a hit song on your hands? Usually if I’m still singing a new song I’ve written the next morning after sleeping on it, then it’s catchy. And I know when I’ve articulated what I want to communicate because I get little butterflies hearing a song back. What’s the weirdest thing about filming a music video? Performing to a camera as if you’re playing to a crowd of people. What was the first thing you said when you found out Coldplay wanted you to support their ANZ tour last year? “OMG.” I was pretty speechless… What was the most fun show you played in 2016? When we played with Coldplay in Brisbane to 45,000 or more people. It was the first time I ran down the thrust [the runway down the middle]. That was amazing. What’s on the agenda for 2017? I’m already getting into new music. I’ll be travelling a lot playing shows and spending a few months in LA.

Words: Laura Collins. Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

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ARTS

PERFORMANCE REVIEW Marina Abramović is the “grandmother

of performance art”, who has given audiences permission to kill her, made strangers cry and faced criticism that her work is sadism, not artistry. Now, at 70, the Serbian artist refuses to be silenced

M

y tolerance of pain is much greater than normal people’s. Some ask how I can keep doing this work, how am I able to push myself so much. I think it’s my background: if I look at my DNA, it’s the strangest combination. I have a very religious grandmother, then two communist national heroes as a mother and father. So within me there is the incredible strictness of my mother, the courage of my father and the fanaticism of my grandmother. When I have an idea, I will do it, no matter what. Even when my body is falling apart. In my performances, I want to experience fear, danger, pain. In “Rhythm 0” in 1974, I gave permission to the public to do whatever they wanted to me [Abramović stood still for six hours in an art gallery as an audience chose from 72 props to use on her]. This included killing me – there was a gun that had a bullet. It was a radical decision. One man moved the pistol towards my neck and touched the trigger. There was a murmur in the crowd, and someone grabbed the guy. A scuffle broke out. I knew after this performance I was lucky to be alive. But I never wanted to kill myself – I love life too much. There’s an old theory that the more miserable the childhood, the better artist you become, and mine has been a difficult life. I was born in 1946, and it was very

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gloomy living in [President Josip Broz] Tito’s Yugoslavia. Communism is a great theory, but it doesn’t work in practice. Partisans who supported Tito had better apartments and lived in better conditions. It created the red bourgeoisie, and my parents were certainly part of it. Everyone envied me because I had all the comforts that other kids couldn’t have. I was lonely because my parents were career-focused, and their relationship was fraught. Rather than loved, I felt abandoned. But it was also my parents who made me strong. In World War II, my father was shot in the arm during the fight for the liberation of [Yugoslavia’s capital] Belgrade; he took a knife and removed the bullet there and then. When my mother had me in hospital, [the nurses] said, “Start screaming – the baby’s going to come.” “Nobody will ever hear me scream,” she replied. There was an emphasis on courage and not being afraid of failure. If I fail, I fail, but I just stand up and go on again. For me, every performance is the conquering of another fear, going forwards. If I give everything, then the critics can’t do anything to me. I always wanted to be an artist; I could not do anything else. I started painting very early as a child. I believed in invisible beings and I saw spirits that other people couldn’t see. To the horror of my parents, I would draw


As told to: Holly Williams. Photography: Getty Images

everywhere, on every surface. My first exhibition, really see the connection and they support my work, when I was 14, was of paintings of my dreams. I went which is phenomenal for me. to an academy in Belgrade to study and won a prize. The Artist Is Present, my show at New York’s Museum I started thinking about how to include the body, and of Modern Art (MoMA) in 2010, would not have materials like fire, water and ice. You spend all those worked at all 10 years ago [Abramović sat for six years learning, but then you have to spend years days a week, seven hours a day, in MoMA’s atrium forgetting and finding your own way. I didn’t escape where visitors were invited to sit on a chair opposite Belgrade until I was 29. I went to Amsterdam, which her]. It worked when it did because we are now so lost was completely free and crazy in the ’70s. When I was in technology. People text each other, they don’t talk – living with my parents in Yugoslavia, I had to be home it’s a sad period for humanity. The work was so simple: by 10pm because my mother was so strict. When I got you’re waiting for hours, and then you come and sit in to Amsterdam, I could walk naked in the streets if front of me, and I look at you. You have nowhere to go, I wanted to. It was an interesting transition of the so you have to go into yourself. That moment of here and now, peace and connection – that is what I provided. spirit, but I had to create rules so that I could It was so hard for me to do that for three months. function. Otherwise, I’d have been lost. There was so much pain and loneliness in my life at that I was sent an invitation in Amsterdam to do a TV time, and people saw that because I was vulnerable. But program on body art. After filming, I said I’d like to being vulnerable meant other people could be open – buy everyone a drink because the invitation to be in I could see their pain. I got emotional responses. Yes, I can the show had arrived on my birthday. A German make people cry! But there was also love. Even now, performance artist, a man called Ulay [Frank Uwe Laysiepen], stood up and said, “It arrived on my on the street, people will stop me and say, “I love you.” birthday, too – November 30.” It was the start of a long I often ask myself whether what I do is art. Whatever it love story. We lived in a van for five years and travelled is, I know that emotional connection is important around Europe, which was pretty rough. We had because today, everything is unemotional, everything nothing: I wore wooden shoes and I knitted my own is in the brain. I want you to get it in the stomach. pullovers. But it was an important few years; how do I was never interested in feminism; I was just doing you deal with the ego of two artists? It was not his my thing. But the negative reaction towards my success work or my work, but our work. is probably because I’m female. I’m not allowed to be For nine years, it was incredibly beautiful. And then successful, wear fashion, have a nice place – men can, the relationship started falling apart. We were going to but a woman is not allowed. No-one ever questioned walk the Great Wall of China – the concept was that that Jeff Koons has a Picasso in his bedroom. I’m only we’d meet in the middle. But it was hell; it took eight facing this reaction now because, before, I never had years before China gave us permission to do it. We were any money. Before, there was a problem about my at the end of our relationship already, so we decided work – now, my whole lifestyle is a problem. that instead of walking the wall and getting married, If I was successful when I was 20, I’d have overdosed, we’d walk and say goodbye. When we said goodbye fucked up and died. But it came so gradually that [after 90 days of solo walking] I knew he’d already had nothing changed in me. You just meet these people, like an affair with a Chinese translator who was pregnant James Franco and Lady Gaga, at restaurants or galas; with his child. It was just a little extra pain. it’s not like you’re trying to meet them. If they like the It’s very amusing to look at what the critics work, they come to talk to me, and we become friends or we don’t become friends. wrote about my work in the ’70s, especially Turning 70, you really put all the about the difficult performances that “In my performances, memories in the past. It’s like a new are now iconic pieces: “This is not art, this is ridiculous, this is I want to experience fear, danger, beginning. And you have very sadism.” They didn’t realise the little time to make sense of your pain. In 1974, I gave permission depths of the performance. It life. You don’t have time for to the public to do whatever they wasn’t easy – 55 years is a long bullshit anymore. In my life, time to believe that you are I am always looking beyond, wanted to me. This included killing right when everyone is against wanting to see every single me. One man moved a pistol you. It’s only during the past culture on this planet, travelling and experimenting and learning. 10 years that things became towards my neck and touched And I’m still learning. q different. My generation is the trigger. A scuffle broke out. bitchy, jealous and constantly Walk Through Walls: A Memoir by Marina criticising, but young people Abramovi ć ($49.99, Fig Tree) is out now I knew after this performance

I was lucky to be alive” ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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DRINK

GIVE IT SOME SKIN It’s one of the fastestgrowing categories on your local’s expertly curated wine list, so let’s get you up to speed on orange wine WHAT EXACTLY IS “ORANGE WINE”? First, let’s clear

a few things up. It’s not produced in Orange, NSW. It’s not made from the fruit of the same name (though that kind of orange wine does exist; it’s popular in Spain). And it’s not white or red wine that’s been infused with orange peels. Orange, in this instance, refers to the colour of the wine; the same way that rosé is often dubbed “the pink wine”. HOW IS IT MADE? In the simplest terms, red wine’s grapes are fermented with skins on

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and rosé is made from red-wine grapes with brief contact from the skins but otherwise processed skin-off. White wine is fermented without the grape skins, and orange wine is made from white grapes, but fermented with their skins on for a period of time, as little as a few hours or as long as a few months. The orange or amber tinge of the wine comes from the presence of grape skins during the fermentation process. HOW DO YOU DRINK IT? Orange wine makes a great aperitif alongside cheese, but is equally suited to meat and vegetable dishes, or spicy food. Even better, it can be drunk both chilled or at room temperature, making it a solid contender for your new go-to tipple year-round. WHY IS IT SO HARD TO FIND? “Many wine lists will group orange wines together in a separate category or differentiate them from the classic white wines,” says Kylie Javier Ashton, wine consultant for Sydney bar This Must Be The Place. “It can be more difficult when it comes to buying orange wines in a bottle shop and often not as common to find them.” Josephine Perry, 2016 Young Gun Of Wine award-winner and winemaker at Margaret River’s Dormilona, adds, “Legally, producers aren’t allowed to directly label a wine as being an ‘orange’ one unless the fruit itself is sourced from [the area of] Orange. So many producers are naming their wines something a little offbeat and wacky... we named our orange wine ‘Skinnie’.” In both cases, it’s probably easiest to ask the staff to point you in the right direction. IF IT’S SO HARD TO FIND, WHY IS IT A “THING”? “Over the past 10 years, there has been a growing interest and demand for these wines,” says Javier Ashton. “Some people say that orange wines are a fad that has been brought around by trendsetting sommeliers, because of their novelty rather than their quality,” adds Perry. “However, orange wines have a long history in winemaking dating back thousands of years to the Eurasian wine-producing countries Armenia and Georgia.” The wines made traditionally in Georgia are intense and tannic, resulting in a dark orange hue, but other popular regions include northern Italy, Slovenia and France. q

Words: Laura Collins. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

This one’s Skinny Flat White by Eden Road Wines ($30, edenroadwines.com.au), but we like drnks.com, too, an online store specialising in sustainable, organic and biodynamic wines.


E L L e | A DV E R TO R I A L

NATURAL BEAUTY Pucker up for mega moisture, all-day comfort, intense colour pay-off, on-trend shades and 100 per cent natural ingredients, thanks to Burt’s Bees Lipstick

MODERN GOTHIC Add some drama to your nine-to-five face with a slick of deep berry. HOW TO: Apply Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Brimming Berry over your lips. Next, add re. a layer of Russet River just in the centre. ne The warmer shade adds a flattering tone g to the purple hue, while the moisturising formula ensures they feel comfortable all day. Brushed-up brows, a light wash off Burt’s Bees Gloss Lip Crayon in Bordeaux Vines and copper shadow focused all the way around the eye give the look a fresh edge. Define using a chocolate eye pencil and finish with black mascara. Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Russet River and Brimming Berry, $19.95 each. Burt’s Bees Gloss Lip Crayon in Bordeaux Vines, $16.95.

THINK PINK The prettiest of all colours shouldn’t only be used on the lips. Extend the shade to your eyes and cheeks for your most feminine face. HOW TO: Scribble a little Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Magenta Rush onto the pad of your finger – this will keep the edges soft as you apply it to your lips. A pink lipstick can also do double-duty on cheeks – try applying Iced Iris where you usually would a highlighter, then intensify with Fuchsia Flood. For lids, create a creamy base with Burt’s Bees Lip Crayon in Carolina Coast, then layer on more Magenta Rush. Finish with a deep pink eyeliner on the lash line.

burtsbees.com.au

Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Magenta Rush, $19.95.

Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Iced Iris, $19.95.

Burt’s Bees Lipstick in Fuchsia Flood, $19.95.

Burt’s Bees Lip Crayon in Carolina Coast, $16.95.


BEAUTY

ON THE MAP Chanel journeys to the globe’s most exclusive spots for its latest skincare innovation

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole. Photography: Pete Daly

W

e’re guessing it wasn’t a hard sell convincing Chanel’s skincare scientists to attend the ingredient-sourcing trip for the brand’s new offering, Blue Serum. In fact, the destinations read like the ultimate holiday bucket list, where locations aren’t filled with tourists, but rather the world’s happiest, healthiest people. “Chanel research was intrigued by the existence of hotspots across the world called ‘blue zones’,” explains Armelle Souraud, Chanel’s international scientific communications director. “They are characterised by a remarkable ecosystem and a high concentration of healthy centenarians.” There are four main zones, and it was three of these spots that became the sources for the hero ingredients in this latest suits-everyone serum. The lightweight formula contains green coffee from Costa Rica’s Nicoya Peninsula

Blue Serum, $155, Chanel, 1300 242 635

(“selected because it is particularly rich in anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties,” says Souraud), olive oil full of essential fatty acids and antioxidants from Italy’s picturesque island of Sardinia, and lentisk (a plant in the pistachio family) from Ikaria in Greece, which contains oleanolic acid to help restore skin’s reparative abilities. It’s a unique blend that works to optimise skin cell energy, so you can look like a happy-go-lucky Sardinian, even from 15,000km away. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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BEAUTY

THE BEAUTY EDIT New buys tried, tested and approved by the ELLE beauty team

SPICE MARKET

NO MOZZIE S P R AY R E Q U I R E D

The latest shadow quads from Dior are inspired by the colours found in a setting sun  and a blue lagoon – perfect for when you want to feel zen and nature-y but not deal with, you know, actual nature.

If intense incense fragrances give you Bikram PTSD, consider instead this smoky and spicy yet surprisingly soft blend of lavender, myrrh and tonka bean.

Myrrh & Tonka Cologne Intense, $255 for 100ml, Jo Malone, jomalone.com.au

MIST CALL

A soothing, hydrating face mist that also doubles as a foolproof gradual tanner? Someone hand us a Noble Prize application, stat.

LOVE CONNECTION

If you’re still mourning the loss of Brangelina, rejoice in this fateful match: Chanel’s luxe Sublimage skincare and dewy, radiant coverage, now together in one lovely foundation formula. Sublimage Le Teint, $180, Chanel, 1300 242 635

H₂O Tan Mist, $38,  James Read, mecca.com.au

Colour Gradation eyeshadow palettes in (from top)  Blue Gradation and Coral Gradation, $105 each, Dior, (02) 9295 9022

ONE AND DONE

Daily Superfoliant, $85, Dermalogica, dermalogica.com.au

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Time In A Bottle, $99,  Philosophy, 1800 812 663

ON ISLAND TIME

High-gloss meets tropical punch in OPI’s new Fijiinspired collection. Grass skirt optional (but encouraged). 

Infinite Shine in (from top)  Living On The Bula-Vard, Super Trop-i-cal-i-fiji-istic,  No Tan Lines, Coconuts Over OPI and Suzi Without A Paddle, $22.95 each,  OPI, 1800 812 663

DON’T SHED A TEAR

Besides being an all-over makeupremoving hero, this oil blend is ophthalmologisttested, which means you can literally rub it alllll over your eyes (adios mascara!)  without looking like you just survived another viewing of The Notebook. Midnight Recovery Botanical Cleansing Oil, $48, Kiehl’s, kiehls.com.au

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

G R E Y M AT T E R

This finely ground  mix of activated charcoal, rice bran and exfoliating enzymes absorbs pollution and other nasty gunk (technical term) for  smoother, clearer skin in seconds.

For an all-round complexion boost, apply this potent new serum and then go do literally anything else (watch TV, knit,  learn French). The  clever vitamin C formulation smooths, brightens and prevents future damage in a single go.


E L L e | A DV E R TO R I A L

RADIANCE AWAITS Stop – and reverse – the early signs of ageing with easy, effective products from Olay’s Total Effects range The first signs of ageing can pop up in your early twenties as skin begins to dull and fine lines start to appear. In fact, there are seven signs of ageing including enlarged pores, dark spots, sagging, uneven skin texture and tones – but you

FRESH START One product with seven cleansing benefits, this foaming wash removes impurities, leaving skin feeling balanced and refreshed. Olay Total Effects Foaming Cleanser. RRP: $13.99, 100g

COMPLEXION PERFECTION Cover imperfections with this lightly tinted BB crème that’s packed with anti-ageing ingredients and skin-saving SPF. Olay Total Effects Touch of Foundation BB Crème SPF 15. RRP: $32.99, 50g

don’t need that many products to have an effective skincare routine. The Olay Total Effects range is packed with ingredients that are hardworking and multi-tasking (just like you), targeting the seven signs with these simple steps.

MORNING ESSENTIAL Layer on each AM to protect against future damage while simultaneously treating the seven ageing concerns. Available in four formulas. Olay Total Effects Day Cream – Available in Normal, Normal UV, Gentle, Gentle UV. RRP: $32.99, 50g

“It’s really important that I feel confident and comfortable in my own skin. Since using the Total Effects range my skin is brighter and definitely more hydrated” JESINTA FRANKLIN, OLAY BRAND AMBASSADOR


FOR LOVE OR MONEY We’re told to follow our dreams, pursue our passion, do what we love. But when did “live to work” replace “work to live”?

I

n her last term of high school, the girl who would later become my mother was called in by the careers counsellor. “Right,” he said, “do you want to be a nurse or a teacher?” “Well, I don’t like blood,” my mother replied, after a minute’s thought, “so teacher?” What she didn’t say, or even think to say, is, “I want a job that pays me as much coin as possible so I can be financially secure for the rest of my life.” It was 1970, the option did not exist.

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CAREER It’s now almost 50 years later. Career choices for women are unlimited. Independence and financial success are ours for the taking. So why is it that many – arguably most – young women still do not choose a job based purely on bank? If there’s a single, pervasive idea underpinning the way we think about work, it’s this: our career – rather, our dream job – must be driven by passion. It must excite us creatively and fulfil us entirely. Above all, we must do what we love. But it’s a myth every bit as limiting, and on the same locked course for frustration, as Teacher vs Nurse. “The concept of ‘do something you’re passionate about and you’ll never work a day in your life’ is really a fallacy,” says career coach Lauren Maxwell. “But I can’t tell you the number of women I work with who say, ‘I write, I paint, it’s my passion and I want to do it as a job.’” However, are they to blame when the highly visual, celebrityled culture we marinate in supports the idea so entirely? Our Instagram feed is awash with photographers on location, designers in studio, dancers at the barre. Influential lifestyle sites such as Goop and The Glow glorify, to the point of fetish, women who flicked the grind and turned their love of cold-pressed juice into an empire. The columnist Caitlin Moran, writing after Hillary Clinton’s defeat in the US presidential election, drew attention to the way romantic comedies still inform our subconscious idea of “women’s work”, as wary as we are of the form. Wedding planners, kooky dogwalkers and confessional magazine columnists populate the screen because, in Hollywood still, “women should not have jobs involving hard slogs, difficult decisions... diplomatic speech, power, or proper, steely heartbreak,” Moran wrote. “Women should not have ugly jobs... their jobs are, essentially, sexy, self-fulfilment hobbies.” And that is the word: hobbies – which, by definition, do not pay the kind of wage that provides financial security, enables property ownership or a fiscal safety net to

mitigate against the prospect of divorce or time away having children. “We have to start thinking about our dream job in the context of our whole life,” warns Natasha Janssens, founder of financial advisory Women With Cents. “We’re bombarded daily with this idea of living the dream, but first we have to ask, ‘Is that actually my dream or someone else’s?’ And then think, ‘Can I actually afford it?’” Because rarely, we should realise, is an Insta-friendly career in artisanal kombucha not bank-rolled by a well-off partner or parents. But we’ve no means to check their privilege, as it were, before launching into our own small-batch baby food or street-style photography. Or before we feel vastly inadequate by the day job we can’t afford to quit. Consider also that the definition of a dream job will evolve significantly as the years go by. Being a freelance fashion stylist in your twenties – schlepping suitcases of product across sand at 6am and living at home to fund it – may no longer resemble a passion once you hit your thirties, when an event like motherhood makes security or paid leave suddenly become the dream. “Most women will face these challenges down the track,” Janssens says. “Values will change. So while there may be a time and place for pursuing a passion, being too naive and romantic early on is not serving us.” Even in certain quarters of the life-coaching industry, emphasis for women is put upon “soft values” rather than pragmatic ones. While men, more openly and acceptably, give primacy to status, money and power, women are conditioned to think almost exclusively in terms of personal fulfilment. “When I ask most women what their values are, they’ll list abstract things like honesty or trust, because they don’t actually know,” says career coach Suzanne Williams of Grace & Grind. Think harder and be mindful of your behaviour, and your real values may turn out to be paying bills or a short commute. ]

Words: Meg Mason. Photography: David Burton

“The concept of ‘do something you’re passionate about and you’ll never work a day in your life’ is a fallacy”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Still, the idea that our work must be “meaningful” and contribute to a good greater than merely paying our own gas bill is almost never questioned, in a society where the nine-to-five is linked intrinsically to identity. “When I meet people in non-work situations... [I] try to see how long I can talk to them without asking about their work or have them ask me about my work,” said Miya Tokumitsu, author of Do What You Love: And Other Lies About Success And Happiness – and one of the first people to call into question the concept of working for passion and not cold hard cash. “It’s actually really hard to last longer than four minutes.” In a 2014 thinkpiece for Jacobin (which has subsequently gone viral), Tokumitsu also argued that following your dream “is now the unofficial work mantra for our time”, even though its likely pay-off is personal dissatisfaction and a broader devaluation of actual work – real jobs, boring jobs, even well-paid grown-up jobs. Even if they’re the jobs that would provide women with more plentiful opportunities later on, and put them in a position where they would be able to pursue a dream from a place of financial security. And even if, in the short term, these jobs mean our creative outlet could stay exactly that. “Are we really so sure that the best thing to do with passion is attempt to monetise it, anyway?” writer Catherine Baab-Muguira asked in her essay on the topic for business news website Quartz. “Why not side hustle for love, and keep the filthy hands of commerce off our art or beloved hobby?” And why not make some proper money on the way through since, as Caitlin Moran pointed out, eventually we must all wake up and think, “Right, it’s [2017], and this isn’t a princess movie.”

