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MARCH

Spring fashion special INTERNATIONAL COLLECTIONS 7 SIMPLE PIECES TO WEAR RIGHT NOW

The

Gigi effect

HOW TO DO THE NEW SHORT HAIR WHAT MAKES AN INFLUENCER?

THE SHAPE OF THE SEASON

Fresh start


PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER


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insideVOGUE MARCH 2017

“The ditzy optimism of Miu Miu’s retro-fantasy aesthetic finds full force in its enthralling towelling coat” PRINTED MATTER, PAGE 300

Regulars 78 EDITOR’S LETTER 92 VOGUE NOTICES Behind the scenes of the issue 103 VOGUE.CO.UK The best of our website 241 CHECKLIST New season statements 351 STOCKISTS 375 MIND’S EYE Rosetta Getty loves Sarah Vanderlip’s desert art and tactile terracotta

In Vogue 131 WHAT’S NEW The people, places, ideas and trends to watch now. Edited by Julia Hobbs 145 COVER STORY BIG IT UP Time to turn up the volume, says Ellie Pithers – right now, size matters 157 BLAME IT ON THE WEATHERMAN Why is it so hard to buy what we want to wear, when we want to wear it, asks Ellie Pithers 167 HOW THE EARRING BECAME THE THING We’re all ears, says Sarah Harris

COVER LOOK

Gigi Hadid wears crêpe-de-chine dress, £1,830, Fendi. Get the look: make-up by Maybelline. Eyes: Color Show Eye Kohl Liner in Ultra Black; The Rock Nudes Palette. Skin: Dream Sun Triple Bronzing Powder. Hair by Tresemmé: Get Sleek Smooth & Tame Cream; Make Waves Shape & Memorise Cream. Hair: Orlando Pita. Make-up: Tom Pecheux. Nails: Lisa Jachno. Production: GE Projects. Digital artwork: R&D. Fashion editor: Lucinda Chambers. Photographer: Mario Testino

Vogue Shops

Spy

174 WHAT TO BUY NOW Spring’s new rule: change your stripes

205 STRAP QUEEN Chanel’s latest tribute to Coco

View

207 COVER STORY SEVEN EASY PIECES This season’s staples. By Naomi Smart

185 WHERE THE HEART IS With swathes of Iraq lying in ruins, Louise Callaghan follows one man’s quest to recover his family’s possessions

212 BE INSPIRED Revisit the Japan of page 264’s shoot 219 QUICK SMART New silhouettes for spring’s daywear

191 DIRECT ACTION Joanna Natasegara’s recent documentary shines a light on Aleppo’s unsung heroes

226 OLD-SCHOOL TIES Bows are back on sparkling form

197 ODD MAN OUT Tom Shone reflects on growing up in an all-female household

232 COMPETITION VOGUE TALENT CONTEST Calling all young writers

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The RL BLAZER, 2016 Photographed by Steven Meisel #RLICONICSTYLE


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insideVOGUE

“ONE BAD SHOW AND IT’S DONE” Page 312

Features 250 COVER STORY G MAJOR Derek Blasberg catches up with the unstoppable Gigi Hadid. Photographs by Mario Testino 290 LET’S GO ROUND AGAIN Echoes of the Eighties are everywhere. Viv Albertine remembers a decade of seismic change, while Vogue compares now with then 312 “ONE BAD SHOW AND IT’S DONE” Jonathan Anderson is frank with Emily Sheffield. Portraits by Venetia Scott

318 COVER STORY UNDER THE INFLUENCE Fashion has fallen under the thumb of a new phenomenon. By Sarah Harris 324 THE SUN AND THE REIGN Elisa Lasowski, Versailles’ breakout star, talks sex and storytelling with Olivia Marks. Photographs by Scott Trindle 330 CACHE IN THE ATTIC How the search for an old christening gown brought about a major fashion exhibition. By Violet Henderson

“That warm fuzzy feeling comes naturally with JW Anderson’s tactile spin on the sheer white summer dress” THE BALLAD OF EAST AND WEST, PAGE 264

Fashion 264 THE BALLAD OF EAST AND WEST The new mood takes its ceremonial cues from Tokyo. Photographs by Colin Dodgson

Beauty

278 KINKY NIGHTS Contributing fashion editor Kate Moss revels in the flamboyance of Eighties clubland. Photographs by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

296 FULLY CHARGED Spark joy with an electric Eighties palette. Photographs by Charlotte Wales

345 POWER SWITCHES Flora Macdonald Johnston plays with the new transformers

335 COVER STORY SHORT STORIES So long, long hair – the crop has come out on top

347 SHAVING FACE Look sharp: razors are beauty’s next big thing. Lottie Winter investigates

300 PRINTED MATTER Psychedelic swirls herald a summer of love. Photographs by Craig McDean

341 LEARNING THE ROBES Nicola Moulton embarks on a quest to find the perfect bathrobe

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348 NOTE PERFECT Same same, but different: favourite fragrances reinterpreted for spring. By Nicola Moulton

Turn to page 198 for our fantastic subscription offer, plus free gift


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Editor’s letter Fast REWIND

78

SAINT LAURENT

BALENCIAGA

VETEMENTS

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Flashback: Eighties-inspired fashion, above, and beauty (left, page 296). Below: reminiscences from Viv Albertine (page 290). Bottom: Kate Moss’s take on clubland style (page 278)

in post-punk Britain. Kate Moss has chosen to reference the London clubland of that decade in “Kinky Nights”, her fashion story with Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott (page 278), and Charlotte Wales’s beauty shoot (“Fully Charged”, page 296) has more than a nod to the graphic, sharp colours of the make-up of that time. What was not part of our lives 30 years back was the notion of the influencers – the people who are a whole new conduit of information, primarily via our digital feeds. In the fashion industry in particular, the role of a style model, who markets product by styling it on herself and sharing this with her followers, has been enthusiastically seized on as yet another way of selling. On page 318, Sarah Harris looks at this very 2017 phenomenon. She asks who it is that they are influencing, where their influence comes from, and what it achieves. It’s a great read.

CHARLOTTE WALES; MERT ALAS & MARCUS PIGGOTT; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

n some ways the Eighties were my era. I started my journalistic life, bought my first flat, and met the father of my son during that decade. And, frankly, it doesn’t seem that long ago. I remember very clearly the fitted navy-blue Joseph suit I bought for my first day working on a newspaper in the newly recolonised Canary Wharf. It was a Lego town of new-build offices and wine bars and, sited to the east of the city, was somewhere I had never previously visited, let alone worked. There I encountered my first word processors, replacing the previous office filled with typewriters, and the early mobile phones the size of the proverbial brick. As a style moment, the Eighties never won my heart (I was too much of a wafty/glam-rock Seventies type), but it has been fascinating to see how now, 30 years on, a new generation is mining that period to come up with something completely contemporary. The similarities in fashion terms are many: the punky Soviet style of Vetements and the shoulder pads of Balenciaga; the sharp Parisian glamnoir of Saint Laurent; and the leggings that have made their presence felt everywhere. But so too is a kaleidoscope of cultural and political events, both tumultuous and surprising, that throw quite resounding echoes. In “Let’s Go Round Again” (page 290), Fiona Golfar and Julia Hobbs have put together many examples of how the current decade mirrors the Eighties, and the latter is drawn evocatively by Viv Albertine in a short memoir of how it was to be an artist


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Richard Prince: I Changed My Name, 1988 Š Richard Prince Acrylic and screen print on canvas (142.5 cm x 198.7 cm) Calvin Klein: Classic Denim Shirt (Calvin Klein Jeans Est. 1978) Photographed at Rubell Family Collection, Miami


Richard Prince: Nuts, 2000 Š Richard Prince Acrylic on canvas (284.5 cm x 517 cm) Calvin Klein: Classic Denim Jeans (Calvin Klein Jeans Est. 1978) Photographed at Rubell Family Collection, Miami


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VOGUEnotices ALL ABOUT THIS MONTH’S ISSUE

HOME CINEMA As 20th Century Women is released, film critic Tom Shone reflects on his matriarchal upbringing in “Odd Man Out” (page 197). Below is his pick of the best family dramas… Meet Me in St Louis – Judy Garland stars in Vincente Minnelli’s glorious, heartrending musical

The Royal Tenenbaums – Wes Anderson’s bittersweet family album

DIVINE INSPIRATION Set designer Gerard Santos transformed a Manhattan studio for our fashion story “Printed Matter” (page 300). His starting point? The bright, many-layered prints (such as For Eleanor, 1964, above) of Corita Kent – a nun who launched a career as a pop artist in the Sixties. “The narrative for this shoot was about overlapping patterns and colours, so I decided to work with translucent film gels,” Santos explains.

Life Is Sweet – one of Mike Leigh’s cheeriest portrayals of suburban togetherness

BIKER CHIC The spring collections saw model Luna Bijl (“The Ballad of East and West”, page 264) strutting down more than 30 catwalks. Off duty, the Dutch beauty gets her adrenaline fix from motocross riding. “It’s a tough sport,” she says. “There’s no room left in your head to think about anything other than not crashing.”

Duchy originals Contributing editor Violet Henderson (above) spent the night at Chatsworth for her piece on its historical-fashion retrospective (“Cache in the Attic”, page 330). “It was the rarest of winter days,” she says. “A butler told me as I walked into the Devonshires’ private quarters that the temperature that morning had read minus seven. The frost made the parkland look like a shoot in National Geographic.”

CORITA ART CENTER, IMMACULATE HEART COMMUNITY, LOS ANGELES/JOSHUA WHITE. HARRY SOAMES; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; REX FEATURES

ROBERTO CAVALLI

MOSCHINO

DOLCE & GABBANA

BLITZ SPIRIT Vogue commissioned legendary make-up artist Val Garland (below, in 1982) to create the beauty looks for “Fully Charged”, page 296. “In the Eighties, I would start doing my make-up at 6pm and go out at 1am,” she recalls. “The look was all that mattered. I was obsessed with Blitz magazine and people such as Steve Strange, Debbie Harry and Siouxsie Sioux.”


