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SPRING STYLE UPDATE

RUFFLES, NEON, MENSWEAR & THE INFAMOUS KITTEN HEEL

DO GENTLEMEN REALLY PREFER BLONDES?

PLUS GWEN

STEFANI’S FAVOURITE LIP COLOUR

MARCH 2017

GWYNETH PALTROW HOW SHE MAKES IT LOOK SO EASY

SPY GAMES

SNOOPING ON YOUR SPOUSE: A CAUTIONARY TALE

RETAIL THERAPY THE NEW ERA OF LUXURY SHOPPING IN CANADA

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#STORYBOARD

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, ELLE CANADA STAFF

@ E L L E C A N A D A

PURPLE HAZE

EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE

BAL-LOONEY TUNES

No black lights were harmed in the making of p. 112, but the photographer’s assistant’s arms sure did hurt the next day.

Yet another person on the ELLE team had a spiritual experience on Fogo Island. This

Look, Ma! We can spell our own magazine’s name! Four helium letters = endless hours of entertainment for our team.

time, it was associate beauty editor Victoria.

IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS

LAZY BOY

ORANGE YOU GLAD?

We snapped this pic of the glitter nails backstage at Rodarte in NYC, and we’re still not over it. For more, see p. 123.

Or should we say “lazy man,” since this model is lounging in menswear for our fashion shoot on p. 102?

Knock knock. Who’s there? It’s model Regan, snapping selfies on-set for our neon-hued shoot on p. 112.

POWER POSE

PANORAMA

PEACE OUT

We bumped into Bella and Hailey at the big bash in NYC to celebrate Dior’s gorgeous new book (p. 134).

Poor associate fashion editor Liz, having to stand in that sunshine and stare out at that beautiful Croatian coast (p. 146).

Nothing but good vibes from supe Carolyn Murphy behind the scenes on the shoot for Holt Renfrew’s spring mag. ■

Get a behind-the-scenes look at each issue as it happens by following us on Instagram @ELLECanada. ELLECANADA.COM

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COVER STORIES

Suit-able

54

62 70

86

96

123

MARCH 2017

136

Get ready to take notes because we’re dishing on this spring’s need-haves. SPECIAL Canadian retail is entering its luxe phase. STYLE We have complicated feelings about the return of the kitten heel too. By Clara Young CELEBRITY Gwyneth Paltrow’s guide to the good life. By Sarah Laing RELATIONSHIP Why one ELLE editor can’t stop snooping on her husband. By Carli Whitwell BEAUTY TREND REPORT It’s here! Your one-stop shop for everything hair/makeup/nails for spring/summer 2017. BEAUTY Things that you’ll only get if you’ve ever gone platinum blond. By Carly Lewis STYLE

STYLE & FASHION What’s cool, cutting edge and important. 101 FASHION One shoot that’s borrowed from the boys and one that looks on the (really) bright side. h 60

STYLE SCOOP

PHOTOGRAPHY, OWEN BRUCE (MODEL); WOOL AND COTTON SLEEVELESS PEACOAT, COTTON SHIRT AND WOOL AND SILK SHORTS (MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION) AND RING (MODEL’S OWN)

101


HOLT RENFREW FENDI.COM


56

Definitely take these baubles at face value.

73

90

92 146 150

RADAR Two rising stars in music and film (hi, Dua Lipa and Haley Lu Richardson); a chat with The Crown’s Claire Foy; WTF is “hygge”?; what you’ll be loving next month. LIFE This woman wants to get her tubes tied. So why won’t her doctors let her? As told to Carli Whitwell PSYCHE When perfect is paralyzing. By Genevra Leek TRAVEL Exploring Croatia’s hidden delights. By Liz Guber TRAVEL INSIDER Talking Berlin and beaches with a creative director from Europe.

112

You need more neon in your life.

BEAUTY & WELLNESS 130

BEAUTY BUZZ

In conversation with makeup genius Peter Philips. By Vanessa Craft 138 HAUL OF FAME Spring is coming.... 140 BODY NEWS The best health, wellness and fitness intel. 134

BEAUTY

EVERY MONTH 37

#STORYBOARD

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

48

GUEST LIST

50

LETTERS

51

ELLE ONLINE

152

HOROSCOPE

153

SHOPPING GUIDE

154

OVERHEARD

ON THE COVER Gwyneth Paltrow is wearing a dress by Valentino and jewellery by Tous. Photographer Xavi Gordo Styling Inmaculada Jiménez Makeup Emma Lovell (The Wall Group) Hair George Northwood Manicure Lucero Hurtado by OPI Pro-Spain (Mön Icon Team) Styling assistant Daniela Gutiérrez

PHOTOGRAPHY, ARKAN ZAKHAROV (MODEL); NYLON SLIP DRESS (ALEXANDER WANG) AND COTTON-CREPE AND SILK BRALETTE (ARAKS)

FEATURES


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO CHANGE? Everything feels possible when spring comes. It’s a fresh-start season, a chance to leap forward into something new and exciting. I connect with this time of year more than any of the other date-related life revamps. In January, my resolutions are largely driven by guilt (I hereby accept that champagne and canapés are not formally recognized food groups) or unadulterated ambition (this is definitely the year I win a Grammy!); consequently, I burn through my willpower before the month ends. September—the fashion-industry New Year— is moderately motivating in a nostalgic backto-school/acquire-more-cashmere kind of way. Spring, I think, is the best time to ride the energy of the warmer weather and brighter days and reflect on who we want to be.

2017

Making a change requires a realistic approach. This issue is more about making an “update” than an “overhaul.” For example, something as simple as changing your hair colour can make you see yourself in an entirely new way. That’s what happened to writer Carly Lewis after she dramatically went from brunette to platinum blond. “Might the confidence and ambition I’ve held quietly inside manifest themselves in my actions, thanks to an image that suggests I embody these traits?” she ponders in “Platinum Status” (page 136). And then there’s shopping. Dressing up in a luxuriously crafted outfit can completely change the way you feel, and there are exciting transformative shifts happening in the Canadian retail market (“Fashion Nation,” page 62). On a more introspective level, we address the futility of pursuing perfection in “Perfect Enemy” (page 92). Can you learn how to live with something that is just “good enough”? (If that concept makes you cringe, know that I am with you. Could I ever truly settle for an MTV Video Music Award? Only time will tell.) We all strive to evolve, but doing things differently is hard. Some of the best advice I’ve ever been given is that true change doesn’t happen in an unbroken forward trajectory; it follows more of a jagged, wavy line. We make progress and then drop back or plateau for a while before moving forward again. But we never fall back to the place we started from.

Vanessa Craft Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @vanessacraft. What do you want to see more of in the magazine? Tell us at editors@ELLECanada.com or #TellELLECanada.

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PHOTOGRAPHY, MAX ABADIAN (V. CRAFT); HAIR, JUSTIN GERMAN (PANTENE); MAKEUP, STÉPHANE CÔTÉ (M.A.C COSMETICS); V. CRAFT IS WEARING A SAINT LAURENT DRESS AND REBECCA MINKOFF EARRINGS (AT HOLT RENFREW, HOLTRENFREW.COM)

MARCH


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ELLECANADA.COM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Vanessa Craft ART DIRECTOR Brittany Eccles FASHION DIRECTOR Anthony Mitropoulos FASHION MARKET EDITOR Elaine Jyll Regio ASSOCIATE EDITOR Liz Guber

FEATURES CULTURE EDITOR Sarah Laing SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Carli Whitwell

HEALTH & BEAUTY HEALTH & BEAUTY EDITOR Katherine ASSOCIATE BEAUTY EDITOR Victoria

Flemming DiPlacido

ART

ELLECANADA

@ELLECANADA

ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Elena Viltovskaia (on ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Brian Fleming DESIGNER Danielle Campbell

leave)

ELLECANADA

COPY COPY EDITOR Marjorie Dunham-Landry PRODUCTION EDITOR Ciara Rickard PROOFREADER Jane Fielding ASSISTANTS Erika David, Maryjane Peters, Michelle Skelsey, Kiera Spronk CONTRIBUTORS Owen Bruce, Fiona Green, Anna Katsanis, Genevra Leek, Georgia Nicols, Geoffrey Ross, Clara Young, Arkan Zakharov MULTI-PLATFORM EDITIONS CONTENT DIRECTOR, MULTI-PLATFORM EDITIONS, BOOKS & SPECIAL ISSUES Jessica Ross CREATIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL EDITIONS Chris Bond IPAD SPECIALIST/DESIGNER Andrew Tran

Download the ELLE Canada app for iPad on the App Store. Digital editions are also available on Molto, Zinio, Kobo, Press Reader and Google Play. HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT & CEO Duncan Edwards SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, CFO & GENERAL MANAGER Simon Horne SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, DIRECTOR OF LICENSING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Guatam Ranji SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Jeannette Chang SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Kim St. Clair Bodden EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL Astrid Bertoncini EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL BRANDING Peter Yates

LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE CHAIRMAN & CEO Denis Olivennes ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL CEO Constance Benque ELLE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES CEO François Coruzzi SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT/ELLE INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR Valéria Bessolo Llopiz SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENSES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION Mickael Berret ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata DEPUTY SYNDICATION TEAM MANAGER Thérèse Genevois SYNDICATION COORDINATOR Johanna Jegou COPYRIGHTS MANAGER & DIGITAL SYNDICATION Séverine Laporte

International Ad Sales House: Lagardère Global Advertising, 10, rue Thierry le Luron, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France CEO Claudio Piovesana claudio.piovesana@lagardere-active.com ellearoundtheworld.com ELLE® and ELLE Canada® are used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse. Registered user: TVA Group – Hearst Publications Inc., 1010, rue de Sérigny, 4th Floor, Longueuil, Quebec J4K 5G7. Contents copyright © 2017 by TVA Group – Hearst Publications Inc. ELLE Canada is published 11 times per year except for occasional combined, expanded or premium issues. May not be reprinted without written permission. Single copy price: $4.50+tax. Full subscription prices: Canada, 1 year, $24+tax; U.S., 1 year, $48 (regular); other foreign countries, 1 year, $146.90 (regular). For subscription inquiries, call 905-946-8319. All reproduction requests must be made to COPIBEC 1-800-717-2022. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage. Printing: Transcontinental Printing G.P., 2049 20th St. E., Owen Sound, Ontario N4K 5R2. Distributed by Coast to Coast Newsstand Services Ltd. Publications Mail Agreement 41557548. Return undeliverable addresses to ELLE Canada, Subscription Department, 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100, Toronto, Ontario M2N 6S7. ISSN 1496-5186

@ELLECANADA


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ELLECANADA.COM

VICE-PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Lucie Dumas GROUP PUBLISHER, TORONTO Sandra E. Martin ADVERTISING SALES, TORONTO 416-227-8248 KEY ACCOUNT DIRECTORS, NATIONAL ADVERTISING SALES David Garby, Andrea McBride, Akta Sharma SENIOR DIRECTOR, MEDIA SOLUTIONS, TRANSACTIONAL Jerome Leys ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Kieran Darcy SALES COORDINATOR Jill Alexander NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jillian Dann-Macerollo (on leave), Cathy Ellis, Gary Forshaw, Joanne Landry, Delainie Marin, Vanessa Watson DIGITAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES, NATIONAL SALES Crystal Falls (on leave), Gwen O’Toole, Tony Vigario, Joanna Woodman SALES ASSOCIATE Patricia Mixemong RESEARCH ANALYST Eva Chau

ADVERTISING SALES, MONTREAL 514-598-2880 (VENTESPUBLICITAIRES@TVA.CA) SENIOR DIRECTOR, MEDIA SOLUTIONS, TRANSACTIONAL Patricia Heckmann SALES DIRECTOR, MAGAZINES AND OOH Anne Scheffer SENIOR DIRECTORS, MEDIA SOLUTIONS Karl Berthome, Caroline Gagnon COORDINATORS Mélina Delorme (on leave), Ingrid Martinez, Marie-Laurence Miron, Maria Perrotti NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES Stéphanie Mercier, Sophie Rémillard LOCAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES Vickie Bouthillier, Stéphanie Cusson, Brigitte Fortier, Francine Lanthier, Kathy Marquis, Natalia Tavares ADVERTISING SALES, INTERNATIONAL & U.S. LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING (LGA) INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

Nelly Streichenberger, nelly.streichenberger@lagardere-active.com PARIS Philippe Leonard (33.1) 41.34.87.53 U.S. ADVERTISING Publicitas North America 212-599-5057 MEDIA CREATIVITY

DIRECTOR, MEDIA CREATIVITY SOLUTIONS, ENGLISH MARKET Randy Mauskopf PROJECT MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR Jocelyne Morissette STRATEGIST Mieka Jansen ART DIRECTOR Suzanne Lacorte CLIENT DELIVERY Ritu Dhaliwal, Rob Stephenson, Inga Terzopoulos

DIGITAL PRE-PRESS SERVICES DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Johanne Perron TEAM LEAD Luc Gauvin PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Linda Desjardins

CONSUMER MARKETING GROUP GROUP CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Doris Chan PRODUCT MARKETING MANAGERS Yen Duong, Amanda Stone DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Jason Patterson FULFILLMENT SPECIALIST Angela Gresseau-Okalow DIRECTOR, NEWSSTAND SALES Pat Strangis TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR Susan Kuskelin

MARKETING, COMMUNICATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR, MARKETING, COMMUNICATIONS & EVENTS Silvana Sciortino MARKETING COORDINATOR Angela Valentini SENIOR DESIGNER Colin Elliott

MARKETING DISTRIBUTION & MAJOR PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER Michel Nivischiuk STRATEGY RESEARCH & MARKETING ADVISOR Marie-Andrée Picotte

AD MI NIS TRATION FINANCIAL INFORMATION & AUDITING MANAGER Anick Dubois ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGERS Vincent Cheung, Robert McAleese

ELLE CANADA IS PUBLISHED BY TVA GROUP – HEARST PUBLICATIONS INC. SENIOR MANAGEMENT, MEDIA GROUP & TVA GROUP INC. PRESIDENT & CEO, MEDIA GROUP & TVA GROUP INC. Julie Tremblay VICE-PRESIDENT & DIRECTOR OF FINANCES Denis Rozon PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES Jean-François Reid EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT OF ADVERTISING Donald Lizotte VICE-PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS Véronique Mercier

c a n a d a

One easy way to reach us: firstname. lastname@ tva.ca


GUEST LIST MICHAEL-OLIVER HARDING WRITER The gig This month, Montreal native Harding talks mental illness with Brain on Fire author Susannah Cahalan (p. 76). “It was so interesting hearing about

NANCY WRITER

how her terrifying medical ordeal profoundly changed her outlook on writing.” Standout flick “Elephant, Gus Van Sant’s haunting high-school tragedy, which

WON

The gig In “Fashion Nation”

dares to be brutally, heartbreakingly inconclusive.”

(p. 62), Toronto-based Won explores how Canada’s luxuryfashion retailers are upping their game. Hint: Your shopping experience is about to change.

Work it “When it comes to style, I think confidence and attitude are everything. Wear what makes you feel good, and who

AMINATA GUEYE MAKEUP ARTIST The gig In order to contrast the bright colours in “Karma Chameleon” (p. 112), New York-

CARLY

LEWIS WRITER

based Gueye went for a simple look that “emphasized the lighting and [model] Regan’s uniqueness.”

The gig Hamilton, Ont., native Lewis weighs in on the age-old

Makeup memory “When

blond-versus-brunette debate as

I was in kindergarten, I wanted to be made up at a summer fair,

she ditches her natural colour

and I was turned into an exquisite

for bleached locks in “Platinum

silver-blue butterfly.”

Status” (p. 136). Go-to ’do “The middle part. It was déclassé for a spell, but I’ve stayed loyal.”

OLIVIA

JANSING

MODEL

The gig New Yorker Jansing had no problem getting into character for our menswear shoot. “I’m a huge tomboy, so I actually love shopping in the men’s section.” Fashion rut “My most embarrassing on-set moment was when I got stuck in some mud. I needed three people to help pull me out!” ■

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ELLECANADA.COM

TEXT, MICHELLE SKELSEY; PHOTOGRAPHY, SATY + PRATHA (N. WON), VANESSA TAVAGLIONE (M.-O. HARDING) & HOLLY THOMAS (C. LEWIS)

cares what anyone else thinks?”


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LETTERS @JaniceDeul Lve @winnieharlow for @ELLECanada Feb 2017. We need diversity in fashion and magazines. #diversityrules #beautyisdiverse

TWEETS

WORD UP

@winnieharlow Thank you so much @ELLECanada for making me the February issue COVER girl with such a massive spread. Means so much to me coming from Toronto to be on this magazine I grew up with & to be a part of this full Canadian spread! Honoured & grateful

Your tweets, Instas, emails and more.

@Broke_Beautiful No Canadian adventure would be complete without picking up an @ELLECanada! They use actual fashion models on their fashion magazine covers! @K_Trevett @ELLECanada @salihughes I learned so much from Sali in a few short minutes. Can’t wait to unwrap my copy of #prettyiconic. @Marra_C @ELLECanada @BobbetteBelle love these cookies!

@hautechilled Absolutely obsessed! Love that it’s all Canadian designers. Can’t wait to see the issue. @Lunagal Love how gorgeous @ELLECanada cover model @winnie harlow makes bold statements about confidence, self-love & change.