“Being a freelance stylist may no longer resemble a passion once you hit your thirties, when motherhood may make security become the dream”

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HAPPILY EVER AFTER We seek out wedding planners and relationship counsellors...

Now meet the divorce coach

N

o-one saw the Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt split coming. After 12 years spent building brand Brangelina, the jetsetting humanitarian couple and their burgeoning international family seemed rock-solid – a beaming example of a harmonious union of two Hollywood heavyweights who’d found the formula for lasting love. Yet just two years after making things official and tying the knot, one half of the dream couple was filing for divorce amid claims of cheating, unfit parenting and mid-air meltdowns. Divorce can happen to the best of us, and bring out the worst in us. It measures number two on a list of 43 stressful life events that can contribute to illness, according to the Holmes-Rahe stress scale – second only to the death of a spouse. The loss of a home, time with kids and a relationship with


Words: Genevra Leek. Photography: Chris Ferguson/bauersyndication.com.au

RELATIONSHIPS Holgate’s typical client is a corporate woman who is “emotionally and financially empowered” yet worried a divorce can devalue her achievements. It’s a valid concern, considering new research from NATSEM and AMP shows newly single women and mothers fare the worst after a divorce, with the average divorced woman’s assets valued at 90 per cent less than her married equivalent’s. “If you weren’t expecting it, you weren’t ever thinking you’d be single, or a single parent – it can really un-hinge. A lot of women say it’s like having a baby: one minute you control everything in your life, the next everything turns upside down.” Divorce coaching is largely unregulated (Holgate is a member of the International Coach Federation, the leading global organisation for coaches which has its own code of ethics), and the service is intended to complement the legal process. “I do not, and cannot, offer legal advice, but I can ask my clients if they’re happy with their lawyers. We’ll make a plan, run through finances – so it can start at a very simple place.” Essentially, it’s about decoding the process for which Holgate charges $200 per BE PREPARED session, including unlimited texting Working with a homeless and email. “A lot of it is about shelter for women 50 and boosting their confidence [so they above, Holgate knows the effects divorce can have later can] make the most rational in life and says there are a few decisions that are going to affect the person who’s supposed to things the 30-year-old you their and their children’s lives.” have always had your back can should know... In addition to a lifetime working be devastating, even when ✦ The financial discussion is in the financial markets, Holgate the decision is mutual. And on par with discussing children. brings her own personal experience while divorce rates in Australia ✦ Don’t leave financial decisions to your husband to the table. “I was living in Hong are on the decline, it’s a reality because he’s "good" with money. that about a third of our marriages Kong, in a corporate career which ✦ If you’re buying a home won’t last the distance. I had worked very hard to excel together, see your lawyer together to understand the At such an emotional time, it in. I was 29 when my marriage ins and outs of this asset. can be helpful to obtain objective imploded. Within 24 hours, I was ✦ Ensure you have a voice advice. That’s where divorce on a plane to my family in Australia. when discussing how and where you should invest your funds. coaches like Megan Holgate I lost my marriage, my friends and ✦ Be across all come in. She’s one of a growing my career as I was left literally insurance policies. number in the profession already holding the baby, our eight-week✦ If you don’t understand your share portfolio, start now. booming in the US and UK and old daughter. My career nose-dived ✦ Ensure your career goals now gaining traction here. She as my husband’s soared.” are made clear when says her role is to ensure people What Holgate is not, is a therapist you are engaged. navigate and emerge from – rather than focusing on relationship history, she helps divorce with the best chance people move through a divorce and move on. “The of a successful future. “Divorce can be an most important thing is to listen. These women, emotionally unstable experience, particularly and men, are in a lot of pain because divorce is when you have children and there’s a lot of money at stake,” says Holgate, who’s based in Byron Bay. a death of the most important relationship. In “A coach’s role can range from simply helping addition to grieving they could be financially in people stay sane, to helping them plan a future a bad place, the partner may have met someone they had wanted to move towards for years.” else, so it’s a world of pain. I like to help.” q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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COLLECTIVE THOUGHT

American female rights activist hen I was in More than 120 years after the opening Dr Emily Ryder, they quickly primary school, of Australia’s first women’s social club, mobilised social change of my parents Ellie Packer looks at the new international proportions. In couldn’t wait for generation of girls-only spaces 1902, Australia became the term holidays to first country in the world roll around. Not because it where women simultaneously meant they got to spend two won the right to vote in federal elections and to be weeks with their precious daughters, but because they elected to parliament. Twenty years later, the first got to make a mad dash to the Greyhound bus station chapters of the Country Women’s Association (CWA) and ply us with red sugared Clouds until the doors were founded. Run as not-for-profit organisations, they closed on our double-decker coach. Our destination were somewhere women could fundraise for various was Grandma’s house, in a tiny little town three hours causes, support local communities and, let’s not forget, from Adelaide called Mundulla. Two things were socialise. They were the kind of places my grandma certain when we stayed at Grandma’s: endless slices of (and yours) went with friends like Heather Wiese. Heather Wiese’s honey sponge roll, and endless visits President of the South Australian CWA, Linda to and from Grandma’s girlfriends (Heather included). Bertram, says that these days the group isn’t just for Whether they were sharing scones and tea, having grandmothers. “We’ve had a huge resurgence recently,” weekly dinners at the bowls club or catching up on she says. “A lot of evening branches have opened – local gossip as part of the Bordertown Lutheran Ladies, predominantly for younger members.” Take the Kyogle they were never far away. Evening branch in NSW, who decorated an old The story of my grandma and her gaggle of Commodore in doilies and crocheted flowers before Mundulla gals is an Australian country classic. The entering it in the local demolition derby. Bertram earliest record of Australian women formally coming together was in 1894, when women from Perth’s notes that younger women are not only joining to keep St George Reading Circle established Karrakatta, the the tradition alive, but also to address their own country’s first women’s club. Inspired by a visit from interests. Defying the conservative “scones and tea”

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ZEITGEIST stereotype, branches have voiced their support for both gay marriage and medical marijuana. It’s clear that something about these established ways of coming together for common causes is resonating with young women – there’s been a recent surge in independently formed women’s clubs, like Sydney’s The Ladies Network. Run by a group of five young women, it initially began as an exhibition aimed at showcasing the work of up-and-coming female artists. “The Sydney arts scene seemed quite clique-y,” says 23-year-old founder Lara Vrkic. “Art shows would always feature the same group of people... and often they would be big groups of guys.” In May 2015, she organised her first exhibition. “Some 800 people came to the tiny gallery it was held in. After the event I received so many emails from girls hoping there’d be another.” The Ladies Network has since expanded into a website with editorial content, an online store and, most recently, a creative agency. Of the agency’s motive, founding member Jess Mincher says, “We really want to create opportunities for women – creatives and otherwise – to collaborate with like-minded brands and help foster viable careers.” Adds her colleague Emmeline Peterson, “Sometimes occupying an online space can feel like an echo chamber – we want people to feel they can be a part of what we’re doing beyond liking a picture.” Aiming for their meet-ups to become more regular, they’ll soon head south with their first Melbourne exhibition. But that’s not to say physical spaces trump online ones. In fact, the latter are valuable resources for those unable to attend meetings in capital cities. The Facebook group Like Minded Bitches Drinking Wine, launched by tech entrepreneurs Gen George and Jane Lu, is a 24,000-strong closed group for “like-minded entrepreneurial chicks to share experiences, offer support and seek help for their growing business empires”. Live since October 2015, the group has been so successful that members have moved overseas to head up international chapters. “No matter where you are in the world, you’ll have a friend who’s going to help you genuinely – not thinking, ‘Okay, what can I get out of this?’” says George of the expansion. Be it an inner-city gallery, a country town hall or a not-so-secret Facebook group, the realisation that making lifelong female friendships doesn’t come as easy as it once did seems to be a major driver in the resurgence of women’s clubs and networks. Because if you work in a male-dominated field, are a freelancer or find yourself in an office that doesn’t value out-ofhours socialising, forming bonds beyond the banter

can be tough. It’s a point not lost on Ira Glass, everybody’s favourite storyteller and host of podcast This American Life. In “The Perils Of Intimacy”, an episode from last May, he opens with: “Okay, fellow adults... When did you last make a friend?... An actual friend who you see regularly, you talk about actual personal things? It’s hard, right – to make a new one?” In my own experience, yes. Two years ago I packed up my comfortable life in Sydney to move to Amsterdam. I’m successfully self-employed, but despite my new countrymen (and women) speaking English better than some Aussies I know, the language is a barrier for friendships especially. For all the good things moving to a new city offers, the biggest downside has been struggling to make friends. It seems like the answer to this collective problem lies in the notoriously clique-y city of New York, where a new women-only social club has been garnering serious attention. Founded by women for women, The Wing is an Acne-pink space that counts modern-day feminists Lena Dunham and Emily Weiss as starting members. Memberships cost $250 per month – or $2,600 annually – which not only grants you entry to the club’s plushly appointed interior (and bookcase lined with female-authored titles), but access to events including workshops and discussion panels. The equivalent to most high-end gym memberships, the initial expense quickly becomes an investment towards a healthy social life. While travelling to Manhattan for monthly meet-ups isn’t feasible for most, you’ll be glad to hear that a local incarnation is in the works. The Ladies Network is in talks with local council to bring Sydney its first permanent physical outpost, and Mincher is quick to note that the focus is on inclusivity. “We don’t want to exclude anyone,” she says. “Our ultimate goal for The Ladies Network is to create a safe and inclusive space for female-identifying people to feel supported and encouraged.” As well as support and encouragement, today’s all-girl groups are continuing the tradition of those from yesteryear: enabling women to find solidarity and address social issues – or just let off steam and drink together. Tea’s good, but wine works, too. q

Photography: Getty Images

“Women’s clubs are defying the conservative ‘scones and tea’ stereotype”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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woman

natural

AS ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST RECOGNISABLE ACTRESSES,

/ Photographs by Xavi Gordo Styling by Inmaculada Jimenez

GWYNETH PALTROW HAS

LIVED HER LIFE IN THE SPOTLIGHT. HAVING SPENT THE PAST DECADE THRIVING AS BOTH A MOTHER AND BUSINESSWOMAN, SHE PROVES THAT PERHAPS YOU

REALLY CAN HAVE IT ALL

Jacket, $POA, pants, $POA, both Boss, hugoboss.com; flats, $POA, Valentino, valentino. com; bangles, ring, all from a selection at Tous, tous.com


Coat, $4,425, shirt, $POA, both Stella McCartney, davidjones.com.au; earrings, ring, both from a selection at Tous, tous.com


At 44, Gwyneth Paltrow

has been in more than 40 films, across every genre – from the beloved Peter Pan live-action Hook and thrillers Seven and The Talented Mr Ripley, to Marvel blockbuster Iron Man and her Oscar-winning role as aspiring thespian Viola in Shakespeare In Love. She’s the mother of two tweens, Apple and Moses, with Coldplay frontman Chris Martin, and despite their “conscious uncoupling” in 2014, the pair still holiday together as a family. Then there’s Goop. In 2008, Paltrow founded the online lifestyle platform as a place where highly curated but still holistic style, food, beauty and wellness recommendations could be shared by her and a select group of alternative-health practitioners. Balancing her work and home lives with a wellness empire and a wardrobe full of cashmere, Paltrow is a thoroughly modern working mother. OUTWARDLY, YOU SEEM LIKE A VERY OPEN AND SPONTANEOUS PERSON. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR VIRTUES AND FLAWS? I have a lot of flaws. For instance, I’m trying to become a more patient person. I always want more because I’m always doing multiple things at the one time. It could be at home, work, my children. That’s my biggest flaw – impatience. I believe my biggest virtue is that I’m a good friend. My friends have told me I’m very supportive, that I’m always there when they need help. I’m always aware of them and I’m always there for them. WHAT IS YOUR SECRET TO AGEING GRACEFULLY? I love being 44! When I was 38 and 39, I used to panic about turning 40. I used to think, “My God! What is going to happen to me?!” But now I feel more comfortable, more relaxed; I’ve stopped worrying about what people think of me. I think turning 40 is such a gift. I believe women of this age have an in-built software that suddenly updates itself and you come into yourself in the most amazing way. You become more open and much more relaxed. I believe you should not focus on insignificant details. DO YOU REMEMBER THE FIRST TIME YOU WERE FEATURED IN AN ELLE MAGAZINE? Wow! That was a long time ago. I was about 20 years old. I consider myself very lucky for having been on an ELLE cover 20 years ago and to be able to be on the cover now in my forties. I respect magazines that bet on women of all ages. ]

“I THINK TURNING 40 IS SUCH A GIFT. I BELIEVE WOMEN OF THIS AGE HAVE AN IN-BUILT SOFTWARE THAT SUDDENLY UPDATES ITSELF AND YOU COME INTO YOURSELF IN THE MOST AMAZING WAY”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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Jumper, $6,620, Brunello Cucinelli, brunellocucinelli.com; pants, $369, Claudie Pierlot, davidjones.com.au; necklace, rings, all from a selection at Tous, tous.com

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ELLE AUSTRALIA


Dress, $POA, Valentino, valentino.com; choker, bracelets, all from a selection at Tous, tous.com


Shirt, $POA, Carolina Herrera, carolinaherrera.com; jeans, $110, Reiko, reikojeans.com; necklace, bracelet, both from a selection at Tous, tous.com Photography: Xavi Gordo. Creative and fashion director: Inmaculada Jimenez. Editor-in-chief: Laura Somoza. Styling assistant: Daniela Gutierrez. Hair: George Northwood. Makeup: Emma Lovell at The Wall Group. Manicure: Lucero Hurtado for OPI


IT’S ALL GOOD: a timeline of Goop moments SEPTEMBER

20 0 8

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN YOUR LIFE? My children – they’re everything to me. They’re the reason I wake up every morning. Being a mother is the most important thing I have done in my life. Motherhood has taught me mindfulness and, thanks to that, my heart is full. It’s something truly amazing. BEFORE OUR PHOTOSHOOT, YOU WERE TALKING TO THEM VIA FACETIME. IS THAT SOMETHING YOU ALWAYS DO WHEN YOU’RE AWAY? Yes. When I travel I make sure I call them every morning to chat with them just before the start of their day. THE THREE OF YOU ARE OFTEN SPOTTED AT COLDPLAY CONCERTS, AND CHRIS HAS SAID THAT SOME OF THE SONGS WERE WRITTEN FOR YOU, APPLE OR MOSES. DO YOU HAVE A  FAVOURITE SONG? All of them! Truth be told, we love Chris so much. His music is amazing. He is amazing; his actual tour is incredible. I love all his songs. I can’t think of a song I don’t like. The children love all his songs; they know all the lyrics by heart. They can’t stop singing at every concert. YOU’RE AN ACTRESS AND A MOTHER, AND YOU’RE ALSO A  BUSINESSWOMAN. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO CREATE GOOP? There was a stage in my life where I was living in London with my  family.  I  didn’t  want  to  stay  away  from  them  filming  on  set  or  travelling  all  the  time.  But  I  define  myself  as  a  very  creative and active person. So I decided that I wanted to do something as a lifestyle brand. I could not have anticipated what Goop would become; today I am responsible for 50 people working on the project. AND YOU COORDINATE EVERYTHING AT GOOP? Yes. I am the heart and soul of the platform. It’s very interesting as I am in charge of the website’s creative direction but I’m also in charge of the business side of Goop, which is a lot more complicated than the creative side. I love the learning process and to see that we keep growing as a lifestyle brand. I feel very fortunate that I am very passionate about it. YOU OFFER ALL TYPES OF ADVICE ON THE SITE. WHAT’S THE BEST ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED, THAT YOU RELY ON EVERY DAY? To always be yourself. I used to worry about other people’s opinions of me. I lost so much time because I didn’t always say what I wanted to say. That’s what women do. We don’t want to come across as strong or stubborn. We don’t want to hurt others. So the most valuable lesson I have learned is to be true to yourself. q

“MY CHILDREN ARE EVERYTHING TO ME. BEING A MOTHER IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING I HAVE DONE IN MY LIFE. MOTHERHOOD HAS TAUGHT ME MINDFULNESS”

The very first Goop newsletter hits inboxes, sent by Paltrow from her kitchen at home.

MAY

20 12

Comedy video site Funny Or Die parodies Paltrow cooking a frittata in the kitchen.

MA RC H

20 14

Paltrow announces via Goop that she and husband Chris Martin are “consciously uncoupling”.

JA N UA R Y

20 15

Paltrow posts a blog to Goop advising women to have their vaginas steam-cleaned. The advice is ill-received.

N OV EMBER

20 15

Goop Mrkt, a holiday-season physical pop-up store from Goop, opens in NYC.

MA RC H

20 16

Goop By Juice Beauty, an organic skincare collaboration with Juice Beauty, launches – it’s really good.

N OV EMBER

20 16

Goop’s first all-natural fragrance, Edition 01 – Winter 2016, launches as an eau de parfum and candle. It smells like “sensual quiet”.

A PR IL

20 11

Her first cookbook, My Father’s Daughter: Delicious, Easy Recipes Celebrating Family & Togetherness, is published. People don’t hate it.

A PR IL

20 13

Paltrow’s second cookbook, It’s All Good: Delicious, Easy Recipes That Will Make You Look Good And Feel Great, is published. One reviewer calls it “laughable Hollywood neuroticism”. On the upside, People names GP the “World’s Most Beautiful Woman”.

JULY

20 15

Discussing her upcoming Lenny newsletter, Lena Dunham says she and co-founder Jenni Konner “have always been obsessed with Goop”.

D EC EMBE R

20 15

The pop-up is robbed during Saturday trading. Thieves make off with US$173,000 worth of expertly curated goods.

SEPTEMBER

20 16

Goop Label, a clothing line designed under the watchful eye of Paltrow, launches. She’s also interviewed for Lenny, positing that the criticism of Goop stems from the fact she’s a woman, while male stars like Ashton Kutcher can expand their careers without being told to “stay in your own lane”. ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

WORK

A wardrobe tip for non-morning people

Sort your clothes by tones and that never-ending “What am I going to wear to work?” saga is solved simply by pairing items that are near each other. Want proof? Here are the best monochrome looks from resort 17...

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

NON-BORING BUYS THAT MEAN BUSINESS

COLOUR-CODE YOUR CLOSET

MAX MARA

Pastels are an entry-level palette for head-to-toe dressing.

Women in the corporate world often teeter between their Work Self and Real Self. The professional, can-do Work Self rules during office hours, with hints of Real Self only really emerging at Friday drinks or through tales from the weekend. But the truth is, you’d probably feel more comfortable and still get noticed by the higher powers if you let your weekend-freak flag fly in the office – if only just

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

BARBARA BUI

Blazer, $670, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377

a little. And a charismatic blazer is unquestionably your best place to start. This one is the perfect balance of bright colour (Real Self) and a polished shape (Work Self), while the on-trend double-breasted buttons will appeal to your fashionable self. It’s a blurring of boundaries that injects a bit of play into your every day – and there are plenty more balancing-act buys in the pages ahead.

A matching coat-and-dress combo is a sophisticated classic. NINA RICCI

A BLAZER THAT “WEEKEND YOU” WOULD APPROVE OF

White accessories freshen up a one-colour ensemble.

Don’t be afraid to mix textures and fabrics.


CRISP BLUE SHIRT

HOW TO MAKE YOUR WEEKEND STAPLES

=

+ SLEEK SKIRT Skirt, $449, Polo Ralph Lauren, ralphlauren.com.au

WERK FOR WORK 

SOPHISTICATED SLIDES

Slides, $1,300, Givenchy, (02) 8197 0420

Backpack, $1,575, Bally, 1800 781 851

Let’s start by declaring your wardrobe devoid of “special pieces” – because even a party dress is officeappropriate if styled cleverly. Think of these equations as your cost-per-wear saviours. ] Jacket, $215, COS, cosstores.com

Shirt, $259, Rebecca Vallance, rebeccavallance.com

YOUR SATURDAYMORNING BACKPACK

N˚21

Skirt, $260, By Johnny, byjohnny.com.au

MIDI PENCIL SKIRT

+

= MINI BUCKET BAG

YOUR SUNDAYARVO BOMBER CHIC POINTS Shoes, $159, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

YOUR SATURDAYNIGHT DRESS Dress, $595, Lover, (02) 9232 7289

Bag, $650, Simon Miller, mychameleon. com.au

Victoria Beckham

TOP-HANDLE BAG Bag, $89.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

+

=

HIGH-NECK TOP Blouse, $350, Lover, (02) 9232 7289

Brogues, $69.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

Calvin Klein Collection

SILVER LACE-UPS ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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THE BEST WATCHES FOR MID-MEETING TIME CHECKS

From left: trackpants, $329, Marc Cain, stylehq.com.au; trackpants, $360, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; trackpants, $119, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

TR ACKPANTS?

FOR WORK?

You better believe it. Although, if you can wear them to the gym, they don’t count. The focus here is on luxe-looking sidestriped trackpants – structured enough to pass as trousers, but relaxed enough to access the hard-to-reach photocopier paper with ease. If in doubt, keep things business- rather than fitness-oriented by throwing a crisp shirt and structured bag, or two, into the mix (see below).

MINIMAL YOU TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR FREAKISHLY NEAT DESK.

Why whip out your phone during an unnecessarily long meeting when a look at your watch says so much more? Here are our top five (and what they say about you)

Watch, $199, Timex, (02) 8543 4600

VINTAGE FEEL YOU KNOW AUTHENTICITY IS KEY. Watch, $1,120, Gucci, guccitimeless.com

ALL BLACK YOUR STYLE IS NO-FUSS. SMART WATCH YOU VALUE INNOVATION (AND STEP-TRACKING). Watch, $295, Fossil, fossil.com

Watch, $130, The Nomad, thenomadwatch.com

CLASSIC YOU GOT THIS. Watch, $9,800, Cartier, 1800 130 000

Backpack, $599, Karen Walker, karenwalker.com

Tote, $2,395, Balenciaga, misslouise.com.au

Bag, $170, Marcs, marcs.com.au

THE

Bag, $3,595, Burberry, au.burberry.com

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Tote, $89.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

DOUBLE-BAG CONUNDRUM

Yes, your mini-bag is cute and on-trend. No, it will not fit a laptop, notes for a 9am WIP and your leftovers for lunch. The solution? You’ll need to bring another carryall, be it a cross-body, backpack or tote. And please, avoid tattered cloth bags – your leftovers deserve better.