VOGUE.co.uk GET AHEAD WITH WHAT’S HAPPENING ON VOGUE ONLINE

VOGUE VIDEO

GIGI A GOGO PEOPLE & PARTIES

You’ve watched “What Would Gigi Hadid Do?” (our first Vogue Video of this month’s cover star), now see her cook up a storm in her second on Vogue.co.uk/video.

Carpet baggers We all know the red-carpet season means gowns, but which is fairest of them all? We look back at the most arresting outfits in Oscar history. Above, from left: Gwyneth Paltrow, 1999; Jennifer Lawrence, 2013; Lupita Nyong’o, 2014

VOGUE MAIL

Post HASTE Have you signed up to our new-look newsletters yet? Do so at Vogue.co.uk/ newsletters to receive your daily download of all things fashion.

PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; JAMES COCHRANE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; GETTY

STREET STYLE

As scene Follow the street style from each Fashion Week city as we detail today’s offthe-catwalk trends.

From left: Yasmin Sewell; Helena Bordon; Miroslava Duma; Caroline Issa

Whatever your preferred social-media channel, be sure to get the latest news from Vogue first by following us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+ and Youtube. Just search for BRITISH VOGUE and MISS VOGUE and join the club.

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VOGUE.co.uk CATWALK

N VU IT TO LO U IS

From New York to London, Milan and Paris, we’ll be reporting live from the autumn/winter 2017 shows. Be sure to log on and tune in to our Twitter, Instagram and Facebook pages (@BritishVogue) for: • Backstage sneak peeks • Every look – plus close-up shots – straight from the catwalk • Vogue’s verdict on the season’s most talked-about shows • Front-row reports detailing emerging trends as we spot them

ETRO

Runway SUCCESS

PEOPLE & PARTIES

Critical hits From left: Bella Hadid; Jennifer Lawrence; Brie Larson; Alicia Vikander; Cate Blanchett

YELLOW

Join us in real time as we dissect the gowns, jewels, hair and make-up of our favourite stars straight from the red carpet at the major film and music celebrations: the Baftas, Grammys, Brit Awards, and – biggest of all – the Academy Awards, on February 26.

NEW STYLE AGENDA

Monday

Start the week with the Monday Catch-Up: a compilation of the weekend’s talking points

PRADA

PRINT MIX

Tuesday Time for Street Style… see what the most fashionable cities are wearing (right, Giovanna Battaglia in Paris)

Wednesday

Thursday

Check Vogue Shops for our edit of what to buy now

Spend five minutes with Vogue’s favourite creatives in our quickfire Q&As in Arts & Lifestyle

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Trend talk takes over as our editors unravel and road-test the latest looks (left)

The fashion news debrief gets you up to speed on anything you may have missed during the week. Plus, our 10 best beauty and fashion buys

Enjoy a leisurely read with our inspiring selection of in-depth features, travel guides and new recipes to try

RT S/S ’17 O P E R D N TR E

EMBROIDERED HEELS, TABITHA SIMMONS. JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; JAMES COCHRANE; GETTY

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CONSIDER THIS YOUR DEFINITIVE WEEKLY FASHION ROUTINE


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ALEXANDRA SHULMAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CREATIVE DIRECTOR JAIME PERLMAN DEPUTY EDITOR EMILY SHEFFIELD MANAGING EDITOR FRANCES BENTLEY FASHION DIRECTOR LUCINDA CHAMBERS

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EXECUTIVE FASHION DIRECTOR SERENA HOOD SENIOR CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS KATE PHELAN, JANE HOW FASHION EDITOR VERITY PARKER FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR ROSIE VOGEL-EADES STYLE EDITOR NURA MOSLEY ACTING SITTINGS EDITOR JULIA BRENARD SENIOR FASHION ASSISTANT FLORENCE ARNOLD FASHION ASSISTANTS BEATRIZ DE COSSIO, KATIE FRANKLIN FASHION BOOKINGS ASSISTANT KATIE LOWE FASHION COORDINATOR POM OGILVY JEWELLERY EDITOR CAROL WOOLTON MERCHANDISE EDITOR HELEN HIBBIRD CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS FRANCESCA BURNS, BAY GARNETT, KATE MOSS, CLARE RICHARDSON FASHION FEATURES DIRECTOR SARAH HARRIS FASHION NEWS EDITOR JULIA HOBBS FASHION FEATURES EDITOR ELLIE PITHERS SHOPPING EDITOR NAOMI SMART BEAUTY & HEALTH DIRECTOR NICOLA MOULTON DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LAUREN MURDOCH-SMITH ACTING DEPUTY BEAUTY & HEALTH EDITOR LOTTIE WINTER ACTING BEAUTY ASSISTANT FLORA MACDONALD JOHNSTON FEATURES EDITOR SUSIE RUSHTON ACTING FEATURES EDITOR NICOLE MOWBRAY EDITOR-AT-LARGE FIONA GOLFAR COMMISSIONING EDITOR OLIVIA MARKS FEATURES ASSISTANT HAYLEY MAITLAND ART DIRECTOR PHIL BUCKINGHAM ART EDITOR JANE HASSANALI DESIGNER EILIDH WILLIAMSON JUNIOR DESIGNER PHILIP JACKSON PICTURE EDITOR MICHAEL TROW ASSOCIATE PICTURE EDITOR CAI LUNN SENIOR PICTURE RESEARCHER BROOKE MACE ART COORDINATOR BEN EVANS DIGITAL CONTENT PRODUCER PARVEEN NAROWALIA CHIEF SUB-EDITOR CLARE MURRAY DEPUTY CHIEF SUB-EDITOR HELEN BAIN SENIOR SUB-EDITOR VICTORIA WILLAN SUB-EDITORS STEPHEN PATIENCE, EMMA HUGHES SPECIAL EVENTS EDITOR SACHA FORBES PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR CHARLOTTE PEARSON EDITORIAL COORDINATOR ELIZABETH WHITE PARIS COORDINATOR SIGRID LARRIVOIRE

VOGUE.CO.UK EDITOR LUCY HUTCHINGS ACTING EDITOR SAM ROGERS ASSOCIATE DIGITAL DIRECTOR EMILY SHEFFIELD CN DIGITAL HEAD OF PHOTO & PICTURE EDITOR GABY COVE DIGITAL PICTURE EDITOR ALASTAIR NICOL NEWS EDITORS LAUREN MILLIGAN, SCARLETT CONLON JUNIOR DIGITAL EDITOR KATIE BERRINGTON BEAUTY EDITOR LISA NIVEN ENGAGEMENT MANAGER RACHEL EDWARDS DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT NAOMI PIKE CONTRIBUTING EDITORS LISA ARMSTRONG, CALGARY AVANSINO, LAURA BAILEY, ALEXA CHUNG, CHRISTA D’SOUZA, SOPHIE DAHL, TANIA FARES, VIOLET HENDERSON, NIGELLA LAWSON, ROBIN MUIR, CHARLOTTE SINCLAIR, PAUL SPIKE, NONA SUMMERS EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER CAMILLA FITZ-PATRICK SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES EMAIL SYNDICATION@CONDENAST.CO.UK DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION & RIGHTS HARRIET WILSON

Vogue is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (which regulates the UK’s magazine and newspaper industry). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice (www.ipso.co.uk/editors-code-of-practice) and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think that we have not met those standards and want to make a complaint please see our Editorial Complaints Policy on the Contact Us page of our website or contact us at complaints@condenast.co.uk or by post to Complaints, Editorial Business Department, The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. If we are unable to resolve your complaint, or if you would like more information about IPSO or the Editors’ Code, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk


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STEPHEN QUINN PUBLISHING DIRECTOR ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER SALLIE BERKEREY

“During the lifetime of British Vogue there have been many Vogue books published, but never one like this” ALEXANDRA SHULMAN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ADVERTISEMENT DIRECTOR LUCY DELACHEROIS-DAY SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR SOPHIE MARKWICK ACTING SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER VICTORIA MORRIS ACCOUNT MANAGER MATILDA McLEAN DIGITAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR CHARLOTTE HARLEY DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGER RACHEL JANSEN BUSINESS MANAGER JESSICA FIRMSTON-WILLIAMS PA TO THE PUBLISHING DIRECTOR DEVINA SANGHANI ADVERTISING ASSISTANT HONOR PHEYSEY FASHION ADVERTISEMENT DIRECTOR (EUROPE) SUSANNAH COE ACTING SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER (EUROPE) BEATRICE CRIPPA ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER US SHANNON TOLAR TCHKOTOUA US ACCOUNT MANAGER KERYN HOWARTH HEAD OF PARIS OFFICE HELENA KAWALEC ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER (FRANCE) FLORENT GARLASCO REGIONAL SALES DIRECTOR KAREN ALLGOOD REGIONAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR HEATHER MITCHELL REGIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER KRYSTINA GARNETT ACTING EXECUTIVE RETAIL EDITOR JO HOLLEY RETAIL PROMOTIONS EXECUTIVE CHARLOTTE SUTHERLAND-HAWES PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR BLUE GAYDON ACTING PROMOTIONS MANAGER JESS PURDUE PROMOTIONS ART DIRECTORS DORIT POLLARD, ABIGAIL VOLKS PROJECT MANAGER GEORGIE PARVIN SENIOR CREATIVE SOLUTIONS ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE GEORGIA BRUNT DIGITAL PROJECT MANAGER AMY MAXWELL CLASSIFIED DIRECTOR SHELAGH CROFTS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER SARAH BARON SENIOR CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVE/TRAINER KATHERINE WEEKES SENIOR CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVES JENNA COLLISON, ALICE WINTERS, ROSANNA DE WAAL CLASSIFIED SALES EXECUTIVE EMILY GOODWIN HEAD OF DIGITAL WIL HARRIS DIGITAL STRATEGY DIRECTOR DOLLY JONES OPERATIONS DIRECTOR HELEN PLACITO MARKETING DIRECTOR JEAN FAULKNER SENIOR RESEARCH MANAGER HEATHER BATTEN RESEARCH MANAGER THERESA DOMKE DEPUTY MARKETING AND RESEARCH DIRECTOR GARY READ ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL MARKETING SUSIE BROWN GROUP PROPERTY DIRECTOR FIONA FORSYTH CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS NICKY EATON DEPUTY PUBLICITY DIRECTOR HARRIET ROBERTSON PUBLICITY MANAGER RICHARD PICKARD CIRCULATION DIRECTOR RICHARD KINGERLEE NEWSTRADE CIRCULATION MANAGER ELLIOTT SPAULDING NEWSTRADE PROMOTIONS MANAGER ANNA PETTINGER SUBSCRIPTIONS DIRECTOR PATRICK FOILLERET MARKETING & PROMOTIONS MANAGER MICHELLE VELAN CREATIVE DESIGN MANAGER ANTHEA DENNING

THE OFFICIAL SIGNED LIMITED-EDITION ANTHOLOGY OF VOGUE’S CENTURY A landmark edition showcasing photographs, illustrations, correspondence, covers and new interviews with 100 renowned Vogue contributors.