@Catty_Tweeter Actress and illustrator #Charlotte LeBon in latest @ELLECanada is divine! Would love to see her #art in the next edition. @QueenofCasual Fashion has no self-control! @ELLECanada #love these @CHANEL specs!! #presentsplease

@tyrabanks Proud

TH IS MON T H ’ S B E S T

ELLE Canada has been a fashion staple for me for as long as I can remember. I have been self-conscious and bullied because of vitiligo since the age of seven, so you can only imagine my pure happiness when I opened my mailbox and saw Winnie Harlow on the cover of the February 2017 issue. Winnie and ELLE Canada are helping the world embrace a different kind of beauty, and for that I am so proud. Thank you so much for helping women with vitiligo feel beautiful and special. Hillary Gail Stewart, email

TREASURED MEMORY Thank you for the article showcasing the sterling-silver Lauren Klassen “safety-pin” necklace [ELLE Insider, February 2017]. This fine piece reminded me of a “paper-clip” necklace that my late mother owned and lovingly gave to me when I was a teenager. After I lost it, the years passed and I could not remember the details of it. Thank you for refreshing my memory of

50

ELLECANADA.COM

a very special gift between my mom and me. Sheila Wasserman, Montreal

DREAM HOUSE Boy, could I relate to “On the Same Page” [ELLE Life, February 2017], in which Heather O’Neill writes about how no man measures up to her literary heroes. Growing up, I was in love with Pa from Little House on the Prairie. I loved how he treated Ma, adored Laura and toiled the land tirelessly. I grew up convinced that I had to have a man like Charles Ingalls. Miraculously, I met a man named Charles who had grown up on a farm, and I thought my childhood desires had come true. Sadly, I realized that not every Charles from a farm would be like my first and only real love. I gave up on him, but I continue to hold a flame in my heart for a kind and loving family man just like Pa. Nina Jetha, email

MIDDLE GROUND Your article “Happy Medium” [ELLE Special, January 2017] found me at exactly the right time and made me reflect on my own goals. The all-or-nothing approach to resolutions isn’t sustainable in the long term, so this year my only goal is to make time for myself—whether in the form of a workout, meal prepping for the week or sitting down with a cup of tea and reading the latest issue of ELLE Canada. Katherine Gross, Maple, Ont.

@chaniralayzell the gorj @winnieharlow on the cover of @ELLECanada #womeninart

Send us your letters via email at ELLELetters@ELLECanada.com or snail mail at ELLE Canada, 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100, Toronto, Ont., M2N 6S7. Include your name and address. Letters may be edited.

PHOTOGRAPHY, NELSON SIMONEAU (W. HARLOW)

SKIN DEEP


ELLECANADA.COM I N S I D E R

A C C E S S ,

B R E A K I N G

N E W S

&

D I G I T A L

E X C L U S I V E S

BY ZI PR E E N R EGAZ TON B

THOR N

DON’T MISS IT! 1. Must-have hair and makeup trends from the spring runways. (Air-dried hair forever.)

AAB

E LI E S

2.

COLLAGE, DANIELLE CAMPBELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY) & GETTY IMAGES (BACKGROUND & STARS)

The season’s key fashion buys: the shoe of the moment, on-trend denim and more.

3. With awards-show season under way, we break down the top beauty and fashion looks from the red carpet.

COAC

H

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TOPH E CH R IS

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E

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T R E N D S R U N W A Y N E W S ,

S H O P P I N G

&

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

YES, FRILLS

TEXT, LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE

Ruffles are a divisive trend, evoking poetic femininity for some and shouting “prom night 1984” for others. This season, designers took a refreshingly easy approach. The unfussy flounces at Magda Butrym and Preen by Thornton Bregazzi may just convert the staunchest skeptics.


STYLE 7

5

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

4

6

8

ERDEM

3

WAVE HELLO

The latest take on ruffles is abstract, fluid and a little unexpected.

2

10

1. Wool, silk and polyester blazers, Club Monaco ($995 each, clubmonaco.ca). 2. Brass earrings, Tibi ($663, tibi.com). 3. Cotton jumpsuit, Ganni ($324, at shopbop.com). 4. Jersey bodysuit, Asos ($40,

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ZIMMERMANN

1

asos.com). 5. Acetate, viscose and elastane pants, Jonathan Simkhai ($693, at Intermix, intermixonline.com). 6. Leather boots, Topshop ($180, at Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com). 7. Silk dress, Magda Butrym ($2,758.44, magdabutrym.com). 8. Gold-plated-metal bracelet, Arme De L’Amour ($737, armedelamour.com). 9. Viscose and elastic skirt, Aritzia ($165, aritzia.com). 10. Leather purse, Fendi ($2,501, at farfetch.com).

STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

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1. Sterling silver, Sarah & Sebastian ($931, sarahandsebastian.com). 2. Pewter and glass, Anne-Marie Chagnon ($39.50, annemariechagnon.com). 3. Gold-tone metal and enamel, Stella McCartney ($556, at NET-A-PORTER.com). 4. Sterling silver, Leigh Miller ($670, leighmiller.us). 5. Gold-plated metal, Faris ($365.15, at needsupply.com). 6. Bronze, Open House ($259, open-house-projects. com). 7. 24-karat-yellow-gold-plated metal, white-rhodium-plated metal and rose-gold-plated metal, Elizabeth and James ($245, at shopbop.com). 8. Brass and hematite, Quarry ($247.03, quarryjewelry.us). 9. Sterling silver, Charlotte Chesnais ($420.73, at Nordstrom, nordstrom.com). 10. Gold-plated brass, onyx and red-jasper stone, Lizzie Fortunato ($388, at bonadrag.com).

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STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE)

J.W. ANDERSON

season.

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Make artful ear Y ring A

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STELLA MCCARTNEY

TOP COATS The utilitarian anorak is updated thanks to edgy-luxe finishes. 1. Nylon, Canada Goose ($395, canadagoose.com). 2. Nylon, COS ($250, cosstores.com). 3. Cotton and mesh, DKNY ($801, dkny.com). 4. Polyester, Topshop ($140, at Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com). 5. Polyester, Hilfiger Collection ($750, tommy.com). 6. Nylon, K-Way ($165, k-way.ca). 7. Nylon, Stella McCartney ($2,475, at fwrd.com). 8. Nylon, Scotch & Soda ($349, scotch-soda.com).

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STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

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STYLE From $637, at Nordstrom (nordstrom.ca)

Q&A Over the course of our 15-minute conversation, New York-based designer Adam Lippes shifted positions seven times—sitting forward, leaning back with his legs crossed, tucking one leg under the other. For some, this might read as restless, but Lippes was energetic and present as he discussed his spring collection, his mentor (the late Oscar de la Renta) and the true meaning of luxury. We sat still and took it all in.

ON HIS SECRET MUSE “She’s a friend of mine, but she doesn’t know she’s my muse. We have a secret mood board that gets hidden when she comes by the studio.” ON LESSONS LEARNED “My aesthetic is very different from Oscar de la Renta’s, but the core values are not. I want to make clothes that make women smile. And so did he. I learned everything about fashion from him.” ON SLOW LUXURY “If something took time to create, then chances are it’s luxurious. Like time spent with family or a dinner that took six hours to prepare—that’s a luxurious dinner.” ON DRESSY CASUAL “I’ve banned the word ‘gown’; I do long dresses. I think the word is ‘ease’; I try to do something that’s comfortable but also dressed up. Comfort doesn’t have to be sloppy.” ON HIS SPRING COLLECTION “There are lots of gathered asymmetrical hems and a play of stiff and soft. We make what we call an ‘opera coat,’ [made of] silk jacquard in 12 different colours. You can wear it with jeans and a T-shirt to the grocery store or out to black tie at night.”

TOP OF THE CL ASS For Léonie Daignault-Leclerc, the most recent recipient of the ELLE Canada

Graduate Award, sustainable fashion is as much about emotion as it is about environmentalism. “Most people think that eco fashion is just about the material; that’s a big part of it, but it’s also about the emotional sustainability of a garment,” explains the Ryerson alum. The first collection for her Montreal-based label, Gaia & Dubos, out this spring, will be produced on demand to cut down on waste. The designs, which are made from organic cotton and recycled polyester, will also be customizable—think varying necklines, sleeve lengths and buttons and cords that let the wearer play with the fit. Daignault-Leclerc believes that offering personalization options like these increases the physical and sentimental longevity of clothing. And she has the proof: She surveyed hundreds of potential customers—namely, women in Quebec—as part of her graduate research project. “Once I identified those interested in paying for high-quality sustainable fashion, I went deeper to learn what they like in terms of design, materials and the way they shop,” she says. “I hope that someday we won’t even have to ask if fashion is sustainable; it will just be a given.”

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TEXT, LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

WHAT’S COOL, CUTTING EDGE AND IMPORTANT IN FASHION


LOEWE

COLL AB OR AT ION NAT ION

CHARMED LIFE

THREE NOTEWORTHY RELEASES TO SHOP THIS MONTH.

The accessories seen on the runways of Loewe and Coach 1941 sent a message: Move over, fuzzy bag charms. It’s all about geometric and graphic extras this season. Clip these cheeky baubles to your go-to carryall or—for the freespirited—the belt loop of your Levi’s 501s.

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FRENCH LESSONS

COACH

From far left: Leather, Pop and Suki ($59.23, popandsuki. com); leather, Coach 1941 ($100, coach. com); leather, Proenza Schouler ($309.64, proenzaschouler.com)

This spring marks the seventh season of Uniqlo’s collaboration with French style icon Inès de la Fressange. The items in the line, like satin jackets, blouson tops and sporty polos, have a relaxed, nostalgic feel and were designed with a nod to idyllic coastal Marseille. The collab is yet another testament to the undying appeal of that ineffable French-girl sensibility.

CODE RED

2

Christian Louboutin was inspired by David Lynch’s Twin Peaks when he designed this surreal-looking clutch that is equal parts objet d’art and chic minaudière. The glossy bag mimics the shape of the brand’s iconic “So Kate” pumps, down to the red “soles” that frame their aluminum shell. Consider our interest...“peaked.” (From $4,450, at Christian Louboutin’s Toronto boutique and christianlouboutin.com)

3

MOTHERLAND

DANCING SHOES

For spring, 80-year-old Parisian shoe label Roger Vivier tapped Argentinian fashion consultant and all-around It girl Sofía Sanchez de Betak to front its latest collection. Standout pieces include sporty-luxe slides with Vivier’s signature crystal-encrusted buckles and the red “Viv’ Tango” bag—its vermilion hue was inspired by Betak’s hometown of Buenos Aires.

Mother and supe Miranda Kerr dreamed up a 12-piece collection that gives back: Proceeds go to Australia’s Royal Hospital for Women Foundation, a cause close to Sydney native Kerr’s heart. She named all the pieces; there’s the “Funday” flare—straight-out-ofthe-’70s bell-bottomed jeans—and a cropped tee that bears the slogan “Attitude of Gratitude.” (From $145, motherdenim.com)

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SPECIAL

CANADIAN RETAIL IS ENTERING AN EXCITING NEW ERA THAT WILL CHANGE THE WAY YOU SHOP. 62


Holt Renfrew Square One and Bloor Street (below)

ISTOCK (FABRIC BACKGROUNDS & LEAF)

THE LUXURY LEADER

Mario Grauso and Ketevan Gvaramadze

It’s a week before Christmas, and Holt Renfrew’s flagship on Bloor Street in Toronto is a buzzing hive of well-heeled holiday shoppers seeking out last-minute gifts and gowns amid the glorious chaos. Next door, 11 floors above, I’m sitting in a quiet, stately office she counters. “It’s important to look at things that with Holts’ president, Mario Grauso, and fashion inspire you.” Creative clashes are part of the process, director, Ketevan Gvaramadze. Both are new to the it seems. Grauso admits it’s a bit “like a negotiation company—barely four months into their roles—but with your family about how you’re going to decorate they are already reminiscing about the latest Fashion the house.” After the pair returned home, many Month, spring/summer 2017. The industry’s biannual hours were spent debating fashion fantasy versus pilgrimage, running from New York to London to reality, for both the shop floor and their revamped spring magazine, a 195-page lookMilan to Paris, affects every business book that serves as a snapshot of decision Grauso will make for the next ” W E ’ R E D E F I N I T E LY the season. And, being the first magasix months. “For me, that’s where it all C O N S I D E R AT E O F MILLENNIALS. THEY zine under Grauso’s leadership, it will starts,” he says. “It’s where all the ideas L O V E L U X U RY, A N D I also act as his unofficial debut— come together.” This explains why, just WA N T T H E M T O S E E a few days after starting at Holts, H O LT S A S A P L A C E T O Canada’s first glimpse of the new Holt Renfrew. Grauso headed off to the shows—a L O O K AT FA S H I O N When Grauso was announced as glam but exhausting circuit of back-toAND GET INSPIRED.” incoming president last July, insiders back presentations, re-sees (an opportunity for editors and buyers to have a closer look at weren’t exactly surprised. He is the former president the collections) and market appointments. It’s a full- of Joe Fresh—which, like Holt Renfrew, is owned on schedule that leaves you physically drained but by the titans of retail, the Weston family—and, with over 20 years of experience as a fashion exec at creatively supercharged. Unsurprisingly, one of the hottest shows on the Vera Wang Group and Puig, he is well known in the fashion calendar made a major impact on the industry. New appointments aside, big change was bound Gvaramadze. “Oh, my God, Balenciaga...,” she says when I ask what her favourite show was. “It was to happen one way or another at Canada’s oldest everything for me. It made my Fashion Week.” high-end department store. With Saks Fifth Avenue Grauso shakes his head. “But the girls couldn’t walk and Nordstrom venturing north of the border and in the shoes!” (He has a point. Spandex-encased Simons expanding beyond Quebec, the luxury landstilettos are tricky.) “Yes, but you have to dream!” scape in this country got a lot more crowded in 2016. It’s a new reality that Holts had been bracing for since 2015, when it began shuttering its smaller outposts—a strategy implemented so it could focus on multi-million-dollar expansions at its major h

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Models Julia Bergshoeff, Carolyn Murphy, Romee Strijd, Liya Kebede and Edita Vilkeviciute ham it up on-set for the Holts magazine shoot.

again in our conversation. It’s also a deliberate shift away from the retailer’s more traditional persona. “We’re definitely considerate of Millennials,” says Grauso. “They love luxury, and I want them to see Holts as a place to look at fashion and get inspired— whether they’re able to buy it yet or not. How young people are shopping now is a new chapter that we, as a department store, have to consider.” Speaking of how Millennials shop, Holts knows that it has to up its e-commerce game, stat. The 180-year-old retailer launched beauty online in 2015 and accessories in 2016, and the aim is to roll out select ready-to-wear categories later this year. “We got into it a little late, so we’re trying to play catch-up,” admits Grauso. “But it’s not just about rushing and getting things up; I want it to look a certain way. It has to be true to the new message of Holts.” That’s one reason its magazine (and its toneddown aesthetic) is so important. “It’s more than just a catalogue,” says Grauso. “It informs everything else: the windows, the website, the ad campaigns.” Gvaramadze, who also handles the look and feel of their Instagram account, gives a definitive nod. “It’s our point of view,” she says. “It’s who we are.” And who is that exactly? “Holt Renfrew has always brought the newest and best fashion to Canada; those are our roots,” says Grauso when asked about his vision. “We’re just going to be tougher [with the DNA]—editing the roster and bringing on new designers who are having a moment.” This will include investing in more boundary-pushing brands (Comme des Garçons, Sacai) and creating a dedicated space for them in all Holt Renfrew locations. “Young people are really thinking outside the box, so [creatively] advanced designers are going to be key,” says Grauso. “These are brands that touch both mother and daughter. When a collection can do that, it becomes really important to us. There’s something for everyone, but it’s an edited something for everyone.” NANCY WON

PHOTOGRAPHY, ISTOCK (FABRIC BACKGROUND). OPPOSITE PAGE: MATHIEU FORTIN (F., R. & B. ATALLAH) & ISTOCK (FABRIC BACKGROUND)

stores in Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto’s Yorkdale and Bloor Street locations as well as a massive merger with Ogilvy in Montreal and a swanky new opening at Square One in Mississauga. That one is an extravagant behemoth: 12,077 square metres with towering ceilings and marble floors, a personalshopping “apartment,” a master tailor and a leather artisan who will add custom embossing to your handbag. Grauso also promises that Holts will offer more concept shops showcasing the world of the designer: Look for Brioni and Loro Piana this year. These changes allow Holts to offer a deeper assortment of products from a wider range of brands, but, much like other big retailers, it still has challenges to face. “Canada doesn’t have the large base of high-end shoppers that the United States does,” says Maureen Atkinson, senior partner at Toronto retail consulting firm J.C. Williams Group, who adds that in a market of limited growth size, the more you cut the pie the smaller the slices. “If all these companies are targeting the same established luxury customer, there certainly isn’t enough business for them all.” In other words, it’s not a bad idea to find another pie, a.k.a. a new customer. This is partly why Grauso immediately thought of Gvaramadze when he found out he would be joining Holt Renfrew. The Georgian-born stylist, with her platinum pixie cut and penchant for wearing Gosha Rubchinskiy tees with oversized Céline trousers, is an unusually edgy choice for Holts. And that’s the point. “Ketevan is always pushing fashion,” says Grauso. “She has this eye and an ability to mix streetwear with more obvious designers in an interesting Holt Renfrew Bloor (below) the way.” In case you missed that, he said Street; Apartment Yorkdale “streetwear”—which implies youth. It’s an idea that comes up again and


Firas, Rami and Bassel Atallah; the Ssense head office in Montreal

we launched the website. We’d all finished our studies by then and had more time on our hands.” That’s right—finished their studies. CFO Firas, the eldest, was just 25 years old at the time, CEO Rami, 24, and Bassel, 21. In other words: They’re Millennials—a fact that, combined with their blatant fashion-outsider status (their backgrounds are in banking, computer engineering and mechanical engineering), might explain their unorthodox approach. “We cater to a Millennial audience because we are in that age group ourselves,” says Atallah. According to Ssense, almost 80 percent of its customers are between 18 and 34—an astonishing stat for a luxury retailer, given that, among high-end brands, luring Millennials has become the golden ticket no one knows how to cash. It’s a huge win that Atallah attributes to an internal culture of At a time when Canadian luxury players are fac- innovation and outside-the-box thinking. “If you ing unprecedented competition in an increasingly come to our offices, you’ll see that the average age dog-eat-dog market, one retailer has managed to of our employees is in that bracket as well,” he says. avoid the conversation altogether. For Montreal- “Millennials are hyper-connected; they live in the present, and they tend to make the based Ssense—which launched in “WE WERE trends instead of follow them—there’s 2003 as a fashion boutique in the Old Y O U N G A N D a real energy to that.” Let’s state the Port and is now a global e-commerce D I D N ’ T H AV E obvious: Building a luxury business force—it’s business as usual. But then A LOT OF EXaround selling $1,500 hoodies and again, Ssense has always operated PERIENCE.... IT WA S A L O T O F $2,000 sneakers to 22-year-olds is outside the comfy confines of the traTRIAL AND ERrisky, to say the least. But given that ditional fashion sphere. How? With ROR, MORE BY Ssense now employs over 300 full-time unconventional buys, strong connecNEED THAN BY staffers, receives 32 million page views tions to art, music and creativity and INTENTION.” a month and has had 82 percent coma sophisticated blurring of streetwear and high fashion long before Yeezy and Vetements pound annual sales growth since its first year, it made it de rigueur. Ssense’s success has been built on looks like it’s working. Atallah insists they didn’t initially set out to chaldoing things entirely its own way. The company started out as a physical storefront lenge the status quo or upend the system. “We were 14 years ago, and COO Bassel Atallah, who founded young and didn’t have a lot of experience, so we it with his two brothers, Rami and Firas, says they naturally took a more analytical, engineering aphad their eyes on the digital prize from day one. “It proach,” he says. “It was a lot of trial and error, was the early days of the Web, and Rami saw a big more by need than by intention.” h opportunity in luxury e-commerce,” says Atallah. “Back then, brands were very reluctant to sell online, so we opened the store to make them feel a little more comfortable with the concept. Then, in 2006,

THE OUTSIDER RISK-TAKERS

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SPECIAL HISTORY LESSONS

Charting 180 years of Canadian retail. 1837 William S. Henderson buys out a Quebec City fur and hat shop, marking the founding of Holt Renfrew. 1870 La Maison Simons opens on 20 Côte de la Fabrique in Quebec City, where it remains to this day.