Bag, $2,762, Mark Cross, matchesfashion.com


Top, $185, Cue, cue.cc

THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

WORK

3 TRENDS TO TRY T

RE

ND:

SPO

R

TY

(that won’t draw a side-eye from the CEO)

Bag, $4,880, Fendi, fendi.com

Hint to your fitness obsession with drawstring details and speedy stripes.

Dress, $49.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

Skirt, $960, Sportmax, sportmax.com

Trainers, $665, Burberry, au.burberry.com

Belt, $299, IRO, (02) 9362 1165

Heels, $200, Trenery, trenery.com.au

R

EN

D:

Skirt, $450, Bassike, bassike.com

VOLU

T

M

Oversized blouses, pants and totes are chic. Worn altogether? Even better – just cinch your waist.

U INO S

Bag, $400, Tome X The Daily Edited, thedailyedited.com

Shirt, $399, Michael Lo Sordo, michaellosordo.com

Pants, $179, Mesop, mesop.com

Jacket, $820, pants, $695, both Bassike, bassike.com

RE

ND:

MAN

Mules, $399, Beau Coops, beaucoops.com

IS

T

N

Think structured suits, chunky flats and a tie borrowed from your boy. ]

H

Belt, $1,245, Hermès, (02) 9287 3200 Sandals, $89.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

Tie, $69, Jack London, jacklondon.com.au

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

65


SHOULDERS: WHILE THE SHOULDER SEAM TRADITIONALLY SHOULD MEET THE CURVE OF YOUR SHOULDER BONE, THIS SEASON’S RELAXED SHAPE HAS IT SITTING JUST A FEW CENTIMETRES DOWN THE UPPER ARM.

BUTTONS: COVERED BUTTONS ARE NEATER, BUT IF YOU CHOOSE TO EXPOSE YOURS, ENSURE THEY’RE MINIMAL AND TONAL.

PLACKET: THE SIGN OF A GOOD SHIRT IS THE NEATNESS OF THE PLACKET (THE LONG STRIP OF STITCHING AT THE OPENING OF YOUR SHIRT).

HEM: IT SHOULD HIT THE BASE OF THE ZIPPER ON YOUR TROUSERS OR JEANS FOR OPTIMAL TUCKING (OR HALF-TUCKING).

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

AN ODE TO THE

WHITE SHIRT It’s the universally adored work staple that is, at once, relaxed and refined. Let us dissect the perfect Great White (take notes)

COLLAR: BUTTONED UP, IT’S BEST TO ALLOW A TWOFINGER COLLARTUG. COLLAR TIPS SHOULD BE CRISP, NOT POINTY .

POCKETS: STICK TO ONE POCKET ON YOUR LEFT SIDE FOR EASY ACCESS – AND ENSURE IT’S BIG ENOUGH TO FIT YOUR PHONE (WHEN YOU NEED TWO HANDS).

CUFFS: ACCORDING TO THE NEW RULES, THE LOWER EDGE OF THE CUFF SHOULD FALL TO THE KNUCKLES. FOR AN EXTRA LOUCHE LOOK, LEAVE THE CUFF UNDONE.


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

TRY BEFORE YOU BUY

When you’re in the change room, try these styling tips to truly test a white shirt’s versatility

1. THE HALF TUCK Are the tails long enough? Even the highly strung can seem cool and collected with an effortless tuck.

Q: WHERE

WORK

CAN’T YOU WEAR A WHITE SHIRT?

A: NOWHERE. OKAY, MAYBE NOT ON THE STEP MACHINE. BUT THE CASUAL POST-WORK

HERE ARE SOME OFFICE SITUATIONS THAT ARE IDEAL 2. THE SLEEVE ROLL Fold up sleeves until they hit just below your elbow.

DRINKS

Shirt, $420, Georgia Alice, georgiaalice.com; scarf, $680, Hermès, (02) 9287 3200; pants, $339, Kate Sylvester, katesylvester.com; loafers, $443, MR By Man Repeller, net-a-porter.com; bag, $2,350, Acne Studios, (02) 9360 0294

FOR ONE. ]

3. THE OTT CUFFS Can you still eat lunch in them? Yes? Buy.

4. THE OVERLAY If it layers under or over a dress, T-shirt or jumper, it will make any piece office-appropriate.

THE RAISE-CLINCHING

POWER MEETING

Jacket, $1,695, Max Mara, maxmara.com; shirt, $485, White Story, whitestory.com.au; pants, $760, Max Mara, maxmara.com; heels, $875, Christian Louboutin, (02) 8355 5282; bag, $750, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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WORK

THE MINI MAKEOVER Shirts, skirts and suits feel fresh in cropped lengths. Or perhaps that’s the breeze of the office AC…

HERMÈS

Jacket, $349, shorts, $249, both Yasmin Raquel, yasminraquel.com.au

THE CLIENT-WINNING LONG

LUNCH

Adopt the school-skirt rule for tailored shorts: three fingers above the knee is best.

Shirt, $259, Viktoria & Woods, viktoriaandwoods.com.au; belt, $4,840, Hermès, (02) 9287 3200; heels, $81.99, Asos, asos.com/au; bag, $1,395, Bally, 1800 781 851; skirt, $79.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

LANVIN

Shirt, $99, COS, cosstores.com

A short-sleeve shirt feels modern in powder blue and with no visible fastenings.

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

Skirt, $84.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300

THE ALL-TEAM CREATIVE

BRAINSTORM

Shirt, $115, COS, cosstores.com; earrings, $410, Giorgio Armani, armani.com/au; bag, $2,910, Prada, (02) 9223 1688; skirt, $115, COS, cosstores.com; slides, $450, Dorateymur, net-a-porter.com

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The wrap-style detail of this skirt adds sophistication to the shorter hem. ]


STYLISH SOUGHT-AFTER

ELLE

SOCIAL

INNERCIRCLE

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

CALLING ALL STYLE ENTHUSIASTS JOIN ELLE ’S EXCLUSIVE COMMUNITY FOR INSIDER ACCESS. SIGN UP TO ELLE ’S INNER CIRCLE AND YOU’LL RECEIVE OUR DAILY NEWSLETTER WITH THE SCOOP ON VIP OFFERS AND COMPETITIONS, PLUS ALL THE FASHION, BEAUTY AND CELEB NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT.

BE IN THE KNOW NOW ELLE.COM.AU/INNER - CIRCLE


THE

ELLE

M A N UA L

WORK

EXERCISE

TRAINERS

FOR: The team-bonding sweat session you forgot about. Trainers, $180, Nike, nike.com.au

POINTED

PUMPS

FOR: Meeting the new management team. Pumps, $990, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

top-drawer mood boosters

THE EMERGENCY

Rely on these add-ons to uplift your spirits

UNDERDESK ’DROBE

Before a daunting presentation, spritz a confidenceenhancing scent. Angel Muse, $149 for 50ml, Thierry Mugler, 1800 241 092

– from unexpected cardio to a crisis conference – with these five shoe styles

STRAPPY

Picking up the slack after your co-worker chucks a sickie? Tie up your hair in a get-shit-done bun and wrap it in a sweet polka-dot scarf.

STILETTOS

Scarf, $530, Hermès, (02) 9287 3200

Heels, $420, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377

When your work spouse resigns, pop on a pair of conversationstarting earrings and smile at the new girl.

FOR: Clocking off on Friday at 5.06pm.

WHITE FASHION

SNEAKERS

FOR: A chic commute and coffee run. Trainers, $473, Golden Goose Deluxe Brand, net-a-porter.com

Earrings, $488, Oscar De La Renta, net-a-porter.com

Working late? Head straight to Friday-night dancing – just swap out your tote for this clutch. Clutch, $258, X Nihilo, xnihilo.com.au

BLACK

LOAFERS

FOR: All-day comfort on back-to-back appointments. Loafers, $99.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300

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Just been hit with budget cuts? Double down on a swipe of red lipstick and some creative thinking. q

Rouge Pur Couture Satin Radiance Lipstick in Le Orange, $55, Yves Saint Laurent, 1300 651 991

Words: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Jason Lloyd-Evans; Imaxtree. Styling: Dannielle Cartisano

Be prepared for

anything your day might throw at you


S AN IS S U

SUBSCRIBE TO ELLE NOW AND RECEIVE TWO FREE TOMMY TOWELS IS THIS THE END OF MONOGAMY?

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LESSONS IN LIFE, HAPPINESS & WITTY INSTA CAPTIONS FROM EVERYONE’S IMAGINARY BFF

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WHY IT MIGHT BE TIME TO LEAN OUT

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SHARING THE LOVE

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DANCE -ALL-NIGHT SHOES, DRESSES AND ACCESSORIES (YOU’LL NEED SOMETHING TO WEAR TO ALL THOSE PARTIES…)

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STYLE ESSAY

TAKE IT

I

EASY

now a movement. It no longer f you told me 18 months ago pertains to our weekend a $1,000 pair of velvet-trimmed wardrobes – it’s impacting how Haider Ackermann trackpants Our workwear is more we dress for work. But why, and would one day top my wish casual than ever, but what does this mean for our list, I’d have shot you my what does that mean actual off-duty wardrobes? steeliest side-eye. If you also for off-duty dressing? “We’re dressing more said my justification for such Bibby Sowray discovers comfortably because we’re a fantasy purchase would be, that a super-relaxed era seeking ease in our hectic lives,” “They’re great for both work says Tamu McPherson, founder and weekends!” I would have has dawned – and we’re of street-style website All The told you to stop being so silly. taking it lying down Pretty Birds. “Our productivity But here I am, poring over demands are so much higher and a photo of Rosie Huntingtonlife is more dynamic than it has ever been, so it Whiteley wearing a similar $1,800 pair by Chloé necessitates less formal clothes.” as she strolls through LAX Airport (left). She’s Studies suggest we’re experiencing more workchannelling what we fashion writers rather related stress than ever, but conversely, those in uninventively call the “model off-duty look”: her professional jobs have more freedom and outfit, which also includes a black tee and black flexibility at work than they did a decade ago, bomber, combines comfort and style in equal suggesting we’re happy to work longer and harder measure. She is, of course, in no way “off duty” – for more autonomy. It’s little surprise then, that with her image being her fortune, she never truly as a sour work life has percolated into our home is, especially at the paparazzi battleground that is life, we’ve reassessed the role our clothes play in an airport. Proof: she’s also wearing strappy heels. helping us deal with it. For many of us, particularly Even though I know all of the above, I’m still those in the creative industries, this has blurred hooked on the idea of more frequently wearing the line between workwear and weekend-wear. the kinds of clothing once limited to Saturday dog “I remember the first time I saw somebody walks in the park. That’s largely thanks to the wearing trainers at work, I thought, ‘She looks runways, where sweatshirts (Burberry, Hood By really efficient,’” says Lisa Aiken, Net-A-Porter’s Air, DKNY... the list goes on) and baggy denim retail fashion director. “When you’re (Balenciaga, Alexander Wang) rule. comfortable, you’re more effective.” I’ve even contemplated creating a DIY Kate Unsworth, founder of wearable version of these trackpants courtesy of the tech start-up Vinaya, says she can’t recall Spotlight haberdashery department. This is the last time she bought clothing just for the perfect example of the power behind those work. “Everything has to be adaptable to two little words: off duty. Initially a trend, it’s

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my lifestyle. If I’m on a nine-hour flight, having meetings with investors or going to dinner with friends, I don’t want to think about whether my clothes are going to be able to keep up with my day.” Having become aware that we’re now seeking multipurpose pieces that represent our busy lives but with comfort at the core, designers and brands are upping their off-duty game – and we’re playing along. “Previously, the off-duty wardrobe was an afterthought, but nowadays women are using them to express their personalities,” Aiken says. “They’re able to have more fun styling the pieces, so they are certainly willing to invest in it more.” As such, the sweatshirt – once a lesser-thought-of essential – has become a luxe statement piece we’re willing to splash out on, whether it’s a Bella Freud knit at around $400 or an intarsia tiger number by Gucci for a $1,300 price tag. And hoodies continue to rise in popularity: “Off-White and Vetements are leading the way,” says Aiken. So if off-duty dressing has taken over our working week, what do we actually wear when we’re, you know, off duty? Natalie Kingham, buying director at Matches Fashion, suggests investing in great outerwear. “I really like athleisure with a camel coat over the top. Designers are doing more cargo and army jackets, which are good for trans-seasonal off-duty. The length, shape, fabric and colour go with everything.” Of course, this change is not simply down to our shift in work-life balance; it’s rooted in how fashion has progressed over the past decade. When Alexander Wang, a Parsons School of Design dropout, arrived on the scene in 2006, he introduced an antidote to the trend treadmill: slightly worn everyday items such as the oversized T-shirt and moth-eaten jumper repurposed with a “don’t give

Photography: Jason Lloyd-Evans

“EVERYTHING HAS TO BE ADAPTABLE TO MY LIFESTYLE. I DON’T WANT TO THINK ABOUT WHETHER MY CLOTHES ARE GOING TO BE ABLE TO KEEP UP WITH MY DAY” a damn” attitude. Thus, contemporary off-duty dressing was born. Of course, Wang didn’t invent casual dressing. “People have always changed into casual stuff when they get home – it marks the transition between work and downtime,” notes fashion writer Kate Finnigan. But what he did do was take it from being something of an afterthought to the catwalk and,

more importantly, beyond. If a trend is a holiday romance – you meet, you flirt, you say your goodbyes and, years later, you look back with a mix of nostalgia and “What was I thinking?” – what Wang did was plant the seed for a love affair worthy of a Nicholas Sparks novel. Ten years on, the influence of off-duty dressing is none more apparent. But it wouldn’t be fashion if things didn’t progress – and again, we have Wang to thank. In 2014, his H&M collaboration brought athleisure to the masses. “I live in gym clothes. When you go out on the street, it’s the uniform now,” he told The New York Times when it launched, adding a major “but”: “I’m not an athlete.” It was a sensibility that struck a chord with women everywhere. Wearing workout clothes in our time off seemed like the next step in off duty. It also went hand-in-hand with the way in which our attitude to health was changing. “Wellness culture definitely influenced a shift to athleisure in our downtime,” says McPherson. “It’s so important for me to work out, but I don’t have time to change for whatever else I have going on that day.” Wearing gym clothes – something that not so long ago may have seemed lazy – now allows us to tell the world: “I’m busy but I’m in control and take care of myself.” It’s also worth noting that off duty and athleisure are two movements that have undoubtedly been strengthened by social media. Not just because it has exposed us to thousands of “influencers” who are showing us how to nail it, but also because Instagram has altered our perception of how successful women dress now. We’re presented with the likes of Leandra Medine and Chiara Ferragni, both of whom preside over growing media empires in jeans and tees. “The suit is amazing, but you don’t have to wear one to prove you belong at that table. You wear what you want,” says McPherson. Off duty really is at its most powerful right now. But in a sea of athleisure and built-forcomfort clothes, how can we maintain our individuality and avoid becoming too casual? “Always have one element that is personal to you,” advises Aiken. “I’ll always have my Hermès watch and multiple rings on no matter what I’m wearing.” Meanwhile, I’ve found an alternative to those dream tracksuit pants that won’t leave me eating soup for six months: adidas Originals’ premium three-stripe cigarette trousers. Athleisure with a bit of tailoring. I think we’re going to be very happy. q

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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LOVE IN TRANSL ATION If you agonise about crafting the perfect text message, it’s time to stop. We may be a generation obsessed with communication but it’s a lot more instinctive than you think. Writer Lauren Collins explains how a love affair with a Frenchman transcended the language barrier

S

tep away from the keyboard. In the end,  it  really  doesn’t  matter  whether  you reply now or three days later, “like” or “heart” the post, @ or DM. You won’t seem like a loser if the time stamp is 6.57am. Using full stops does not suggest you are  bad  in  bed.  Just  bang  out  the  first  thing  that  comes  to  mind.  Turn  off  spellcheck.  Throw  in some Xs. The person on the receiving end of your message, whoever they are, isn’t going

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to be swayed by your choice of adverb. Short of using an eggplant emoji, I’m telling you: you cannot screw this up. What makes me so sure that how you say it is more important than what you actually say? Why am  I  an  evangelist  for  getting  hyper-articulate  women to loosen up? Alors: it was the experience of falling in love with someone with whom I didn’t share a native language. Eventually having to learn his convinced me that if love is


gonna happen, it’s gonna happen, whether you can blow his mind with a perfectly crafted text message or not. I met Olivier at a party. Technically, I was a crasher, if by crasher you mean someone who was not invited by or even known to the host. I was 30. I had arrived in London exactly 24 days earlier, having fled a happy-ish but stagnating life. Taking pity on a newcomer, a friend of a friend had invited me to tag along with her for the night. The theme of the party was wine and cheese. I had got my first passport when I was 19; I couldn’t have pronounced fourme d’Ambert if Gérard Depardieu had been plopping great gloopy look in your eyes never wedges of it into my mouth himself. changes. People are saying we For some reason – I still don’t know will be miserable, we will regret, exactly why – I made a beeline for Olivier. but we are happy, we are I think it’s because he looked “European”, laughing always, we are singing. activating my adult-gap-year fantasy of We are talking Spanish and becoming a sort of romantic locavore. (It French and Arabic and Turkish. was either the strong nose and the hooded We are admitted everywhere eyes, or the shirt he was wearing, that and they strew our path with I regret to report read “Let’s rock” spelled flowers.” They saw their affair as an opportunity – their out in boulders, that gave off a continental air.) I was in a bold mood. I introduced differences as a superpower myself and asked him where he was from. rather than a handicap. “France,” he said. “A village about an hour On our first date, we headed outside Bordeaux.” to a pub, where our path Olivier and I had absolutely zero in was not strewn with flowers common, even beyond our cultural but cigarette butts, and then backgrounds. I was a writer. He had a PhD to a Chinese restaurant. in maths. If I’d been pressed to claim I loved his sharp mind and his understated sense of humour. a hobby, I might have said, not very He was emotionally elegant in a way that struck ambitiously, reading, whereas he was me as very French. But I had no idea what life obsessed with aviation and had a pilot’s with someone from another culture, and another licence. He traced aerobatic moves in the air language, would entail. A lifelong monoglot, my as we continued talking, for longer than main takeaway from high-school Spanish was one might have thought. I remember the the word sacapuntas (pencil sharpener) – conversation, for some reason, turned to drugs and I was impressed – imagine I was ignorant of the risks and rewards of loving knowing how to say “pothead” in a second someone across a language barrier. Olivier was language? Eventually, Olivier announced he a skilled English speaker, but we couldn’t finish was tired and had to go. He took my email each other’s sentences. We were lucky, actually, if address and sent me a message containing we got the gist of the first halves of them. As we got nothing but “hello” in the subject line. to know each other, I experienced this as a sort A fairly unpromising start, in this era of of liberation, a free pass from the expectation of slaved-over Instagram captions and Tinder being clever, well-informed and always having profiles written by committee. something to say. When the time came for me to As bicultural correspondents go, we meet Olivier’s French-speaking family, I didn’t weren’t exactly Anaïs Nin and Henry have to sing for my supper, or even speak for it. Miller. Nin, a novelist who was fluent in I could just be. The gaps in our communication three languages, received countless letters seemed like proof of the primal authenticity of from writer Miller that described their our connection: imagine being loved by someone intense feelings as so: “We’re in Seville and to whom you couldn’t properly speak. then in Fez and then in Capri and then in Eventually, lust in translation gave way to love Havana. We’re journeying constantly, but in translation. Olivier and I, like all couples, went there is always a machine and books, and from googly-eyed idealism to the nitty-gritty your body is always close to me and the everyday. Amid the chaos, it was often hard to ]

“ S H O RT OF US I N G A N EGGPLANT E M OJ I , I ’ M TELLING YO U: YO U

CA NN OT SC R EW THI S UP ”

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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“WHEN TRYING TO SAY I’D ACCEPTED DELIVE RY O F A GIFT HIS MOTHER HAD SE NT TO O U R APARTM E N T, I TOLD H E R T H AT

Protestant daughters had married Catholics. But a lot has changed. These days, we pick and mix across increasingly meaningless gender, race, religious and cultural barriers with relative ease. We have babies with incredible skin tones and improbable names. The interestingness of our lives, for the most part, makes up for their occasional lack of context. Six months into our marriage, and living in Switzerland’s francophone Geneva where Olivier’s job had moved, my lack of French bothered me in a way that it hadn’t earlier. I signed up for another class and got serious: flashcards, notebooks, listening to the radio at top volume every single morning until I at long last understood, one glorious day, that the presenter was talking about un nid des oiseaux chanteurs (a nest of songbirds). After the nest of songbirds test, my confidence rose. One night, I heard Olivier talking on the phone to his brother, and it was as though someone had turned up the volume on the previously muffled soundtrack to my life. “Elle n’est pas très mobile,” he was saying (“It’s not very mobile”). Four years after that night at the party, I was hearing Olivier’s real voice for the first time. Even more miraculously, I soon discovered mine. One night, I found myself sparring with Olivier over his refusal to take more than a week of holiday read each other’s signals. Olivier told me that always speaking to me in English felt like a year. “C’est idiot!” I barked (“It’s silly!”), willing “touching me with gloves”. In addition, when to sound like one myself if it meant getting trying to say that I’d accepted delivery of a gift through on an emotional level. I felt like a different person in French – more credible somehow, its his mother had sent to our apartment, I told her formal locutions and regimented syllables that I’d given birth to a coffee machine. buttressing my arguments. I also felt, by virtue of A professional communicator, I was tonguehaving bothered, like a properly loving wife. tied in my personal life. I finally faced up to it: We live in Paris now and have been married I had to learn French. for three years. I’m fluent in French, which is to I’d tried before. A year or so into our say I speak it well enough to know how many relationship, I had enrolled in evening French mistakes I’m constantly making. I’m 36. I doubt classes. There were maybe 10 of us: me, a South my French will ever catch up to Olivier’s English. African who was dating a Frenchman, a Korean Our daughter is set to overtake me at who was dating a Frenchman, a Turk who was approximately two-and-a-half years old. The dating a Frenchman, a Swede who was married other day I looked up “hanneton”, a word I saw in to a Frenchman, and so forth. Intellectual an article, and the dictionary came back, curiosity is dead. Or at least, I can attest, it’s confusingly, with “cockchafer”. Still, not having a non-starter when it comes to adult languagethe language for all those years made me realise learning. The only people desperate enough to that words aren’t the tools of seduction I once spend their Thursday nights conjugating thirdthought they were. It made me learn to love, as group verbs were the wives and girlfriends of an assorted bunch of Gallic men who, judging a transitive verb, rather than simply trying to from the collective evidence, couldn’t be articulate my love, the common noun, all the time. And having it now makes me realise that if understood until you understood their language. being able to communicate doesn’t bring us With each of us mangling the language in our together then it keeps us together, trying to tune own unique way, I quit somewhere between into each other’s needs and desires through all “Je m’appelle” (“I am...”) and “J’ai dans mon sac” the static. We translate inside languages as much (“I have in my bag...”). as we do between them. It doesn’t matter what In our parents’ day, most people ended up your birth certificate says, or how you say fourme with a partner who was very much like them. d’Ambert; at some point, every couple has to put Even marrying outside of one’s religious cleverness aside and learn how to talk. q denomination was enough to raise eyebrows: Lauren Collins is the author of When In French: Love In A Second my maternal grandmother was known to Language ($32.99, HarperCollins) comment on the fact that four of her five

I’D GIVEN BIRTH TO A C O F F E E M AC H I N E .