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR SARAH JENSON COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER XENIA DILNOT SENIOR PRODUCTION CONTROLLER EMILY BENTLEY ACTING SENIOR PRODUCTION COORDINATOR SAPPHO BARKLA COMMERCIAL SENIOR PRODUCTION CONTROLLER LOUISE LAWSON COMMERCIAL AND PAPER PRODUCTION CONTROLLER MARTIN MACMILLAN COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION COORDINATOR JESSICA BEEBY FINANCE DIRECTOR PAMELA RAYNOR FINANCIAL CONTROL DIRECTOR PENNY SCOTT-BAYFIELD HR DIRECTOR HAZEL M C INTYRE DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR ALBERT READ

Limited to 1,916 copies, each hand-bound leather book is individually signed by at least eight contributors from a panoply of names, including Grace Coddington, Patrick Demarchelier, Kate Moss and many more.

AVAILABLE NOW AT WWW.VOGUE-CENTURY.COM

NICHOLAS COLERIDGE MANAGING DIRECTOR PUBLISHED BY THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD, VOGUE HOUSE, HANOVER SQUARE, LONDON W1S 1JU (TEL: 020 7499 9080; FAX: 020 7493 1345). DIRECTORS JONATHAN NEWHOUSE, NICHOLAS COLERIDGE, STEPHEN QUINN, ANNIE HOLCROFT, PAMELA RAYNOR, JAMIE BILL, JEAN FAULKNER, SHELAGH CROFTS, ALBERT READ, PATRICIA STEVENSON JONATHAN NEWHOUSE CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE, CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL


inVOGUE Stretch a POINT

JILL STUART

MARC JACOBS

BALMAIN

What’s

NEW THE PEOPLE, PLACES, IDEAS AND TRENDS TO WATCH NOW

MOSCHINO LEATHER SLINGBACKS, £410 VERSACE

MUGLER

ALASDAIR McLELLAN; JAMES COCHRANE; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

i

f you thought leggings had been relegated to a sartorial no-go zone, think again. Thanks to Céline, Balenciaga and Gucci, a flash of brilliant Lycra beneath a calfgrazing dress or sharp suit is now the ultimate style trick. Pair crimson leggings with an asymmetric floral dress, switch out the tailored trousers (as seen at Versace), or do scarlet cutoff tights beneath an oversized sweater. Lastly, lose the trainers (the athleisure moment has been and gone) and replace with a mid-heel slingback – the ideal accompaniment for onpoint Eighties style.

Edited by JULIA HOBBS From left: John Keats (Faber & Faber); 40 Sonnets, by Don Paterson (Faber & Faber Collectors’ Editions); TS Eliot Selected Poems (Faber & Faber); New Selected Poems 1966-1987, by Seamus Heaney (Faber & Faber Collectors’ Editions)

WELL VERSED Shelve the novel; poetry is having a moment. When Penguin resurrected its classic Modern Poets series last year with new volumes by Anne Carson, Sophie Collins and Emily Berry, a major revival ensued – and not only in print. Somali-British Warsan Shire’s spoken-word recordings went viral after featuring on Beyoncé’s Lemonade, New Zealander Hera Lindsay Bird has become a cult figure through her online poems about everything from Friends to bisexuality, and Toronto-based Rupi Kaur’s 864,000 Instagram followers have been sharing her free verse like gospel. More of a traditionalist? Seek out Faber & Faber’s Collectors’ Editions, or join the regular poetry salons hosted by New River Press at the Burberry Café in Mayfair. HM

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BULGARI DIAMOND AND EMERALD PENDANT NECKLACE, PRICE ON REQUEST

Gothic NOVELTY

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS TIGER’S-EYE AND CARNELIAN EARRINGS, £5,950

t

he eye-popping explosion of colour on the spring/summer catwalks might have sidelined the all-black uniform beloved by fashion editors (for now), but a gang of darkly beautiful muses are stepping into the vivid limelight. Enter the neo-goth – a pin-up with jet-black tresses, vampiric rust-red eye make-up and an aversion to sunshine (warming photo filters are out). See models Sofia Fanego and Aida Blue, and photographer Sarah Piantadosi for inspiration. The neo-goth is reviving New Rock’s flatform shoes (and Eighties metal band Megadeth), signing off her emails in Germanica (to match the slogan font of her “Hate me now love me later” sweater), and will never be caught taking a bikini-clad selfie. A breath of fresh air, no?

STYLE TALKING POINT

Old-school jewellery with new cult appeal Mix up your modernist jewellery collection: from Tiffany’s Love Lock chain necklace to Elizabeth Gage’s Zodiac rings and Bulgari’s rarefied Serpenti bracelet, there’s a new jeunesse to the storied treasures of the classic jewellery box.

VERDURA GOLD WATCH, £22,000. GOLD BRACELET, £24,000. BOTH AT HARRY FANE

ELIZABETH GAGE GOLD AND ENAMEL RING, £3,960

Top: Sofia Fanego. Above: Manami Kinoshita. Above right: Ashley Williams, s/s 17. Far right: Angelica Erthal in Paris

ALEX BRUNET; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; NICK HOPPER

Jasmine Hemsley’s Sound Bath toolkit includes a guitar, a Tibetan masterbowl and an Irish drum

Surround sound Switch to a new bathing rutual: LA’s trend for immersive sound baths has reached London. What’s involved? Relinquish the smart phone, lie down and let your mind wander to the intense, meditative vibrations of live Tibetan bowl music. Book a private session via Otto Sound Therapy, or look to ayurvedic-food guru Jasmine Hemsley. Her pop-up sound baths (launching this month at East by West in Mayfair) offer immediate escape from the hustle and bustle.

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inVOGUE

Ancient and MODERN aggie Rogers is a musician full of contradictions: she is an internet sensation who rarely goes online; an electropop phenomenon who was raised playing the harp. When a video of Pharrell Williams listening in awe to one of Rogers’s songs surfaced online last summer, it – and she – went viral instantly. But for someone who started using social media only six months ago, it didn’t mean much. “The video hit a million views, which feels crazy, but I have no barometer,” she says. “It’s all so nuts.” While her roots might explain her desire to escape the trap of screens – Rogers grew up in rural Maryland, where her days were largely spent outdoors and technology free – they belie the contemporary sound of the Pharrell-endorsed song “Alaska”, which has since reached close to 3 million plays on Soundcloud and landed her a record deal. “I grew up pretty much listening to classical music,” she says. “No one in my family is musical, so no one was actively playing me music. I didn’t hear the Beatles until I was 13 or 14.” However, being a latecomer to popular culture clearly hasn’t stunted Rogers’s creativity. She is working on her first “proper” album but points out that really it’s her third. “I’ve been in folk bands, in punk bands. I’ve always made music with my friends.” Now all she wants to do is get on stage and meet the people who brought her success. “The internet brings you to an audience but it also removes you from them. What I’m so excited about is releasing new music because that’s when I stop becoming a sensation and start becoming an artist.” OM Maggie Rogers is at Omeara, SE1, on February 27 and 28. Her debut EP is out this month

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In the mix: Maggie Rogers’s viral hit “Alaska” blends lo-fi folk with R&B

Shiro Kuramata’s acrylic Miss Blanche chair LIZ O’BRIEN TABLE, FROM £3,780

JONATHAN ADLER VASE, £98

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JEAN-CHARLES DE CASTELBAJAC VINTAGE CHAIR, £1,427, AT 1STDIBS.COM

CHAD MOORE

Colour supplement Let the new season’s kaleidoscopic palette spill over into your home. We’re predicting a revival of Shiro Kuramata’s original acrylic furniture (seek out his Miss Blanche chair, which is studded with imitation roses). NS


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BIG it UP SPRING’S SILHOUETTE IS SUPER-SIZED – AND EMINENTLY WEARABLE. GO LARGE OR GO HOME, SAYS ELLIE PITHERS

CHLOE

STELLA M CCARTNEY

Extra-wide trousers STYLE TIP Pair super-sized trousers with a fitted top, choosing fabrics that are crisp but not heavy