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1883 Timothy Eaton opens a three-storey department store on Yonge Street in Toronto. It’s the first in Canada to have electric lights. 1896 Simpsons opens across the street from Eaton’s. The two department stores’ retail rivalry lasts into the 1970s. 1913 The first of the original six Hudson’s Bay department stores opens in Calgary. 1930 The Eaton’s Winnipeg store earns the quirky record of having the longest meat counter in North America. 1974 Creeds opens on Bloor Street in Toronto. The luxury boutique houses Canada’s first Chanel store as a shop-in-shop. 1981 The West Edmonton Mall, the world’s largest shopping centre at the time, opens boasting a skating rink, a water park and an aquarium. 1991 Hudson’s Bay takes over the old Simpsons-department-store space across from the Toronto Eaton Centre; in 1999, Eaton’s closes its doors after 130 years in Canadian retail. 2009 The Room in the Queen Street Hudson’s Bay is renovated and reinvented to stock contemporary luxury brands like Proenza Schouler and The Row. 2014 Nordstrom opens its first Canadian location in Calgary’s Chinook Centre. 2016 Saks Fifth Avenue arrives in Canada and revives the oldworld European fine-food hall by partnering with Pusateri’s. h

“HISTORY LESSONS,” LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, ISTOCK (FABRIC BACKGROUNDS) & GETTY IMAGES (CREEDS)

This year will see Ssense continue to swim against the retail current. The company is in the process of constructing a five-storey David Chipperfield-designed flagship store in Montreal. Set to open later this year, it will be not only eight times larger than its original shop but also, according to Atallah, fully “digitally integrated.” When pushed for more information, he says that with the rise of digital, “the concept of “ALMOST physical retail is undergoing its big90 PERCENT gest transformation in history.” He OF SALES IN also adds that whenever the conTHE LUXURY cept of merging online and offline INDUSTRY is introduced, “people tend to exSTILL HAPPEN OFFpect a ‘store of the future.’ We are LINE, SO rethinking the role of the physical THERE IS space as a means to crystallize our D E F I N I T E LY brand vision in a tangible way.” A HUGE OPPORTUNITY The decision to invest in bricks T HERE, NOT and mortar in an increasingly O N LY F I digital culture may seem, again, N A N C I A L LY counterintuitive, but that’s what BUT ALSO we’ve come to expect from Ssense. IN TERMS OF MAKING “Almost 90 percent of sales in ANOTHER the luxury industry still happen CONNECoff-line,” says Atallah, “so there TION is definitely a huge opportunity WITH OUR CUSTOMER.” there, not only financially but also in terms of making another connection with our customer.” And as a self-admitted “Canadian retailer with a global mindset,” taking that IRL connection beyond Montreal via physical flagships in other cities will be the next step in Ssense’s boundary-busting vision. “We want to continue to build Ssense into the best company it can possibly be—to achieve its full potential,” he says. “We’re growing at a fast pace, and there’s a lot going on, but there’s plenty to be excited about NANCY WON in 2017.”


© 2016

SEPHORA

NORDSTROM

HUDSON’S BAY

SHOPPERS DRUG MART

TORYBURCH.COM


SPECIAL THE DIRECT-TOCONSUMER DISRUPTOR

THE TRAIL...BLAZER

Smythe, the brand known for its menswear-inspired toppers and the A-list stars who wear them, is growing its digital presence. This spring, the made-in-Canada label will launch its own e-commerce platform. The online destination will carry a full range of outerwear as well as blouses, dresses and shirting. We’re already making a wish list.

Montreal-based eyewear brand BonLook was born online. It wasn’t until four years later, in 2015, that the retailer opened its first physical outpost in the Promenades Cathédrale shopping mall in Montreal. The brand, which designs and makes its own pairs of glasses while cutting out the distribution middleman (think Canada’s answer to Warby Parker), is in rapid expansion mode. Last year saw the opening of the first BonLook store outside Quebec, at the CF Rideau Centre in Ottawa, and 20 more locations are in the works. In keeping with BonLook’s digital roots, the stores skip the cash registers: Shoppers pay solely online.

GROWTH SPURT

Canadian companies in expansion mode.

A section of the mural painted by Maya Gohill

THE HERITAGE MOMENT Iconic Quebec retailer Simons unveils its first Calgary location this month. The fivestorey outpost covers an entire block of the city’s downtown 2nd Street and takes over a part of the Lancaster Building, Calgary’s first skyscraper. Simons sets up shop with a three-storey mural painted by local artist Maya Gohill as well as an in-house hangout/caffeine station.

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THE PATRIOTIC POP-UP

Sarah Power founded INLAND, a Torontobased biannual shopping event, in 2014 with a mission to connect contemporary Canadian brands with consumers. Indie jewellery designer Anne-Marie Chagnon, womenswear labels Jennifer Torosian and Zoran Dobric and leather-goods brand Martin Dhust have participated in past events, which drew hundreds of stylish attendees to trendy locations like 99 Sudbury and the QueenRichmond Centre. ■

TEXT, LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRISTOPHER WAHL (SMYTHE) & ISTOCK (FABRIC BACKGROUNDS)

THE INSTAGRAM POWER PLAYER

Seven years after setting up shop in Vancouver’s Gastown ’hood, minimal label Oak + Fort leveraged its 100,000 Instagram following with a shoppable account powered by digital marketing firm Dash Hudson, whose other Millennial-minded clients include Glossier and Converse. The link in Oak + Fort’s Insta bio takes you to a fully shoppable feed where snaps of artfully layered looks link to the brand’s e-commerce platform.


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Clara Young on the oftmisunderstood shoe that is “safe but not sensible.” FASHION WATC HERS SAY THAT THE kitten heel is ubiquitous this spring, but is it? Since the kitten heel is neither as flat as a crepe nor as high as a flagpole, much gets dumped into its medium-sized category that isn’t kitten, or, really, even feline, at all. In fact, it’s easier to say what a kitten heel isn’t than what it is. It is certainly not a stiletto. Neither is it square, squat, sturdy or stacked, even if it’s medium height. What makes the Dior slingback with logo strap, Prada sandal, pointy Acne Studios slingback, Loewe moccasin and Céline babushka slipper kitteny is the indentation right at the top of the heel, called the “seat.” It makes the heel look like a comma. Sometimes, it’s so bent in that it looks like a cartoon shoe that has skidded to a screeching halt. And although the heel is shaped like an hourglass, it is imperatively skinny because a fat hourglassshaped heel is for high kicks and tap dancing. “They give your leg a pretty silhouette,” says my friend Sabine. “And if you have full calves, kitten heels make them taper away and disappear.” Kittens are great in-between shoes. They are safe but not sensible, dressy but not ditzy, stylish but not slavish. Which is

E

why they were the heel of choice for Audrey Hepburn and Jackie Kennedy (and still are for Michelle Obama). But what do we really think about the kitten heel? It isn’t a heel that inspires heated passion. By nature a compromise shoe, the kitten emerged in the 1950s as a “training” heel for younger girls. Designed for one’s first tentative steps in what was then the high-speed foot race for husbands and high heels, kittens are cute, tasteful, elegant and demure. They are the Baby Duck that comes before champagne. They are the quinceañera of footwear. That said, cats have their claws and so do kittens. When the heel is spiky and the toe pointy, like last fall’s white Balenciaga bootie, it can be an interesting, ag gressive shoe. Diana Rigg wore a black leather bodysuit and kitten booties as she kungfu-chopped villains in the ’60s TV show The Avengers. Sharp kitten heels, torn fishnets, bird’s-nest pompadours and gobs of black eyeliner was how punk icons Exene Cervenka, Siouxsie Sioux and PJ Harvey rolled in the 1980s and early 1990s. These were not women of moderate taste, as the kitten heel is wont to express. This shows that it’s a shoe with plenty of wiggle room for personality and, possibly, even rebellion—a shoe exactly suited to our times. ■

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DRIES VAN NOTEN

JASON WU

ERDEM

GIVENCHY

WHEN THE HEEL IS SPIKY AND THE TOE POINTY, IT CAN BE AN INTERESTING, AGGRESSIVE SHOE.

PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (RUNWAY) & GETTY IMAGES (BACKGROUND). OPPOSITE PAGE: STYLING, ELAINE JYLL REGIO

KITTENS WITH CLAWS

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NEW LOWS The kitten heel gets an update. 5

1. Faux-leather pumps, K&M by Kate & Mel ($55, at The Shoe Company, theshoecompany.townshoes.ca). 2. Leather pumps, Gloria Coelho ($665, at farfetch.com). 3. Leather and plastic slingbacks, Nicholas Kirkwood ($1,115, nicholaskirkwood.com). 4. Velour and napa-leather booties, Christian Louboutin ($1,295, christianlouboutin.com). 5. Leather slingbacks, Le Château ($99.95, lechateau.com). 6. Leather pumps, Roger Vivier ($985, rogervivier.com). 7. Leather booties, Topshop ($170, at Hudson’s Bay, thebay.com). 8. Cotton and leather pumps, Aldo ($90, aldoshoes.com). 9. Suede pumps with interchangeable plastic heel, Tanya Heath ($550 for the pumps, $85 for the heel, tanyaheath.com). 10. Polyurethane mules, Zara ($89.90, zara.com). 11. Napa-leather pumps, Francesco Russo ($1,230, at NET-A-PORTER.com).

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F R E S H N E S S T H AT WO R K S H A R D E R , B E C A U S E Y O U H AV E TO

© Procter & Gamble 2017

WO R K H A R D E R TO G E T A H E A D .

STRESS TESTED FOR WOMEN


A R T & T H E

B E S T

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M O V I E S ,

B O O K S ,

M U S I C

RADA

TEXT, SARAH LAING

You’re going to start seeing (and hearing) Dua Lipa all over the place. Everything you need to know about this singer and other up-and-comers is just one page flip away.

T R A C K I N G

WAT C H THIS FACE

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SOUNDS LIKE... Get familiar with Dua Lipa, pop’s next great hope.

f you take Ariana’s vocal chops, Taylor’s real-life-to-rhyme-scheme songwriting and Tove Lo’s enter-with-your-middle-finger-raised attitude and gloss it all with Katy’s candy-coated production aesthetic, you’ll come close-ish to Dua Lipa. This Kosovar-Albanian Brit is poised for a big 2017: Her second single, “Be the One,” is a hit in Australia and Europe, she’s on the short list for the BRIT Critics’ Choice Award (previous winners include the likes of Adele and Sam Smith) and she’s got a hugely anticipated debut album coming out soon. We caught up with the 21-year-old at home in London during a rare quiet block in her calendar. HOW’S LIFE? “It’s been so crazy! Now that I have a day off, I don’t know what to do with myself. I’m like, ‘I guess I’ll just go sit on my couch for three hours.’”

DO YOU NOT LIKE BEING ALONE? “I’ve been so busy that I’ve gotten used to having a schedule, so when I’m at home, I start putting things in my diary like ‘I’m going to turn the washing machine on at this time.’ But it’s actually nice to have a moment to chill and reflect on everything that’s been happening.”

and I was writing just for me. And then when I started releasing music and people came up to me and said ‘Your song made me feel a certain way and thank you for that,’ I was no longer writing just for me; I was also writing for my fans. If I’m able to do something that is so therapeutic for me and then make someone else feel safe or empowered or just escape from reality for a tiny bit of time...that’s what I’m here for. I want to show people that we all go through the same things, because sometimes an artist can seem like a hybrid, not a real person. I’m just like you, but I WHAT WE’RE TALKING ABOUT THIS MONTH IN ARTS & CULTURE have the opportunity to get it out through music.” HAS POP ALWAYS BEEN YOUR THING? “Pop is my first love; growing up, I listened to everyone from Nelly Furtado to Destiny’s Child to Christina Aguilera. I moved to Kosovo when I was 11, and everyone there listened to hip hop so I fell in love with 50 Cent and Snoop Dog—although I guess 50 Cent is still fucking pop. The first show I ever went to was Method Man and Redman. I would say now that my music is those two things alongside each other. I’m J. Cole and Pink put together. I’ve got pop production but with the honesty and truthfulness and flow of hip hop.”

IT SEEMS LIKE YOU HAVE A VERY CLEAR IDEA OF WHO YOU ARE AS AN ARTIST. “There have been opportunities where I was offered features and I was like, ‘I know this is a great song and it will potentially be a massive hit, but it’s not for me.’ I don’t want to take it for the sake of it because I feel like I’ve worked so hard to get across who I am as an artist.” HOW DO YOU DECIDE WHETHER IT’S FOR YOU OR NOT? “Lyrically it has to make sense to me. It has to be a song that I feel I could have written.” ONCE THE ALBUM’S OUT, WHAT’S NEXT? “World domination! [Laughs] I want to see the venues grow; I want to go to more places I haven’t been to. I want to keep releasing albums. I want to be on my eighth fucking album like Rihanna. She’s just doing whatever the fuck she wants and it’s amazing. You know what I mean? I’m just enjoying this so much, and I hope it never stops.” h

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TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, ISTOCK (STARS)

HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT YOUR “BRAND” AS A NEW POP ARTIST ARRIVING ON THE SCENE? “In a way... When I started writing music, it was all very autobiographical


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RADAR

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FILM

MORE BOOKSTURNED-INTOMOVIES COMING SOON

SLOW BUR N A BESTSELLING MENTAL-HEALTH MEMOIR GETS THE HOLLYWOOD TREATMENT. I’m in a downtown Toronto boardroom, sitting opposite Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness author Susannah Cahalan and Dr. Souhel Najjar, who are catching up like old friends reunited after a prolonged absence. Najjar is the world-renowned physician who saved the then 24-year-old New York Post journalist’s life, putting an end to her self-described “month of madness” by diagnosing her with autoimmune encephalitis in 2009. This, after medical practitioners had agreed to lock her up in a psychiatric unit. Now, they’re back on the press circuit to promote a Hollywood film based on Cahalan’s memoir. “Susannah is the true hero in this story,” explains Najjar, skilfully deflecting the praise headed in his direction. “She has become the voice for people afflicted with autoimmune brain disorders in general, especially those who cannot advocate for themselves.” The man does have a point. Cahalan’s Brain on Fire is a gripping page-turner rooted in her harrowing medical journey. Since her story became a 2012 New York Times bestseller, Cahalan has made it her professional mission to destigmatize mental illness. (Her forthcoming book will unpack the history of psychiatry, no less.) She has also heard from thousands of readers suffering from neurological ailments that were initially misdiagnosed as psychiatric conditions. It’s something Cahalan acknowledges is an unfortunate reality of the medical realm. “That’s not necessarily a condemnation of the system,” suggests the poised reporter, frequently pausing mid-sentence to exchange glances with her ultrasupportive partner-in-cure. “The problem is that clinical

care and medicine are an art, not a science. And for a patient, it’s very difficult to navigate that road.” One particularly high-profile fan of her memoir, producer Charlize Theron, optioned Brain on Fire’s film rights, which explains why Cahalan and Najjar are sitting before me and revisiting her neurological ordeal. “I’m watching Chloë Grace Moretz play me doing something I don’t even remember” is how Cahalan describes attending the movie’s world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival last September. “It’s a very strange out-of-body experience.” (The film is currently awaiting a wide-release date.) Given that the film now sits in the pantheon of bigscreen renderings of psychiatric conditions, the conversation naturally turns to cinema’s less-than-stellar track record in that department. “I can’t stand when it’s just the trope of the crazy person who is discounted,” says Cahalan. “It’s just so lazy and, at this point, regressive.” She cites Girl, Interrupted and Kiwi chess drama The Dark Horse for their spot-on depictions of borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder, respectively, as examples of films headed in the right direction. Cahalan recognizes that not knowing the root cause of these diseases can make them very frightening to some. “I’m not wagging my finger and being pedantic about it,” she says. “But I think those who are able to should contribute to greater public knowledge about these conditions.” Turning once more to acknowledge Najjar, she adds, “I’m really proud to be among those people.” MICHAEL-OLIVER HARDING

The Dark Tower by Stephen King (July 2017) Idris Elba in a cowboy hat? That delight awaits you in this Westworld-meets-It fantasy horror western based on King’s series about an alternate dimension ruled by a scary sorcerer.

Wonder by R. J. Palacio (April 2017) The Cutest Person of 2016 (a.k.a. Canada’s own Jacob Tremblay) plays a young boy who looks a bit different from the other kids. This tearjerker also stars Julia Roberts.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven (2018) Two teens, both intending to end their lives, meet at the top of a bell tower—and what happens next is the plot of this potential YA juggernaut starring Elle Fanning.