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Photography: Michael Hauptman/trunkarchive.com/Snapper Media

A PR OF E SSI O N A L COM MUNI CATO R , I WAS TO NG U E TIED IN MY PER SON A L L I F E ”


MONIQUE LHUILLIER

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AUSTRALIANS WASTE

up to

WORTH OF FOOD every year Let’s break that figure down…

I

f you think Australia’s food-waste figures seem grim, compare them to America’s, where $165 billion worth of food gets unnecessarily tossed every year. Back on home soil, while some supermarkets have made an effort to reduce the level of fresh produce going to waste, it’s difficult to compete with consumers’ high – and unrealistic – aesthetic standards for food (standards that are propagated by the food industry, but still...). Over the course of a year, Harris Farm Market’s “Imperfect Picks” initiative saved two million kilograms of fruit and vegetables from landfill. Woolworths sold a further 16,000 tonnes of “Odd Bunch” produce. But those numbers make up less than 10 per cent of all fruit and vegetables sold around Australia. Last November, food rescue charity OzHarvest hosted the world premiere of Theater Of Life, a documentary about the Milanese soup kitchen Refettorio Ambrosiano, started by chef Massimo Bottura. It was first launched during the Milan 2015 World’s Fair, and Bottura – whose restaurant Osteria Francescana is rated as the world’s best – invited some of his most famous contemporaries to join him in cooking for refugees and the city’s homeless population using only food waste from the fair. Today, it continues to prepare meals for the needy using supermarket waste.

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33%

fresh food

27%

leftovers

9%

drinks

15%

9%

packaged and long-life products

frozen food

7%

takeaways


G

30% OF A

LL LTURAL LAND ICU PR GR A

LY, AL B LO

A 2011 REPORT FOUND THAT

78%

TO

STE WA

Locally, Youth Food Movement Australia launched in 2011 and hosts events and workshops designed to educate and empower gen Y who, studies show, are some of the biggest food wasters. These high rates of food waste exist despite the fact that two million DISCARDED Australians seek food relief each year, and ON-FARM 43,000 are turned away every month – 34 per IT TAKES IN NORTH cent of whom are only children – because of food shortages. QUEENSLAND A misconception lies at the heart of the ARE DUE TO problem: many businesses believe they’re COSMETIC liable if a person who eats their donated food IMPERFECTIONS TO gets sick. In fact, in nearly all circumstances, they’re not. But logistics also play a role in PRODUCE limiting a business’ capacity to get their 1 HAMBURGER THE AMOUNT OF WATER excess product to the people who need it (that’s why the work of charities like (that’s 400 toilet flushes) USED TO PRODUCE OzHarvest and Foodbank is so important). The environmental impact is just as concerning. In households, 40 per cent of IS ENOUGH TO FLUSH what’s in your garbage bin is food waste. The slightly wilted lettuce leaves you toss out, the milk you bin because it’s a day past its use-by date (though it still smells okay), the lone sausage you can’t be bothered taking to work for lunch tomorrow – all that waste ends up in landfill and, when it decomposes without air, produces methane, a greenhouse gas that’s 25 times more potent than the CO₂ pollution emitted by your car exhaust. So despite your ONE-FIFTH best efforts to bike to work or switch to green IS NEVER EATEN (EQUIVALENT TO AROUND power, your food waste is just as significant 63 MILLION TONNES) a contributor to climate change. So let’s talk about how you can reduce your waste. Learn how to store food properly, and make use of leftovers – there are more than five million search results for “leftover recipes” on Google. Don’t be so stringent about dates on food – trust your eyes and nose. Sign up to Idecologie’s newsletter (idecologie.net/en) for genius planet-saving ideas delivered weekly. The easiest way to make a difference is by not over-shopping, over-cooking or over-serving. If 20 per cent of a household’s food goes to IN THE AVERAGE waste each week, save HOUSEHOLD yourself the money BUT... 1 IN 6 AUSTRALIANS SAY (and fridge space) A QUICK NOTE ON FOOD DATES and buy 20 per cent Expiration and best-before dates on food THEY HAVEN’T HAD ENOUGH generally mean nothing. They’re just less. And we all know FOOD FOR THEMSELVES OR the manufacturer’s best guess of when that more money in THEIR FAMILY AT LEAST ONCE a food might go off (and, of course, it’s your pocket is always IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS in their best interest to keep them short a good thing. q so that you’ll buy more often).

of the bananas

OD THAT S FO GO CE ES DU O

2,400 litres of water

1 APPLE

11 toilets

of meat produced globally

Words: Laura Collins. Photography: Sevak Babakhani

1 IN 5 BAGS of groceries is wasted

No food was wasted in the making of this story ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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ELLE FICTION

BREAK ALL THE WAY DOWN By Roxane Gay

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he mother of my boyfriend’s youngest child called in the middle of the night. My boyfriend was asleep, the heat from his body wrapping around us. I stared at the dark shadows of the ceiling fan lazily spinning above us. He sleeps soundly despite many reasons he should not. “I’m at the front door,” she said. Her voice was tight and thin. I tried to shake my boyfriend awake but he merely shifted, stretching his leg across my side of the bed. He snored lightly. I sighed. Anna Lisa, the mother of my boyfriend’s youngest child, handed me her daughter, still in her carrier, as well as a large duffel bag. She nodded towards the bag. “The baby’s things.” I looked at the baby, neither cute nor ugly, a blob of indeterminate features. We stood quietly, listened to moths and other insects flying into the bright, buzzing lamp covering us in its light. My shoulders ached. The air was damp and heavy. Anna Lisa is beautiful but she looked tired. She wore a loose pair of sweatpants with fading block letters down the left leg. Her T-shirt was stained. Her breasts were swollen. I could see that. Her hair hung limply in her face. She smelled ripe. There were dark circles beneath her eyes. I don’t know that we looked different.

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I invited her in, offered to give her a bath. I wanted to help her undress, pulling her shirt over her head. I wanted to run a bath of hot water, to wash her body and scrub her back and her thighs, the still loose skin of her stomach, to wash her clean. “I cannot take care of my child anymore.” I looked at the baby again. The baby stared back, yawned, and blinked tiredly. “You want to leave your baby with him?” Anna Lisa shook her head. “I’m leaving my baby with you.” My husband hates my new boyfriend. I do, too. He is the kind of person everyone hates. My husband is the man I love. He likes his eggs scrambled soft with freshly ground pepper, sea salt. I woke up early every morning to make him breakfast, enjoyed the rhythm of it, enjoyed feeling useful in that way. My husband calls me daily, says, “Why are you punishing yourself?” He says, “Come home.” My boyfriend isn’t really my boyfriend; he and I aren’t quite living together. We came to a silent agreement where more often than not, I am around. My things are still at my house – four bedrooms, three baths – with my husband. I visit my things, my husband, often. I run my fingers over the modern statue near the front entrance, the dimple in my


husband’s chin, the thick, ropy muscles of his shoulders, the mahogany mantel over the fireplace. I belong with these things, they are mine, so I do not stay long. A mosquito bit my cheek and I winced. I pressed my hand to my stomach, ignored the thin roll of scar, how it pulsed against my palm. The baby whimpered so I set the duffel bag just inside the foyer and picked her up out of her carrier, held her against my shoulder. She smelled sweet and powdery and settled as I patted her back, soft, steady. I said, “There, there, baby love.” Anna Lisa covered my hand with hers as I comforted her child. Anna Lisa’s hand was sweaty. She did not look at the baby as she walked away. I sat with the baby in the living room, setting her on a clean blanket. When I tired of watching her, I stretched out, resting my hand on her stomach. I fell asleep with the baby staring at me, her eyes wide open. In the morning, my boyfriend kicked my foot with his heavy work boot. “What the fuck is this?” I sat up quickly, holding a finger to my lips. I stood and pulled him into the bedroom. “Anna Lisa brought the baby last night. She can’t take care of her anymore.” My boyfriend shook his head and reached for his phone, quickly dialling his ex. “This is bullshit,” he muttered. When Anna Lisa didn’t answer, he threw his phone against the wall. “What the hell am I supposed to do with a baby?” “Keep it alive.” He shook his head and brushed past me. “I have to go to work. You deal with this.” I have read many baby books. After my boyfriend left, I filled the kitchen sink with warm water and soap and washed the baby, gave her a fresh diaper and chose the cutest outfit. I prepared a bottle and fed the baby and she fell back asleep. I did a quick inventory – a stack of neatly folded onesies, seven outfits, a stuffed animal, three bottles and a zip-lock bag filled with nipples, two cans of formula, a half-filled package of baby wipes, six diapers and a notebook filled with detailed instructions about the baby’s personality, likes and dislikes, daily schedule, what the baby’s different sounds mean – the kind of accounting made possible only by the reach of a mother’s love. We needed to go

shopping but first I needed to share this development with my husband. Once or twice a week, he works from home. I found him in his office, bare-chested, wearing a pair of flannel pyjama pants. He smiled when he saw me and I wanted to crawl inside him. When he noticed me carrying a baby, he stood, frowning. “Why are you holding a baby?” “A woman gave it to me.” My husband peered into the carrier. “That’s not funny.” “I’m not joking.” A lot of people decided I went crazy after the accident. They kept waiting for me to strip naked in a shopping mall or eat a cat or something. When I took up with an asshole, they breathed a sigh of relief. “Your situation is still fixable,” my mother said when I was still taking her calls. I am not crazy. My husband, Ben, crouched down and tapped the baby on her nose. She smiled and he did it again. He looked up. “You didn’t, like, steal this baby, did you?” I shook my head. “It’s his baby. His ex dropped her off last night. She said she was leaving the baby for me.” Ben sat, and pulled the baby out of her carrier. He started clapping her hands together and singing a silly song. I felt the scar across my stomach stretch tightly. I ran to the bathroom and reached the toilet just in time, heaving until my back ached. Ben appeared in the doorway. “Are you okay?” I stared at my breakfast, floating calmly on the surface of the toilet water. That night when my boyfriend came home from work, he was drunk. I heard him at the door trying to make sense of how his key fit into the lock and what he was supposed to do next. I didn’t try to help. The baby was already asleep in a small basket I bought for her at a baby store for people with too much money and no sense. The saleslady, who knew me from a different time, looked down at the baby and said, “He’s gotten so big,” because all babies look the same and all women with babies look the same. I bit through my tongue and nodded. I sat on the couch with the baby in her basket and we watched a reality show, one about famous people pretending to suffer from fake addictions. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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ELLE FICTION My boyfriend finally made his way into the apartment. “Woman, where are you? Goddamnit,” he said when he realised I was not alone. “That kid is still here?” He pulled me up from the couch and dragged me into the bedroom. I relaxed, made myself into meat for him. He threw me onto the bed and started unbuckling his belt. “Why are you always so damn quiet? It creeps me out.” I said nothing. He did not need my voice. He crawled onto the bed, spreading my legs, pulling my jeans down. He lay on top of me, his body so heavy I sank deeply into the mattress. He pressed his boozy lips against my neck, squeezing my breasts between his fingers, reshaping them. It hurt. I groaned. “Say something,” he said. I closed my eyes and hoped the baby couldn’t hear her father. He slapped me and my eyes watered; the bones in my forehead felt like they would splinter. I tuned my head slightly, offering him my face. “Seriously, say something or I will lose it.” I opened my eyes. “Don’t wake the baby. She had a long day.” He clasped my throat and squeezed harder and harder, leaving his mark. I held his gaze. I waited for him to punish me and when he did, it was perfect relief. My husband called the next day. “If you felt like coming by with that baby, I wouldn’t mind.” I looked for a long-sleeved shirt with a high neck but couldn’t find one so I covered myself with a hooded jacket and too much makeup. I talked to the baby in the rear-view mirror as we drove. Ben was waiting on the front porch and he came out to the car when we pulled up, carefully removed the baby from her car seat, opened my door for me. “Just like old times,” he said, softly. I gritted my teeth as I sat on the couch, one of the first nice things we ever bought. Ben put the baby in the playpen that had been empty in the corner of our den for months. She began playing with the toys – plastic things that made noise. He sat next to me, pulled the hood of my jacket down. He slammed his fist into the coffee table. One of the books slid onto the floor. “I’m going to kill him.” I leaned into his shoulder, the warmth of it, and then I laid my head in his lap. “I’m really tired.” He pushed out a heavy burst of air, rubbed my arm softly. “You can rest here,” he said, and so I did and he watched over me. A few days later, the baby had a fever. She cried and cried, her face red with tiny, heated rage. I stripped her down to her diaper and stood with her near the open freezer while the air conditioner covered us in frigid air. She wouldn’t stop crying. She missed her mother,

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ELLE AUSTRALIA

I decided. My boyfriend came out of the bedroom, his boxers hanging off his narrow hips at an awkward angle. I held the baby closer, whispering sweetly. He reached into the refrigerator for a beer and nodded towards us as he removed the cap. “What’s wrong with her?” “She has a fever.” He took a long swig of beer, wiped his lips. “Does she need a doctor or something?” “I don’t know yet.” I began bouncing around as the baby calmed a bit. “We’ll have to wait and see.” My boyfriend hopped onto the counter and sat, swinging his legs. “How do you know so much about babies?” I rubbed the baby’s back slowly. “We don’t ask each other those kinds of questions.” He spit into the sink and took another sip of beer. “Suit yourself.” When he grew bored, he wandered back to the bedroom. The baby stopped crying, her body trembling every few minutes as she hiccupped. I sat with her on the balcony because it was cool outside and the air was clean. I called Anna Lisa. She answered after seven rings. “Is everything okay?” I nodded even though she couldn’t see me. “I thought you might want to know how the baby is doing.” She was silent for a moment, coughed. “Yeah, that’d be good.” The baby held on to my T-shirt, her tiny fingers curling around the cotton. I told her mother about the fever and how Ben and I played with her and took a long walk. I told Anna Lisa how the baby enjoyed bathing in the kitchen sink. I told her about the new outfits. “Does she miss me?” “Absolutely.” “Why the hell are you with him?” “I’ll call you next week.” I hung up and stared into the night sky, dark and heavy and still. The baby was still fussy in the morning, wouldn’t rest easy in my arms, sweaty and squirming. She barely slept. I barely slept. My boyfriend got mad because she kept making this sound, a high-pitched whimpering, and she wouldn’t stop and it got on his nerves. I lay next to him, waiting for him to explode. He would. He did. I went slack and hoped he would beat me until my bones finally softened. When he was done, he said, “There’s something wrong with you.” Later, Ben called as the baby wailed lustily like an old sorrowful woman. I admired her for it. “I want to see your face,” he said. I smiled. “I want to see your face, too.” “That kid has one hell of a mouth on her.”


I bounced the baby on my hip. “That she does.” In the bedroom, my boyfriend sprawled across the bed on his stomach wearing only a pair of jeans. I asked if he planned on going to work and he grunted something unintelligible. At Ben’s house – I had to force myself to think of it like that – he was once again waiting in the driveway for us. He took the baby and jogged slowly towards the house. I leaned back as I watched him. He paused on the porch, waved. I nodded and closed my eyes. Seven months ago, we were in a parking lot at a grocery store, the kind where everything is organic and artisanal and overpriced. For the first time in our marriage, we could afford to shop wherever we wanted. We bought lots of olives in those days because there was an olive bar at the fancy grocery store. The absurdity was irresistible. We made a lot of tapenades. We were adults. We had a boy, who shared his father’s name. He was 14 months old, still getting used to how his legs moved him, his chubby thighs rolling around each other with each awkward step. He always held his hands in front of him when he walked. We called him BZ or Baby Zombie and sometimes, a lot of the time, we gelled his hair so it stood on end. We took a hundred thousand pictures, the excesses of parents of only-children, capturing how he curled his fingers when he neared us and how his nose wrinkled just before he laughed and his eyelashes, they were so long, you could see each one like some perfect extension of his beauty. Our parents thought the zombie nickname was crude. It was funny. Ben and I were flirting as we put the groceries in the trunk. There was a bottle of wine, some organic merlot such-and-such, and a promise of what we were going to do after we drank that wine. I said we didn’t need to wait and he said something about blindfolding the baby for the drive home and we laughed and leaned into each other over the cart to kiss, wet-tongue sloppy. Ben Jr started smacking the handle of the grocery cart, shouting da da da da da. He wanted out so I lifted him, enjoying the weight of his body against the curves between my thumbs and forefingers. I kissed both of his cheeks and his forehead and his father rubbed the baby’s back as I set our boy on the ground. I pulled his hand to my jeans and told him to hold on to me or he’d have to stay in the cart. He nodded and grinned, his dimples deep and winking as he hugged my leg. I looked at that boy and the man who helped me make him as we stood in the centre of a perfect life. The heat of that joy could have burned us all. A young guy walking some shitty little dog passed by. Ben Jr loved dogs, called them doshi. We have no idea where that came from but it was his word so it

became our word. Doshi doshi doshi. He shouted, “Doshi,” and let go of me and when he let go, when I no longer felt that tug, I was so cold and hollow. There was nothing holding me to the ground. Ben Jr started running and both Ben and I leapt after him but those tiny, chubby legs of his, when they wanted to, they moved real fast and we were still happy so it was hard to make sense of the urgency. Our son chased the doshi, his arms in front of him like he intended to make that dog undead. An 84-year-old woman, Helen McGuigan, came barrelling through the parking lot. She couldn’t see my little boy over the hood of her 1974 Grand Prix, a real tank of a car. Ben and I screamed. Ben Jr stopped and turned to look at us, was so startled by the pitch of our voices, he cried. The last thing my child did was cry because he was scared. He held his arms higher, the way he does, the way he did, when he wanted to be held. The curves between my thumbs and forefingers throbbed violently. When the car ran him over, I did not look away. I saw what happened to my boy’s body. I saw everything, all of him, everywhere. I don’t allow myself to be around dogs anymore. I could kill them all, every last one of those dirty animals with their wagging tails and long hanging tongues. I cannot stand the stink of them. Ben and I did not go to the funeral. After the viewing, after seeing the impossible size of that coffin, we had nothing left. Our families could not understand. During the funeral we sat on the floor of Ben’s nursery, waiting for him to come home. We are still sitting there. Ben called my name. He stood on the porch, handsome, his hair wild and curly, the baby strapped to his chest. I swallowed hard as I got out of the car. In the corner of the yard, I saw a red plastic bat. Acid burned my throat and before I could stop myself, I puked over the hedges lining the house. We used to trim them together. We’d wake up on Saturday mornings and say, “We are doing yard work today.” We’d giggle because our fathers do yard work, raking their yards in sandals and knee-high socks. Ben rushed to me and rubbed my back. He said soft, soothing things. He led me into the house and gave me water. I drank but my lips remained parched. As I leaned over the kitchen sink, my shirt rode up. My head was splitting so I forgot to pull the shirt down. My husband rolled it up further, hissing. My heart sank. I had no energy for pretending he couldn’t see what was there. “What the fuck is this? Seriously, babe, what the fuck is this?” He pulled my shirt up around my shoulders and slowly turned me around. I couldn’t look him in the eye. He traced an angry, spreading bruise along my rib cage, dark purple, almost black around the edges. I winced. “That’s it,” Ben said. ]

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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ELLE FICTION “That really is it, Natasha.” He unstrapped the baby from his chest and handed her to me. “Stay here.” “Don’t,” I said, grabbing his arm. He shook his head and ran out of the house. He kicked the car door before he opened it, kept kicking the door until it caved. I’ve never seen him so angry. He pointed at me. “Don’t you dare leave.” I watched as he sped away. I took the baby into our bedroom and lay on my side, holding the baby to my chest, inhaling her warm, milky breath. She finally stopped fussing and we fell asleep. When I woke up, Ben was sitting in the reading chair near the foot of the bed. I sat slowly and pulled my knees to my chest. There was a bruise on his chin and his knuckles were red-raw like meat. “Enough,” he said. “You’ve broken yourself enough. You’re coming home.” I pressed my forehead against my knees. My chest was empty. It was nice for someone to tell me what to do. Ben stood and took the baby, still asleep. He disappeared with her and was alone when he returned. He set a baby monitor on the end table and crawled into the bed next to me. It is hard to breathe in a house with no air but I tried. I stretched myself against him and when he started to undress me I let him. My desire for him was unabated. My tongue could not forget the taste of his skin, his mouth. Pale evening light filled the room, enough light for us to see each other plainly. He kissed the bruises along my collarbone, around my navel, the dark spreads of purple on my upper arms, my thighs, in the small of my back. It had been a long time since a man touched me gently – such luxury. I had almost forgotten. Ben held my face in his hands as he kissed me, and then I fell into him and I fell into us, his tongue in my mouth, his mouth on my breasts, his fingers between my thighs. He filled me in a way that let me know he was taking me back. I opened myself to let him. I kissed his red-raw meat knuckles and his chin and wrapped my arms around him. I said, “Hold me to the ground.” It was late, crying from another room. I lay on my back, Ben’s body half covering mine as he slept. I covered my chest with my hand, rubbed softly like that might move my heart back to its proper place. Still there was crying from another room. I tried to remember where I was. My mouth was dry and sorrow, my lips still parched, my eyes dry. Everything was dry. I ran my fingers through Ben’s hair. The crying grew louder so I kissed my husband’s head and slipped out of bed,

tried to remember the geography of the room I had not slept in for months. My breasts ached, engorged with the milk of sweetly spoiled fruit. Ben’s shirt lay on the floor and I pulled it on, then held my hand to the wall as I walked to the nursery. When I turned on the light, the baby rolled over and blinked. The room still smelled like my son. He was there even though he was not there. I could feel him in my fingers. I picked the baby up and cradled her along the length of my arm, the weight of her nearly tearing my heart out of me. We went outside for fresh air, sat on the patio Ben and I built ourselves, all brick, more yard work. I called Anna Lisa. She answered again after seven rings. “I am leaving him,” I said. “You should know that.” “I left my baby with you.” “You can’t be serious. I can’t be trusted with a child. This isn’t legal.” “I know what happened to your son, saw on the news,” Anna Lisa said. “It was not your fault.” “This is not the answer to whatever you or I have going on.” “I don’t know anyone else who can help me.” “We can’t stay here, especially not with her. We are leaving.” “Don’t tell me where you’re going,” Anna Lisa said. She hung up. The baby shifted in my arms. I traced her little lips with my finger. “What am I going to do with you?” I asked. She cooed and grabbed my finger, wouldn’t let go, so we sat like that for a long time, her grip growing tighter and tighter. I thought she might break me, too. Damp circles spread across Ben’s shirt. No matter what I did, my milk refused to dry. My body needed something to feed. When I went inside, Ben was holding his phone and car keys. His hair stood on end. He looked so young, like when we first met. We were freshmen in college and he chased me across a quad because he liked the pink streak in my hair. He said he always knew he would love a woman with a three-syllable name. I wasn’t sure which Ben I was looking at and then he came to me and pressed his nose in my hair and told me I smelled like the night air. “I thought you left.” “I thought you said I couldn’t.” His face stretched into what has become his smile. “We can’t live in this house.” Ben nodded. “We can’t live in this city, nowhere near.” “I know.”