MARNI DENIM TROUSERS, £350, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

SONIA RYKIEL

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

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ow you feel about oversized clothing probably depends on how assiduously your mother subscribed to the “you’ll grow into it” school-uniform policy. If you spent your childhood drowning in a blazer built for a rugby player, legs engulfed by a tunic dress big enough for you and your non-existent twin, I sympathise. As the eldest of three I should, you might think, have escaped such a hulking fate. Big (ahem) mistake. The thing is, big is back. The stealthy mushrooming of silhouettes over the past few seasons means that for spring, one size up – at the very least – is key. Leading the charge is Vetements, whose brobdingnagian hoodie defined its inaugural a/w ’14 collection. Demna Gvasalia and the gang are having the last laugh, though: it’s the brand’s biggest-selling piece and set off a trend for enlarged proportions that is only gaining ground. Those quarterback jackets electrified the Balenciaga catwalk this season (where Gvasalia is concurrently at the helm) via giant trench coats and boxy pin-striped blazers, shoulders blown up to such grand scale that they would appeal to Lurch from The Addams Family. Others followed suit: at Céline, Louis Vuitton, Michael Kors and Alexander McQueen, blazers were major. Elsewhere, sleeves – perhaps the easiest way to press inflate on your wardrobe for spring – ballooned. Saint Laurent, Marques Almeida, Jacquemus, JW Anderson and Gucci all sprouted Eighties-throwback power shoulders, some ruffled and recalling the pomp of a Tudor monarch, others unstudied and streetwise, cuffs left to fly in their wake. Meanwhile at Dries Van Noten, >

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CELINE

Major blazers JIL SANDER

Tibi, Sonia Rykiel and Kenzo, extrawide trousers were the telltale tic of a maxi mood. In short: the volume next season is turned up, up, up. I know what you’re thinking. Volume is only for tall, willowy women. But big doesn’t have to mean beastly, as Rosie Assoulin attests. The New Yorker is perhaps the one designer who can convince you that high-waisted culottes that flare out to at least 30cm wide at the ankle are the next thing in chic – and if not her, then Solange Knowles, who often wears Assoulin’s entrancemaking clothes to ravishing effect. Amy Smilovic, of Tibi, is another who insists big is best – and utterly wearable – and she’s 5ft 5in. “If I’ve got volume somewhere I play it slim somewhere else,” she says. “Belting things helps, as does wearing a wider sleeve with something corseted at the waist.” She pauses, then adds: “You really need to get in the mindset, to own it. You have to have a lot of confidence, but when you wear that much fabric at once – I have to say, it feels very empowering.” She’s right. Something about the oversized shape says: I know my own mind. Imposing, fearless, it’s become sartorial shorthand for boldness; the absolute antidote to the bodycon mania that defined 2010. Kym Ellery – she of the maxi sleeve and perfectly slouchy, oversized blazer – “Wearing that insists you give volume a try. much fabric at “I love the feeling of your clothes moving around your once feels very body as you walk. Look for empowering” fabrics that are crisp and allow for an architectural shape.” Ah yes, shape – that can be useful. Because the best part about embracing volume? You can eat a huge lunch and no one will know. Q

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STYLE TIP The rule is simple: go for statement size on shoulders, or on lapels, but never both at the same time

GUCCI BLAZER WITH PATCHES ON BACK, £2,340

JIL SANDER STRETCH-WOOL BLAZER, £1,390

Scaled-up sleeves MARQUES ALMEIDA COTTON SHIRT, £310 PAUL SMITH SILK-MIX TOP, £480

STYLE TIP Juxtapose a wider sleeve with something slim-fitting at the waist 146

From left: Rihanna, Leandra Medine, Solange Knowles and Hilary Rhoda wear it well

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Blame it on the WEATHERMAN AS SPENDING ON CLOTHES TUMBLES, RETAILERS SAY IT’S THE FAULT OF THE WEATHER. SO WHY CAN’T WE BUY WHAT WE WANT, WHEN WE WANT IT? ELLIE PITHERS INVESTIGATES ometimes, to amuse myself, I like to imagine British poets being interrogated by highstreet retailers. “Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Mr Keats? That’s what you think of autumn? Try selling down jackets during the mildest October for 50 years,” one chief executive might upbraid the author of “To Autumn”. “Oh to be in England now that April’s there? Forget the chaffinches, Robert Browning. It’s freezing in London and I’ve got to shift 1,000 units of white chiffon,” rails another.

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Sometimes I like to interrogate them myself – particularly Shakespeare, whose archetype of lovely and temperate summers I find acutely cruel, given that most of my summer dresses finally come out for 10 days in September and never see daylight at any other time. At least Philip Larkin is on my side, dismissing summer for an “autumn more appropriate”. Still, none of these men, it seems, ever had to grapple with how to get dressed when it’s the warmest December for 70 years or the coldest April for 40. Moreover,

Last year, our weather was inappropriate from start to finish…

they don’t have to sell clothes to a permanently confused British public. Take 2016, when our weather was inappropriate from start to finish. The impact on clothing sales was punishing. A warm, bare-legged December 2015 sloughed into a mild January, then a very cold March and April. Next came a wet June and a disappointingly cool summer, followed by the equal-secondwarmest September since records began in 1910. A mild October segued into a freezing November. Meanwhile, global surface temperatures were > 157


breaking records, and the Woodland Trust reported that bluebell and hawthorn were flowering 21 and 14 days earlier than the historical average. Those traditional three-month-long English seasons? They’re starting to look as delusionary as the fanciful charms of romantic poetry. Then there’s what’s actually in the shops. Autumn collections – coats, boots, knitwear – pile on to racks in July. Spring fripperies arrive in January. But when September is mild, who wants to buy a thick Prince of Wales check coat? And when January is bitter, who’s interested in purchasing an offthe-shoulder plissé crêpe dress? Besides, if you’ve made it to January without procuring that Stella McCartney maxi velvet down jacket you’ve had stashed in your digital shopping basket for four months (congratulations), you begin to reckon you can last the winter without buying one. And if you get to September without splurging on the Lemaire sundress that you’ve been pining after for weeks, you might decide to save up for, say, a winter-sun flit to the Caribbean instead. Certainly, fewer of us are splurging on our wardrobes. According to data released in October 2016 by market researcher Kantar Worldpanel, spending

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on clothes and footwear in Britain dropped to its lowest level in seven years. John Lewis, Debenhams, House of Fraser, Marks & Spencer and Next all took hits on their clothing sales, variously blaming Brexit, increased spending on holidays and leisure activities, the pressure of customers’ price expectations and online-only competition. But the one excuse they all used? “Changeable”, “unseasonable” and just plain “wrong” weather. Shouldn’t the shops be When January better at expecting the by now? Yes and is bitter, who’s unexpected no, says Anna Thal Larsen, interested in partner and retail specialist consultancy plissé crêpe? atfirmmanagement Bain & Company. “The weather clearly does impact apparel sales, but it’s also an easy factor to point to, as it’s the least controllable,” she explains. Still, she admits that the linchpin of British small talk is a valid scapegoat. First, there’s climate’s temporary effect, when an unexpectedly hot day discourages people from hitting the shops and sends them to eat ice cream in the park instead. Then there’s the more Cold snaps fundamental issue of having the wrong and warm things on the shelf for the real-time fronts collide on the shop floor weather, so that people delay their

planned annual winter-boots purchase because it’s 34 degrees outside. But she adds: “The reality is that the UK’s mass apparel sector is facing a perfect storm: competitive intensity, falling volumes and prices, plus rising costs, while also catering to a consumer seeking more newness and better service across more channels.” Key word: channels. Clearly, there’s a gulf between the online shopper and the buyer who likes to fight it out in person, browsing and purchasing in store. What has changed is that the digital shopper has been encouraged to buy whatever they want, whenever they want – be that a bikini for a holiday in November or a cashmere sweater during a cold snap in July. And as one of those digital shoppers – I rarely venture into a store to buy something in person – I can’t help thinking: planning, shmanning. For if there’s been any real shift in the way we shop, surely it’s that nobody plans their wardrobe purchases on a seasonby-season basis any more. And as for switching your wardrobe around every six months? That’s now as Victorian as changing your curtains. Online shopping has also fuelled an insatiable desire for the new, new, new. “Women want instant satisfaction from clothes and our customers are increasingly approaching purchases with a see-now, buy-now mentality,” says Laura Larbalestier, buying director at Browns. “We usually find customers are reluctant to buy summery pieces, but in summer 2016, as the heatwave kicked in during August, statement summer dresses from Dolce & Gabbana saw an increase in sales of 50 per cent.” Matchesfashion.com reports a similar trend; it manages its customers’ relentless mouse-led pursuit of the Just In tab with exclusive capsule collections, such as a high-summer dress collection with Emilia Wickstead, or a preChristmas offering with Simone Rocha – neither of which, crucially, has already been seen on a catwalk. Brand-new, seasonless product is booming at Asos, an entirely digital business. “We drop 4,000 new pieces each week and we have to cater for northern and southern hemispheres at the same time, so in that regard, it’s always sunny somewhere and it’s always cold somewhere,” says Nikki Tattersall, Asos’s buying director, who seems nonplussed by my weather-related clothing quandaries. A company ruled by that Ovidian dictum that novelty in all things is charming (and wildly >

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inVOGUE lucrative), Asos reports its fashionobsessed customers were buying catwalk-led stepped-hem padded duvet coats in August and are “always on the look-out for something fresh”. How does that translate? “We used to be strict on colour, and phase whites, blushes and lighter colours in as we went into March and April, but we have found over the past couple of years that white sells for us in volume in January – and that’s not just southern hemisphere, that’s in Europe, too.”