K AT E T EMPEST It is with hesitation that we call Kate Tempest a “spoken-word performer” because, well, we saw you cringe. Instead, let’s not classify the 31-year-old Brit as anything and just enjoy her newest project, Let Them Eat Chaos, in all its singular provocative, explosive, wildly moving glory. Tempest’s work is a blending of hip hop and poetry that’s a bit like Ed Sheeran’s flow...if he was into delivering vividly drawn, politically charged soliloquies on the state of the world today. h

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TEXT, SARAH LAING

MUSIC


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RADAR

Richardson in The Edge of Seventeen

PROFILE

A couple of Richardson’s crochet designs

SCREWBALL

BOOK

THE SPIDER AND THE FLY BY CLAUDIA ROWE Warning: This true-crime memoir is INTENSE—as in “take breaks and palate cleanse with a Hallmark movie” levels of unrelenting grimness. This story of one woman’s obsession with a spate of murders in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.—and her subsequent correspondence with the man convicted of killing those women—is terrifyingly good, even if it does take a deep dive into the ugliest corners of the human experience.

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Goofy” seems like such an old-fashioned word, but after a 30-minute conversation with Haley Lu Richardson, we felt it was the most apropos adjective to describe the 21-yearold—that and “delightfully, disarmingly unaffected.” This is one young actress who is not “cool,” and she’s not even pretending otherwise. Case in point: Within 30 seconds of our getting Richardson on the phone, she’s laughing as she tells the story of her ill-fated tenure on the high-school track team. “It was my first race at my first meet,” she recalls. “I looked behind me to see if anyone was catching up to me...and then I just dove into the ground and did like five somersaults. I finished rolling a few inches from the finish line. I sat there criss-cross apple sauce as all these people ran by me.” Richardson, an Arizona native, has lived in Los Angeles since she was 16, wedging her foot in the door with momentum-building-type roles such as a lead part on the short-lived TV show Ravenswood, a critically acclaimed turn in indie film The Bronze and most recently as Hailee Steinfeld’s BFF in the buzzy The Edge of Seventeen. “Slow and steady wins the race,” she says of her career thus far. “I see people who work really hard and don’t get a break until they’re 50, and then I see people who book the first thing they audition for and then get really busy and overworked and burned out.” Next stop on that path? A lead role in M. Night Shyamalan’s latest film, Split, out now. “I thought you were supposed to call him ‘M. Night,’ so in all my emails to him and on the phone before we met I was calling him that,” says Richardson of working with the director best known for The Sixth Sense...who goes by “Night.” “I was an idiot.” In the film, Richardson plays a woman abducted by a man with dissociative identity disorder. If this sounds a bit like 2015’s Oscar-nominated Room.... “It’s very different,” protests Richardson, unfortunately hamstrung by not wanting to give away the twist. “It’s really cool and creepy.” When she’s not on-set, Richardson says she can be found “eating and crocheting”—usually at the same time. “Right after a meal I’m full, and then I burp and it kind of releases and I’m hungry again,” she says. “And I crochet pretty much all the time too. I always bring my yarn on-set.” (In fact, she stocks an Etsy store, called Hooked by Haley Lu, with her handicrafts.) If you’re wondering about the “Lu” in her name, so is she. “I honestly don’t know why, but my dad came up with it,” she says. Like Cindy Lou Who in How the Grinch Stole Christmas? “Exactly!” she says. “I kind of look like her because I’ve got one of those noses with a ball at the end. If they do a remake, I could definitely play her.” ■

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (H. L. RICHARDSON) & ISTOCK (SPIDERWEBS)

A convo with the funny (and on-the-rise) Haley Lu Richardson.


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LONG MAY SHE REIGN The Crown’s Claire Foy on

why playing the Queen is totally a laughing matter. BY SARAH LAING

PHOTOGRAPHY, VINCENT PETERS/NETFLIX

FOR A CONVERSATION THAT’S ostensibly about her big TV show The Crown, Claire Foy and I spend an awful lot of time talking about cake. Part of it is a question of timing: It’s late on a Friday afternoon, a.k.a. sweet-craving o’clock. It’s also the day after I had tea with an ex-chef of Queen Elizabeth’s (relevant because Foy plays the Queen on the breakout Netflix hit about the early years of her reign) and was full of fun facts about her eating habits. (Side fact: The real Liz Windsor’s favourite treat is chocolate biscuit cake. When it’s served at tea, it’s the only one she eats more than a sliver of.) Foy also has sugar (or a lack thereof) on the brain. She’s a self-described “addict” who recently got “back on the wagon” (all the better to fit into the wasp-waist fashions her character wears on the show, currently in production for its second season). “I was on, like, an eight-month

bender where I just ate anything that had any sugar in it,” she confesses over the phone from London, where she lives with her husband and daughter. “I definitely live to eat, but giving up sugar just makes you feel so much better. I’ve become sort of evangelical about it.” In fact, “giving up sugar” is one of the things that Foy and her co-star Vanessa Kirby (who plays Princess Margaret) talk about between takes. She also mentions that she really struggled to keep a straight face while filming scenes with John Lithgow (Winston Churchill). “You’ll notice that there are no lingering shots of the two of us,” she shares, pinning the blame on Lithgow. “They cut quite fast because I just can’t be in a room with that man without laughing. He’s got funny bones.” Of course, not every scene could be taken quite so lightly, especially given that the series is high in interpersonal and political drama. I mean, in the 10 episodes of the first season alone, we see Elizabeth’s uncle abdicate, her father die, her husband’s attentions wander and her sister’s heart break—not to mention the symbolic weight of her taking on the changing British Empire at the age of 25. “I remember when we shot the coronation,” recalls Foy, referring to the showstopper scene in the first season of the most expensive Netflix series ever. “I thought that Elizabeth would have been more nervous when it came to making her vows to God, but that moment actually gave her strength, as opposed to being a massive weight on her shoulders. She might have felt quite lonely before, but in that moment she felt a union and a reassurance. She suddenly got it and realized that that was what she was supposed to be doing.” The series, for which Foy just won a Golden Globe, emphasizes the young queen’s strong sense of duty and how it is sort of a North Star that guides her life. Foy, well, not so much. “It did make me think, ‘Would I stick with something I didn’t want to do because I felt it was my duty?’” she says. “The answer is I don’t know. It’s day by day, isn’t it? You can’t look at the next 60 years of your life and say ‘I shall do this forever.’ You just have to live each day well and hopefully get to the end of it.” And, yes, that includes going sugar-free. ■

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WORD OF THE MONTH: HYGGE 5 steps to living your most hygge life.

f 2016 was all about Marie Kondo-ing your life (throw away everything that does not “spark joy”; end up with nothing in your house but a Gucci bomber jacket and a paper crane your fifth-grade crush gave you), this year’s big “lifestyle” buzzword is an extension of that... but snugglier and with more hot chocolate. Hygge (pronounced “hoogah”) is a Danish word that has been popping up all over the Internet, most frequently seen hashtagged under a picture of someone’s feet in chunky-knit socks propped in front of a fire. It loosely translates to “luxuriating in being cozy” combined with “cherishing downtime” and a dose of “low-key mindful enjoyment of simple things.” Basically, it’s like a bunch of recent trends (Happiness! Actual Netflix and chilling! Fetishizing all things Scandinavian! Slow living! Hiding from the world because it’s imploding!) rolled into one concept that has for millenniums gotten the Danes through those dark winters. They’re also the happiest people on earth. Here’s how to get in on that bliss:

GO TO THE SOURCE.

Publishing books about the hygge life is turning into a bit of a cottage industry among Danes keen to proselytize. Here are three essential volumes to get you started. Conveniently, reading is a very hygge thing to do.

1. The Little Book of Hygge by Meik Wiking. 2. The Book of Hygge by Louisa Thomsen Brits. 3. Hygge: The Danish Art of Happiness by Marie Tourell Søderberg.

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DRESS THE PART.

2

GET LIT. Do any reading on hygge and candles come up almost instantly. Author Meik Wiking says that 85 percent of Danes name them first when they play hygge-object word association. We recommend this super-cozy scented candle from Foxhound Collection, a small-batch fragrance company in Truro, N.S. ($18, foxhoundcollection.com)

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GATHER THE TROOPS.

Yes, you can totally have a hyggelit evening solo in your robe bingeing on Black Mirror, but it’s a feeling best enjoyed with people you love. Bake some cookies together while having a hyggesnak (chit-chat), go on a mulled-wine-fuelled stroll through the woods or watch all the seasons of Gossip Girl while doing facial masks. (We recommend Skyn Iceland.) But whatever your preferred bonding activity, put away the phone and be (you guessed it) present.

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ELLECANADA.COM

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There’s a Danish word specifically for clothing you wear when you’re getting your hygge on (hyggebusker), so you definitely need some options.

1. Flannel nightshirt, The Sleep Shirt ($327, at intothebedroom.com). 2. Sweatshirt and track pants, Olivia von Halle ($1,425, at NET-A-PORTER. com). 3. Velvet robe, The Sleeper ($425, the-sleeper.com).

MAKE THINGS MORE HYGGELIT . Add whipped cream to your cocoa, string up some fairy lights or wake up 15 minutes early so you can sit at your kitchen window and watch the sun rise—all simple ways to embrace this lifestyle. We particularly love the idea of imbuing your breakfast with a little hygge by using this so Scandi Äggcøddler, a genius device that literally “coddles” your morning eggs (plus whatever veg/cheese/meat/spices you want). Just chuck it into boiling water and eight minutes later it presents you with a warm and comforting meal. ($27 each, aggcoddler.com) ■

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, ARTAMONOV TIMUR (MODEL) & GEOFFREY ROSS (ÄGGCØDDLERS)

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RADAR THAT NOW THIS Charting what you’ll be loving next month based on what you’re into now.

NOW

Prince Harry + Meghan Markle =

J. Cole, 4 Your Eyez Only

The Young and the Restless

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I’LL BE DAMNED Oh, come off it: We know the only reason you even own a TV is so that you can PVR America’s number one daytime drama, and it’s mainly for Victor Newman, right? Right. So naturally you’re dying to read I’ll Be Damned, the autobiography of Eric Braeden, the actor who has been onscreen bringing suave-y back for 37 years and counting. (Fun fact: He was initially booked for a threemonth stint back in 1980!) And even if you don’t know the ins and outs and miraculous coma recoveries of Genoa City, this memoir is (a) really well written and (b) a fascinating look at Newman’s life off-screen. Side note: For optimal reading pleasure, have “Nadia’s Theme” playing on a loop.

ELLECANADA.COM

If you were among those who made Meghan Markle one of the most Googled actresses of 2016 (nothing to do with her whirlwind romance with a certain royal and everything to do with deep diving into her stellar body of theatrical work, of course), then you’re probably going to be interested in a new exhibition that Kensington Palace is hosting from February 24. Diana: Her Fashion Story is a walk down sartorial memory lane for which any royal watcher would happily book a flight to London. It traces the Princess of Wales’ life through major clothing milestones—everything from her 1981 wedding dress to the Victor Edelstein gown she wore at the White House when she famously waltzed with John Travolta.

SAMPHA, PROCESS If dark, moody hip hop with major emotional heft is your thing (and you’ve been feeling all the feelings with J. Cole’s latest), we suggest you add Sampha to your Spotify queue ASAP. This Brit’s slightly hoarse vocals might sound familiar, thanks to an impressive spate of recent features (Drake, Kanye, Frank Ocean), but this album, Process, is his well-deserved step into the solo big time. We’re loving the vaguely EDM-y “Blood on Me,” but “Timmy’s Prayer,” with its gospel vibes, is probably our favourite because it manages to be heartbreaking, uplifting and sultry all at the same time.

TEXT, SARAH LAING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (PRINCE HARRY, M. MARKLE, J. COLE & PRINCESS DIANA)

W H AT ’ S N E X T

DIANA: HER FASHION STORY


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CELEBRITY

SITTING PRETTY AN AUDIENCE WITH THE ENDLESSLY FASCINATING GWYNETH PALTROW.

By Sarah Laing Photography by Xavi Gordo

WHAT WOULD YOU DO FOR A PEEK at Gwyneth Paltrow’s phone? It’s a thought that certainly crosses our mind as we sit with the A-lister, her smartphone laid face down on the chair next to her. And while, yes, Paltrow is warm and present and even more beautiful than you’d expect, the device’s constant buzzing is distracting—if only for the myriad intriguing possibilities of who among

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Paltrow’s extensive network of celebrity pals might be messaging her. Is it “Auntie B” texting to see if Apple can babysit Blue Ivy? Chris Martin texting about whatever it is that consciously uncoupled couples text about? Paltrow, looking simultaneously regal and relaxed in matching separates that drape in a way that just screams “expensive,” is holding forth on one of h


Suit (Boss), bracelets (Tous) and shoes (Valentino Garavani)


CELEBRITY Coat and shirt (Stella McCartney) and earrings and ring (Tous). For details, see Shopping Guide. Styling, Inmaculada Jiménez; makeup, Emma Lovell (The Wall Group); hair, George Northwood; manicure, Lucero Hurtado by OPI Pro-Spain (Mön Icon Team); styling assistant, Daniela Gutiérrez. We would like to thank Hotel Villa Magna (Madrid).


her more recent projects: a collaboration between her brand, Goop, and the skincare and makeup line Juice Beauty. The 44-year-old talks about silicones and pigments with a fluency and ease that speaks of genuine passion and not, say, the scripted sound bites of a well-prepped celeb fronting a product they’d never use themselves. “I was really shocked to learn what is in the products we all use every day,” she says of a turning point that came while bathing her then infant (now tween) daughter with conventionally produced (albeit luxury) bath stuffs. “So I started to lean toward a more natural or organic product.” After that research, she overhauled her own cosmetics routine. “I’ve really cleaned up my makeup kit and my vanity,” she says. “I love changing it up and mixing brands, but I just make sure that, for the most part, they’re non-toxic.” Of course, Paltrow’s passion for all things wellness is well documented—which is a kind way of saying that she (and the website she founded at her kitchen table in London in 2008) has, at times, been pilloried for what some read as dispatches from Planet Bizarre-and-Out-of-Touch. A quick Google of “crazy things Goop” pulls up 592,000 results, many with words like “ridiculous,” “pretentious” and “insane” in their titles. And yet, for all that, what started as a newsletter with a recipe for banana-nut muffins is now a globally recognized brand that employs 60 people, sees millions of hits to its website each month and is the reason that “vaginal steaming” was briefly an actual topic of conversation in the world. Paltrow talked about minimizing her role as the public face of Goop mid-last year, saying that “its scalability is limited if I connect to it.” As a justification—that she’d be standing in the way of the business’ growth if it’s all about her—it’s a head-scratcher, because half the allure of reading about 18-karatgold dumbbells, the perils of nightshades (back away from the tomatoes) and ways to combat the scientifically unproven phenomenon of adrenal fatigue was that it offered a glimpse into the life and psyche of one of the most privileged and accomplished women in the world. Of course, Paltrow isn’t the type to feel the need to explain her actions to anyone

ever. When we ask if her philosophy for life is “Don’t apologize, don’t explain,” she says, “That’s exactly right.” Perhaps the most extraordinary thing about her, however, is that we’ve come this far into a profile about her with nary a mention of her acting career, despite her being, you know, an Oscar-winning thespian. Part of that is Paltrow’s own choice—for the past few years, she has only done one film a year in order to be around more for her kids, 12-year-old Apple and 10-year-old Moses— but it also speaks to the extraordinary life she has had beyond the reason she became famous in the first place. Quick refresher: She starred in Shakespeare in Love, for which she won that Oscar, The Talented Mr. Ripley and the vastly underrated Country Strong. We the public, of course, have a complicated relationship with Paltrow, who is nothing if not polarizing—a fascinating sort of relatably unrelatable that has kept us intrigued by her since the ’90s. She’s Hollywood royalty (her mother is Blythe Danner, her late father director Bruce Paltrow) who has also published three cookbooks of (debatably) “no-fuss” recipes, and she’s a red-carpet style icon who says she wipes off her makeup in the limo on the way home. She’s just like us, but she’s not. Case in point: For the new book Goop Clean Beauty, Paltrow penned a foreword that warns against the fantasies peddled by the beauty industry...while dropping in the fact that she was once awarded the title of People’s Most Beautiful Person. “I’ve always stuck my neck out,” says Paltrow, when asked about the way that a perception of her authenticity has contributed to her success. “I’ve always been pretty true to myself, for better or for worse.” And even when you’re Gwyneth Paltrow, there is a “worse”—like her divorce from singer Chris Martin or the death of her beloved father. “I tried to heal him by proxy,” she remembers. “When he was diagnosed with cancer, I went really hard-core macrobiotic, which makes very little sense looking back.” And she gets stressed too, guys. “Post-40, when I get stressed, lack sleep or have alcohol, it really shows in my skin.” When asked if the answer to that might be an organic wine instead, she’s quick to correct. “Well, it’s much better if you can find biodynamic wine.” ■

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LIFE

FIT TO BE TIED

Chloe* is child-free and happy about it. So why won’t doctors agree to tie her tubes? AS TOLD TO CARLI WHITWELL

want children, even when I was as young as eight or nine. When I played house, I’d pretend I lived downtown with my boyfriend and dog—no babies or kids. My Barbies lived with their friends or had a pet. I was a lifeguard during high school and university, but I never instructed the small children. It was a running joke—everyone knew not to give the babies or the little kids to me to teach. When I got older, conversations about having a family came up in my relationships, but I always told guys I couldn’t see myself having kids. “I’m 32 now. A lot of my good friends have babies; they’re cute, but I don’t necessarily want to hold them or interact with them. I just don’t feel that connection. And I like my freedom—I like being able to go out after work and have drinks with friends or splurge on that Gucci purse. Luckily, my parents have never pressured me. They’re fine if they have no grandkids; they’ve always told me to live my own life. “I started thinking about getting my tubes tied when I was in my early 20s. I went on the pill when I was 18— mostly to help with severe period cramps. Then, two and a half years in, I started to spot. It was like having another period: I was always wearing tampons or panty liners. Not fun. So I tried going off and then back on the pill and switching brands. It just didn’t agree with my body.