“When I woke up, there was a bruise on his chin and his knuckles were redraw like meat”


I looked down at the baby. “She’s coming with us. For now. Until her mum can take her. The baby won’t fix what’s wrong. I’m not crazy the way everyone thinks. I know who this baby is and who she isn’t.” “You can say his name.” Ben’s eyes met mine. Our son had his eyes. There was a time when I wondered if I could stand to look at my husband for the rest of my life. “Say his name,” Ben said. I held my hands open and shook my head. When Ben Jr was born, we had been married for seven years. We were both only-children. We were still young but our parents had resigned themselves to not having grandchildren and then this bright, beautiful boy found his way to all of us. After the accident, I called my mother to tell her what happened. I told her while sitting on the front porch because I couldn’t be in the house, where there was no air. Ben sat next to me. We held the phone between our cheeks. My mother moaned when I explained to her that my son was a bloody stretch on the hot pavement of a parking lot, that he was driven out of his shoes, that he was lying somewhere, alone and cold. I tried to stay in the morgue with Ben Jr the day he died but it was against regulations. A stranger with cold hands kept saying, “We’re so sorry but you have to leave.” Eventually, two police officers escorted us to the parking lot. I made a wild, messy scene. I’m proud of that. One of the officers said, “We don’t want to have to take you into custody,” and I shouted, “Are you fucking kidding me?” People walking into and out of the police station stared, pointed, shook their heads. The officer grabbed my elbow, pulled me close enough that I could smell coffee on his breath. He leaned closer, said, “I’ve got four of my own but you have to leave,” and again I shouted, “Are you fucking kidding me?” My throat was raw. All of me was raw. I didn’t give a damn. I would not leave my child alone. Finally, Ben snapped out of his trance and dragged me away. I fought him hard. When he finally got me in the car, he stood by my door. He pointed and said, “Stay, baby,” then ran around to his side of the car. Sweat trickled down his face and neck. There were damp arcs of sweat around my neck and below my armpits. We were rotten, filthy with grief. He turned and looked at me. “You’re stronger than I thought.” I pressed my hand against the car window as we pulled away. I said, “You have no idea.” Later, we drove back to the station, parked a few blocks away, and sat silently near the morgue window in the back until Ben Jr’s body could be released to us in the morning. Instead of saying something kind, instead of saying nothing when I told her my son was dead, my mother said, “How could you let this happen?” I started

shaking and yelling at her but I made no sense, all yerga ghala fraty ghuja, crazy rage words. Ben took the phone. He said, “How dare you?” We stayed in the garage that night and the next night and the next night. The refrigerator where we store deer meat and High Life hummed loudly. We’d listen to it all night, pretending we were asleep, pretending sleep was possible. It was hot in there, smelled like motor oil and dirt and grass clippings. Ben kept his arms wrapped around me, never let me go. We moved to a tent in the backyard until the neighbours complained. We cooked canned food on a small camp stove and drank wine and smoked, while we sat in lawn chairs until we were too tired to stay awake. Ben would say, “Talk to me,” and I’d try but nothing would come out but dry air. I took a leave of absence from work but Ben kept going to the office, said he needed one thing to make sense. While he was gone, I sat in the parking lot of the fancy grocery store where we bought eight different kinds of olives. Sometimes an employee recognised me and brought me coffee, said, “We are so sorry.” I heard that phrase so often it started to sound like one word, wearesosorry wesorry sosorry sosorry sosorry. I lost all the baby weight that lingered and more. Ben grew angry when I said I couldn’t eat, said I had no right to ruin myself. One evening, he made my favourite pasta. When I refused to eat, he straddled me as I sat, and force-fed me. I couldn’t keep the food down. Ben got so angry he threw the beautiful clay bowl holding his beautiful pasta onto the kitchen floor. He made a terrible mess. His hands clenched into tight fists and I wanted to feel his knuckles against the bone of my jaw. I threw myself into him. I said, “Hit me,” but he wouldn’t. I hit him and hit him and he didn’t stop me. I said, “Hit me or I’m leaving.” He refused so I left. I slept in my car near the railroad tracks where we used to take Ben Jr when he couldn’t sleep. My husband found me and told me to come home. I didn’t go home. At a bar I found a man who would hit me. It wasn’t hard. I could smell the anger on him by looking at him. I was drinking Maker’s, wearing nothing much, all bare tits and leg. He sat next to me and ordered me a drink even though I wasn’t halfway through the one I had. He tapped my rings and said, “Where’s your husband?” I slammed back what was left of my drink and the one he bought me. “Don’t worry about it,” I said. He talked and we drank for hours and when he said, “Let’s go out back,” I let him pull me along. The man pushed me against the wall and covered my mouth with his like he was trying to eat my face. He came up for air, said, “How do you like it, baby?” I grabbed him by his belt. He tried to kiss me again and I turned away. I said, “I want you ]


ELLE FICTION to hurt me,” so he did, over and over and over again. I stopped sleeping at home. Every time that man sank his fists into my body, I could breathe a little. I used one hurt to cover another. I became a fiercely tender bruise as he broke down my skin and muscle and bone and blood until I felt nothing but the way he used my body for a few perfect moments every day, moments I’d worry between my fingers until they were well worn away. Ben grabbed me by my shoulders and shook me. “Say his name.” “Harder,” I said. The baby giggled. She grabbed his shirt and mine, like she was trying to pull us into each other. Ben stilled and looked down at the baby. He let go of me. “Please.” I clasped the back of his neck and stood on the tips of my toes. I closed my eyes and saw each letter, the shape of our child’s name. I tried to lose myself in my bruising. I put the baby in the playpen and walked to the nursery. Ben followed on my heels. I stood next to the crib, gripping the railing. Our child’s favourite teddy bear was still propped up in one corner. The sleeve of a small T-shirt peeked out from beneath the pillow. And then I couldn’t stand anymore. I fell to my knees, gasping. “Hit me,” I said. I begged. I grabbed his hand and curled his fingers into a fist and held his fist to my breastbone. I said, “Please, if you love me, hit me.” My voice was so ugly and hungered. If Ben would break the broken places in me a little more, if he would break whatever was left of me beneath my skin, I could finally break all the way down. Ben knelt beside me, uncurling his fingers. “I do love you.” He wrapped his arms around me as I reached for air. He was so gentle, so terrible. “My God, please do it, Ben. Please.” A ringing in my ears made it hard to concentrate on anything but the bitter ache in my chest. He pulled his arm back and I watched his fingers tighten back into a fist and I cried out but then he relaxed. “No,” he said. “I will not.” I held on to that crib, shaking it, slamming it into the wall until the bolts loosened, until the crib that held our child broke all the way down, too. The B-E-N hanging on the wall above the crib fell to the floor. My arms grew tired and I let go of the broken railing in my hands. Sweat pooled in the small of my back. I thought about shoving everything in that room into my mouth, thought if I tried hard enough, I could make room. Ben leaned

forward, pressing his forehead against the ground. “I miss him as much as I love you. I love you as much as I miss him,” I said. I collapsed against him and somehow, we fell asleep like that, breaking against each other. The next morning, we took everything from the nursery and put it in the backyard on our brick patio with the uneven edges. We burned all of it until it was nothing. The neighbours stared from behind parted curtains. They weren’t going to be our neighbours for much longer. I raised my middle finger high in the air. We stood and watched everything melt into a black, hardened mass – toys and sheets and T-shirts and very small shoes and pacifiers, all of it. When the fire finally died, our skin was coated with a thin layer of soot. The air reeked of the scorched memory of things that should not be burned. The baby slept and slept and slept. We stumbled inside and I tore at Ben’s clothes, kissing him hard with the bone of my face, the whites of my teeth, wanting to feel something different even as my body ached sharply, everywhere. Ben folded me over the dining room table, his hand pressed against the back of my head as he entered me. He breathed hotly onto my neck. What we did, the way we sounded, was untamed. After, I said, “Please get me away from here,” and Ben said, “Say our child’s name.” I held his face and wiped away some of the soot beneath his eyes with my thumbs. In a few weeks, we would hand the keys to our house to a realtor who would eventually sell the house and wire the money to a bank account. We would tell Anna Lisa she would always know where we are. She would tell us she would not follow. We would pack what we needed in our car. We would put the baby in the back seat, listening to her babble happily. We would look back at that girl child, her features growing more and more determined with each passing day, and say this is crazy, this is wrong, this is right, this is wrong. We would drive north and west and north and west until we reached an ocean and rocky shores and green everywhere and a big, big sky to hold the baby up to while she laughed. Before that, though, I kissed Ben, softer, softer. His curls spilled through my fingers. We tasted like the whitest heat of a fire closest to the ground where most things burn. I said Ben Jr’s name into his mouth, memorised the charred taste of it. q This story was taken from Difficult Women by Roxane Gay ($29.99, Corsair). “Break All The Way Down” was first published in Joyland in a slightly different form in 2013

Photography: Getty Images

“I used one hurt to cover another. I became a fiercely tender bruise as he broke my skin”


START

FRESH

Jumper, $59.99, H&M, hm.com/au; shirt, $259, Viktoria & Woods, viktoriaandwoods.com.au; skirt, $159, Isabelle Quinn, isabellequinn.com.au; earrings, $205, Lee Mathews, leemathews.com.au

TAKE

CHARGE CHOOSE

Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group. Styling: Sara Smith. Hair: Adam Markarian. Makeup: Sam Addington at Kramer + Kramer. Model: Lameka Fox at IMG

A NEW

DIRECTION

ELLE

FASHION


POINT BLANC Hit the spot between cool and casual with deconstructed shapes in shades of cream and white / Photographs by Darren McDonald Styling by Sara Smith

Knit, $1,050, Dion Lee, dionlee.com (worn throughout); pants, $900, Tome, tomenyc.com; shoes, $1,500, Céline, celine.com (worn throughout); earrings, $205, Lee Mathews, leemathews.com.au (worn throughout)

93


Coat, $1,800, Edun, shopbop.com; top, $330, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au; skirt, $495, Bianca Spender, biancaspender.com

94


Jacket, $6,500, dress, $1,900, pants, $POA, shoes (worn throughout), $1,700, all Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600; earring, $4,900, Tiffany & Co, tiffany.com.au

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Jacket, $514, T By Alexander Wang, alexanderwang.com; top, $293, Alexander Wang, alexanderwang.com; jeans, $700, Off-White, off---white.com; earring, $2,950, Sarah & Sebastian, sarahandsebastian.com

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Top, $120, Scanlan Theodore, scanlantheodore.com; pants, $1,300, CĂŠline, celine.com

99


T-shirt, $156, T By Alexander Wang, alexanderwang.com; jumpsuit (worn as pants), $1,612, Stella McCartney, stellamccartney.com; earring, $110, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au (worn throughout)

100


Jacket, $220, Vale, valedenim.com; shirt, $300, Anna Quan, annaquan.com; pants, $1,100, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au

101


Dress, $5,600, rings, $510 each, all Louis Vuitton, au.louisvuitton.com

102


Jacket, $2,550, Ellery, ellery.com; belted top, $51.99, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300; pants, $780, DKNY, dkny.com; earrings, $220, Dinosaur Designs, dinosaurdesigns.com.au Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group. Hair: Adam Markarian. Makeup: Sam Addington at Kramer + Kramer. Model: Lameka Fox at IMG

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THE ITALIAN J OB Photographs by Stefania Paparelli Styling by Emma Kalfus

When in Rome... look exactly like this


T-shirt, $350, Bally, 1800 781 851; pants, $405, Karen Walker, karenwalker.com; belt, $299, IRO, (02) 9362 1165 Opposite: top, $490, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au; pants, $420, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; loafers, $1,495, Maison Margiela, maisonmargiela.com (worn throughout)


Shirt, $30, Boohoo, boohoo.com; corset, $640, Christopher Esber, mychameleon.com.au; pants, $49.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600


Jumpsuit, $175, COS, cosstores.com; bag, $3,945, Fendi, fendi.com

107


Shirt, $1,210, pants, $2,440, both Chanel, 1300 242 635; belt, $POA, Maison Margiela, maisonmargiela.com

108


Bodice, $269, pants, $389, both Kate Sylvester, katesylvester.com; shirt, $149, Hansen & Gretel, hansenandgretel.com

110


Jacket, $99.99, pants, $59.99, both H&M, hm.com/au; T-shirt, $49.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300; heels, $1,900, CĂŠline, celine.com


Crop, $345, Georgia Alice, georgiaalice.com; T-shirt, $44.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300; pants, $1,579, IRO, (02) 9362 1165; sandals, $520, Bassike, bassike.com

112


Jacket, $149, Denim CoLab, denimcolab.com; shirt, $350, Toteme, mychameleon.com.au; pants, $115, COS, cosstores.com; loafers, $1,500, CĂŠline, celine.com (worn throughout)

113


Dress, $POA, pants, $POA, both Louis Vuitton, au.louisvuitton.com; sandals, $1,600, CĂŠline, celine.com

114


Top, $3,450, pants, $1,300, both CĂŠline, celine.com Photography: Stefania Paparelli at Company 1. Hair and makeup: Daniela Maggineti. Model: Nuria Rothschild at IMG

115


Dress, $2,200, Christopher Esber, christopheresber.com.au; shirt, $650, Coach 1941, coachaustralia.com; jacket (tied around waist), $94.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300; jeans, $130, Levi’s, levis.com.au; earring, nose ring, both model’s own (both worn throughout); bag, $500, Max Mara, maxmara.com; ring, $149, Swarovski, swarovski.com (worn throughout)

play it cool

The season’s hero pieces come easy done. Mix them accordingly /

Photographs by Simon Upton Styling by Rachel Wayman


Jacket, $110, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300; dress, $6,700, Gucci, gucci.com/au; shoes, $825, Bally, 1800 781 851 (worn throughout); bag, $259, Lacoste Runway, lacoste.com.au; ring, $1,450, Sarah & Sebastian, sarahandsebastian.com (worn throughout)


Blazer, $1,610, Max Mara, maxmara.com; shirt, $490, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; pants, $90, adidas, adidas.com.au; earrings, model’s own (worn throughout); necklace, $1,695, Bally, 1800 781 851; bag (worn around waist), $149, Lacoste, lacoste.com.au; watch, $249, Kapten & Son, kapten-son.com.au; ring, $380, Sarah & Sebastian, sarahandsebastian.com (worn throughout); bag, $8,070, Fendi, fendi.com


Jacket, $3,550, Bally, 1800 781 851; top, $329, Marc Cain, stylehq.com.au

119


Jumpsuit, $1,620, Natasha Zinko, stylebop.com; earring, $780, Ellery, ellery.com (worn throughout)

120


121


Coat, $660, pants, $390, both Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; jumper (on shoulders), $59.99, H&M, hm.com/au; dress, $6,120, Chanel, 1300 242 635; earrings, $595, Marni, (02) 9327 3809; bag, $2,190, Salvatore Ferragamo, 1300 095 224; watch, $249, Kapten & Son, kapten-son.com.au (worn throughout)


Top, $390, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; pants, $659, Sonia Rykiel, stylebop.com; necklace, $795, Marni, (02) 9327 3809; bag, $4,880, Fendi, fendi.com; ring (on model’s left pinkie), $89, Swarovski, swarovski.com

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Jacket, $100, adidas, adidas.com.au; dress, $2,500, boots, $950, both Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com; jeans, $160, Levi’s, levis.com.au; silver bracelet, $475, gold bracelet, $525, both Lucy Folk, lucyfolk.com

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Coat, $3,250, bag, $2,995, both Bally, 1800 781 851; jacket, $120, Ellesse, theiconic.com.au; dress, $490, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377

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Jumpsuit, $1,620, Natasha Zinko, stylebop.com; top, $290, Sandro, (02) 9327 3377; jumper (tied around waist), $169, The Upside, theupsidesport.com.au; bag, $220, Salty Bag, greekstylecouncil.com Photography: Simon Upton at The Artist Group. Hair: Michael Brennan at The Artist Group. Makeup: Amanda Reardon at Vivien’s Creative. Model: Waleska Gorczevski at Priscilla’s Model Management


T-shirt, $39.95, Levi’s, levis.com.au

in the trenches

Jumper, $49.99, H&M, hm.com/au

The trans-seasonal quick-fix? A long, breezy coat thrown over a summer dress.

Coat, $250, Finders Keepers The Label, finderskeepersthelabel. com.au

Belt, $59, David Lawrence, davidlawrence.com.au

Culottes, $175, COS, cosstores.com

CHECKLIST

Dress, $169, Isla, islalabel.com

High-street buys inspired by this issue’s fashion shoots

Trench, $240, C/meo Collective, cmeocollective.com

clean slate

RAW, NATURAL TONES WITH A HINT OF CHEEKY RED: THIS IS

white flag

Swap your favourite blue jeans for new-look white denim. Bonus points for unfinished hems and contrast detailing.

Jacket, $140, The Fifth Label, thefifthlabel.com

THE WARDROBE FRESH-START YOU’VE BEEN SEARCHING FOR. Top, $49.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

Pants, $69.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

Trench, $110, Sportsgirl, sportsgirl.com.au

Bag, $45.95, Zara, (02) 9376 7600 Mules, $200, Jaggar Footwear, jaggarfootwear.com.au

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Heels, $120, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300


Slides, $200, Wittner, wittner.com.au

Slides, $200, Jaggar Footwear, jaggarfootwear.com.au

back to black

Flats, $29.99, H&M, hm.com/au

The working girl’s shoe of choice: black flats made cool by tapered toes and oversized buckles.

T-shirt, $20, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300 T-shirt, $29.95, Sportsgirl, sportsgirl.com.au

Sleeveless trench, $349, Cue, cue.cc

roman holiday

T-shirt, $20, Zara, (02) 9376 7600

WORK-TO-PLAY TAILORING Jacket, $229, Isla, islalabel.com

LOOSENS UP THANKS TO BRIGHT COLOURS AND CLEVER LAYERING.

Pants, $150, C/meo Collective, cmeocollective.com

Words and styling: Claudia Jukic. Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group; Stefania Paparelli at Company 1; Pablo Martin (still-life)

Dress, $130, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300

Jacket, $369, Rails, railsclothing.com Pants, $89.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300

the not-so-basic staples

Two outerwear classics (the denim jacket and the bomber) get a fresh update by way of embroidery and eyelet details.