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hotpants and up to their thighs in mud; or the royal family, gritting their teeth in shift dresses as they peered through the monsoon of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Pageant in 2012, to witness the national impulse to dress for the weather you want, not the weather you have. You also don’t have to look far to find a woman who will buy a shearling Balenciaga jacket on the hottest day of the year, if it’s the hottest item of the season. When Very.co.uk Shops need to launched its V by Very in September 2016, break from rigid line during one of the warmest seasonal models weeks of the year, it promptly sold out of the colour-block coat and the black leather fringed skirt. “If the product is desirable, the appetite is there,” insists Kenyatte Nelson, group marketing director at Shop Direct, which owns Very. At the other end of the retail spectrum, Harrods reports a similar demand. “We have a strong business within the early adopters market,” says Helen David, chief merchant at Harrods. “As soon as a new season launches we see a surge in sales of the key categories – coat sales in July and August are very healthy.” That doesn’t explain why retailers are still facing a chill wind. How easy is it, really, to mitigate against changeable weather? I decide to head to source: the Met Office. “No one in the world is capable of doing an accurate six-month weather forecast, but we can provide clients with 14-day sales forecasts for any product category we analyse,” Barbara Napiorkowska, business

The weather outside is frightful… but new swimwear is always delightful

manager at the Met’s commercial retail weather services arm, tells me. Most of its boundless data can be used to improve logistics. Napiorkowska cites the time when the Met Office was able to advise, with 100 per cent accuracy, that winds in the north of England would exceed 50mph during a spell in winter 2015. Its clients suspended more than 300 drivers ferrying stock around the country; sure enough, there were seven truck accidents that day. More interestingly, however, Napiorkowska also admits that the Met Office has 15 years’ worth of data – temperature, sunshine hours – that a client such as Marks & Spencer has at its disposal to help decide, for instance, whether it really ought to launch knitwear in mid-October rather than on September 1 on the dot (as it apparently has for time immemorial). That doesn’t mean clients have to take the advice: judging by the results, retailers are a stubborn bunch. What is clear is that shops need to break out from rigid seasonal models. For while a fashion-obsessed customer will buy “the very thing” whatever the weather, the rest of us are thinking: “Coats? In July? Couldn’t we just have them in September, when we’re ready?” In the end, however, you can always rely on rain. “No Englishwoman who spends her money on a really attractive wet-weather wrap will ever have reason to deplore lack of opportunity for its use,” counselled Vogue in September 1923. The good news? Cagoules are back for spring. Every cloud… Q

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he defining quality of our 2017 wardrobes is that they are seasonless. Frequent travel and better central heating (versus unexpected Arctic blasts of office air conditioning) mean that thick, heavy fabrics are out and lightweight gauges are in. None of us is buying heavy coats any more. If you’re wealthy, you travel to warmer climes all year round; even if you’re not in possession of a G6, you now know you don’t need more than one duvet coat. Sure enough, over the past five years, sales of woollen outerwear at Debenhams have halved as shoppers seek lighter options in trench coats, anoraks and quilted jackets. There’s more: Debenhams’ heavy-gauge knitwear sales are also declining, while sales of cardigans now account for 85 per cent of the sales mix (two years ago they made up just 15 per cent). Layering – that very American habit – is now a very British tic. “The female mindset has changed,” says Jo Bennett, head of womenswear buying at John Lewis. “There is a major move towards having pieces in your wardrobe that you actually wear year-round but style in very different ways.” Hence mididresses, a “dramatic success” at John Lewis, are being worn with roll-necks in the winter and sandals in the summer; blazers with T-shirts in April and cashmere in October. And John Lewis, like Debenhams, has also adapted its fabrics for all-round styling. “We use lighter yarns, lighter gauges, and we are developing styles that are much more versatile. When we launched our new line, Modern Rarity, we included some beautiful Italian wool coatigans that are lightweight and perfect for layering,” says Bennett. Coatigans – don’t they suddenly sound wonderfully chic? Especially set against a backdrop of climate deniers in pursuit of fashion at all costs. One only has to look at Aintree attendees, shivering in their Louboutins; or Glastonbury hordes, quaking in


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How the EARRING became the THING

ANNIE COSTELLO BROWN SILVER AND GOLD PLATED, £170, AT VALERYDEMURE.COM

THE BEST PLACE TO MAKE A BOLD STATEMENT NOW? THE LOBE. SARAH HARRIS GETS THE HANG OF IT

PROENZA SCHOULER

Above: asymmetry ruled the runway at Marni s/s ’17

VALENTINO

shapes and clever neutral tones such as sensible, go-with-everything khaki and tobacco, we’re having to look elsewhere for a frisson of excitement: to ears, in fact. Add an earring to those clothes and it sets the look alight. Likewise, as we develop a taste for streetwear – tracksuit trousers, the hoodie, the oversized lumberjack shirt – to an untrained eye (an eye that doesn’t know that said hoodie costs close to £1,000), statement earrings are the ticket to elevate it all, away from a look that could easily read “Oh, you caught me in clothes I usually walk my dog in” to a considered “Yes, I know what I’m doing.” That’s the kind of power transmitted by earrings now. Designers are in unison over ear decoration. At Valentino, there were dangling swords, which pointed towards the shoulders; made of hammered metal, they looked as though a caveman had handcrafted them. Proenza Schouler’s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez favoured a major tribal-looking design made up of arches and >

BALENCIAGA

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

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here’s a shop in Paris that we call the Earring Shop. It’s a tiny place, the kind that you can’t swing a cat in, where every surface, from floor to ceiling, is crammed with – you guessed it – earrings, all vintage, or vintage reworked by the nameless man who sits in the corner behind an untidy desk. They vary from colourful Bakelite designs to gold and gaudy Eighties styles and other gewgaws streaming with beads and crystals. During the biannual ready-to-wear collections, and always right before the Sonia Rykiel show, the Vogue team schedule a speedy sweep of the Earring Shop. We’re in and out in approximately eight minutes; just enough time to expertly scan the jumbled shelves, pick out what catches the eye – carefully, because an inelegant attempt will likely set off a domino effect of tumbling earrings around the entire shop – before always, without fail, leaving with a prize buy in hand. For me, in September, it was a pair of shoulder-dusters: 15cm-long earrings made up of a single strand of pea-sized crystals each interspersed with a silver metal rod. It’s a sign of the times that these were my only souvenir from Paris – a purchase that reflected a dismal post-Brexit conversion rate that wouldn’t allow for a morsel of Céline, but more importantly, a purchase that highlighted the fact that the earring is now The Thing. As the catwalks – and, in turn, our wardrobes – fill with harder-working investment clothes in clean, minimal


TIBI

TIFFANY DIAMOND, PRICE ON REQUEST

a new wave of hit jewellers who are carefully factoring weight considerations into their dramatic designs. Cue her collection of graduated bonbon earrings, which are made in India, each ball handwrapped in silk cording. “They’re substantial but easy and light to wear; they can also be that daring touch when you know you need something else but you’re not sure what.” Meanwhile, earrings by Annie Costello Brown have been popping up all over the right Instagram feeds. Raised in the Californian Sausalito houseboat community of the Seventies and Eighties, her childhood was spent surrounded by artists, musicians and craftspeople. “I was obsessed with British fashion,” she says, adding that she still has the pages she tore from i-D featuring Judy Blame, who made jewellery from materials such as cork, safety pins and other hardware. Her own designs have something of Alexander Calder kinetic sculptures about them; the way they gently move. “I create my pieces by hand. My most recent series of hammered cut-out shaped earrings are a direct result of

REBECCA DE RAVENEL CORD, FROM £240, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM AURELIE BIDERMANN GOLD PLATED, £240, AT MATCHES FASHION.COM

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To be really avant garde, wear two earrings

experiments with collage and painting. The first samples of these were made of cut-out paper, then translated to metal,” she says. They’re grand gestures, but feel entirely weightless on your ears. But how to wear them? “I prefer singles, I think it’s more modern,” says Annelise Michelson, who’s garnered a following for her hoops based on super-sized chain links. Annie agrees: “Asymmetrical styling can look extraordinary on the right person.” How to avoid being asked whether you’ve lost an earring? “I would suggest wearing a simple stud or an ear climber in the other ear,” says Natalie Kingham, who’s noticed single earrings becoming something a more sophisticated and timeless-centric customer is buying. Ida agrees: “With the trend for multiple ear piercings still going strong, our customers are increasingly shopping to create ‘an ear story’ – essentially mixing larger and smaller items on their ear until they find a symmetry they enjoy.” And so, to that end, anyone looking to be really avant-garde shouldn’t master the single earring idea at all. Instead, turn up wearing two earrings. Eyebrows will rise. Recently, I witnessed a newspaper fashion editor exclaim to her dining companion, “Wait… Are you wearing a pair of earrings?” She’d been talking to her profile for the past hour and hadn’t realised. It was as though this was completely unheard of, and that no one was even selling pairs any more. The other woman slipped off her earrings and handed them to her to try. She clipped them on and smiled, as though it was the first time that total equilibrium had ever existed on her ears. Q

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

ALIGHIERI GOLD PLATED, £280

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rectangular tablets linked together with silver rings, while Balenciaga sent out giant fabric-covered discs that matched the blazers models wore. But elsewhere, mismatching was a theme. Marni had huge golden orchids blooming from one ear and a smallerscale gem in the other; JW Anderson’s asymmetric approach manifested with gold fans on the right and a grape-like grouping of silver bells on the left; McQueen, too, had lopsided pairings. “Earrings now make up almost half of the total mix of our jewellery categories, which is a huge growth on past seasons,” says Natalie Kingham, buying director at Matchesfashion.com, which has dramatically increased its earring offering. “They’re our main sales drivers, accounting for more than half of our autumn/winter ’16 sales, and it’s unlikely to wane, since the designers we work with have focused extremely heavily on earrings for spring.” At Browns, too, Ida Petersson, accessories buying manager, has doubled its earring buy this season compared with last, adding that she has witnessed “a steep increase in preorders of earrings by Céline, Gucci, Alessandra Rich and Saint Laurent.” As a toddler in the mid-Eighties, I remember venturing downstairs in the small hours during my parents’ dinner parties and finding pairs of big gold earrings scattered among the tabletop debris of crumpled napkins and empty After Eight sleeves. I could never understand why my mother’s friends would take off the best part of their outfits – until, that is, I developed a liking for hoops of a similar scale in the Nineties and realised that the only downside of large-scale (read: heavy) pieces is that they have a short lifespan – usually about 90 minutes. It’s a frustration that LA-based Rebecca de Ravenel can relate to. She’s part of

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29 BRUTON STREET — MAY FAIR — W1J6QP

(LONDON)


spotted this on my way to work.

katespade.co.uk covent garden | sloane square westfield london | regent street


VOGUEshops What to buy

NOW Photographs by WARD IVAN RAFIK

Change your STRIPES

CHAIR, JEAN PROUVE, AT THE CONRAN SHOP. TABLE, TOM DIXON

LESS PREPPY, MORE GRITTY: SERVE UP STRIPES FOR SPRING WITH LEATHER – AND ENGAGE A SUPERIOR ATTITUDE

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Gloss, wool, metal… a texture clash reworks eclecticism for the everyday