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off. Once I did, it took a few months to have a normal period and cycle. “I approached my gynecologist shortly after. It was one of those times when you’re sitting in the waiting room forever and when you finally get called, it feels like the doctor is ready to run out the door as soon as you start talking. ‘We’ll figure this out,’ she said, although she was shaking her head no as she spoke, her short curly hair bouncing. ‘Use condoms for now.’ So I did, most of the time. (There were a few times when things got out of control and I had to take the morning-after pill.) I suspect my gynecologist thought I would grow out of wanting my tubes tied. She suggested trying the pill again or even an IUD with a low dose of hormones, but I didn’t want to go through that for three or four months and have it not work. I’d also read that hormones can make you moody or bloat or get acne, and I’d heard so many urban legends about IUDs hurting or popping out. Neither option seemed worth it to me. “When I moved to Toronto in my mid-20s, I got a new doctor and told her that I wanted the procedure. Again, I got the same response: ‘It’s not something we really recommend’ or ‘Why do you want to do this? It’s permanent.’ Last spring, when I went for my physical, she reluctantly referred me to a gynecologist. He was polite but blunt

“DOCTOR’S ORDERS?” CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

“I’VE ALWAYS KNOWN THAT I DON’T That was when the doctor suggested permanently going


when I explained my situation. ‘Whoa, let’s chat about this,’ he said. ‘I get where you’re coming from, but I’m not doing this. It’s risky, and I don’t feel the need.’ The argument? He didn’t want me to have unnecessary surgery if I had no health issues. He also reminded me that tubal ligation is permanent and suggested that my partner get a vasectomy because it’s less invasive. “I’ve been with my partner for six years, and we’re still using condoms. The thing is, my boyfriend has always wanted kids. In the early days of our relationship, I told him that I didn’t want to be a mother; we agreed that we would see where the relationship went regardless. We’re still together, but what if he’d had a vasectomy because he thought he was meant to be with me and then we broke up and he couldn’t have kids with someone else? I don’t think it’s fair to ask him to have one. “After that appointment, I followed up with my doctor and asked for a referral to another gynecologist, just to get another opinion. It was the same story. ‘Why don’t you freeze your eggs before you get your tubes tied?’ this doctor suggested in the nondescript examining room, peering at me over his glasses. I was annoyed, but I calmly outlined my concerns: The process is costly and, more important, an unnecessary backup for me. “What bothers me most is that both gynecologists were listening but they weren’t actually taking me seriously. I’ve gone through all the proper channels—first my doctor and then referrals—and I’ve never felt that what I wanted was a priority. I feel defeated, like even if I were to push and say ‘I want to do this now,’ they’ve already made up their minds and won’t do it. “It’s not like I need them to agree with what I want; I just need someone to perform the surgery. So I’m in limbo. I’m hesitant to even ask my doctor to refer me to someone else because the gynecologists were so adamant. The experience has also made me wonder if a man my age would ever be treated so dismissively if he wanted permanent birth control. Yes, I know the procedure is less invasive and potentially reversible, but both sexes should be able to make this call themselves. It’s old-fashioned to think otherwise. It’s 2017. Not every woman dreams of being a mom. And it’s time doctors caught up with that reality.” ■

“IT’S NOT LIKE I NEED THEM TO AGREE WITH WHAT I WANT; I JUST NEED SOMEONE TO PERFORM THE SURGERY.”

* Name has been changed.

DO C TO R ’S O R DER S ? WHY YOUR GYNECOLOGIST MAY BE RELUCTANT TO TIE YOUR TUBES—AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT.

A doctor pledges to “first do no harm,” so you can imagine the conundrum tubal ligation (the technical term for tying your tubes) presents. “Every gynecologist has probably had somebody in tears in his or her office saying she wished she’d never had a tubal, and I think that can affect the way you feel when you’re counselling the next patient,” says Dr. Ashley Waddington, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Queen’s University. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 percent of women under the age of 30 who have had the surgery say they regret it. That figure falls to 6 percent in older age brackets. “Some doctors have interpreted that [stat] as ‘We won’t even offer this to people under 30,’” says Waddington, who argues that young women who haven’t had children should have the same access as anyone else to the surgery. “If somebody really wants their tubes tied and I think they are adequately informed, I will provide the surgery.” The key word is “informed.“ Here’s what gynecologists want you to know:

TUBAL LIGATION IS PERMANENT. In most procedures, two small incisions are made in the abdomen and the fallopian tubes are clipped or cauterized to prevent eggs from entering. While technically this can be reversed, it’s not covered and can cost you up to $6,000, and there is no guarantee it will work because scarring can permanently damage the tubes. THERE ARE RISKS. Getting your tubes tied is quick surgery—about 30 minutes—but it’s still surgery. You’ll be under general anaesthetic, and the surgeon is operating near your organs. (Note: With the newer hysteroscopic tubal—in which the fallopian tubes are accessed through the vagina—typically only local freezing is required, but it’s not available in every hospital.) “In my experience, you’ll never find a surgeon who would choose surgery if there is an equally effective alternative method,” says Waddington.

Y O U H AV E CO N T RA CE P TIO N O P TIO N S . The experts we spoke to all recommend the IUD; statistically, it is slightly more effective at preventing pregnancy than tubal ligation. (Not to mention it can also make your periods lighter, and, while it doesn’t last a lifetime, you’ll get at least five years.) The vasectomy, meanwhile, was touted as the top form of permanent contraception. It’s an outpatient procedure (read “super-fast and not dangerous”) that requires only local freezing, and the failure rate is very low (one in 2,000). THE TAKEAWAY? It’s your call and yours alone. “Once a doctor has explained all the risks and benefits, it’s a woman’s decision,” says Dr. Amanda Black, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Ottawa and chair of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada’s Contraception Awareness Program. Getting your tubes tied doesn’t require spousal consent, but a doctor has to refer you to a gynecologist. If your gynecologist refuses, Waddington recommends requesting a referral to a family-planning specialist, who may be more open to doing the procedure.

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PSYCHE

PERFECT ENEMY What do you do when “good enough” feels straight-up unacceptable?

THERE’S A RUMOUR out there on the World Wide Web about the creation of Google Maps. The story goes that the development team were presenting what they considered to be an early prototype to Google senior management when founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin supposedly said: “It’s already good enough. Ship it.” Naturally the team complied, and the rest, which you’ll know if you’ve ever been lost in the shady back streets of an outerlying suburb and needed a guiding hand, is history. I’m relaying this story because, right now, I’m having trouble handing this article over. I’m struggling to “ship it,” so to speak. I’ve tweaked and teased. Copied and pasted. Command Z-ed more times than I’d like to admit. It’s safe to say I

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reached the point of diminishing returns (where effort exceeds value) a week ago, but still it sits on my desktop, cursor blinking with possibility. It’s not that this article is particularly tricky, mind you (and by no means a Shakespeare-level masterpiece—although it’s riveting, I promise). It’s just the way I am. It has been like this since Grade 1, when, on one especially memorable day, I sat in a blisteringly hot schoolroom perfecting the colouring in of a carefully drawn dolphin long after my classmates had hit the playground, despite Miss Elvy having already profusely complimented my budding artistic abilities. “Good enough,” for better or worse, is not in my repertoire.

PHOTOGRAPHY, JAMIE CHUNG/TRUNK ARCHIVE

BY GENEVRA LEEK


It’s perfectionism. But not in that coy, secretly proud way that people tend to mention it in work circles or offer it up as a “flaw” when asked about their weaknesses in a job interview; it’s more in an “I really need to address this before my nearest and dearest disown me” kind of way. And I’m not alone. There’s a slew of articles and self-improvement tomes geared toward the perfectionist to prove it, many of which offer abstract advice about perfection being unattainable and trying to leave work on time (ha!). Which is why when All or Nothing, a book by clinical psychologist Mike McKinney, came across my desk, I mentally relegated it to the pile before a quick flick through piqued my interest like most self-help books fail to do. While the tag line—Bringing Balance to the Achievement-Oriented Personality—seemed optimistic, something that jumped out around chapter four made me involuntarily shudder: “It can be helpful to contemplate not being perfect or achieving the perfect outcome. Although this may be scary and unsettling, it can help build resilience. Tolerating thoughts about ‘good enough’ outcomes can be empowering and help one keep the Harsh Internal Critic down to a dull roar.” Good enough. Two words that may as well read “epic fail” to those unable to accept anything less than perceived perfection. Two words that were just as unacceptable to me as a child making my big sisters repeatedly braid and unbraid my hair until there wasn’t a strand out of place as they are now when the helpful man at the car wash struggles to see the smudges I’m pointing out on my freshly washed windshield. And that’s before I even get to the office. So, could near enough ever really be good enough? Mike McKinney, please explain. “The idea of ‘good enough’ is becoming a pejorative label,” he tells me. “So, all-or-nothing people run from it as soon as it’s mentioned because it connotes failure. It’s taught to us from a very young age. It perhaps comes from our family—if you get your allowance, if you get your affection, if you get your attention from doing a really good job, then that’s what becomes the standard. Over time, if you’re not sure what the standard is and therefore don’t know how to meet it, what do you do? You raise the bar.” McKinney says that this is where the meaning of “good enough,” which for most of us translates to “just barely passed,” comes into play. “What I’m trying to suggest, particularly for perfectionists, is perhaps you have lost your perspective here,

because what you are doing is great in the sense of challenging yourself but it’s not necessarily giving you an opportunity to stop and reflect on yourself and say ‘Wow, I’m doing okay.’ Instead, most perfectionists say to themselves ‘Well, if I could do that, it probably wasn’t hard enough.’” A childhood expectation that you should always do your best, a deep fear of failure, a desire to please others—it seems inevitable that perfectionists exist in a constant state of concern that the world is going to see them for who they really are. Studies have shown that perfectionism can affect mental health—anxiety, depression—and has been cited as a factor in relationship problems, lack of confidence or compassion, workaholism, low productivity, extreme procrastination and perfection paralysis. McKinney says it’s also one of the main causes of burnout. “There can be a ‘healthy’ perfection driver, where we challenge ourselves to extend our performance and try to go further in a desired direction for positive reasons,” his book reads. “There is also the less positive perfection driver, where we dump on ourselves immediately and continuously when we do not meet the targets we set for ourselves. Unfortunately, all-or-nothing people tend to operate in the realm of the latter.” While “good enough” may require a radical (read “dread-inducing”) new way of thinking, McKinney says it’s not so much about having to dumb down expectations but about not beating ourselves up when we fail to meet goals that were most likely unachievable in the first place. “What I want to encourage people to do is to be able to pause a little bit and be objective with themselves in terms of ‘Am I really doing a great job here?’ And, if so, ‘Well done.’” Self-confessed “recovering perfectionist” and founder of Business Chicks, Emma Isaacs is a mother of four children under seven and runs a global company. She acknowledges that the connotation with the word “enough” doesn’t sit well with high achievers. “But I think it’s really speaking to the esteem and worthiness of women,” she says. “It’s part of our value system at Business Chicks to be grateful for what you have while working for what you want. So it’s not to say you can’t be ambitious and you shouldn’t be seen to be better, but you also have a baseline of being worthy and loved. We often look externally for validation and inspiration for success, but if you do the inner work, [you realize] ‘You know what? I’m bloody great to start with and anything on top of that is a real bonus.’” h

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PSYCHE While McKinney says that he encounters both male and female clients with all-or-nothing attitudes—“highly functioning but paying a real price”—it’s women who in some ways are more vulnerable. “As a society, we’ve taught women to be incredibly harsh on themselves. As they’re becoming more confident and entering areas that are traditionally male, sometimes insecurity is a powerful driver in terms of ‘I have to work 20 times as hard to show I’m just as good.’ If you couple that with long-standing personal attributes of wanting to do an outstanding job anyway, you have a powerful dynamic.” In a way, the idea of “leaning in,” popularized by tech exec and author Sheryl Sandberg, has

While internationally celebrated fashion designer Karen Walker’s exacting profession doesn’t allow for “good enough,” the business owner and mother has her own way of maintaining equilibrium. “I’m very careful with my scheduling, with the projects I take on or decline, with allowing time for my own headspace and my family. And if that means there’s simply not time to take on a project or to meet a proposed deadline, then the project or deadline is declined. I’m not into taking on insane amounts of stress or work. I’m into creating work I’m proud of and that my customers and fans love, having a team of people around me I respect and enjoy working with, and not scrimping on family and personal time.” In 2015, she was away from home for work for 97 nights; last year she was able to cut that down to be closer to 80, and she plans to reduce that again this year. All big work-related decisions are also life decisions (her husband is a partner in the business) laid against the vision they have for their personal lives. Most important, failure is an option. “Of course I don’t like to fail,” says Walker. “But it happens from time to time; there’s no way around that. If you have given something your all, you did the best you could, made the decisions you felt were right at the time, had the best team around you, et cetera, then you don’t need to beat yourself up over failures. No project ever starts out with a 100-percent guarantee; there’s always a chance of failure. The most important thing is knowing what caused it so you can go into the next project wiser.” One of the big motivators for an all-or-nothing individual is the threat of being judged by others, says McKinney, which can result in the abandonment of a project to avoid the embarrassment associated with producing an inferior outcome or not trying in the first place because of fear of not living up to (their own) high standards. Increasingly, certain companies, such as Google, have established initiatives to counter perfectionism and improve quality by rewarding staff for failure. It’s got me thinking about setting some of the attainable goals and realistic outcomes favoured by those achievement-oriented personalities McKinney knows who’ve nailed the “balance.” In the meantime, I’ll be adopting my own motivational catchphrase: Just ship it. ■

“IT’S UNLEARNING THE PERFECTIONISM AND CONTROL, BUILDING YOUR OWN PERSONAL RESILIENCE AND SAYING ‘OKAY, I DID MY BEST, ALL GOOD.’” created the perfect storm. Women are being encouraged to take on gender inequality in the workplace, pursue their ambitions and step up to lead, but when it comes at the cost of our well-being, is leaning out the only viable solution? “I don’t think you ever really work anything out,” says Isaacs, who believes that every achiever at some point struggles with perfectionism. “I don’t think there’s actually anywhere to get to. It’s not a linear road to balance—you’re going to get pulled in certain ways at different times throughout your career and with your parenting. We send a message to young people, mainly to women, that we need to have this perfect kind of harmony with our work and our personal life and that we’re less if we don’t—they think their work is suffering when they’re with their family, and if they’re with their family they feel bad for not focusing on work. That’s a kind of construct that restricts us.” Interestingly, it was motherhood that allowed Isaacs to loosen her grip. “Parenting changes every single day. Just when you think you’ve got this, your nanny resigns and your kid gets sick, and it’s just this constant shape-shifting. It’s unlearning the perfectionism and control, building your own personal resilience and saying ‘Okay, I did my best, all good, no worries.’ I think women need to develop that calmness.”

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RELATIONSHIP

PRIVATE PRACTICE

Carli Whitwell comes clean about curbing her snooping. was cheating when I read our iPad Internet history. “It’s against the rules to Google clues to The New York Times Saturday Crossword,” I grumbled, shocked that Tim—who has a vocabulary that Rory Gilmore would be jealous of—had resorted to such treachery. He was sheepish but not surprised that I had found him out—this wasn’t the first time my snooping had unearthed a secret in our relationship. And the time before, it was something far more serious than “What’s a four-letter word for new pop of 1924?” (Nehi, if you’re wondering.) Five years ago, my all-consuming curiosity ruined the surprise marriage proposal Tim had planned for a weekend getaway in Montreal. It started innocently enough. A few weeks prior, we had been debating the age difference between then couple Derek Jeter and Minka Kelly. (Don’t ask.) I borrowed his phone to look for the answer, and when I opened the browser, a window with a search for engagement rings popped up. Most people would hand back the phone calmly while internally combusting, get their nails done and then hunker down to wait out a proposal. But I couldn’t let it go. At the first opportunity, I searched the Web history of our computer. And I found links to

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And Birks! Then I did what no person should ever do: I read his email (I know his password, which, according to a 2014 study by the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C., is common—about two-thirds of couples share this info) and saw a note from my best friend that contained a hearty “Good luck, Tim!” Jackpot. I knew, and because I’m a rotten liar and panicked every time he knelt down to tie his shoe or reached into his pocket for his wallet, he knew that I knew. After a day of sightseeing and too much poutine, he ended up proposing while we were sitting on the bed in our hotel room eating Tootsie Rolls. He held out his hand, mumbling with a resigned air something about how I probably knew this was coming, and I’ll always regret robbing him of the moment that should have been. You’d think I’d learn my lesson, but I snoop more than ever now. I regularly creep Tim’s email inbox and read his text messages. I don’t even know what I’m looking for. And I’m not a sociopath—I know I shouldn’t do it, and I do feel badly about it. It’s a violation of his trust and the Criminal Code of Canada, and I would be livid if he ever did the same to me. I’m not the only one doing this, though. According to a h

PHOTOGRAPHY, TXEMA YESTE/TRUNK ARCHIVE

I F O U N D O U T T H A T M Y H U S B A N D rings! So many sparkly rings! From Tiffany’s!