Pants, $79.95, Topshop, (02) 8072 9300

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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SINGING THE RED CARPET BLUES With a new celebrity

fashion sighting

I

blazing across the social-media universe every .0001 seconds, can a single dress survive in our mind’s eye long enough to

n 1976, a very bronzed and svelte-again rapture-inducing procession of gowns, Elizabeth Taylor strode down the jewels and shoes – has ignited trends, onstage staircase at the 48th annual sparked careers for designers as well as Academy Awards to close the stars, and launched magazines, TV ceremony with a sincerely loopy salute programs and even networks. Last year’s to the US Bicentennial, which ended with telecast alone attracted several hundred become legendary? her beseeching the bewildered audience million viewers around the world and / to join her in a sing-along of “America generated 3.9 billion “tweet impressions” Words by Hal Rubenstein The Beautiful”. All that saved this bizarre within a 7.5-hour time frame – roughly finale from ranking as an All-Time Awkward Oscars one for every two people on earth. Moment – right up there with Rob Lowe’s legendary With appetites that voracious, it’s no wonder the 1989 duet with Snow White to the tune of “Proud Mary” traditional red-carpet season that once stretched from – was that Taylor looked sensational. Her brilliant the Emmys to the Golden Globes to the Grammys poppy-red strapless gown, designed by her new best and ended with the Academy Awards has expanded friend, Halston, showcased the streamlined allure of the to include the People’s Choice Awards (what are those most influential American designer of the ’70s. for, again?), not to mention all those acronyms – VMAs, Burned as it was into my brain for decades, the gown CMAs, SAGs, BAFTAs. Add to that the daily sartorial would have been a prime candidate for my 2011 book, fix provided by celebrity Starbucks runs, courthouse 100 Unforgettable Dresses. But a six-month search appearances and morning-show drop-ins (the red produced no useable photos. We found grainy stills carpet, it seems, is neither red nor a carpet anymore), and onstage shots, but where was the full-length photo and you have a nearly non-stop parade of heavily we now routinely see posted within seconds of any star documented and disseminated fashion moments. air-kissing Ryan Seacrest? There weren’t any. The “red Question is, what effect does all that muchness have on carpet” as we know it didn’t exist in 1976. the impact of a single, stunning dress? Will women still Sounds as inconceivable as a world without Spanx, sigh for, crush on and memorise (not to mention buy) right? Oscars night, that annual armchair pilgrimage a truly killer gown – when they know there are endless to fashion mecca – with its arrhythmic, occasionally options just around the corner? ]


Blake Lively in Chanel Couture / 2014 Cannes Film Festival

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Uma Thurman in Prada / 1995 Academy Awards

When The Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences began unrolling a red runner in 1961, its presence was functional, marking a direct path to the ceremony. Photos of awards-show arrivals at the time were still mostly black and white (the first in-colour Oscars telecast wasn’t until 1966). With the exception of Audrey Hepburn’s lifelong friendship with Hubert de Givenchy, most fashion designers courted society doyennes, not actors. Indeed, it was common for stars to be dressed for events by their movie studio’s costume designers. The aquamarine satin gown Grace Kelly wore to accept her statuette in 1955 – deemed by many to be the best Oscars dress ever – was created by Paramount costumer Edith Head. The only reason there are great photos of Kelly wearing it is that Life magazine shot her in it days after the ceremony. It wasn’t until 1989 that Giorgio Armani changed things forever by dressing a 30-year-old Michelle Pfeiffer, then fresh off Dangerous Liaisons, for the Oscars. Years before, when Armani had first approached the actress about wearing his designs to events, she had said, “Why do I want someone to dress me? I can dress myself. And who is Giorgio Armani?” But the charming designer prevailed, and the Armani cocktail suit Pfeiffer wore to the Oscars signified a designer-geared shift in red-carpet dressing – not that there are many photos of her, either. “Back then, the red carpet wasn’t even wide enough to get a full head-to-toe shot,” says Wanda McDaniel, Armani’s long-time executive vice-president of entertainment industry communications. Nevertheless, Armani’s idea proved prescient. The designer backed Hollywood’s collective revaluation of stardom: actors were choosing “clothing that enhanced... not costumes,” he noted in one interview – Beyoncé in Givenchy / 2015 Met Gala

“WITH COUTURE, THE CANDY STORE DOESN’T OPEN FOR EVERYONE. DO YOU HAVE A RELATIONSHIP WITH US? DO YOU FIT THE BRAND?”

“exactly the type of revolution I was endorsing in the fashion world.” Armani had a hunch the public would relate better to his “real” clothes on these “real” folks, as opposed to models. Recruitment was swift and impressive: Anjelica Huston, Jodie Foster, Annette Bening and Julia Roberts got on board, as did countless producers, directors and agents. So many people sported the maestro’s label to the 1990 Oscars that Women’s Wear Daily proclaimed it the “Armani Awards”. One thing’s for sure in fashion: no matter who comes up with a flashpoint idea, sole ownership doesn’t last long. The following year, Armani’s rival, Gianni Versace, staked his claim on wowza sex appeal when one of his favourite supers, Cindy Crawford, accompanied thenbeau Richard Gere to the ceremony in a red gown that plunged navelward in front and slit up past her thigh in back. This, plus Liz Hurley’s subsequent trafficstopping safety-pin gown, confirmed Versace as the decade’s go-to man for provocative ready-to-wear. The red carpet’s influence became even more obvious when one glance at an ethereal Uma Thurman aswirl in lavender chiffon in 1995 suddenly alerted millions of “civilians” to the fact that Prada made more than cute nylon backpacks. A year later, Calvin Klein successfully shifted his brand image from saucy jeans and underwear campaigns (and undermined the carpet’s penchant for excess) by sliding a simple beaded slip over the town’s new golden girl, Gwyneth Paltrow – handily accessorised by the town’s new golden boy, Brad Pitt. Presto, slip dresses became an instant Calvin trademark – and the most knocked-off dress of the season. Which is why, when Vera Wang wanted to put her business on the map, she did so not at New York Fashion Week, but by embarking on a fabled association with Sharon Stone, who famously paired a Gap shirt with a Wang ball skirt in 1998. “I didn’t have the money to do fashion shows,” Wang says. “But I saw Armani, Versace and Dolce being defined by who they were dressing. So I put my budgets into dressing a few stars.” But it was John Galliano who irrevocably upped the ante. Before the 1997 Oscars, Nicole Kidman was known as the tall, titian-tressed Aussie overshadowed by her shorter supernova husband, Tom Cruise. But in Galliano’s shimmering chartreuse chinoiserie – embossed with hours’ worth of hand-stitched floral embroidery and a latticed back of hand-strung crystals – she commanded the night’s brightest spotlight. Every designer got in line to dress her, and the carpet got a new benchmark: the exclusivity of haute couture. It was no longer enough for a star to wear something pretty. Now, she needed to have what no-one else had. Cate Blanchett upgraded from Armani to Armani Privé; Jennifer Lopez had Valentino recreate a gown once made for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. But not every actress was deemed worth the 200-odd hours it takes to craft a one-of-a-kind gown. “With


Cate Blanchett in Armani Privé / 2016 Academy Awards

Photography: Getty Images

Rihanna in Guo Pei / 2015 Met Gala

“THE ‘RED CARPET’ NOW REFERS TO ANYTIME I HAVE TO DRESS A STAR”

couture, the candy store doesn’t open for everyone,” McDaniel says. “Do you have a relationship with us? Are you friends with Armani? Do you fit the brand?” But while exclusivity ensured a singular moment on the red carpet, it also had its drawbacks. Clothing that out of reach is eye candy; less real-life relevant to a fashion-loving viewer. “I’ve made some amazing gowns for A-listers, but even I couldn’t think of where I would ever wear them,” Wang admits. “The dress becomes an end in itself, a fantasy piece, but I don’t think such fantasies make anyone want to go shopping.” But there are still plenty of instances when a redcarpet look has made people go shopping – like the time Megan Fox, a sultry (if not super) star, showed up for the 2009 Berlin premiere of the second Transformers film in a scarlet Roberto Cavalli gown with a sizeable midriff cut-out at the waist. To quote the grand old ladies’ man himself: “Within three days, there wasn’t one red Cavalli dress to be had anywhere in the world.” Take note. Fox walked a carpet at an untelevised Sunday-night event in Berlin. So how did a global buying frenzy ensue? In less than a decade, social media had forged two seismic changes in carpet coverage: first, it gave us the ability to instantly view activity anywhere in the world; second, it magnified our appetite for content – now, even with a red carpet somewhere on the planet every night of the week, we’re never satiated. “Social media is about continuous eyeballs: how many? How fast? How often?” says star stylist Elizabeth Stewart. “For me, the ‘red carpet’ now refers to anytime I have to dress an actress. If Jessica [Chastain] or Cate [Blanchett] is publicising a film with buzz, I’ll be putting her into between 150 and 200 outfits a season. Under those circumstances, any woman would need a stylist – it’s insane! And each one of those looks will get time on social media – it’s the great equaliser.” How much can a dress resonate, when there’s the “Dress Of The Day”, “Best Of The Week” and “10 Picks For Tuesday”? It’s fun, but superlatives can be numbing. Remember last August, when Taylor Swift reported for jury duty in a low-key black jumpsuit by

L’Agence? That look generated the same Instagram fervour as Rihanna’s silk Alexandre Vauthier gown, one of the four looks she wore at the VMAs the night before. “People have never been able to see as much,” says Stewart. “While that can be great for raising a designer’s profile, the clothes become a fabulous blur when every appearance has equal importance.” Social media is perhaps the most important brandawareness builder today. But not a single designer, stylist or retail executive interviewed for this story could offer proof that millions of social media hits increase actual sales. Off the record, many wonder if the “Next!” mentality that eschews lingering on a look hasn’t dulled the sheer fashion impact of main-stage red-carpet events like the Oscars and the Golden Globes. One fashion director of a luxury department store confessed that his best customer recently dismissed his recommendation of a much-anticipated autumn arrival, saying, “I’m sure it’s new, but I’ve seen it on everyone already. What else have you got?” A few days before I interviewed McDaniel, a stylist had called her, frantic to dress a young actress in something “memorable, wonderful and immediate”. Had an awards show moved up a date? Were George and Amal renewing their vows and allowing in press? No. It was for a budding star’s first appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!. The actress has a huge Twitter following. For now, the Oscars can wait. q

Jennifer Lawrence in Dior Couture / 2013 Academy Awards

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inspired by clouds for a clean, crisp taste.

vapour distilled mineralised water. Š2016 Energy Brands Inc.


FIT CLUB

fuel gauge What you consume before, during and after a workout has a huge impact on how well you perform and how good you feel. We quiz nutritionist Pip Reed on the perfect fuel plans for every fitness scenario START

CARDIO IS MY RELIGION

How intense is your workout? At what time of the day do you work out?

I KEEP IT ZEN WITH YOGA/BARRE/PILATES

FIRST THING

Compiled by: Janna Johnson O’Toole. Photography: Bjarne Jonasson

Electrolyte Formula, $28.50, IsoWhey Sports, isowheysports.com.au smartwater, $3.50, Glaceau, woolworths.com.au

PRE-WORKOUT: About 30 to 45 minutes

before training, have a small carbbased snack such as half a banana, plus half a litre or more of water, sipped on rather than sculled to reduce stitches. Add electrolytes if you perspire a lot. MID-WORKOUT: Choose room-temp water or an electrolyte drink. Reed recommends IsoWhey Sports Electrolyte Formula, which contains natural electrolytes derived from coconut water with added magnesium, and is free of artificial colours, flavours and sweeteners. Avoid sugary sports drinks. POST-WORKOUT: Hydrate with coconut water and assist muscle repair with a smoothie made with a shot of espresso and protein powder with milk (the coffee will also keep your metabolism firing). IDEAL NEXT MEAL: Within 45 minutes of training, have a protein- and carbrich breakfast, such as eggs with spinach, tomato and avocado on rye sourdough.

LATER IN THE DAY

PRE-WORKOUT: One to two hours

YOUR FUEL GUIDE

room-temperature water (it absorbs faster than icy-cold). If a heated yoga class makes you perspire significantly (or your workout is longer than 90 minutes), add electrolytes to maintain energy and avoid dehydration. POST-WORKOUT: Keep up your fluids with water. If you’re hungry, reach for a protein- and carb-rich snack such as two boiled eggs and a banana. And enjoy that morning coffee – caffeine helps muscles recover faster, especially when consumed with carbs. IDEAL NEXT MEAL: After finishing the above post-workout, your next main meal should be about 90 minutes later and consist of lean protein (chicken, fish, turkey) with avocado, nuts, seeds and salad or vegetables (in other words, don’t undo that hard work with a schnitty).

YOUR FUEL GUIDE

YOUR FUEL GUIDE

PRE-WORKOUT: Sip on water. MID-WORKOUT: Reed says to opt for

before you start training, have some carbohydrates to increase your energy levels, such as Greek yoghurt with fruit or sourdough with sliced banana. MID-WORKOUT: Consume water, with the addition of electrolytes if you sweat a lot. POST-WORKOUT: Boost your hydration with coconut water, and within 45 minutes of your session have a combo of protein and carbs, such as boiled eggs and a banana, or 200g Greek yoghurt with chia seeds and nuts. IDEAL NEXT MEAL: Have a dinner rich in lean protein (chicken, turkey, tuna, salmon) and complex carbs such as quinoa, brown rice and vegies. q

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chill pills Stressed? Ha. Like we had to ask. We quiz top naturopaths on the best supplements to help you cope

C

igarettes, sitting, sugar: you’ve all had your moment of naming and shaming. Step aside for the latest health assassin du jour: cortisol. “Our body’s way of dealing with a busy and stressful life is to pump out this stress hormone throughout the day,” says naturopath Lisa Guy. “And if you have consistently high cortisol levels, it will start negatively affecting your health in a variety of ways.” The hormone is well-intentioned; it’s adrenaline’s trusty flight-or-fight sidekick – a survival tactic that’s meant to kick in during the most stressful, lifeendangering times (think lion versus cavewoman). But in 2017, life’s overstimulation has our adrenal glands (which release cortisol and adrenaline) working overtime, and these high levels of hormones are unfortunately sending everything out of whack and causing adrenal fatigue. “The effort of keeping all of life’s balls in the air can be very stressful and affect sleep, energy levels, digestion and hormonal balance,”

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says Danielle Steedman, Blackmores’ advisory naturopath. From suppressing our immune system, slowing our metabolism and creating inflammation in the body (which not only causes premature ageing, but can also lead to chronic diseases such as cancer), to sleep problems, low libido and increased fertility issues, stress is literally our worst enemy. The good news (and yes, there is some) is that there’s a variety of supplements to help the body cope better. So if being told to just relax and meditate yet again makes you want to hurl a yoga mat out the window, we suggest you opt for one of these instead...

withania

WHAT IT IS: Otherwise

known as Indian ginseng, this herb is used in Ayurvedic medicine for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant properties. HOW IT HELPS: “It’s especially useful for immune and stress


FIT CLUB PSA: YOU CAN’T SUPPLEMENT YOUR WAY OUT OF A BAD DIET Chill out by filling up on…

support and helps decrease cortisol levels,” explains Cheryl Goodman, Swisse naturopath. TRY: Swisse Ultiboost Stress Relief ($29.95, swisse.com), which combines withania with vitamin C, to support the adrenals.

VITAMIN C Beyond boosting your immune system, the vitamin “supports the synthesis of hormones involved in the body’s response to stress,” says Goodman. Stock up on capsicum, dark leafy greens, kiwifruit, broccoli, berries, citrus fruits, tomatoes, peas and papaya. B VITAMINS “They help support the nervous system, which improves the body’s ability to cope with stress,” says Steedman, who recommends beans, chicken, turkey, fish, fruits, vegetables, meat, eggs and dairy for a vitamin B boost. PROTEIN Foods rich in protein supply the amino acid tryptophan. “It’s needed to make serotonin and melatonin, which help us feel calm, relaxed and promote sleep,” says Guy. Fill up on tofu, cheese, red meat, chicken, turkey, fish, lentils and eggs.

licorice root

Popular in Chinese medicine, licorice root is considered an “adaptogenic” herb that helps support adrenal health, says Guy. HOW IT HELPS: Licorice root helps the body to regulate cortisol more efficiently, thus giving your adrenals a break and helping prevent adrenal exhaustion. TRY: Bodhi Organic Tea TranquiliTEA ($17, bodhiorganictea.com). The blend contains certified organic licorice, aniseed, fennel, valerian and passionflower. WHAT IT IS:

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole. Photography: Alamy; Liz Collins/trunkarchive.com/Snapper Media

magnesium

WHAT IT IS: This essential mineral assists with a multitude of functions, helping with blood glucose control, optimising muscle recovery and supporting a healthy nervous system. HOW IT HELPS: “Stress, especially when experienced chronically, can deplete levels of magnesium in our body so it’s important to ensure we replenish what is lost during these times,” says Goodman. It also helps relax muscles, which often hold pent-up nervous tension. TRY: Blackmores Bio Magnesium ($33.49, blackmores.com.au), which also includes vitamin B to help support the nervous system.

phosphatidylserine

chamomile and passionflower

Naturopath David Jivan recommends sipping a tea blend containing these herbs, which are said to support the nervous system, reducing anxiety. HOW IT HELPS: Passionflower is actually listed as a herbal tranquilliser in Germany, while chamomile has been shown to reduce the symptoms of generalised anxiety disorder – even against an identically smelling placebo. TRY: Koala Tea Organics Dreamtime Organic Tea ($4.35, koalatea.com.au). WHAT IT IS:

turmeric WHAT IT IS: A

herb praised for its high level of antiinflammatory properties. HOW IT HELPS: By reducing free-radical damage associated with inflammation (a side effect of cortisol), turmeric can help prevent cell damage, premature ageing and worse. TRY: Swisse Ultiboost Curcumin ($39.99, swisse.com), which contains a high dose of turmeric’s active ingredient. q

WHAT IT IS: A naturally occurring amino-acid derivative, it’s found in cell membranes and plays a vital role in keeping cells functioning and communicating well. HOW IT HELPS: It regulates and blocks excess levels of cortisol, helping restore healthy sleep patterns and WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH SPRAY SUPPLEMENTS? preventing adrenal fatigue. Studies If the thought of choking down large pills puts you off vitamins and supplements, then show that a 400mg dosage is the the idea of a spray may be easier to swallow. While they’re not mainstream yet, a variety most effective for keeping cortisol of brands are creating supplement spritzes that deliver the vitamins and minerals either through the skin or under the tongue. The theory is that it’s absorbed more quickly, levels in a healthy balance. unlike a pill that has to be digested and metabolised through the liver and kidneys. TRY: Jarrow Formulas PS 100 ($68.60, Ease’s magnesium spray may be the most promising for stress relief, with claims jarrow.com).

“this powerful supplement is easily absorbed into the skin, enters the blood stream and goes directly to work in your body, eliminating aches and pains, alleviating stress and anxiety, aiding digestion, ensuring deeper and more satisfying sleep and leaving you feeling revitalised and strong”. A single spray delivers 27.2mg (compared to 300mg in most vitamins), so prepare to spritz skin (think chest and abdomen) a dozen times. Visit store.activationproducts.com for more info. And, of course, chat with your GP before starting a supplement regimen.

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smart because it’s made that way.

vapour distilled mineralised water inspired by clouds, for a clean, crisp taste. Š2016 Energy Brands Inc.


BEAUTY

@jodhimeares

my weekend in products

Jodhi Meares, founder and creative director of sports-luxe fashion label The Upside, follows a mindful regimen centred around holistic health

Compiled by: Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); courtesy of The Upside. Shelves, $14.99 each, IKEA, ikea.com/au

From left: Patchouli, $32.95, Perfect Potion, perfectpotion.com.au – “I mix my own scents instead of using perfume.” Glimmer Shine, $37.95, Moroccanoil, moroccanoil.com – “I don’t use a lot of hair products. I let it dry and use this if I need more shine.” Shampoo For Moisture & Control, $58, Conditioner For Moisture & Control, $59, both Oribe, 1300 725 122 – “I like to wash my hair daily. My amazing friend and hairdresser Di G [Diane Gorgievski] put me on to these.” UVA/UVB Defence SPF 50+, $25.30, Cetaphil, 1800 800 765 – “I live in Hawaii and am out in the sun often – protecting my skin is paramount.” Skin Moisture Boost Lotion, $11.99, Alpha Keri, alphakeri.com.au – “Straight after a shower, I moisturise with this. I don’t feel I need to spend a fortune on skincare.” Pure Radiant Tinted Moisturiser, $63, Nars, mecca.com.au – “I apply it before I leave the house. But I do believe great skin starts from the inside. I practise yoga, eat well and see an acupuncturist.” Blush Volupté, $75, Yves Saint Laurent, 1300 651 991 – “I use just a touch.” Naturally Glossy Mascara, $34, Clinique, clinique.com.au – “When I’m out for dinner, it’s just tinted moisturiser, blush and mascara.”

From left: Gentle Facial Wash, $84, GlyMed Plus, senseonline.com.au – “I cleanse day and night. Every time I meet with my beautician, she’ll vary products from this brand.” Dream On Temple Balm, $24, Theseeke, theseeke.com – “Essential for a better night’s sleep.” Protective Lip Balm SPF 30, $19, Aesop, aesop.com/au – “It can get windy on [my hiking] trails as I reach the clifftops, so I always have this.” #Salts Travel, $7, #Salts, $20, both Sid & Jac, sidandjac.com; Candle in Wreath, $33, Wildfolk, wildfolk.com.au; Salt Soak, $39.95, Theseeke, theseeke.com – “I’m building a company, so my days can be stressful. I use the weekends for a reboot, which calls for an evening bath. I light a candle and get a good book. It makes my soul happy.” Lavender Pure Essential Oils, $35 each, Jurlique, jurlique.com.au – “Just a few drops on my pillow.”

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BEAUTY I

R E A L LY

phoebe tonkin

beauty weapon

KIT ESSENTIALS

2

1. Rouge Allure in Pirate, $52, Chanel, 1300 242 635 2. Gold Lust Repair & Restore Shampoo, $68, Oribe, 1300 725 122 3. La Solution 10 De Chanel, $132, Chanel, 1300 242 635 4. Purity Detox Scrub, $68, Cosmedix, 1800 648 851 5. Vitalumière Aqua Ultra-Light Skin Perfecting Makeup, $77, Chanel, 1300 242 635 6. Holi (Rose) No.4 Deodorant, $32, Agent Nateur & Shiva Rose, iamnaturalstore.com.au

makeup remover – I use that or olive oil, which is especially great when you are on location and you can just order it from room service!

BEAUTY

WITHIN.