Opposite: cotton top, £220, Solace London. Corset belt, £340, Toga, at Matchesfashion. com. Leather jeans, £225, French Connection. Gold-plated earrings, £19, Cos. Silver-plated pinky ring, from £165, Jennifer Fisher This page: striped sweater, £28, Next. Sleeveless top, £35, Cos. Vinyl trousers, £40, H&M. Silver earrings, £235, Annie Costello Brown, at Liberty. Hair: Kei Terada. Make-up: Lotten Holmqvist. Nails: Trish Lomax. Model: Nora Attal. Fashion editor: Julia Brenard

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VOGUEshops

WARD IVAN RAFIK. CHAIR, JEAN PROUVE, AT THE CONRAN SHOP

Paired with a retro patent jacket, clingy, colourful stripes feel thoroughly refreshing

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Opposite: vinyl jacket, £25, Primark. Striped cotton sweater, £80, Tommy Hilfiger Denim. White ribbed tank top, £39, & Other Stories. Patina brass earrings, £170, Annie Costello Brown, at Liberty This page: cotton shirt, £495, Monographie, at Harrods. Strapless dress, £55, River Island. Grosgrain mules, £325, Mansur Gavriel. Gold-plated stud earrings, £91, Sarina Suriano

How to counterbalance dramatic statement sleeves? Emphasise a slim waist and show off lean legs

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This page: cotton shirt, £450, Marques Almeida. Vinyl jeans, £55, Topshop. Suede heels, £180, Kurt Geiger London. Silverplated choker, from £235, Jennifer Fisher Opposite: suede jacket, £295, Whistles. Cashmeremix sweater, £40, Uniqlo. Striped jeans, £163, The Kooples. Striped babouches with fringing, £175, Scotch & Soda. Choker, £20, French Connection. Goldplated ring, £120, Elizabeth & James

WARD IVAN RAFIK. CHAIR, ROBIN DAY, AT THE CONRAN SHOP

Drop a line: play off generous proportions with cherry-red vinyl and a cold shoulder

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VOGUEshops

Beetlejuice stripes are back. Underline their uncomplicated charm with grown-up khaki

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VOGUEshops

Pinstripes don’t have to mean business. A feminine cut and knockout earrings take them outof-ofice

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Opposite: linen top, £340, Tibi. Belted vinyl trousers, £240, Self-Portrait. Leather heels, £280, Claudie Pierlot. Patina brass earrings, £105, Annie Costello Brown, at Liberty. Gold-plated ring, £130, Elizabeth & James This page: tri-colour off-the-shoulder blouse, £430, Isa Arfen, at Net-a-Porter. com. Striped silk trousers, £290, Equipment, at Matchesfashion.com. Satin slides, £415, Boss. Hoop earrings, £10, French Connection. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

WARD IVAN RAFIK. TABLE, MAGNUS LONG, AT THE CONRAN SHOP

The unexpected approach to schoolboy stripes? Wear with a gently risqué blouse and sturdy slides

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VOGUEview

Where the HEART is When the Iraqi town of Bartella was liberated from Isis, its residents returned to find their homes reduced to rubble. Louise Callaghan charts one man’s mission to rescue his family’s most treasured memories

JOHN BECK; GETTY

i

n the decaying ruins of his home, thousands of Christians who have lived David screamed through his teeth in Iraq since biblical times. This was the first time David had in frustration. All day he had been rifling through the debris of his returned home since the summer of former life, looking for his wife’s most 2014, when he loaded his family on to a pick-up truck and they drove for valued possessions. On the floor lay piles of grubby their lives, with Isis militants on their clothes, sequins and diamanté appliqués heels. For two years, they have lived in Erbil, 40 miles to the east, with nothing glinting in the torchlight. In the corner was an intricately carved wooden crib, from their old lives but the clothes they escaped in, knowing upturned and covered in dusty rags. A picture “These shoes their home was under the rule of Islamists of the Virgin Mary lay are her who wanted them dead. smashed on the floor. But last autumn, as For two years, their favourite. the Iraqi army pushed home in the northern Iraqi town of Bartella – She’ll cry when through the countryside where David and his she sees them” around Mosul, Bartella was finally liberated. wife, Liza, had raised “This is my wife’s underwear,” David their two children – had been controlled by Isis fighters. In 2014, the militants said as he scrabbled through the detritus took advantage of the regional chaos to of his home, which had been ransacked sweep through Iraq, taking over large by Isis fighters. “This is my daughter’s swathes of the country in weeks and dress. What did we do to deserve this? If my wife comes here she will break.” imposing their brutal brand of medieval Finally, he found what he was Islam. Millions fled their homes, looking for. A pair of 5in stilettos, among them most of the hundreds of

Above: Bartella, October 2016. Below: “These are all the memories I have…” Liza and her family were forced to leave everything when they fled their home

covered in a patchwork of multicoloured leather. “These are her favourite,” he said, his drawn face cracking into a smile. “She’ll cry when she sees them.” David came back to Bartella as soon as he heard the militants had been driven out, but what he found was devastating. The church where he had worked as a rector had been vandalised and the courtyard was riddled with gaping holes left by mortar strikes. Houses owned by Christians had been marked by Isis fighters with the Arabic letter nun, for Nazarene. Inside the church, crystals from the great chandelier crunched underfoot >

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JOHN BECK. NAMES HAVE BEEN CHANGED

VOGUEview – the only sound in a deathly silence. In one photo, they stood in a row, The pews were covered in a thick layer pouting, one hand on hip; in the next of dust, and torn pages from hymn they had collapsed with laughter. books fluttered in the breeze. Stones They could have been any group of knocked from the altar crowded the young British women getting ready for floor, along with fragments of statues a night out. Liza’s face was meticulously hacked to pieces by the militants, who made up – eyes contoured in copper consider them to be idolatrous. eyeshadow with thick black liner. Her In the corner, at the base of a tapered lips shone vermilion as she posed, slim marble column, the bodies of four body encased in a knee-length red Isis fighters could be seen through a velvet sheath. She was wearing the hole in the floor. They were hidden shoes that were on the sofa next to us. here, according to Iraqi soldiers, when “We were so happy,” Liza said, airstrikes by the anti-Isis coalition – stroking a picture of David dancing of which Britain is a member – made in a crowd of wedding guests. The it too dangerous for funerals to take table in the background was loaded place. One of them, half-covered in a with champagne, whisky and arak, yellow fleece blanket, had disintegrated a traditional aniseed-flavoured spirit. so much that his face was little more “Look at how much we’re laughing. than a pile of dust. We danced so much that night. As dusk settled on the burnt field in I could always dance, even in shoes front of David’s house, just a few this high. Even when I was pregnant.” hundred feet from the church, he In one picture, Liza – wearing a huge stared out at the blackened mess of tulle dress – was holding the ceremonial rubble that stretched into the distance. sword used to cut the wedding cake. “When we left this place it was green. David stood next to her, ramrod straight Grass grew everywhere,” David said. in his slim-fitting suit. Both were “Now look at it. It’s a clearly trying not to ghost town. How can laugh. “When we we come back?” “It was the best night. left this place, We had more than 700 Inside, the damage was ruinous. There was it was green. guests – and we all almost nothing clean, drank champagne and Now it’s a or whole, left of their danced,” said Liza, former lives. But as ghost town” pulling the sleeves of David walked out of the her black sequined house that evening there were two cardigan over her hands. “I miss my things in his arms, things important old life so much. enough to carry back to his family: But when Isis came they destroyed his wife’s shoes, and an album of their my dreams. I can never go back there wedding photos. again. I can build a new house just A few hours later, in a tiny, strip-lit like the old one, but then one day Isis flat in Erbil, Liza turned the colour of can just come back again.” milk as David pulled out the shoes Though Isis had, when we visited, from an old plastic bag. With a sob technically been cleared from Bartella, that ripped through the air, she the area was still extremely dangerous. grabbed them and clutched them to As the militants retreated they her chest – bent almost double as she rigged some houses with explosives. shook. It was as if she wanted to push Many are attached to the front doors them right through her body. of residential properties, seemingly “I never thought I’d see these targeting returning homeowners. again,” she said, wiping her eyes with Those that have been identified are scarlet-manicured fingers. “I thought sprayed with an X by the army, but they had destroyed my house. These many more have yet to be discovered. are all the memories I have.” As Liza flicked through the album, Gently placing the shoes next to her her daughters Maria and Sara, aged on the sofa, she picked up the photo four and seven, stared wide-eyed at album and flicked through to the the glamorous pictures. Sara said she pictures from her henna night – a remembered Bartella, but seemed hazy celebration held before the wedding on the details. Most of her schoolfriends that, much like its British equivalent, were also Christians from that area, involves dressing up and having a party and they’d got used to the idea that with your girlfriends. The pages were they were waiting to return home. For filled with an explosion of giggling Maria, Bartella was another world – women in jewel-coloured silk dresses, all she knew was Erbil. curled hair sweeping down their backs. Though the family are better off than