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RELATIONSHIP 2013 survey by a U.K. mobile-phone company, 62 percent of men and 34 percent of women have scrolled through a partner’s phone. So why do we do it? Jennifer Pink, a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology at Simon Fraser University who has studied snooping and its effect on relationships, says that one of the most common reasons is also the most obvious: trust—or a lack thereof. A 2012 study published in College Student Journal found that 66 percent of college students felt that it was okay to snoop when they were curious or suspicious about the actions of someone they were dating. Technology has made it so much easier: If you’re worried your BF is being unfaithful, you are far less likely to get caught reading a phone than rifling through his desk for receipts and sniffing his coat for perfume as if you’d stepped onto the set of Days of Our Lives. I wasn’t spying because I was worried that Tim was having an affair—he’s no Noah Solloway. In fact, he probably hasn’t talked to a woman outside our circle of friends since 2007. On the other hand, he’s not overly emotional or expressive—I’ve seen him cry only twice in 10 years, and once was while watching Field of Dreams—so it can be tough to know what he’s thinking. He also sometimes forgets to tell me things, big things, like when he got a bonus at work or the day that a bunch of people got fired from his company. Maybe that’s where my urge to check up on him comes in. Pink agrees. “If you’re feeling like your partner isn’t as open as you’d like him or her to be, that can lead to uncertainty about ‘What is my partner thinking and feeling about this issue?’ or ‘What’s the future of our relationship?’ So that snooping can really be an effort to seek reassurance.” For me, it was also a question of self-control: Once I’d started, it was hard to stop. “You’ve taught yourself ‘If I just indulge, I can soothe this curiosity,’” explains Shyamala Kiru, a marriage therapist based in Newmarket, Ont., who notes that this behaviour is common. If you read that text and don’t find the evidence you were looking for, you feel relieved. Maybe you’ll justify your teensy transgression because your worries were assuaged, and next time you’ll feel more inclined to peek. And on it continues.

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As of writing this article, I’ve been snoop-free for three months. Here’s why. Two things happened the last time I checked Tim’s phone—in this case to read a text message from his cousin to see what he was up to. Tim (finally) vented his frustrations with my bad habit, which started a fight but (eventually) got us communicating about topics and issues we were regularly glossing over. I also realized that I don’t really want to know everything he’s doing. Having some non-relationship-damaging secrets from your spouse is totally normal. I haven’t told Tim how much my Mansur Gavriel bag really cost or where I hide the good cheese in the fridge. He shouldn’t have to bare all either. “Privacy and autonomy are equally as important as intimacy and connection,” says Kiru. “The healthiest relationships that I’ve seen are the ones where the couple is able to balance that separateness with that togetherness, and privacy allows us to foster that separateness.” Even if that means letting go of the odd crossword cheat now and then.

I SPIED. NOW WHAT? 1. Come clean and apologize. “Say ‘Listen, I have done this;

I don’t want to continue because I don’t like the way it makes me feel and I don’t like what it does to our relationship,’” says Kiru. 2. Figure out why you snooped, and talk about it. “What need is snooping fulfilling for you? Is it curiosity? Uncertainty? Are you looking to feel closer?” asks Pink. “Once you know that, talk to your partner and, as a team, come up with ways you can meet that need.” For example, if you feel the urge to peep at your man’s bank balance because you’re worried he spent the rent money adding to his Stan Smith collection, find some middle ground: Tell him you don’t want to police his budgeting and suggest that he limit new shoes to one pair a month or you look at his account together every six weeks. 3. Make it impossible for you to snoop. If you feel the urge—mine gets bad after a glass of Malbec—ask him to change his passwords. 4. And if you find something you should be worried about? You’re not off the hook, says Kiru. “Share that you were feeling anxious about the relationship, which led you to make a choice that you realize was a boundary violation. Don’t minimize your partner’s feelings about your snooping just because you’ve uncovered a secret. Then express your concern.” She adds that at this point you may need to see a therapist. “There are likely some bigger issues at stake that require more focused attention.”


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G E N T L E W O M A N THE NEW CODES OF MENSWEARINSPIRED DRESSING ARE HERE.

Photography by Owen Bruce Styling by Anna Katsanis Fashion direction by Anthony Mitropoulos Art direction by Brittany Eccles

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Wool blazer and shorts, jersey mock turtleneck and gold-tone-plated-metal earrings (Balenciaga) and ring, worn throughout (model’s own)

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Wool blazer and skirt, wool and silk waistcoat, silk bodysuit and leather boots (Louis Vuitton)

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Cotton shirt (Rochas)

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Satin and wool jacket and pants and leather shoes (Gucci) and cotton shirt (Marc Jacobs)

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Cotton jacket and trousers (Stella McCartney)


Cotton and tweed jacket and gold-plated-metal earring (Chanel)


Cotton blazer and shirt and leather trousers (CĂŠline) and leather platform boots (Marc Jacobs)

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Wool jumpsuit, cotton and leather belt and leather pumps (Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello)

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Cotton T-shirt and wool trousers (Dries Van Noten). For details, see Shopping Guide. Model, Olivia Jansing (Next New York); makeup, Linda Gradin (L’Atelier NYC/M.A.C Cosmetics); hair, Romina Manenti (Home Agency/Amika); manicure, Eri Handa (MAM-NYC/Dior Vernis); digital technician, Annie Powers; photographer’s assistants, Romek Rasenas and J.P. Herrera; styling assistant, Jaclyn Mastropasqua

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Cotton-poplin and jersey dress (CĂŠline), white-gold and turquoise earrings and white-gold and diamond septum ring (Maria Tash) and sterling-silver-platedbronze brooch (Lady Grey)

K A R M A

Photography by Arkan Zakharov Styling by Fiona Green Fashion direction by Anthony Mitropoulos Art direction by Brittany Eccles

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Velvet dress (Sies Marjan) and satin boots (Gianvito Rossi)

C H A M E L E O N THE SEASON’S ELECTRIFYING COLOUR SPECTRUM FAVOURS THE BOLD.


Jersey-georgette bodysuit (Emilio Pucci)


Wool sweater (Carven), macramĂŠ-lace skirt (No. 21) and patent-leather boots (Mulberry)

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Cotton and linen dress (Loewe) and silk scarf (Roberto Cavalli)


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Silk blouse (Preen by Thornton Bregazzi), cupro skirt (Creatures of Comfort) and lamĂŠ boots (Marc Jacobs)

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Velvet bomber (Marc Jacobs), mesh tank top (No. 21), mesh bra (Yasmine Eslami) and white-gold and turquoise earrings (Maria Tash)


Tulle lace dress (Erdem), leather sandals (Paul Andrew) and leather bag (Alexander Wang)


Silk top (Dries Van Noten). For details, see Shopping Guide. Model, Regan Laird (Elite New York); makeup, Aminata Gueye (MAM-NYC/M.A.C Cosmetics); hair, Eric Williams (MAM-NYC/Oribe); manicure, Riwako Kobayashi; photographer’s assistant, David Hans Cooke; styling assistants, Douglas Wright and Karolina Frechowicz

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PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (MODEL)

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1. At Michael Kors, Dick Page, makeup artist for M.A.C Cosmetics, dabbed cherry red in the centre of models’ lips and then buffed it out to the edges for a “matte glow.” 2. Popsicle-stained at Mansur Gavriel. 3. Just outside the lines at Ottolinger. 4. True matte red at Giambattista Valli. 5. Dual-tone cherry and fuchsia at Cushnie et Ochs. 6. Pat McGrath highlighted the Cupid’s bow with her signature gold at DKNY. 7. Pewter at Acne Studios.

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Below, from left: Ilia Lipstick in Humble Me ($31); Maybelline New York Color Sensational Inti-Matte Nude Lipstick in Beige Babe ($8); CoverGirl Colorlicious Oh Sugar! Tinted Lip Balm in Caramel ($10); Face Atelier Lipstick in Latte ($24); Lipstick Queen Chess Collection in King ($32); Rimmel London The Only 1 Matte Lipstick in Take the Stage ($9); Shiseido Rouge Rouge in Bloodstone ($35); Marc Jacobs New Nudes Sheer Gel Lipstick in May Day ($38); Make Up For Ever Artist Rouge in C-604 ($27); M.A.C Cosmetics Lipstick in Dreampot ($21). For details, see Shopping Guide.

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TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO & KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)

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Schouler’s show, damp-haired models could be found lining the sunny Chelsea, N.Y., sidewalks outside the venue. It was all part of the prep for Anthony Turner, lead stylist for Bumble and Bumble. “We’re celebrating each girl for exactly who she is—all the little mistakes that happen in their hair,” he said. “To achieve that, we shampoo and send the models outside to air-dry.” To prevent frizz, Turner applied Bumble and Bumble Hairdresser’s Invisible Oil ($50) but steered clear of the roots so that the hair would “feel light and move on the runway.”

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Not every woman’s natural hair texture requires, or allows for, a wash-and-go style. For hair that had relaxer growing out, Turner used a small curling iron to create consistency. A rich mask like Kérastase Chronologiste Crème de Regeneration ($72) keeps coarser textures healthy. h

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From above: NARS Radiance Primer ($45); Kat Von D Alchemist Holographic Palette ($43); No Bare Brows Universal 4 in 1 Brow Fix ($24)

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PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE), GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS) & ISTOCK (FLOWERS & MARIE ANTOINETTE)

NICHOLAS K

Had enough of mermaid waves? Hair was pin straight at Versace and Victoria Beckham.

ALEXANDER WANG

Try: Sampling the best of decades past.

VICTORIA BECKHAM

Y O U : N O S TA L G I C .

2017 TREND REPORT S/S


’80s

At Gucci, layers of plaits reigned.

GUCCI

’70s

Y O U : WA N T T O L O O K LIKE YOU WEREN’T DRINKING CHAMPA G N E L A S T N I G H T B U T D O N ’ T H AV E T H E E N E R G Y T O D O A N YT H I N G A B O U T I T.

6

Save this look for your next cottage/ Coachella experience.

Try: The new mascara. Unlike the dense fringes of last fall, lashes were quiet this season. If they weren’t left bare, they were accentuated in new and subtle ways. At Naeem Khan, Gato, makeup director for Maybelline New York Spain, nestled the mascara wand at the base of the lashes without brushing it through. “When you just do the root, you have this definition in the eyes,” he explained. “You’re not focusing on the lashes; you’re really focusing on the eyes.”

KENZO

TRY “draping,” a popular trend from the ’80s in which bright-pink pigment is scattered up the cheekbones and into the temples. Confused? Think contoured but in shocking pink. OR, skip draping altogether and pat bubble-gum- and watermelon-like shades over your eyelids.

1770s PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI

CHANEL

Kelly Kapowski would have cosigned the crimped hair at Topshop Unique. Ditto the look at Chanel, where models wore side ponytails with glossy-pink lips and snapbacks.

Revlon InstaBlush in Berry Kiss ($13)

At 3.1 Phillip Lim, Francelle Daly, makeup artist for NARS Cosmetics, used Q-tips and micellar water to create a blocky eyeliner with negative space. “It’s not just about putting a line on the top and bottom of the eye and then walking out the door,” she said. “It’s a new way of looking at the shape of the eye.” h

PRABAL GURUNG

L’Oréal Paris Infallible Blush Paints ($20)

Try: Impossibly precise geometric eyeliner.

FENDI

NARS Velvet Eyeliner in Darklight ($29)

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

ANNA SUI

Y O U : H AV E T O B E S O M E W H E R E F I V E M I N U T E S A G O .

Almay Pen Eyeliner in Black ($10.49). For details, see Shopping Guide.

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DIOR

TRESemmé Botanique Damage Recovery Oil Elixir ($7)

Moroccanoil Luminous Hairspray Medium Finish ($26)

ALEXANDER WANG

Redken Guts10 Volume Spray Foam ($23). For details, see Shopping Guide.

From left: Sally Hansen Moisture Rehab Overnight Nail Serum ($10); CND RidgeFx ($13.90); OPI Infinite Shine 1 Primer ($16.95)

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PHOTOGRAPHY, IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)

2017 TREND REPORT S/S


MAX MARA

HAIDER ACKERMANN

Smashbox Cover Shot Eye Palette in Bold ($35)

MICHAEL COSTELLO

CHRISTIAN SIRIANO

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

RYAN LO

OPENING CEREMONY TKTKTKKTKTKT

NAEEM KHAN

2. GO FAUX. I recently discovered press-on nails that aren’t doomed to end up in my hair/laundry/coat pocket like those of my past. Backstage at Christian Siriano and Naeem Khan, KISS nail artist Gina Edwards, who has worked with the likes of Rita Ora, Demi Lovato and Bella Hadid, demonstrated how to apply the brand’s Impress nails. “The main concern you should have is that your nail bed is clean, without any oil,” she said. (The set comes with an alcohol swab to cleanse nails prior to applying.) Thanks to a new dual-layer adhesive, once the nails are on, they won’t lift, peel or head for your pockets. (And after wearing them for eight days, I can attest to that.) The key to getting a natural-looking shape is filing the nails before you put them on—this allows for greater dexterity, especially when filing your non-dominant hand. If you’re changing the shape significantly, Edwards recommends using a file with a coarser grit, while a lighter grain is better to perfect edges. “Go with the curvature of your nail beds,” said Edwards of the ideal nail shape. “If you have more of a curved nail, then do more of an oval. But I never tell people to conform to a certain shape. If you feel that you want a stiletto nail, do a stiletto nail.” VICTORIA DIPLACIDO

KISS Impress PressOn Manicure OneStep Gel ($10)

3. BOOK IT. Nail art won’t go down without a fight, as seen on the spring runways. Call your local nail genius and book standing appointments for the rest of 2017. ■

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BEAUTY Revlon Ultra HD Gel Lipcolor in Garden ($11.49)

“One of the first lip colours I ever wore—and I wear one just like it in the campaign, which is crazy—was a pink, not quite what they were wearing in the ’90s but like a fuchsia with bits of purple in it. Growing up in Anaheim [Calif.], I was the only girl in an all-male band, so I didn’t have a lot of female influencers, aside from the Hispanic neighbourhood, where girls would paint their faces and wear really dark lipstick, quite like the chola style. I’d stare at them in class as they put on their makeup and think they were so beautiful and flawless. I was always attracted to that.”

WAT E R W O R K S Long hailed by Frenchwomen and makeup artists for its ability to cleanse skin without stripping it dry, micellar water is going next level. The no-rinse makeup-erasing liquid (teeny drops of suspended oil bond to pigments, oil and dirt) was birthed in France in the 1920s and has finally gotten a 21st-century tweak. Here are three new adaptations:

– GWEN STEFANI, Revlon’s newest global brand ambassador

THIS MONTH’S NEW & NOTEWORTHY MUST-HAVES

1. Sephora Collection Micellar Cleansing Water in Charcoal ($11) taps buzzy ingredient activated charcoal, known for its capacity to draw out debris from the epidermis for an ultra-deep clean.

Jo Malone London Whisky & Cedarwood, Garden Lilies, Blue Hyacinth, Leather & Artemisia and Tobacco & Mandarin ($90 for each 30 mL cologne). For details, see Shopping Guide.

U N U S UA L S U S P E C T S

3. NeoStrata Detoxifying Micellar Gel ($22) contains a plant extract called “celldetox” that helps reinforce the process of cell detoxification (and translates into cleaner skin and a faster uptake of your anti-aging serum).

When perfumer Yann Vasnier explored the English countryside in search of inspiration for a new Jo Malone London fragrance, he fell in love with the idyllic scenery. Creating the Bloomsbury Set—a nod to a clan of English intellects including E. M. Forster and Virginia Woolf—required research at Charleston, a bucolic cottage in East Sussex that served as a study hub for the famously liberated crowd. “We enjoyed the idea that this group of people appeared to be very English and proper, but they were, in fact, nonconformists and true hedonists,” says Vasnier. “We liked how the ‘proper’ contrasted with the ‘promiscuous.’ They were the juxtaposition of domesticity and simplicity with this hugely intellectual environment.” Which explains the notes of “waxy wooden floor” in Whisky & Cedarwood and “beeswax sweet pipe tobacco” in Tobacco & Mandarin. h

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ELLECANADA.COM

TEXT, KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)

2. Garnier SkinActive Micellar Water Wipes ($10) are fragrancefree and promise to clean skin and remove last night’s Altuzarrainspired smudgy eye.


©2017 P&G

DNA or OLAY? Olay discovered that almost  of women naturally look years younger. Now every woman can be ageless. We’ve newly engineered our products through decades of research with only the best ingredients, helping take years off your skin age in weeks. Who needs DNA when you have Olay?


BEAUTY From left: Burt’s Bees Tinted Lip Oil in Misted Plum, Crimson Breeze, Rustling Rose, Whispering Orchid, Showering Sunset and Caramel Cloud ($12 each)

N AT U R A L WO M A N

PHOTOGRAPHY, MARIA HILLIER (FOGO ISLAND INN & SCENERY), GEOFFREY ROSS (PERFUME) & ISTOCK (FLOWER)

Fogo Island Inn is located on a remote island off the northern coast of Newfoundland—two flights from Toronto, an hour-long ferry ride and a two-hour car ride kind of remote. The property is unabashedly luxurious and architecturally mind-blowing (propped up on stilts, it looms over the Atlantic), and its owners are firmly committed to social and environmental responsibility, an ethos also embraced by Burt’s Bees. That’s why the natural beauty brand chose this locale to present its newest innovations and why I’m in the inn’s movie theatre wearing an apron and whisking together a nourishing formula of oils, iron oxide and beeswax. “The skin on your lips is very thin compared to anywhere else on your body,” says Abina Antwi, senior innovation scientist for Burt’s Bees, as she encourages me to keep stirring. These ingredients make up the new Tinted Lip Oil ($12), which was designed especially for dry lips. Each of the six shades provides a sheer wash of colour—from peachy nude to rosebud pink—and hydrates lips for eight full hours. The longevity is thanks to the beeswax, which thickens the formula to help keep the moisturizing oils contained on the lips. All of the brand’s beeswax is sustainably sourced; half is from Uyowa, Tanzania, where hives are kept 40 kilometres outside the city in the Moyowosi-Kigosi Game Reserve to protect them from pollutants. “When you look at our skincare philosophy, we don’t put silicones in the products and then drop in a bit of sunflower oil and just call it [natural],” says Antwi. To wit, the lip oils are free of paraVICTORIA DIPLACIDO bens, phthalates and petrochemicals. Naturally.