F O R A N I G H T O U T, I W A N T T O F R E S H . Lately I’ve been sticking to really clean, matte skin, a blotted, stained red lip, a dark brow and no mascara. I use Chanel Vitalumière Aqua foundation, Glossier Boy Brow and Chanel Rouge Allure lipstick in Pirate.

LOOK

I L O V E FA C I A L S . I W O U L D G O

In Sydney, I see Melanie Grant, and in LA, I go to Shani Darden. They are my two magical skin fairies. For a body treatment, I go to a Korean spa, where everyone is nude and you get the greatest body scrub – it feels like a whole layer of skin has come off. My friend calls it the “dolphin treatment” because that’s how smooth you feel afterwards. ONCE A WEEK IF I COULD.

W H E N YO U H I T YO U R M I D -

The Originals actress may have hit superstar status, but that doesn’t mean she’s forgotten her Aussie roots. She shares her go-to products, supplements and why room service is her secret

1

FROM

TWENTIES, TO

YO U

U N D E R S TA N D

S TA R T WHY

E V E RYO N E T E L L S YO U TO

W E A R S P F. It’s so important, especially being Australian, and I don’t go a day without it. My routine is pretty simple. In the morning I wash my face with an iS Clinical cleanser, followed with their serum, and then I moisturise with La Solution 10 De Chanel, and lastly, I apply sunscreen. In the evening, a few times a week, I use Cosmedix Purity Detox Scrub, Resurface By Shani Darden Retinol Reform and Chanel Le Lift Flash Eye Revitalizer. And the Oribe Gold Lust products are my go-to for hair.

WHEN

I

FEEL

I ’ V E F O U N D T H E B E S T N AT U R A L O U T T H E R E . It’s Agent Nateur & Shiva Rose’s Holi (Rose) No.4 Deodorant, which is made of coconut oil and avocado butter. I also use coconut oil in my hair and leave it in for a few hours, and it makes a great

DEODORANT

@phoebejtonkin

4 5

6

ELLE AUSTRALIA

H AV I N G

I take chlorophyll and spirulina tablets so at least I’m incorporating some greens! They’re great for an extra boost. I also take a daily probiotic and vitamin D because I’m inside a studio all day and sometimes won’t see any daylight. And I’ll splurge on quality organic food and acupuncture – I really believe it’s important to listen to your body, be gentle on yourself and nourish yourself with good food and good, positive people. q

3

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LIKE

CHEESE AND WINE FOR DINNER,

Compiled by: Janna Johnson O’Toole. Photography: Sevak Babakhani (still-life); Getty Images

tête-à-tête with

BELIEVE

I feel most beautiful when my skin is glowing, my hair is silky and lustrous, and I don’t even need to wear any makeup at all. Eating nutritious fruits and vegetables and getting enough water – drink more than you think you need! – is a big priority for me, and then using good products and keeping consistent with my skincare regimen comes second.

S TA R T S


EXTRA

On our February wish list: an edgy new fragrance, pretty pink aviators and two head-turning bags

ZADIG & VOLTAIRE

Photography: Darren McDonald at The Artist Group. Styling: Sara Smith. Hair: Adam Markarian. Makeup: Sam Addington at Kramer + Kramer. Model: Lameka Fox at IMG. Model wears: top, $120, Scanlan Theodore, scanlantheodore.com; pants, $1,300, shoes, $1,500, both Céline, celine.com; earrings, $205, Lee Mathews, leemathews.com.au

Zadig & Voltaire is known for its cool, rock-chic clothes, and its new scents are no different. With shared notes of pepper, vanilla and sandalwood, these fragrances are unique yet in sync – perfect for you and your man. This Is Her!, $70 for 30ml, This Is Him!, $62 for 30ml; (02) 9695 5678

GLACEAU

Inspired by the natural water cycle, Glaceau smartwater is vapour-distilled to deliver a distinctive, clean, crisp taste. Then Mother Nature gets one-upped, with the addition of electrolytes. They don’t call it smartwater for nothing. $3.50; coca-colajourney.com.au

MIMCO

Rendered in Italian snake-embossed hide and luxurious suede, Mimco’s Westminster Tote is as ornate as its namesake. With six ways to wear, it’s both versatile and statement-making – but only 50 have been created, so you better get in quick. $799; mimco.com.au

ZIERA

From work to weekend and anything in between, the Caprice wedges by Ziera are your new wardrobe hero. Available in denim, nude and black suede, they’re equal parts chic and comfortable, so you’ll feel fabulous all day. $230; zierashoes.com

TOM FORD

If ever there was a case for adopting rosecoloured glasses, it’s these stylish aviators from Tom Ford. Featuring blush-toned mirrored lenses and a leather brow bar, they’re a subtle nod to this season’s playful pink trend. $779; healyoptical.com.au

COACH

Coach has re-imagined one of its iconic designs from the ’70s, releasing the Dinky 24 Crossbody bag in luxe glove-tanned leather with an on-trend chain-and-leather strap. In a chic wine shade with contrast stitching, it’s a must-have for autumn. $795; coachaustralia.com

SHEDD

No room in your closet for your new purchases? SHEDD your unwanted items for cash. The app offers a fashion-only marketplace where you can sell (and buy) pre-loved items in just a few simple steps. It’s never been easier to update your wardrobe. Free on iTunes and Google Play

BURT’S BEES

Sure, Burt’s Bees Lipstick offers vibrant colour – but that’s not the only reason we’re fans. It’s also 100 per cent natural and packs a serious hydration punch, with moringa and raspberry seed oils helping to keep your lips soft and supple for a full eight hours. $19.95; burtsbees.com.au

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WINK,

WINK Lush lashes have always been a muse’s defining asset. From Elizabeth Taylor and Twiggy to modern-day icons such as Kimmy K, the quest

for a full, flirty set is eternal. But you don’t have to rely on extensions or falsies: the

latest mascara technology boosts

volume and length and, depending on how you apply it, can create any look – from pretty and

posh to cloggy and cool

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BEAUTY the PERFECT lash

Start by curling your lashes. “Always curl them, regardless of whether you apply mascara or not,” advises Maybelline New York makeup director Nigel Stanislaus. Not only will it open up your eyes, but it can also help prevent that messy mascara fallout from when straight lashes skim the under-eye area. Then it’s all about the wand shape – Stanislaus recommends Maybelline’s Lash Sensational Luscious mascara, which has a triangular tip so you can get the oil-enriched formula into hard-to-hit areas (think the outer corners, which are often missed, and the lower lashline). “Plus, the multi-panelled comb prevents clumps and creates long, beautiful lashes,” he says. If you feel like going rogue (and have a few extra minutes), use the wand to coat a flat eyeliner brush with mascara, then use that to paint your lashes. “Sometimes you don’t have enough control with the wand. If I really want to get into the bottom lashes right at the root and to the very tip, I use a combo of the wand and a brush,” says celebrity makeup artist Dotti. It’s her pro secret for creating a super-full effect. From top: Lash Sensational Luscious Full Fan Effect mascara, $21.95, Maybelline New York, 1300 369 327; Angled Eye Brush, $9.99, Wotnot, wotnot.com.au

KICK THE CLUMPS Lash Domination Volumizing Mascara, $27, BareMinerals, mecca.com.au

Le Volume De Chanel Mascara in Noir, $54, Chanel, 1300 242 635

If you love volumising formulas but not the clumps that can come with a rushed application, the good news is you can avoid them – you just have to be quick. Warm the tube in your hands, or in a cup of warm water, to get the product to thin out a little. Once the mascara is on, use a disposable wand (or a cleaned-off old one) to comb through the lengths before it dries.

Grandiôse Mascara, $54, Lancôme, lancome.com.au

BLACK is the new BLACK We’ve tracked down the formulas that are most packed with ultra-rich pigment, so you can maximise your assets with very little effort ]

Great Lash Big Mascara in Blackest Black, $12.95, Maybelline New York, 1300 369 327

the COOL lash

If you’re looking for a finish with a bit more street cred, the recent international runways provided plenty of lived-in-lash inspo. Consider the slightly smudged “morning-after” look created by Tom Pecheux at Rag & Bone SS17. It’s easy to create, says Stanislaus, who suggests first lining eyes with a thin liner, then applying your favourite mascara. “Before lashes dry, blink your eyes a few times to create that organic finish. Then use a cotton tip to clean up any major dollops of mess.”

Telescopic Extra-Black Extreme Lengthening Mascara, $26.95, L’Oréal Paris, 1300 659 359

Diorshow Black Out Mascara, $55, Dior, (02) 9295 9022

Master Precise Skinny Gel Pencil, $13.50, Maybelline New York, 1300 369 327

Film Noir Full Spectrum Mascara, $40, Hourglass, mecca.com.au

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“BEFORE LASHES DRY, BLINK YOUR EYES A FEW TIMES TO CREATE THAT ORGANIC FINISH. THEN CLEAN UP ANY MAJOR DOLLOPS OF MESS”

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BEAUTY 1

AND DON’T FORGET ABOUT A FEW DETAILS…

upgrade your arsenal

A curler does the hard yards in one easy step. Makeup artist Pati Dubroff swears by the “perfect” shape of Surratt Beauty’s version. Relevée Lash Curler, $42, Surratt Beauty, mecca.com.au

Underwhelmed by your current mascara? Don’t settle for ho-hum when va-va-voom is just a tube away. Try one of these ELLE-approved picks 2

If you have FAIR LASHES…

This clever formula delivers a tint with each application, so lashes gradually become darker over time.

1. Volume Colourist Mascara, $18.95, Rimmel London, 1800 812 663 3

With all eyes on your eyes, people are bound to notice your brows, too. Use a fine-tipped pencil to fill in gaps and brush hairs up to keep tidy. Brow Precise Micro Pencil, $13.95, Maybelline New York, 1300 369 327

If you have SENSITIVE EYES…

Opt for an ultra-gentle, ophthalmologist-tested formula. Tarte’s Gifted is free of irritants (think parabens, phthalates and sulfates) and gets the eye doc’s stamp of approval.

2. Gifted Amazonian Clay Smart Mascara, $29, Tarte, sephora.com.au 4

If you suffer from a PERPETUAL CASE OF PANDA EYE…

Try a tubing formula, which uses a flexible polymer (instead of a normal wax formula) to shrink-wrap lashes so they’re virtually sweat- and smudge-proof.

5

3. The Volume Mascara, $40, Kevyn Aucoin, mecca.com.au

If you have to squint to see your SUPER-SHORT LASHES…

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole. Photography: Jonas Jensen; Sevak Babakhani (still-life)

Select a formula that swipes on tiny, lash-building microfibres to bulk up length-challenged lashes. 4. Sumptuous Extreme Lash Multiplying Volume Mascara, $48, Estée Lauder, 1800 061 326

If you apply mascara WHILE SITTING AT A RED LIGHT…

You need it all (volume! Definition! Curl!) in a single swipe for perfection on the go.

5. Roller Lash Curling Mascara, $42, Benefit, benefitcosmetics.com/au

6

If you’re in LASH-EXTENSION REHAB…

A conditioning formula will get your lashes back on track. This gel will soften and strengthen while also providing a natural, glossy finish. q 6. Lash Perfection Gel, $41, Per-fekt Beauty, sephora.com.au

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NEW SEASON, NEW RULES Everything you need to know right here for the hautest eye trends of the season, starting with your new season toolkit

F

resh seasonal trends call for new additions to your beauty arsenal. Full-flutter lashes, laser precision liner and defined, fuller brows is the new eye makeup trifecta, and the technology in these beauty game changers makes mastering the combo a quick flick of the wrist.

THE MASCARA Lash Sensational Luscious Mascara, Maybelline New York, $21.95. The reservoir fanning brush reaches the tiniest of lashes, for that high impact, full-fan effect, while the mascara formula is enriched with Argan, Safflower Seed and Rose Fruit Oil to keep each lash nourished, super lush and long. It’s available in regular (washable), waterproof and brownish/ black versions. Winner.

Maybelline New York, Lash Sensational Luscious Mascara, $21.95.

THE EYELINER Master Precise Liquid Liner, Maybelline New York, $15.95. The 0.5mm lasersharp tip on this liquid liner means wobble-free definition is actually achievable. And the fact that it’s waterproof means the colour density will pay off all day and night if you need it to. THE BROW PENCIL Brow Precise Micro Pencil, Maybelline New York, $13.95. Fluffy, with a focus on fullness over sky-high arches is everyone’s brow goals right now. The 1.5 mm tip on this dual ended pencil means you can mimic the tiniest of hairs with serious precision, and then soften the trickery with a spoolie brush that blends and sets your oh-sonatural new shape. Three shades: Blonde, Auburn and Soft Brown means we can all finally get involved in bigger, better brows.

“THIS RUBBER WAND IS ACTUALLY FANTASTIC. IT MANAGES TO ADD VOLUME WHILE SEPARATING OUT MY LASHES” AUSSIE_CAT87, BEAUTYHEAVEN.COM.AU


WITH PRECIOUS OILS

FANNING RESERVOIR BRUSH

NEW TM

LUSCIOUS MASCARA Now the full-fanned look goes luscious. Nourish your lashes with precious oils.

All I want? Denser, softer lashes.

©2016 Maybelline LLC.


❤ the 2017

EL LE

GREEN AWARDS We tested hundreds of new eco-minded products to select the top performers. Meet the winners that prove going green doesn’t mean sacrificing results

the cult ANTI-AGER _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ TLC Framboos Glycolic Night Serum, $132, Drunk Elephant, mecca.com.au

By the time this US brand landed on our shores last October, there was so much buzz it sold out within its first week on shelves. But it’s no surprise – it marries highly effective ingredients with, well, that’s it. Drunk Elephant’s ingredient blacklist is long and includes parabens, sulphates, phthalates and fragrance among others. So you better believe the actives in this nightly exfoliating treatment (glycolic, lactic and citric acid) not only pack a punch, but also serve a very specific purpose – there’s no filler in sight. Apply nightly to smooth fine lines, refine texture, balance oil and fade pigmentation.

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the GLOW-GETTER _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Amazonian Acai Energising Radiance Mask, $39.95, The Body Shop, thebodyshop.com.au

Talk about paying it forward. Not only does this exfoliating mask polish a lacklustre complexion into super-smooth radiance (sans parabens, silicone, mineral oil and paraffin), but each jar contains babassu oil sourced from a co-op in Brazil, which The Body Shop acquires at a specific price to ensure the women can afford to send their children to secondary school. How amazing is that?

the natural FACELIFT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Cryō Facelift Ice Cube Treatment, $180 for eight, Vanessa Megan, vanessamegan.com

The clever formula combines all the benefits of the totally sci-fi cryotherapy (skinplumping and lifting) with an on-the-couch DIY facial. Expect calm, soothed and less-red skin plus that elusive radiant glow. It also happens to just feel really very nice, which is a trait not to be underestimated in this day and age, because if you feel good, you look even better.

the luxe BODY treat _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Sacred Nature Bio-Certified Oil, $44, Comfort Zone, (02) 9430 2200

For a lavish way to treat your largest organ, this heavenly scented body oil, made with only natural and certified organic oils, is the perfect antidote to a long, hot (read: drying, damaging) summer. The combo of jojoba and buriti oils nourishes skin (and combats stretch marks) while the brand is committed to using only renewable energy to power production.

the OILY-SKIN saviour _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Aknedoron Cleansing Lotion, $25.95, Weleda, 1300 551 454

Finally, an effective, all-natural acne product is no longer an oxymoron. This olive oil-based cleanser contains organic chamomile and biodynamic calendula to soothe red, inflamed skin, while a yummy blend of orange, grapefruit and lavender essential oils fends off bacteria. And because it doesn’t contain harsh chemicals, you won’t have to trade spots for equally frustrating flakes. ]

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GREEN AWARDS

the lovely LIPPIE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Lipstick in (clockwise from top) Lily Lake, Brimming Berry and Sunset Cruise, $19.95 each, Burt’s Bees, burtsbees.com.au

We suggest you think long and hard about which of these pretty shades you want to try, because if you think it’s just going to rub off regardless, think again. Despite being 100 per cent natural, these hydrating lipsticks give legit pigment payoff (we’re talking the kind usually reserved for formulas three times as expensive), while also moisturising with moringa oil, raspberry seed oil and vitamin E. And since the packaging is recyclable and made from post-consumer recycled material, there’s no need to feel bad about having one in every bag if you just can’t make up your mind.

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the essential for BUBS (and you) _ _ _ _ Baby Gentle Body Wash, $9.95, Sukin, 1300 858 898

This body wash is incredibly boring – which is why it’s great. No fancy fragrance, no harsh detergents, no sulphates or parabens; it’s completely void of anything that could disagree with even the most sensitive skin types (and sweet, tiny humans only a few days old). It’s still packed with good stuff – aloe vera, avocado and chamomile – but made 100 per cent carbon-neutral, so really, it couldn’t be more perfectly low-key if it tried.

the ON-THE-GO hero_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Purity Made Simple One-Step Facial Cleansing Cloths, $18, Philosophy, 1800 812 663

These ultra-soft cloths won’t leave you stinging (literally) for a proper face wash after you use them – they’re free from alcohol, synthetic fragrances, dyes, petrochemicals and many of the other irritants that make face wipes too harsh for daily use. And since they’re an extension of Philosophy’s beloved Purity Made Simple cleansing line, they’re gentle enough to use on the eyes, making them the easiest way to take the day off.

the POLISH to the power of two _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 6-Free Formula Nail Polish in (from left) Beloved and Sublime, $22 each, RMS, mecca.com.au

Makeup artist (and green-beauty pioneer) Rose-Marie Swift already has a cult range of makeup that we worship. A couple of years back, she added polish to the collection, based on the bestselling shades of her creamy cosmetics. The polishes adhere to the brand ethos of being cruelty- and petrochemical-free, and are made without those pesky parabens, DBP, toluene, camphor, xylene, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin and any animal products – yet they’re positively packed with (all-pretty) pigment. Which means you can change shades every other day and not feel guilty about it.

the TRIPLE THREAT _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Natural Defence BB Cream SPF 30, $24.99, Swisse, swisse.com

Perfectly natural, glowy tint? Check. Powered-up sun protection without even a hint of ghostly white on the skin? Got it. Petrolatum- and paraben-free? You bet. Don’t let the simple packaging or the fact that it’s not a makeup brand fool you – this sun protection-packed BB cream is one of the best tinted moisturisers we’ve found. Use it all weekend for even, radiant skin that doesn’t feel like you’re wearing anything, or apply it instead of foundation for your nine-to-five. ]

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GREEN AWARDS

the clever COMBO _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Tulasāra Facial Dry Brush, $54, Tulasāra Radiant Oleation Oil, $59, both Aveda, aveda.com.au

Inspired by the well-documented benefits of dry-body brushing (boosted circulation, detoxed system and smoother skin), this innovative brush-and-oil pair is a perfect example of how you sometimes need to look back to go forward. Put down the smart phone and take two minutes every morning, then reap the benefits of better skin. The first minute should be spent brushing the skin in circular motions. The second is for massaging in the beautiful blend, which is created for all skin types including acne-prone, and contains six plant oils to boost skin radiance. The brand also manufactures using 100 per cent certified wind power. Now exhale...

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the better BRUSH _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Buffing Brush, $29.95, Nude By Nature, nudebynature.com.au

Not all brushes are created equal. By using high-quality synthetic fibres, this brush is not only cruelty-free and hypo-allergenic, but perfect for applying foundation and concealer for a pretty, natural finish.

the DEO that works _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Australian Wildflower Deodorant, $16, Rohr Remedy, rohrremedy.com

This Australian brand employs the benefits of ancient Indigenous remedies and native plants in its all-natural products. That means this compact roll-on isn’t just free of aluminium, parabens and petrochemicals, it’s also packed with soothing, antiseptic oils that nix your regular whiff and help to calm the skin. Unlike many natural deodorants that often rely on citrus scents, this one has a delightful earthy, herbal vibe that won’t clash with your perfume.

the FRIZZ-FIGHTER _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Lavender Smooth Balm, $40, Less Is More, lessismoreorganic.com.au

Anyone with unruly hair knows that smoothing products are a dime a dozen, but one that actually works is hard to come by – and one that works that’s also made from as many organic ingredients as possible is basically a unicorn. Created by a chemist and aromatherapist, this product uses lavender, rose geranium, apricot, coconut and other natural ingredients to protect against heat and UV, while softening dry, thick, frizzy hair and making it manageable without a silicone or synthetic polymer in sight.

the all-natural BUFFER_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Exfoliating Body Balm, $35.95, Trilogy, trilogyproducts.com

Packed with rosehip (an anti-inflammatory) and sweet almond oils (a beautiful hydrator), this body buffer gently exfoliates with finely ground rosehip seeds, making it totally biodegradable (and free of bad-rap microbeads). It rinses clean – no oily residue – so it’s the perfect pre-tan prep or post-beach scrub to smooth away SPF and salt water. ]

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â?¤ the 2017

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GREEN AWARDS

the SUMMER HAIR solution _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Your Hair Assistant Blowdry Primer, $39.95, Davines, davines.com/en

Technically, you’re meant to spray it pre-blow-dry to give a little guts to your glory, but the clever formula (it builds body while fighting frizz-inducing humidity) makes it a mean addition to the regimens of those who prefer to let nature do the hair drying, too. It also happens to be free of parabens and the packaging is entirely carbon-neutral. Double the fun.