David picks through the ruins of what was once his house. The church where he worked was also vandalised by Isis militants when they seized control of Bartella in 2014

the thousands who live in makeshift camps around the city’s edge, surviving on church aid, they still only scrape by. David earns less than £400 a month doing odd jobs, most of which is spent on the £300 rent for their tiny flat. The entire extended family is crammed into similar houses on the streets of Ankawa – Erbil’s Christian quarter – which is overflowing with refugees. “I want to go to Australia or America,” said Liza, hugging Maria to her chest. “I don’t want to be in Iraq. I want a new life. But it’s so expensive here that we can never save money, never make plans to go anywhere. And visas are almost impossible.” As Liza’s face began to crease again, four-year-old Maria leant over and pointed to a picture of her at the wedding. Staring intently, she looked back and forth from the photo to her mother, biting her lip in concentration. “Is that you?” she asked, incredulously. “Is that in Bartella? Can we go there?” For a second, the mood lifted. Liza and David looked at each other and laughed. “Your dad will have to go back,” Liza said, tugging at her daughter’s long plait. “I’ve got another wedding coming up, and I need him to go back and get my black high heels.” Smiling, she pushed her copper hair back from her face and suddenly looked years younger – more like the happy girl in the wedding photos. “Some people are always thinking about getting more gold,” she said, grinning. “I’m always thinking about getting more shoes.” David rolled his eyes and bent down to his bag to pull out the last surprise he’d retrieved from the house. “I took these glasses back from the kitchen,” he said, brandishing a couple of dirty tumblers in front of her. “Tonight we will drink arak from them and be happy. We’ve lost everything, but we still have our family.” Q 187


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Direct ACTION The volunteers who risk their lives saving others as the bombs fall in Aleppo are the heroes of the new film by documentary maker Joanna Natasegara. By Ellen Burney

JOANNA WEARS DRESS, BOSS. HAIR AND MAKE-UP: REBEKAH LIDSTONE

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en years ago, British film producer Joanna Natasegara was halfway through her application for a position in the Foreign Office when fate called “Cut!” With an MSc in human rights under her belt, the then 26-year-old was scouted by filmmakers seeking advice about how to navigate their way around the UN for a documentary they were making. Fast-forward to 2014. Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton is pulling Joanna aside to congratulate her on producing the Oscar-nominated documentary Virunga at a screening in New York co-hosted by Bill Clinton

and Leonardo DiCaprio (the film’s executive producer). The film investigated the controversial oil exploration of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, home to endangered mountain gorillas. “Suddenly the number of secret-service personnel in the room doubled, and I saw Hillary at the back, casually leaning against a wall, dressed in trousers and a bomber jacket,” Joanna tells me at her home in south London. “She had real presence.” She wasn’t the only one to make an impact – Virunga went on to win nearly 50 international awards.

Joanna Natasegara, photographed at the Prince Regent, SE24. Sittings editor: Julia Brenard. Photographer: Jo Metson Scott

Manchester-born Joanna clearly has an eye for a story. Her second documentary, The White Helmets, is in the running for an Oscar nomination, this time for best documentary short. The 40-minute film is a devastating insight into the work of Syria Civil Defence, a volunteer force colloquially named after their protective headgear. These civilians made the decision not to flee – or fight – but to spend their time rescuing people from bombedout buildings, often at great personal risk. Indeed, the group burst into the public consciousness when it saved a 10-day-old “miracle baby” from the rubble in Aleppo in 2014. (The rescuer, Khaled Omar, a painter and decorator before the war, was later killed in an airstrike.) Being long-listed is an “honour”, Joanna says, but one tempered by sadness. “Eastern Aleppo has all but been destroyed,” she says. “The situation couldn’t be worse and we’re terrified for those left behind.” Born to an English mother and an Indonesian father, Joanna has the sort of good looks that another woman might have capitalised on for a career in front of the camera. But her long, dark hair is tied studiously back, she wears minimal make-up, and when she talks, concern speaks as much from a furrowed brow as it does from the sort of lips some would pay for. She pitched The White Helmets in summer 2015 at a rooftop party in Los Angeles thrown by Netflix, Virunga’s global distributor, for the film’s Emmy win. “Orlando [von Einsiedel, who had directed Virunga] and I had both been following the White Helmets through friends, and when he called me to suggest we do a documentary on them, I agreed straightaway. The commissioner knew I had an idea and asked if I wanted to ring the next day or tell her then,” she explains. “Perhaps buoyed up by a couple of glasses of champagne, I walked her to her car and she listened to my pitch.” They were prepping the new project by November. But seeing what’s on the ground in northern Syria was not without challenges. “Entering that part of the country was not an option,” Joanna says. “Few journalists go to rebel-held areas and return alive. You see some in Assad-controlled parts with his permission, but those who go to eastern Aleppo too often end up paraded in orange jumpsuits by Isis. As a team, we’re no strangers to conflict areas, > 191


VOGUEview but in Syria there’s such a big price on your head it would have been suicide.” How, then, to get from that rarefied rooftop in West Hollywood to eastern Aleppo and the plight of Syrian civilians trapped in their own city? “The White Helmets have wonderful support teams in Istanbul,” she explains. “They had hand-held Go Pro cameras, but I travelled out to Turkey and gave them some additional broadcast-quality equipment.” The documentary, which was shot over a couple of months from the end of February 2016, consists almost entirely of footage shot by Syrians in the field. The White Helmets made waves across the globe. The New York Times ran a trailer for the film alongside a report about George Clooney, Ben Affleck and Daniel Craig among others signing a petition urging the Nobel committee to award its 2016 peace prize to the Syrian volunteer force (the Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos eventually won). Although celebrity activism is often sneered at, Raed Al Saleh, head of the White Helmets, said it was “a huge morale boost” to see such international support for their work. He joined Joanna for a question-and-answer session following a screening of the documentary at the United Nations in New York, hosted by America’s ambassador to the UN, Samantha Power. “By making the film, we wanted to raise the profile of what was happening in Syria,” Joanna tells me, “and show that, despite the complexities, there were some extraordinarily good people there doing altruistic work against all the odds.” While Hollywood may beckon (there’s talk of a feature film), for now, south London is Joanna’s base – indeed, her production company, Violet Films, is in the converted attic of her house. She admits that as an Asian woman in film she has faced barriers, but will only say these “episodes” are “to be fought but not dwelt upon”, adding, “They’ve made me more determined in the end.” Indeed, it is this determination that has led to films such as The White Helmets and Virunga getting the green light in the first place. “Film breeds empathy,” she says. “Features reach more people than documentaries, but both are important, and there’s nothing like the latter to show you a world you didn’t think you were interested in. In some cases you need to see the reallife people… With The White Helmets I felt the viewer had to physically see what’s on the ground.” 192

The White Helmets was first screened last year, at the “very prestigious and pretty” but tiny Telluride Film Festival, to the tune of its Damon Albarnpenned title track. “Telluride is full of total cinéastes who have been coming for more than 30 years,” Joanna says. (It’s where Oscar frontrunners La La Land and Moonlight both made their American debuts.) Amid the glamour, The White Helmets received a rapturous, emotional reception. “We had to hug a few audience members on the way out,” Joanna remembers. “The situation is still so awful, it’s hard to console people.” From Telluride, the documentary went to the Toronto International Film Festival. “It’s the opposite,” Joanna continues. “It’s huge and has thousands of films playing, with most of Hollywood in attendance.” During our conversation Joanna sits quite still, her legs curled up. It’s telling of her professional role as an observer, not a performer. There’s no dramatic gesticulating or rehearsed storytelling, just a fidgety habit of occasionally pulling at her top lip. She’s been

interviewed on CNN, NBC and Fox News, and while this is a successful time for her, it’s clearly a challenging one, too. “After Virunga, it was hard for Orlando and me to find a story with the same inspiring message, but this has that. The subject matter – daily life in a city under attack – is quite bleak, but the work of the White Helmets restores my faith in humanity.” Joanna married chartered surveyor Lawrence two years ago, with rings made from ethically sourced Congolese gold. So crowded is her schedule, however, that it was a further 18 months before the pair were able to take their honeymoon. They travelled to the Andaman Islands last March,

“Film breeds empathy… I felt the viewer had to physically see what’s on the ground”

Rescue workers in Aleppo. The footage for The White Helmets was shot by members of the volunteer force themselves

where they spent most of their time diving and swimming – two of Joanna’s passions outside film. “I love scuba diving,” she says. “I first learnt in Indonesia and have dived in Borneo, Egypt and the Maldives. I’m very cautious but very, very keen.” She also loves dressing up, and while she wore Prada to the Oscars in 2015, she’s undecided what she will wear this year. “I like clothes in extremes,” she admits. “Very masculine, but also occasionally very feminine. So 90 per cent of the time I’m in boy clothes, and then it’s just a flash of ultra girl.” A book lover, she reads anything she can get her hands on, although she’s devoted to Jon Ronson. “I’ve read all of his books,” she tells me, adding science podcasts and the Financial Times to the list. “I’m an old man, really; I like martinis in Dukes Hotel and the odd John le Carré.” She later tells me she’s spotted her dream outfit: a navy silk tuxedo with black trim by Rag & Bone. But what about that abandoned venture into politics – any regrets? “The artform of film feels just as powerful,” she says. “Virunga captured the interest of both celebrities and the political elite. It actually worked, it created change.” Indeed, since the oil company left the park, the Virunga Foundation that runs it ( Joanna now sits on the board) has raised millions of dollars (including sizeable donations from DiCaprio’s and Howard G Buffett’s foundations) for sustainable development projects. Does she ever wonder how she ended up here? “My mother, Barbara, who’s the director of an NGO, was a big influence. Like many, she fought to break barriers for us to get where we are, and we have a duty to keep pushing up and breaking down even more of our own.” And to keep pushing into corners where there are too few women or people of colour? “Most filmmakers are still wealthy white males but some of the best content is made by women. There still aren’t enough coming through as directors, though, much like mainstream politics.” I think we can rest assured, however, that Joanna will keep pushing until that changes. Q “The White Helmets” is on Netflix


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Odd man OUT A new film triggered Tom Shone’s memories of what it was like to grow up the lone male in a house full of women…