ELLE LOVES Notes of orange blossom are highlighted by flourishes of heady sandalwood and peppery jasmine in the newest iteration of this iconic feminine scent. Chloé Love Story Eau Sensuelle Eau de Parfum Spray ($112 for 50 mL). For details, see Shopping Guide. ■

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BEAUTY Models backstage at Dior’s s/s 2017 show; Dior Rouge Dior Matte Finish Lipstick in Montaigne Matte ($43); Peter Philips; iconic makeup looks showcased at the launch of The Art of Color in NYC (far right)

a makeup artist,” he says, leaning forward against the pull of the cushy chartreuse sofa. “I wanted to do fashion shoots and work on avant-garde projects. I grew into being a creative director, and along the way I discovered all aspects of beauty.” Chances are you’ve felt the impact of Philips’ boundary-pushing work. He is, after all, the man responsible for making beauty products that sell out faster than you can meekly ask “Can I be added to the wait-list?” In the early days of his career, Philips made a name for himself at a Raf Simons shoot, when he deftly drew Mickey Mouse on the face of model Robbie Snelders for the inaugural issue of V Magazine. The forBY VANESSA CRAFT mer global creative director for Chanel makeup has worked with photography eter Philips is in a reflective mood. greats such as Irving Penn, Bruce Weber and Richard Sitting in his colourful suite at the Avedon, and his artistic talent is wielded each season at Crosby Street Hotel in New York, Fendi and Dries Van Noten. Philips joined Dior in 2014. the soft-spoken creative and image director His responsibilities include makeup direction for the coufor Dior Makeup is pausing to take stock of his ture and ready-to-wear runway extravaganzas as well as impactful—and influential—career. “I never conjuring up products for four different makeup collecintended to create products; I just wanted to be tions a year.

ART & SOUL A man and his makeup in the spotlight.

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Philips created a sharp graphic eye for s/s 2017 couture using Dior Diorshow Pro Liner Eyeliner ($36) and used Dior Diorskin Forever & Ever Wear Extreme Perfection & Hold Makeup Base ($60) to prime models’ skin. For details, see Shopping Guide.

In short, his innate curiosity and imagination are Chiuri, the first female designer to ever lead Dior, and boundless. “I tell stories based on my palettes and my Philips’ first time collaborating with her. Chiuri’s boldly collections,” he says. “Since the day I started in makeup, I feminist and confident clothing required a look that referhave never thrown away a product. I even keep empty enced models in their natural state of beauty, and Philips lipsticks. I also collect little bits of fabric that inspire me, created a luminous, skin-focused makeup collection. He and I tell myself that they would make a magnificent lip- calls the spring makeup, which features natural-pink lips stick with the same shine.” and a soft eye rimmed with a touch of mascara, “a starting Speaking of magnificent, one of Philips’ biggest im- point that plays with the radiance of a natural yet conpacts was taking the beloved and iconic Rouge Dior firmed femininity.” lipstick in new directions: matte textures and unusual Although this is a new era for Dior, looking back shades, including grey—which, by the way, through history is why Paris-based Philips is flew off the shelves. How does something in New York. Later this evening, he will atso subversive succeed? “It’s the people who tend the star-studded launch of The Art of work on our Dior counters,” says Philips, Color, a tome of artistic reference and colwith a humble shrug. “They love makeup. our—the kind you’d expect to see sitting They got really excited about all the colours atop a Jean Pascaud sideboard with a and started doing ombrés and gradations, Kandinsky hanging above. Featuring interand it caught everyone’s eye. They sold like views, art history and images from three of hot cakes!” Dior’s creative directors of makeup, Serge Not that there was any other possible outLutens (1967–1980), Tyen (1980–2014) and come. Philips seems to know what makeup Philips, the book is a comprehensive remindThe Art of Color ($150) is women want before we do; he also chaler of the house’s legacy. Working on this a celebration of glorious, outspoken colour and artistry lenges us to try things we might otherwise project, Philips says, reconnected him with by Dior creative directors reject. (See: grey lipstick.) It’s as if he possesses his roots as an artist. “Audacity, creativity past and present. a magic wand that makes beauty products and vision are at the heart of Dior,” he exinstantly covetable. Take the new Pro Liner Eyeliner, which plains. “This is a daring house with unconventional beaumade its runway debut during the spring/summer 2017 ty shoots that have been going on here since day one.” couture show. Part calligraphy pen and part “if I don’t As Philips’ career has evolved, so has the world of own this, I’ll die,” it makes precision eyelining a breeze. beauty. “Now when we talk about the fashion and beauty Or the Forever & Ever Wear Extreme Perfection & Hold industries, it’s a big machine,” he says. “There’s a danger Makeup Base, used for the spring/summer 2017 ready-to- that you’ll lose the creative part, that you’ll lose the visionwear show, which works like “double-sided tape, gripping ary part. It’s easy to fall back on [chasing] easy sales.” Does the skin and the foundation so it lasts longer.” that mean he is always focused on the next big thing? He That particular ready-to-wear show was a big, historic shakes his head. “I don’t try to create the trend. I create deal. It was the much-lauded debut of Maria Grazia products that guarantee beauty.” ■

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BEAUTY

PLATINUM STATUS Carly Lewis is faking her way to realness, one hair appointment at a time.

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and hoping to reinvigorate from the outside, I went for it. Carla cautioned that it would take several appointments to gradually achieve the lightness I desired. Three hours later, I was a honey blonde. That night, I went to an event; a former colleague didn’t recognize me and walked right by. I was camouflaged; I was new. And a month later, I went nearly platinum. When asked by Harper’s Bazaar whether she preferred herself with dark

PHOTOGRAPHY, TRUNK ARCHIVE (MODEL), IMAXTREE (BACKSTAGE) & GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS)

i

t was during the finale of a drawnout, painful breakup that I decided to go blond. My ex once told me that he preferred brunettes and had wished that the woman he’d dated before me would go back to her original dark hue. If I’m being entirely truthful, part of going blond was about defying his gaze. As we hooked up a final time, he grumbled that I looked “so hot” with blond hair. His disingenuousness was delicious. Beauty was now on my terms. For years I’d been telling Carla, my hairdresser, that I wanted to try out life as a blonde. I wanted to explore what I could do in the cloak of unrecognizability. It would be a challenge, she warned, and require maintenance and a commitment four times as costly as my current regimen. As a forever-dark (sometimes almost black) brunette with long Morticia Addams hair, I used to fantasize about my theoretical blond self, but, fearing change, I’d always back down. At last, emotionally restless


GOLD RUSH

Stacey Staley, founder and creative director of Toronto’s Blonde, says that the upkeep required—the violet shampoo, the reparative masks, the toning treatments—to keep dyed blond hair healthy is worth it, according to her clients. “Blond takes a lot,” she says. “But it also gives a lot. There’s something magical about being a blonde.” (Renowned hairstylist Guido Palau, who bleached the hair of 18 runway models for Alexander Wang’s spring/ summer 2017 show last September, appears to agree.)

ICY BLOND NEEDS LOVE. CODDLE IT WITH THESE PRODS. 1. TINT IT. L’Oréal Paris Colorista Semi-Permanent Colour #Purple400 and #Blue600 ($17 each) takes platinum in a candy-coated direction that lasts for four to six washes. 2. CONDITION IT. Ogx Hydrate & Colour-Reviving + Lavender Luminescent Platinum Shampoo and Conditioner ($11 each) contain lavender oil and camomile extract to quell brassiness and boost shine. 3. SEAL IT. Maui Moisture Nourish & Moisture + Coconut Milk Weightless Oil Milk ($11) hydrates the thirstiest ends with guava oil and mango butter. For details, see Shopping Guide.

or light hair, Kim Kardashian replied: “Blond. Brunette is who I am obviously; it’s my core. Blond Kim is this alter ego; she has a vibe to her that I love.” Similarly, beneath these locks of mine, I am still the same hard-working, serious woman who values privacy and time spent alone. But society’s presumption that blondes, especially faux blondes, are leisurely, adventurous and easily amused has drastically changed the way people treat me. The attention I receive from men has tripled. I am interpreted as an easy prospect by those who see my hair as a signal of social enthusiasm. With blond hair, especially when my dark roots reveal themselves, I look wild—so much so that when I decline male attention, I am met with a look of surprise that seems to say “You’re blond; shouldn’t you be more fun?” In professional settings, I have to work harder to be taken seriously because my hair suggests that I—like model Soo Joo Park, singer Debbie Harry and many other righteous bottle blondes before me—have more fun than anyone. Dying my hair has also recalculated my social currency: Bartenders serve me faster, shop girls are more attentive, strangers ask me where to find the good after-hours clubs and people of all genders perceive me as being an aspirant It girl. I’m not, but being blond has afforded me the impression of being audacious—

ironic, given how long I wavered about making the switch. A 2012 study conducted by French psychologist Nicolas Guéguen found that compared to brunettes, blond women receive more romantic attention, unsolicited help and, in the case of serving staff, better tips from men. Last year, a study from The Ohio State University revealed that blond women are more likely to be in the highest IQ category than other categories. “Stereotypes often have an impact on hiring, promotions and other social experiences,” says Jay Zagorsky, the study’s lead author. Stacey Staley, founder and creative director of Toronto salon Blonde, adds, “This idea of the dumb blonde is very passé—we’re over that now.” Still, I’d be lying if I said going blond hasn’t forced me to recontextualize myself: Could I be a common hot girl after all? (And, after long rejecting such trite beauty ideals, do I want to be?) Might the confidence and ambition I’ve held quietly inside manifest themselves in my actions, thanks to an image that suggests I embody these traits? Nikki Kennedy, a colourist at Good Day Hairshop in Toronto, says that posttransformation life changes may come from within more than we realize. “I don’t think it’s a matter of perception on its own,” she says. “When we go blond, we tend to project more of ourselves. In a way, it’s performative.” Has going blond brought my steeping confidence to the surface? Perhaps it’s my emboldened personality, not my lighter hair, that others find alluring. I love this bolder version of myself that going blond has led me to. Eventually I’ll go back, and I will love that dark-haired woman just as much. But for now, I’m content. It took a little fakeness to find the real me. ■

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BEAUTY HIGH BEAM Organic mongongo oil, high in moisturizing fatty acids and derived from the South African manketti tree, is the star in this blend of fast-absorbing oils. Apply strategically (on windchapped cheeks, for instance) as the weather changes from cold to, well, slightly less cold. Physicians Formula Organic Wear Bright Booster Oil Elixir ($20)

FLORAL ARRANGEMENT This new take on Miu Miu’s debut fragrance keeps lily of the valley and the patchouli-like Akigalawood as top and base notes while adding a white floral heart for a scent meant to evoke the first day of spring. Miu Miu L’Eau Bleue Eau de Parfum Spray ($105 for 50 mL)

BLUES FOR PINK If you’ve maxed out on Millennial-coloured products (you know the shade), may we suggest this powdery hue as an alternative? OPI Infinite Shine in Suzi Without a Paddle ($16.95)

SECOND COMING When Target left Canada, so did beloved brand Pixi. Now it’s back (hurrah!), and for the first time, skincare is available in addition to cosmetics. Our pick: this just-launched physical (sugar cane) and chemical (lactic acid) exfoliant. Pixi Beauty Peel & Polish ($34)

H A U L O F FA M E

SPRING AWA K E N I N G Warm up to colour this season.

PASSWORD PROTECTED Two satin (peachy beige and gold) and two matte (caramel beige and pinky red) shades comprise Chanel makeup artist Lucia Pica’s face palette for spring. Chanel Coco Code Blush Harmony ($70). For details, see Shopping Guide.

tion from Giorgio Armani marries the technology of the brand’s oil-based Maestro Fusion with the long-wearing pigments in its liquid eyeshadows for a high-coverage formula that feels like a serum. Giorgio Armani Power Fabric Foundation in 3.5 ($70)

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This hue is our favourite of the 10 shades of seriouslylong-wearing liquid lipstick and gloss. CoverGirl Outlast All-Day Colour + Gloss in Coral Crave ($12)

FRUIT POP Holding a can of dry shampoo close to your scalp and spraying will not do you any favours. Batiste applicators are designed to disperse product evenly from 30 centimetres (think half an arm’s length) away, and particles are sized to penetrate the hair shaft, nixing oil right from the roots. Batiste Dry Shampoo in Cherry ($9)

TEXT, VICTORIA DIPLACIDO; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS

IT TAKES TWO The latest founda-

INTO THE GLOSS


THE ACTIVE WAY TO BETTER-LOOKING SKIN

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Strengthens skin’s natural barrier.

GLOWS For instantly softer, healthy-looking, glowing skin.

See the results at garnier.ca


BODY

Flounce Tunic in Pink Linen Blend, The Sleep Shirt ($185, thesleepshirt.com); West Elm The Belgian Flax Linen Sheets ($420, westelm.com)

for blanket burritos is Egyptian cotton, satin or fuzzy flannel, give linen a shot. After a handful of washes, the crispy-at-first-graze material softens to feel like organic pima cotton. “Linen is a beautiful, breathable fabric for nightwear, and it looks great creased—no one wants to iron their sleepwear, right?” says Alexandra Suhner Isenberg, creative director for Vancouver-based brand The Sleep Shirt, which incorporates linen into its cultfave line of clean-cut sleepwear. “Linen is also stronger than cotton, so the fabric is often more durable, if cared for properly,” she adds. Take that one step further by indulging in proper linen sheets. Although the upfront cost of the highest-quality set can mirror that of a Prada tote, they can last over 20 years. And since the weave of the fibres, which are from the flax plant (particularly the strains grown in Belgium and France, considered the mecca for this material), is extremely tight, small and slightly gritty, your skin benefits from a micro-massage. Softness aside, linen is also antimicrobial and temperature regulating, discreetly absorbing your lover’s sweat while you cozily roll back to your side of the bed.

THE BEST HEALTH, WELLNESS AND FITNESS INTEL

SUMMER-PREP JUMP-START Looking to see results a few weeks before you’re beachside? Start now, as there is no joy in the 24-hour cleanse or Kourt/Khloé K-esque training sessions. (The Snapchatting alone would be exhausting.) Make compound exercises (those that involve two muscle groups at once) your go-to. “These burn extra calories while sculpting your legs, booty, shoulders, core, arms and back,” says Katrina Scott, one half (with partner Karena Dawn) of the extremely fit duo behind the fitness website and program Tone It Up. Do three to four circuits three times a week and you’ll see major results in a few months. Use a five-pound weight and shift up to eight once you’re feeling strong.

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1. DEAD LIFT + FLY Tones butt, hamstrings and upper back. Begin by holding a dumbbell in each hand and maintaining a slight bend at the knees and elbows. Hinge forward from the hip as you lift your right leg back and open your arms out to the sides. Engage your core to help maintain your balance and keep your spine neutral. Slowly return to start. Complete three sets of 15 reps on each side, alternating with each rep.

TEXT, KATHERINE FLEMMING; PHOTOGRAPHY, GUSTAVO ZYLBERSTAJN (MODEL), GEOFFREY ROSS (PRODUCTS) & ISTOCK (PRODUCT BLOB)

SLEEP COUNTRY If your standby fabric


WHAT IS CULTUR AL S TR ES S ? STOP THE MADNESS: RESTORE YOUR MIND AND BOD.

TYPICAL STRESS Meeting deadlines and slamming on the brakes, both of which are managed through the release of hormones.

CULTURAL STRESS Dr. Howard Murad, a Beverly Hills-based dermatologist, coined the term in his latest tome, Conquering Cultural Stress ($28, at indigo.ca). This is the man-made stress that we put on ourselves as we strive to live up to others’ expectations, and it negatively affects the way the brain and body function. It’s a perfect storm of being digitally dependent and burned out.

W H AT C U LT U R AL ST R ESS D OE S TO Y O U R. . .

SKIN Water loss, acne, eczema flare-ups.

BODY The excessive outpouring of cortisol and adrenalin damages cells and depletes energy.

BRAIN Increases anxiety and feelings of isolation; quashes creative energy.

H OW T O F I X I T …

FOOD Whole foods, such as colourful fruit and vegetables, can comprise 85 percent water, and they fuel cells faster than H20.

TECH Step away from the blue light at least 30 minutes before bedtime, and wake up at the same time every morning.

MOVE Take a walk,

LAUGH Luxuriate in

attend a yoga class or make a meaningful connection with a friend—in person. (Smartphones bye.)

how children have a carefree, silly outlook on life. Find time every day to belly laugh like they do.

2. PLANK ROW

3. JUMP TUCKS

Tones core, shoulders, biceps and upper back.

Tones lower abs with a cardio boost.

Begin in a plank position with hands directly below your shoulders. Grab a dumbbell with one hand and pull it up by your chest, keeping your elbow tucked by your side. Slowly lower your arm. Complete three sets of 15 reps and then switch sides.

Begin in a standing position with your knees bent. Jump high into the air, bringing your knees up to meet your elbows. Land softly on your feet. Complete three sets of 15 reps.

DO U BLE A GEN T This foamy body wash invigorates skin and leaves it clean and tingly, but it’s so moisturizing that you’ll feel like you’ve been basted in cream. Dove Shower Foam ($7.97, at drugstores and mass-market retailers) taps the brand’s NutriumMoisture technology and ingredient stearic acid (a fatty moisturizing acid naturally found in your skin) so you don’t get the feeling that you’re washing all the skinsmoothing realness down the drain. It’s offered up in three scents: Shea Butter with Warm Vanilla, Cucumber with Green Tea Scent and Deep Moisture.

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OILS in blo m

Want to break out of those postwinter beauty blues? Jump on the latest trend to hit Canada this spring. Natural oils. More specifically, argan, olive, avocado, shea and camellia oils, which have been known for centuries in cultures around the world for their nourishing and purifying properties. These hydrating miracles can save hair and skin ravaged by harsh winter conditions one drop at a time.

NUTS about

Shed tired winter skin with

ARGAN

Moroccan argan single-handedly put beauty oils on the map. Used since the dawn of time (literally), its magical emollient properties seal in moisture, cleanse pores without clogging and protect skin and hair against pollution, cold air and sun exposure.

Restore dry hair to its natural glory with

Whole Blends Marvelous Oil.

Beyond shampoo and conditioner, this leave-in oil blends nourishing argan oil with shine-enhancing camellia oil to transform hair, repair split ends and illuminate hair. Your hair will look Mah-velous.

Clearly Brighter Argan Nut Smoothing Scrub, made with sustainably sourced argan crushed nutshells that gently exfoliate skin and refine pores. The forecast? Clear and bright with healthy, glowing skin for days!