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Manuka Honey Detoxifying Facial Mask, $17.99, Swisse, swisse.com

The combination of food-grade manuka honey, charcoal and clay detoxes the skin and battles blemishes without drying you out. The soothing, perfect-for-Sunday-night treatment is also free of nasty preservatives and packed with natural ingredients like aloe and algae, which help to calm and cool your complexion as well as boost moisture – all for change from a twenty.

hero ingredient MANUKA HONEY

Words: Janna Johnson O’Toole; Amy Starr. Photography: Pete Daly. Plants courtesy of The Plant Room, theplantroom.com.au

Y

ou already know that bees are essential to the success of pretty much the entire ecosystem (and mankind), but those sweet little buggers have further benefits. Manuka honey, made in its purest form from uncultivated manuka or tea trees often high in the mountains of New Zealand (high altitude and cool air means other plants are unlikely to grow, so honey doesn’t get diluted by other blooms), has antibacterial and antifungal superpowers that has seen it used for burns, medical dressings and, more recently, in skincare. Kourtney Kardashian (who you might know from a little show called Keeping Up With The Kardashians) has also been espousing the benefits to her health and skin. “New Zealand is going against the trend of the rest of the world in terms of the decline in bees,” says beekeeper Martin Laas, who tends to the hives that supply manuka honey found in products from Swisse. “Because of recent interest and increased value of manuka, there’s been growth from 200,000 to 500,000 hives in New Zealand in the past 10 years alone.” That “value” he speaks of is also pretty significant. The highest grade honey can be worth up to $38,000 a drum. So, quite different from the stuff you slather on your toast. On skin, this magic all-natural elixir is capable of healing, cleansing, soothing and hydrating. Basically, everything you want from your skincare. If you’ve got it straight from the source, try dabbing a thin layer on a blemish to gently nix a pimple without skin going flaky. If you baulk at the hefty price tag of the jarred variety, try one of these formulas, with manuka built in.

Pure Vitality Skin Renewing Cream, $87, Kiehl’s, kiehls.com.au

Containing the highest quality manuka honey sourced from New Zealand’s North Island, this latest innovation from Kiehl’s helps the skin help itself by boosting barrier function, so it can better lock in moisture and fend off environmental aggressors such as pollution (think of it as giving the skin a mini pep talk about how great it is). But what you’ll notice right away is how super-soft your skin feels – the formula (which, thanks to manuka’s antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, is perfect for any skin type) instantly absorbs into skin for an addictive glow. And with 99.6 per cent naturally derived ingredients, it’s your regimen’s new hero. q

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full

bloom

Collected treasures and, of course, plenty of market-fresh flowers pretty up the home of florist Holly Hipwell

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LIVING

S FLOWER GIRL Florist Holly Hipwell in her garage, where her amazing installations come to life

he creates unique, statement-making installations for a living, so it’s no surprise that florist and stylist Holly Hipwell of The Flower Drum (theflowerdrum.com.au) has a base camp that’s heaving with props, personality and a kaleidoscope of colour. “Working from home means your house has to be partretreat, part-chaos,” she laughs. “I do most of my work out of the garage, which is floor-toceiling vases and props. When it’s busy, it’s quite the obstacle course. There’s never enough time to put things away.” Her home, which she affectionately refers to as “The Lodge” on account of the timber-panelled ceilings, is nestled in a hill overlooking Sydney’s Pittwater. The surrounding bush affords her privacy, endless inspiration and sometimes even the extra frond or two when she really needs it. On a sunny day, you’ll find her creating, crafting or painting on the flat outcrop of rock that forms her backyard, complete with spectacular 180-degree water views (there’s even a faint trail of blue spray-paint on the odd blade of grass to prove it). ]

SWEET RETREAT The home is a girlie-girl’s dream – complete with a pink coffee table ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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“THE BOTANICAL PAINTINGS BY SYDNEY ARTIST DANIEL O’CONNELL MEAN I ALWAYS HAVE FLOWERS IN THE HOUSE. I LOVE HIS COLOURS AND MOVEMENT”

SITTING PRETTY Mismatched chairs help to create an eclectic, lived-in feel


INTO THE WOODS Plenty of timber grounds the home’s feminine details

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Hipwell lives in much the same way as she works. “My aesthetic is lush, en masse and colourful – lots of everything, everywhere,” she says. “The way I decorate is the same. I love collecting and I showcase my favourite pieces in amongst the clutter.” Fortunately for her, what she does for a living provides plenty of justification for regularly adding new loves to her collection at home. And the open-plan living, dining and work space allow for frequent reinvention. “Things come in and out so often that I rearrange the whole space all the time – mostly late at night when I should be in bed. My job allows me to collect bits and pieces I know will come in handy ‘one day’,” she says. Until that day, this clever creative is content to live amongst her greatest discoveries. “Sometimes I think I’m about to cross into the hoarding category but somehow it just works together in its own mad way,” says Hipwell. Sure does.

“I RESCUED THESE BEDSIDE TABLES – OR ROADIE CASES – FROM THE LOCAL TIP”

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NATURAL BEAUTY The daybed (above) offers the perfect spot to soak up the sun while looking out over the surrounding bush


Cushion, $110, Langdon Ltd, langdonltd.com.au

Basket, $39, Olli Ella, olliella.com.au

Flowerhead, $240 for 100ml, Byredo, mecca.com.au

Balloon, $2.95, Lark, larkstore.com.au

Make a playful colour palette more sophisticated by adding in rich leather, shiny metals, cosy velvet and natural timber. q

Vase, $49, Zakkia, zakkia.com.au

Cushion, $199, West Elm, westelm.com.au Pouf, $149, Castle, castleandthings.com.au

Words and styling: Amy Starr. Photography: Sevak Babakhani. Hair and makeup: Allison Boyle at The Artist Group

Armchair, $3,795, Coco Republic, cocorepublic.com.au

Wings, $27 for three, Rainy Sunday, rainysunday.com.au

Vase, $195, Lovestar, lovestar.com.au

Rind Concentrate Body Balm, $39, Aesop, aesop.com/au

Board, $59.90, CittĂ , cittadesign.com Print, from $74.95, Blacklist, blackliststore.com.au

Couch, $3,940, Pop & Scott, popandscott.com

Lantern, $9.99, IKEA, ikea.com/au

Brass ornament, $49, West Elm, westelm.com.au

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romantic getaways

(for non-romantic types)

These far-flung escapes are made for couples who take their vacationing with a side of adventure

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GRAND HOTEL TREMEZZO Lake Como, I TA LY When you arrive at Grand Hotel Tremezzo, an hour’s drive from Milan, it’s easy to see how this palace became known as Lake Como’s “grande dame”. With a time-honoured nod to the splendour of its formative Belle Époque days, the five-star hotel is Art Nouveau to the core. The property has been a regular fixture for the Greta Garbos of the world since it was established back in 1910, yet seasonally updated facilities keep it feeling fresh and modern. Current co-owner and CEO Valentina De Santis has helped fuse the charm of yesteryear with all the prerequisites of a contemporary grand hotel, with features including the exclusive “T Beach” with Pommery champagne bar, rooftop suites by Italian designer Venelli Kramer, an expanded award-winning day spa within the adjoining

18th-century Villa Emilia... you get the gist. Even better, all the 90 rooms and suites offer guests unimpeachable views of the lake or the hotel’s century-old 20,000sqm park and gardens, and each of the suites comes with its own private terrace, outdoor jacuzzi and butler service. Thanks to a collaboration with the biggest name in modern Italian cuisine, Gualtiero Marchesi, the in-house La Terrazza Restaurant is a major drawcard where you and your partner can be treated to creative, locally sourced dishes that put a focus on fresh seafood. After your meal, head to the Sala Musica for a digestif in one of its Alla Moda-hued armchairs. It’s here the original 1900s lights and floors beguile, and as you sip on a limoncello, you’ll find yourself mesmerised if not by your S/O, then by the expanse of Lago di Como, like so many writers, artists and Prussian princesses before you (if only the walls could talk). ] grandhoteltremezzo.com

T H E D A Y T R I P HEAD ACROSS THE LAKE TO THE VILLAGE OF BELLAGIO ON THE HOTEL SKIFF (BOND GIRL MUCH?), OR VENTURE TO VILLA DEL BALBIANELLO (SITE OF A CASINO ROYALE SCENE OR TWO), WHERE YOU’LL FIND AN INCREDIBLE COLLECTION OF ARTEFACTS FROM THE PREVIOUS OWNER’S LIFE OF INTREPID EXPEDITION.

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SATAO ELERAI CAMP

Amboseli National Park, KE N YA

Intimacy typically comes with privacy, and Satao Elerai Camp has this in spades – but do expect to share your quiet, romantic moments with the occasional roaring elephant. Up close. Prepare also for the constant gaze of mighty Mount Kilimanjaro. Located just outside Amboseli National Park in a 5,000-acre private conservancy owned by the local Maasai community, Satao Elerai is a poster child for sustainable tourism. Built atop a volcanic rock outcrop, THE DAY TRIP entirely from natural materials, IT’S NO DOUBT the camp oozes a rugged HARD TO LEAVE CAMP, BUT THE minimalism. It’s a serene REAL MAGIC LIES contrast to the excitement of IN THE BUSH. RISE arrival – in a private plane EARLY AND OPT smaller than a dining table, FOR THE BUSH followed by a bumpy ride in BREAKFAST, SERVED AT SUNRISE, THEN an open-sided Jeep. VISIT THE LOCAL The camp’s open-air dining MAASAI VILLAGE, area, well-stocked bar and A PHOTOGRAPHIC infinity pool look out to CONTRAST OF a waterhole 20m away. JOYOUS SMILES, COLOURFUL Amboseli means “dry and CLOTHING AND salty” in the local Maa language, STARK, PRIMITIVE and the open-air bathtub is LIVING. LATER, a magnet for animals of every AS THE ANIMALS kind. Giraffes, zebras, impalas, GATHER FOR A DUSK DIP, SETTLE IN AND elands and buffalos are all SIP ON AN ICE-COLD TUSKER BEER, THE PRIDE OF KENYA.

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regulars but they vanish quickly when the main attraction, a herd of African elephants, stomp in to drink and bathe. Lucky guests may even see cheetahs or lions, while guided game drives into the main park offer the chance for more sightings. An exclusive affair, accommodation comprises just 12 tents and five lodges. Choose the former and forget any bad camping memories – this is glamping and then some. Think of a gigantic field tent, three metres high and pitched on a wooden floor. The resulting room is filled with plush, rustic furnishings and a waisthigh bed, plus an attached fully equipped luxury bathroom with pipinghot water to wash the dust away. The toilet even looks out over bushland, for bonus game views. Ultimately, only the best tent-like elements are preserved: the light flapping of canvas as you and your partner drift off to sleep and the joy of unzipping your front door onto a glorious mountain vista (and a pair of watchful zebras). sataoelerai.com


BELMOND EL ENCANTO

TRAVEL

Santa Barbara, CA LI FO R N I A Los Angeles is fun and all, but throngs of tourists and hour-long drives to get from point A to point B can put a certain damper on things. Drive two hours north and stay instead in Santa Barbara, a postcard-pretty city between the Santa Ynez Mountains and the sea that’s steeped in history thanks to its Spanish colonial heritage (evident everywhere you look courtesy of all the white stucco and red roof tiles). Perched high on the hills, away from the bustle of downtown (but still within walking distance), Belmond El Encanto is a local icon. Opened in 1918, it was renovated in 2013 at a budget of $134 million, so these days, while the decor hasn’t lost any of its old-world charm, the hotel has that fresh, we-really-lookafter-the-place appeal. Stay in one of the bungalows and coming home at the end of a long day to lie by T H E D A Y T R I P BORROW BIKES FROM THE HOTEL AND RIDE EAST ALONG MISSION RIDGE ROAD. SOON YOU’LL HIT FRANCESCHI PARK, A PLOT OF PURE NATURE IN THE MIDDLE OF SUBURBIA THAT BOASTS IMPRESSIVE VIEWS (SEE FAR RIGHT) AND IS A BELOVED PICNIC SPOT FOR LOCALS AND TOURISTS ALIKE.

the heated pool (with views so unbelievable you’ll have your boo on Insta-husband duties despite explicitly saying you’d never be that couple) feels like exactly that... home. But, of course, your pillows at home aren’t monogrammed, are they? These ones are, with your initial – it’s one of the little luxuries this place prides itself on. Well, that and each bungalow’s bathroom – they’re huge, for one, with floor-to-ceiling marble, the biggest rainfall showerhead you have ever seen and Etro products to suds up in. Wander up to the main clubhouse in the morning to take breakfast on the large, open deck where 360-degree views of the Pacific await. Order huevos rancheros, a Mexican specialty, and a bellini before you head to the spa for a couple’s massage, or go it alone and send him away to work off last night’s cocktails at the gym, where stationary bikes sit out on the terrace instead of cooped up in a windowless room. Genius. ] belmond.com/el-encanto-santa-barbara/

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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BILL & COO SUITES & LOUNGE 166

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Megali Ammos, M Y KO N O S While it’s true that there’s absolutely no shortage of luxurious hotels to call home on Greece’s most fabulous party island, this one – part of the Leading Hotels Of The World stable – is tough to pass up. It’s all in the name, really – “bill and coo” is an expression that implies affection and whispered sweet nothings. Of course, as a non-romantic you couldn’t care less, but the thought that went into the name shows how much detail is valued here. At your request, they can provide a personal assistant, trainer, even shopper. There’s a luxury transfer service available, yacht charter, private jet. Much like Burger King, you can have it your way. Close enough to town to make a late-night gyros run an easily accomplished mission, but secluded enough for you to hear only the insects buzzing when you finally turn in for the night, the 30-suite hotel looks out over Megali Ammos Bay. Its design is a contemporary take on the Cycladic aesthetic, with traditional white walls and pale timber furnishings.

You needn’t wander to Little Venice to watch the sunset either – it looks just as epic from your private verandah or from beside the infinity pool, which has scattered tiny LED lights at the bottom to create an effect akin to the night sky. Recline on the poolside loungers, Aperol spritz in hand, and watch the sky turn pink and orange before you walk the 10 steps to the open-air restaurant that runs alongside the pool area. The service is a major drawcard here, too; the staff are never far away when you need them, but maintain a stealthy distance the rest of the time. Upon check-in, you’ll get a mobile phone to call reception from anywhere on the island, or your room, whether you want advice on whether Kiki’s Tavern really is worth the wait (we say it is) or just need someone to show you how to use your room’s Sonos speaker. q lhw.com/hotel/bill-coo-megali-ammosmykonos-greece


TRAVEL

Words: Felicity Bonello; Laura Collins; Rob Grant. Photography: Alamy; Christos Drazos

THE DAY TRIP DRIVE TO THE CENTRE OF THE ISLAND, STOPPING AT FLORA, THE SUPERMARKET OPPOSITE THE AIRPORT WHERE A DJ SPINS BEATS AS YOU PERUSE THE RARE-WINE COLLECTION AND PICK UP SNACKS. THEN GO TO FOKOS BEACH, A SOMETIMESNUDIST BEACH HIDDEN AWAY DOWN A VERY BUMPY DIRT ROAD.

ELLE.COM.AU / @ELLEAUS

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N…

ASK

E QU STI

O

ADVICE

A

EMAIL ejean@bauer-media.com.au OR TWEET @ejeancarroll

and big, beautiful eyes. I’ve never been so attracted to anyone, ever! This man you, I have a wrenching pain can dress! We were the in my stomach from the last to leave the dance floor, blatant betrayal. I work for and afterwards we began a small, prestigious publishing messaging, sexting and company, and when I applied exchanging poems and erotic for a newly announced photos – the whole thing. position with a long email Then he discovered I was detailing my desire, ambition married and stopped and expertise, attaching my answering my texts. So résumé and a thoughtful I left my husband, moved invitation for the owners, the in with my sister, bought art director and the editor-inthe musician a beautiful chief to sit with me so I can watch (the most expensive show them the work I’ve thing I’ve bought anyone – Tormented? Driven witless? done in my two years here – except for the engagement Fear not, help is just a short letter away get this: I was rewarded with ring I bought my husband, complete silence! The art which he lost), surprised the director finally assured me I was being “considered”, musician with the watch at the club where we met and but they had to “go through the process of posting the told him: “You have my heart.” He refused to look me job and interviewing”. I’m disgusted they’d even in the eye and took off (with the watch). consider anyone else! I’m so loyal to them! I don’t It appears I’ve been manipulated and used by this understand this betrayal one bit. Should I leave? insecure man, who has no ability to open up to others. Now I miss my husband’s sensitivity and respect. I’m – Seduced And Abandoned ashamed I betrayed him. He’s willing to take me back SEDUCED, MY LOVE Good. I like it. You’re seething like a sea – but will he change? I’ve been reading your column lioness. You may not deserve the job, you may not be for years and you’re my favourite agony aunt. Do you right for the job, you may peeve the editor-in-chief no see anything worth salvaging with either of these men? end with your insistence that she “sit with you”, but When will guys stop being narcissistic assholes? And you’re doing the best thing possible. Use that fire to could a few more of them learn how to dress for a night become the most formidable, brilliant, amazing out and manage a savings account? designer there ever was. Let that “wrenching” stomach pain, that “disgust” energise your career. Begin – Doubly Heartbroken interviewing at other companies. Tweet good news DOUBLY, MY DELPHINIUM Give me a moment... I must dab about your industry. Acquire fresh skills. Create a new my eyes with a hankie. Such an overpowering moment position. Dress like the boss. Think like the owners. for Auntie E. You’re as gorgeous an example as Use your anger. Nothing fuels success like a snub. I’ve ever beheld of a 34-year-old who’s been jamming her brain with Ask E columns. A newlywed running FLIRTING WITH DANGER after a baby-faced musician – honey, you break rules DEAR E JEAN, Maybe I just need to watch more like a champion! I love you, Miss Doubly. But one little Amy Schumer movies, but here’s my problem: I’m point, if I may: when our lives are going to hell and we can’t figure out why, we must not blame men. a 34-year-old newlywed – my husband and I are Depending on the time, the place and the circumstance, activists – and we’ve made our marriage about respect, any of us can be perfect asses. You’ve got yourself love and equality. But we work so hard we barely go to a nice, salvageable husbandly chap there (upon whose bed together or wake up together. When we do have “sensitive and respectful” hide you could have sex, I fantasise about Kit Harington and my husband showered three Hugo Boss shirts, two accountants to fantasises about porn. Also, he won’t do any chores do the finances and one Kit Harington wig – the and refuses to learn how to manage the finances. pullback, the curly or the snow-flecked – with the bread On a rare night out with the girls, I met a tall, you spent on Mr Dancer’s watch). muscular South American musician with a baby face

GET A GRIP. THEN GET A NEW GIG DEAR E JEAN, As I’m writing to

ask e jean

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?

This crazy, psycho, Pinterest-obsessed maid of honour has declared that we bridesmaids must read poems at the bridal shower. (I read my assigned poem to my husband, and he said it was the dumbest thing he’d ever heard.) How do I muster the self-control not to insult her?

But you’re a live-in-the-moment woman waging the battle between freedom and marriage – two ideals so at odds that even Amy Schumer, the Simone de Beauvoir of her generation, could not solve the problem in Trainwreck. (To which Miss Amy says: “Don’t judge me, fuckers.”) Hence, I have offered for your consideration your own Marriage/Freedom Risk Portfolio. In the chart below, based on my vast experience receiving letters such as yours, as a married woman you would be 61 per cent free to dance with attractive men and women, but only eight per cent free to have cocktails with them. Talk it over with your husband and increase or decrease the percentages as you see fit. Miss Amy lost her nerve in Trainwreck and went for the obvious rom-com ending. (But as far as I can tell, she’s pursuing all her radical ways in real life.) Marriage – tender and sublime as it can be – may or may not be for you. I wish you a beautiful journey figuring it all out. PS: Mr Dancer should return the watch. MARRIAGE/FREEDOM RISK PORTFOLIO

(Or: what you can do with attractive persons who aren’t your spouse and remain married)

61% DANCING WITH

21% TEXTING WITH

!

though we’re separated Darling! I love you, by a continent, we talk but it’s not your all the time and miss wedding. Your role is each other terribly. He to deliver happiness. has always wanted to work in international Read the poem. And development; I studied should you take as your journalism and dramatic inspiration international relations. We want to help the great Bette Davis people and travel the doing her “I’ve Written world, but how can we A Letter To Daddy” in be a power couple when we’re separately What Ever Happened miserable in our families’ To Baby Jane?… then homes on opposite sides all the better. of the nation? – Ambitious And Blinded By Love MISS BLINDED, MY BEAR CUB What? Wait. You’re telling me there are no careers where he lives? Where is your famous “ambition”? Pack your bags! – Ravishing Regards, E Jean BUT E JEAN! What if I move to be with him and it doesn’t work out? What if I move and it turns out I’ve made a terrible career decision?

– Ambitious And Blinded 8% COCKTAILS WITH 7% SEXTING WITH 3% BOFFING

Photography: Gregg Delman. Styling: Christian Stroble. Hair: Eduardo Carrasco at Ford Artists NYC. Makeup: Sylwia Rakowska at Ford Artists NYC

LOVE, LABOUR… LOST DEAR E JEAN, Which is more important: career or love?

I’m 22, fresh out of university and head over heels for someone who also just finished uni and has now moved home – across the country from me. After a lot of talking, questioning and crying, we decided to break up and not pursue a long-distance relationship, but this doesn’t feel right. He’s the one I love, and he loves me. We should be together, right? My mother raised me to always put my career and education first and boyfriend second, and I agree, but

MISS A AND B Oh, well... And “what if” Ryan Gosling

comes to my house and asks me to stop answering this letter because he needs to feed me cake and ice-cream? If you want 100 per cent guarantees, Auntie E will promise that you can make as “terrible” a “career decision” by not moving as by moving. Nothing is permanent. Forget finding the job; get a job, learn it, love it, and the more you love it, the luckier you’ll get – and the luckier you get, the wider new doors will swing open. Every woman’s a dud until she’s a success. Anyway, who says career or love are your only choices? It will be a happy world when you cease believing you have just two selections to prioritise and screw up. Two? Hahahahaha! You have hundreds of options to screw up, and your life will be quite fascinating because of it. q

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Photography: Sevak Babakhani

let’s play…

With another star-studded awards season in full swing, here’s a little game to help get you through the mind-numbingly long Academy Awards telecast

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Vibrant, sexy and simply delicious

contemporary japanese cuisine

SYDNEY THE ROCKS | DOUBLE BAY BRISBANE EAGLE STREET PIER MELBOURNE HAMER HALL | FLINDERS LANE

sakerestaurant.com.au



Elle - Feb 2017 AU