Avocado is in season

In-between seasons is no excuse for in-between hair colour. Dried out hair is usually to blame for lacklustre locks. Cue the triple threat hydrating power behind Nutrisse Cream. Avocado, olive and shea oils nourish hair and add shine. The better the condition of the hair, the better the colour. Something to keep in mind when you’re picking that perfect new hue this season.


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TEXT, CARLI WHITWELL; PHOTOGRAPHY, GEOFFREY ROSS (REN PRODUCT) & GETTY IMAGES (HVAR)

& T A L E S G E T A W A Y

A record 16.6 million people travelled to Croatia last year. Beat the crowds in 2017 with our guide to cool-girlapproved city and seaside spots that even the locals don’t know about.

G R E A T

E S C A P E S

TRAVE

TOWN AND COUNTRY

CARRY ON, CARRY ON 1. Hvar, pictured here, is known as the “island of lavender”; show your solidarity with this lavenderfilled sleep mask. Aromatherapy Associates Relax Eye Mask ($106, at NET-A-PORTER.com). 2. The secret to looking like you slept in a five-star hotel instead of on a 747: a face treatment that melts into skin like moisturizer and contains glycolic and lactic acids to boost skin-cell turnover. Ren Wake Wonderful Night-Time Facial ($64, at NET-A-PORTER.com). 3. A romper works as well on the beach in Hvar as it does for brunch in Zagreb. Satin jumpsuit, Lacausa ($187, lacausaclothing.com).

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TRAVEL

o CHANGE OF SCENERY

Discovering Croatia’s alternative appeal. BY LIZ GUBER 146

n the third day of my week-long journey through Croatia, I picked up a local phrase: “Ste uzimanje masno a iz mene”—or “You’re taking the fat out of me.” Although the literal translation sounds like something you’d say to your personal trainer, it’s actually a lighthearted way to say “You’re making me jealous.” And that’s exactly what I was doing, according to my friends via Snapchat, as I shared a play-by-play of my day exploring Hvar—a ruggedly picturesque island off the country’s southern coast. Hvar’s draws are plentiful: secluded pebbly beaches, weather so sunny it borders on obnoxious and a winemaking legacy dating back more than 2,000 years. The most famous feature of all, however, is the pretty 13thcentury port town that shares the island’s name. Thanks to the surge in the Croatian Riviera’s popularity as a summer getaway spot, Hvar Town has earned a reputation for two things: yachts and youth. The former, moored in Hvar’s rocky inlet, are unapologetically lavish (who needs a helicopter pad?), while the latter emerge at night and travel in packs toward the neon lights and thumping beats emanating from the clubs that hug the island’s shoreline. Hvar Town is party central. Which is why my guide, Sinisa, took it upon himself to show me “secret” Hvar with an off-road tour of the parts of the island that are often overlooked by visitors and locals alike. So while the previous night’s revellers were still sleeping off their après-beach apricot radlers, I

PHOTOGRAPHY, IVO BIOCINA (HVAR TOWN), GETTY IMAGES (HVAR TOWN PORT) & ISTOCK (BAN JELACIC SQUARE & ST. MARK’S CHURCH)

A view over Hvar Town; the port at Hvar Town (right); the writer in Hvar; the village of Malo Grablje (lower right)


Clockwise, from below: Ban Jelacic Square; the Dolac food market; St. Mark’s Church; the Croatian Design Superstore

was in Sinisa’s road-battered Toyota 4Runner, driving down dusty paths flanked by olive trees, in pursuit of Hvar’s alternative attractions. The first stop was Malo Grablje, an eerily idyllic ghost village located in the island’s interior. The tiny settlement was largely abandoned in the 1920s when the local grape crops failed. In the early ’50s, the last holdouts—a man and his goat—finally packed up and moved on. The crumbling stone houses are overgrown with wild capers; it seemed like the village was under a spell and that life would resume if I simply pressed a “play” button. I imagined that the communal olive press would start up again and an elderly man would appear to ask what I was doing in his yard, his goat giving me the side eye. After a brief stop at the nearby straight-from-apostcard village of Velo Grablje (not quite abandoned— population: seven), it was time for another perspective. I bounced in my seat as we drove up a precarious cliffside path to Sveti Nikola, Hvar’s highest peak, and its tiny chapel and even tinier weather station. From the 628-metre height, the Adriatic appeared boundless beyond the bulging tops of the neighbouring isles Brac and Vis on one side; on the other, Hvar’s craggy landscape, with its ancient vineyards and sleepy townships, opened up before me. They are views you could never see from the deck of a 60-metre yacht, and I revelled in the fact. Then, the “aha” moment: I figured out what the helicopter pad was for. It was my turn to feel jealous.

ON THE WAY: ZAGREB AND SPLIT ONE WAY TO GET TO HVAR IS TO FLY INTO ZAGREB AND THEN TAKE A BOAT FROM THE SOUTHERN PORT TOWN OF SPLIT. HERE’S HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TIME.

1

ZAGREB

Don’t overlook the country’s capital city, located east of the Adriatic coast, which combines striking Austro-Hungarian palaces, a vibrant arts scene and plenty of foodie delights.

MORNING Grab a cheese bureka (a flaky savoury pastry) in the city’s Lower Town neighbourhood and claim a bench in the verdant Ribnjak Park, a quiet spot hidden behind Zagreb Cathedral. Then, after a brief stop to admire the ornate art-nouveau facades of Ban Jelacic Square, climb the stairs to Upper Town, the city’s historic heart. The coloured-tile roof of St. Mark’s Church is a must-see.

AFTERNOON Head to the Dolac open-air food market, known as the “belly of Zagreb,” for lunch. On the menu? Whatever catches your eye, like nutty sheep cheese with lavender honey. For shopping, check out the Croatian Design h


TRAVEL A view of Split from Marjan Forest Park; Zagreb’s Zrinjevac Park (right)

Superstore. The name is a bit misleading (the shop is more quaint boutique than Costco), but it’s well stocked with local designs. You’ll find leather accessories by Kon2re and zany printed sweatshirts by Ana Krolo.

EVENING Book a table at Vinodol’s walled-off terrace in Lower Town. Peka, a traditional Croatian meat-and-veggie dish cooked under a cast-iron dome, pairs nicely with a glass of the country’s underrated red wine made from indigenous highaltitude Plavac Mali grapes. LATE NIGHT Finish your day the same way you started it: at

Diocletian’s Palace (right and below); Split’s trendy Bokeria (below right)

a park. Zrinjevac comes alive at night, with couples and families coming out for a starlit stroll under the plane trees. If you’re still hungry, try some freshly grilled corn from one of the street vendors.

2

SPLIT

EXPLORE Diocletian’s Palace was built in the fourth century by one of the few Roman emperors to enjoy retirement. Some 1,700 years later, the Unesco World Heritage Site served as home to Daenerys’ brood of dragons. But you don’t need to be a classics nerd or a Game of Thrones fan to appreciate the labyrinthine halls, which are packed with restaurants, shops and people. HIKE Marjan Forest Park is just steps away from Split’s main strip. If you’re up for a bit of a walk, the pine woods are worth breaking a sweat for. They look dark and imposing from a distance, but the hilly hike offers an escape from the bustle of the town’s high-traffic port and some of the best sea views in the area. EAT Set in an old hardware store in Split’s historic Old Town, trendy Bokeria is the go-to for elevated Mediterranean fare—think risotto with pesto and capers and sea bass ceviche made with local ingredients. ■

HOW TO GET THERE FLIGHT PLAN Air Transat offers flight and hotel options for two- or three-stop stays in Croatia. I chose the three-stop option (Zagreb, Split and Hvar) and found that I had enough time to seek out adventures despite the multiple transfers. WHEN TO GO July is considered high season; expect crowds of bacchanals wherever you venture. A visit in late August will find the beach towns winding down for the season.

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PHOTOGRAPHY, ISTOCK (MARJAN FOREST PARK, ZRINJEVAC PARK & DIOCLETIAN’S PALACE EXTERIOR) & GETTY IMAGES (DIOCLETIAN’S PALACE)

Croatia’s second-largest city leads a double life. Where else do raucous bars share walls with ancient Roman residences?


FIGHT COLD SYMPTOMS WITH YOUR EYES CLOSED.

#NOSICKDAYS

To ensure this product is right for you always read and follow the label. Keep all medicines out of the reach of children. © Procter & Gamble, Inc., 2017


TRAVEL

TRAVEL INSIDER

m

KARIN VEIT A creative director’s stylish stopovers.

A view of the Berlin Cathedral on the bank of the Spree; a healthy lunch at Daluma; Open Sky Yoga; the island of Salina (inset); Isola del Giglio

arc Cain’s spring/summer 2017 runway show took over Berlin’s sprawling industrial CityCube exhibition space, but the mood was downright tropical— thanks in part to the jungle’s worth of palm trees brought in for the occasion. Creative director Karin Veit looked to sunny, vibrant Cuba for inspiration for the German label, which expanded into Canada last year. Although the breezy maxidresses and brightly printed tunics hinted at a love for lush escapes, Veit is quick to point out that gritty-cool Berlin will always be a muse: “It’s a very young, trendy city. I’m constantly discovering new things when I’m out and about.”

BLACK BOOK: BERLIN

TRAVEL STYLE

FLIGHT PLANS

Aluminum necklace ($160), polyamide and elastane swimsuit ($230) and calfskin sandals ($290), all Marc Cain, marc-cain.com

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GLOBAL ADDRESS BOOK TRAVEL STYLE “I plan my trips at the very last minute. My husband and I usually book a hotel for one night and then rent a car and drive off to enjoy new sights. When I’m in a city, I like to see everything on foot.” VACATION SPOT “Salina, an aeolian island near Sicily. Reading, swimming and trying local food make it easy to fully relax there.” DREAM DESTINATIONS “Bhutan, Mongolia and Iceland. I’m inspired by outstanding natural landscapes.” NEXT TRIP “Isola del Giglio. It’s a small Italian island without any stress or hustle and bustle—just sunshine and sea.”

HOME BASE Ammerbuch, a small village near Tübingen, Germany. CHECKED BAG OR CARRY-ON? “I always check a bag—leaves more room for souvenirs!” WINDOW OR AISLE? “Aisle—I feel less trapped.” AIRPLANE ESSENTIALS “I always have a good book, a plaid cashmere blanket and my music.” INFLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT “Work, read, sleep. In exactly that order.” ■

ELLECANADA.COM

TEXT, LIZ GUBER; PHOTOGRAPHY, GETTY IMAGES (BERLIN) & IMAXTREE (RUNWAY)

BOUTIQUE BUCKET LIST “VooStore is a shop that’s typical of the city. The way local products are mixed with international designers is very inspiring. Bikini Berlin is one of the first concept malls in the world; the terrace is based on New York’s Highline and offers spectacular views of the neighbouring Berlin zoo.” THE BEST CAFÉ “I love the coffee at Meierei, which is in the district of Prenzlauer Berg. They have the best homemade apple strudel.” FOOD FIX “Daluma in the Mitte district—they serve freshly squeezed juices and raw food.” MUST-TRY “Open Sky Yoga in the city’s outdoor club Haubentaucher.”


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“The Doggie Paddler ”

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“The Jumping Jack”

“The Cliff Hanger”


HOROSCOPE N I C O L S

PISCES

ARIES

TAURUS

(FEB. 19 – MARC H 20) Happy Birthday! This is your time, which is why you’re attracting important people and favourable circumstances. You feel energized! Indeed, you can regenerate yourself this month for the year ahead. No wonder you are shopping for little treasures for yourself and your loved ones. Dress for power now because you are on your game.

(MARC H 21 – APRIL 19) Fair Venus will be in your sign all month. This makes you very romantic and charming with everyone—much more so than usual. This is also a great time to buy wardrobe items because you will like what you see in the mirror. (When you shop for clothes, you have to feel good about yourself, right?) Start to make goals for your new year ahead.

(APRIL 20 – MAY 20) This is a wonderful, popular month for Taureans. Get out and enjoy the company of others because people want to see you. You will be stimulated and happy dealing with clubs, classes, groups and associations. Meanwhile, a secret love affair could be brewing for some of you. If you’re in a relationship, don’t risk something solid for a mere bonbon.

GEMINI

(MAY 21 – JUNE 20) This is the best month of the year for you to make a great impression on bosses, parents and VIPs—you really shine in their eyes. Because of this, act now if you want to make a pitch, ask for something, present a proposal or seek a promotion. Friends and groups will be particularly supportive this month, so lean on them when you need to.

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G E O R G I A

CANCER

(JUNE 21 – JULY 22) People in authority will favour you this month because Venus is at the top of your chart. Figure out how to use this to your advantage. For some of you, Venus will also signal a new romantic relationship with someone who is older or in a position of power. Meanwhile, this is a great time to travel because you want adventure and a change of scenery.

VIRGO

LIBRA

(AUG. 23 – SEPT. 22) It will soon be obvious that you need more rest this month. Recognize this and be good to yourself. The advantage that you have right now is the ability to objectively observe your style of relating to others, especially in your closest relationships. This is also an excellent month to ask for a loan or mortgage because you can benefit from the wealth of others.

(SEPT. 23 – OCT. 22) This is a busy month for you because you are motivated to be more productive and efficient in everything you do. You’re on a mission to clean up your act and be effective. This is a good thing. Meanwhile, your ruler Venus will be opposite your sign all month, making all your relations with friends and partners extra warm and easygoing.

LEO (JULY 23 – AUG. 22) Travel for pleasure appeals to you this month. Many of you will strike up a romance with someone from another culture or a different background. Nevertheless, this is also an excellent time to tidy up loose ends with inheritances, shared property, taxes, debt and insurance issues. Do yourself a favour and get this stuff out of the way.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23 – NOV. 21) Who knew that March would be your most fun-filled, romantic month? If possible, slip away on a vacation, especially with someone who makes your heart pound. The bottom line this month is all about fun, pleasure, entertaining diversions and romance. Many of you will be involved with playful activities with children as well. Enjoy!

SAGITTARIUS

CAPRICORN

AQUARIUS

(NOV. 22 – DEC. 21) You will be pulled in two directions this month. In one way, you want to cocoon at home and feel safe among familiar surroundings—many things will make you focus on home and family more than usual. In another way, you also want to party and enjoy a vacation. Can you do both? Why not? Keep a bag packed just in case.

(DEC. 22 – JAN. 19) This month, you hit the pavement running. Your jam-packed schedule is full of short trips, meetings, appointments and conversations, plus you are reading, writing and studying more than usual. There’s more: You’re also entertaining and redecorating at home. You’re very busy! (Hot tip: It’s also a good month for real-estate deals.)

(JAN. 20 – FEB. 18) You have your eye on your money and cash flow this month. In part, this could be because you are contemplating a big purchase. But you also want to pull your financial scene together. You are surveying your belongings to figure out what to let go of and what to keep. In other words, do you own your stuff or does it own you? ■

ELLECANADA.COM

For your daily and weekly horoscope, visit ELLECanada.com/horoscope.

ILLUSTRATIONS, EMILIE SIMPSON

BY


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WORK HERE.

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FEND I Karl Lagerfeld deftly mixes utility with quirkiness, making us all want to double up on the season’s highcontrast stripes. Fur bomber, cotton pants and stretchfabric booties. Available at Holt Renfrew stores, see holtrenfrew. com for details.


S ACA I Chitose Abe has a knack for turning everyday dressing on its head. Here, the Japanese designer tackles classic tweed and graphic lines with her signature sartorial wit. On Liya: Cotton dress. On Carolyn: Silk-organza shirtdress with removable belt


CÉ L INE This artful blouse and fluid, frayedhem skirt sum up the duality of Phoebe Philo’s designs: subtle but never boring, dramatic yet far from over-the-top. Wool blouse with necktie, viscose and jersey skirt and leather mules


M AI S ON M AR G I ELA The trench is back in a big way for spring. Consider a muted mint hue to be 2017’s answer to Millennial pink. Bonded-cottoncanvas trench with raglan sleeves


THE R OW Leave it to Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen to make a wardrobe of black, white and cream inestimably desirable thanks to relaxed tailoring and a dose of unstudied ease. On Liya: Linen bouclĂŠ coat and canvas sneakers. On Carolyn: Quilted-tweed coat with silk lining and canvas sneakers


G I VEN CH Y The trench vest is infinitely versatile. Riccardo Tisci’s take contrasts classic details (double-breasted buttons and roomy pockets) with unexpected add-ons. (We see you, reverse zipper.) The topper meets its match in a pair of bell-bottomed trousers. The shape has a retro vibe, but the cherrytomato hue is decidedly now. Trench vest, flared pants and leather pumps


STE LLA MCCA RTNEY The latest silhouette from the Brit designer riffs on spring’s corsetry trend with none of the rigidity while giving the paperbag waist a sporty spin. Cotton jacket, cotton trousers and eco alter napa stilettos


GUCCI Alessandro Michele’s beautifully eccentric creations need little introduction, and if there’s a piece more joyous than this baroque-patterned coat, we’d like to meet it. Jacquard coat, brocade elastic belt with brass finish and Swarovski-crystal buckle, patentleather sandals with latex socks

DRIES VAN NOTE N (Previous page) Belgian designer Dries Van Noten approached spring’s perennial floral trend with a brooding elegance. The tapestry trousers and satin wrap coat are at once edgy and Edwardian. On Liya: Silk robe, embroidered blouse and brocade pants. On Carolyn: Bomeo jacket and shorts

THE BOUNDARYPUSHING DESIGNS SEEN ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPRING RUNWAYS SERVED AS INSPIRATION FOR HOLT RENFREW’S MODERN NEW FASHION DIRECTION. Armed with a fresh vision and strategy, the beloved 180-yearold Canadian department store is making a statement with its approach to luxury. Here is an ELLE Canada-edited preview of its revamped spring magazine (or, as president Mario Grauso describes it, “our ultimate list of how you should put your style together for the season”). From Gucci’s exuberant prints and Givenchy’s directional silhouettes to the inventive, fresh shapes of Sacai and Céline, these are the must-own pieces that champion craftsmanship, artisanal details and cutting-edge ideas.



Elle - March 2017 CA