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on’t you need a man to raise a man?” asks Elle Fanning in Mike Mills’s autobiographical new film, 20th Century Women – a coming-of-age story examining one of the biggest changes to child-rearing in the West since the baby boom: the fatherless household. There are now some 2 million single parents in Britain (that’s a quarter of families with dependent children), and around 90 per cent of them are women. Cue the curtain-twitchers at the tabloids running headlines about broken homes, fractured families and “man deserts”. But there’s nothing broken or fractured about Mills’s film – a warm, whimsical valentine to the women who raised him. Foremost is his mother, played by Annette Bening as a free-spirited divorcee called Dorothea, who wears Birkenstocks, chain-smokes Salem cigarettes and imparts heartfelt hit-and-miss advice to her 14-yearold son, Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann), whom she is determined to raise as a good man. Dad is long gone, calling only on birthdays. The only male in sight is a hippyish handyman played by Billy Crudup, who lives on the second floor of their ramshackle house. Sneaking in Jamie’s bedroom window every night is his best friend Julie (Elle Fanning), a 17-year-old heartbreaker who subjects him to the agony of platonic sleepovers. Also renting a room upstairs is Abbie (Greta Gerwig), a young photographer with a shock of red Bowie hair, a survivor of cervical cancer, who gives Jamie a copy of Our Bodies, Ourselves, the bestselling

classic about female reproductive health and sexuality, which soon becomes his bible, even if it sows confusion among the jocks at school. Beaten up by a skate punk, he goes home to Mom. What was the fight about, she asks him? “Clitoral orgasm,” he replies. The film is set in a very specific point in American history: the tailend of the Carter era, a time of halter tops, Volkswagen Beetles and Talking Heads, the turmoil of the Sixties and Seventies about to be smoothed out by the Reaganite Eighties. Though my own adolescence occurred 5,000 miles away, and a few years later, I spent much of the film thrilling delightedly in recognition. My mother left my father when I was six and, after a reconciliation, divorced him when I was 10. She had boyfriends

Tom Shone, with his mother Gail in 1967

after that, but they were never really what you might call stepfathers, and after one of them turned violent we found refuge in a large, four-storey house in Brighton’s North Laines. My mum ran the ground floor as a café, then an antique shop. On the top floor for a while was a 17-year-old friend of the family, Antoinette, her room plastered with Bowie posters and whose copy of Our Bodies, Ourselves, with its simple line illustrations of ovaries and fallopian tubes, formed the basis of my early understanding of the female form. On the next floor down was my sister, a year younger than me at 13, but always seemingly older because she was more rebellious, had older boyfriends and smoked. For a while, too, we had my older female cousin, Ruth, who was studying > 197


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VOGUEview cosmetics at a local college. And there, amid all the oestrogen and boy talk, the tampons and the Wham! singalongs and the copies of Vogue, was me. To exist solely on the rocket fuel of a mother’s love, without the brakes on your power put in check by a father, is often to be raised something of a sensitive megalomaniac. A little prince in his harem, I was adored by my mother, a strong-willed woman who had married young and was still in rebellion from her own father, a Second World War fighter pilot who insisted on indicating when he pulled out of a parking space because that was what the Highway Code said. If I didn’t feel like going to school, she let me skip it. The spirit in our house was one of kidstogether, us-versus-them camaraderie. “We always liked going there because we were allowed to do stuff,” says Rachel, my best female friend from school, an all-girls grammar where I was among the first year of boys, and where my closest male friend was gay. I sang in the school musical, idolised the Bloomsbury Set, painted furniture, got my nuts squeezed by bullies and was chased down the street for wearing a big floppy white suit like David Byrne’s to a late-night screening of Stop Making Sense. My recoil from machismo was at its height in those years – the result, I think, not just of my father’s absence, but a protest vote against the men who had dated my mother. All my friends were girls, netball and hockey players, on each of whom I nursed an unrequited crush at one point or another, while providing a sympathetic ear when some boy failed to ask them to the school disco. When the girls came back from holiday in Turkey reading Jilly Cooper novels, I borrowed the same books from my sister and silently absorbed the news contained therein, most of it bad: women went for mean bastards who were rude about their moussaka. But when we had a sleepover to celebrate our O-level results, and one of the girls’ mothers expressed concern that they would be sharing a bedroom with two boys, she could barely stifle her laughter – “Them!” – meaning, “You don’t have to worry about them.”

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hat’s the bit of Mills’s film that had me nodding the most: the emasculation of being best friends with girls you were secretly in love (or lust) with, but who don’t even think of you anywhere near the dating pool. When Jamie finally does go to

from a girlfriend whom I kept waiting for dinner, arriving in a flurry of apologies that struck her as just a touch too winsome. “Just drop the nice-guy act,” she snapped. That stung. We weren’t long for this world, but in many ways it’s some of the best advice I’ve ever been given. Not seeking to come across as a “nice guy” at all times turned out to be the first step in my journey towards being a man. Not that writing that sentence doesn’t make me squirm. I have never bought a copy of GQ or Esquire. The most recent album I bought was by Tegan and Sara, and I still prefer female to male company. I have never pulled off a high-five that was entirely to my satisfaction, or without panic. I cook the moussaka in our house;

My wife is from Ohio, and by the standards of a Midwestern male I show up as a thin mist over the Atlantic bed with Elle Fanning in the movie he tells her, “I don’t just want sex.” He wants to know her. She’s used to rougher treatment and is bored. “It would be better if you did just want sex,” she says. “You’re exactly like the other guys. You just seem like you’re all modern.” That line pretty much sums up my twenties: a decade of plunder and pursuit, all under the guise of being a modern, metrosexual guy; a little bit tortured, sensitive enough to come off more like a girlfriend than a guy who would jerk you around, while also leaving in the morning while you were still asleep. I was a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a soft lad, with a kind of gender dysmorphia – when I looked in the mirror I just didn’t see a man – and with this invisibility came a particularly tenacious strain of irresponsibility and self-justification. I wasn’t being a male bastard because I barely identified as male in the first place, and besides, have you seen my George Michael record collection? It’s hard to say when I saw myself clearly for the first time. Moving to America sped up the cycle, as it tends to. As the recent elections showed, what sexual politics pertains to in Britain plays out in extreme form in America, where gender is both more codified and fluid, avant-garde and retrograde. I was given the fiercest dressing-down I have ever received

Top: a young Tom Shone, on left, with his mother, grandmother and sister on holiday in Pakistan, 1984. Above: Annette Bening and Lucas Jade Zumann in 20th Century Women

indeed, living with me, says my wife, is in many ways like living with a teenage girl. She is from Ohio, and by the standards of your typical Midwestern male I show up as a thin mist somewhere over the Atlantic. “You do have your Steve McQueen moments,” she tells me, citing the time I ran down the street after a driver who hassled her as she crossed the street with our two-year-old daughter. Ah, yes: the well-known scene in Bullitt in which McQueen yells empty threats at speeding motorists. I know my masculinity more through my relations with the two of them, perhaps, than as something I feel in myself. I have seen my daughter through her first visit to the ER. I have cut an umbilical cord and halted an entire hospital corridor with a demand that our obstetrician get her ass in here right now. Perhaps that is a definition of masculinity I can live with: what it is to be a husband, what it is to be a father. In myself, it still feels a little more up for grabs, messy, unformed… like my bedroom when I was 14. Q “20th Century Women” is out on February 10 199


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THE MIDI CITY DRESS What could be more desirable than a dress that steps up to whatever the day has in store? A style that can be layered over wide-leg trousers for when you want an added edge – something flattering but not too polite – even when plucked straight out of a suitcase. The new day dresses by Bottega Veneta and Miu Miu aren’t about fussy ruffles or upholstery florals. Now, we’d rather have the cooler, crisper mood that comes with gently structured printed cotton or raw linen, thank you. It’s the cut of the waist and those amplified shoulders (plus that mid-calf-grazing hemline) which marks this as spring’s smartest purchase. JH

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Make like Gucci’s Alessandro Michele and reconsider paste. Look, too, to Balenciaga’s brooch: when attached to even the plainest of blazers it hints at classical taste. Or Saint Laurent’s logo clip earrings, which dress up a plain black T-shirt. A new splash of unexpected sparkle is a guaranteed pick-me-up, and paste still has the allure of a precious heirloom. Transform simple staples into something fresh with this touch of débutante extravagance. JH

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5 Daywear’s new normal falls back on wardrobe staples, given a vital, minimalist spin. Case in point: the wrap skirt, soon to be the hardest-working piece in your collection of sartorial go-tos. Prada’s bookish, Nineties iteration is begging to take up the uniform mantle, as is Louis Vuitton’s subversively slit, office-grey design. Pair with a slim knit and belt decisively. EP

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Sometimes it’s wise to let the dust settle on a trend before you take it for a spin. Enter the corset. Forget uptight and constricting: spring’s new bodices cinch but don’t pinch, merely adding definition to an oversized shirt, polish to a lumpy sweater or a twist to a classic blazer. Isabel Marant’s are particularly transformative – think of them as akin to “oversized belts” and you’ll be well on your way to a waist. EP 210

Warmer weather poses the question: which shoe? Hold off on switching to an upscale slide or a supple ballet slipper. Right now, in keeping with spring’s new easy mood, the long boot – from JW Anderson’s techno-practical lace-up leather styles (in any shade but black) to more supple, slouchy Eighties examples – is the mainstay of a versatile wardrobe. They also happen to be very flattering on freshly exposed legs. Meaning the JW spring boot pairs ANDERSON LEATHER AND perfectly with SUEDE BOOTS, the city dress. JH £1,095

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HOBBS LEATHER OBI BELT, £69

Be INSPIRED BEATRIZ DE COSSIO UNFOLDS THE JAPANESEINFLUENCED FASHION PORTRAYED IN “THE BALLAD OF EAST AND WEST” (PAGE 264) Y’S YOHJI YAMAMOTO COTTON BRA TOP, £380

DESTINATION TOKYO Located in Nihonbashi near upmarket Ginza, and surrounded by the best of Japan’s fashion houses, the Mandarin Oriental is a tranquil retreat from bustling Tokyo. Retire to the bar – and one of the most spectacular views over the city – on the 37th floor. 212

H&M LEATHER SHOES, £80

EMPORIO ARMANI LEATHER EARRINGS, £280

KEPLER ORGANIC-COTTON TROUSERS, £125 ARTHUR ELGORT; COLIN DODGSON; INDIGITAL; PIXELATE.BIZ

KEJI SILK MINIDRESS, £495, AT NET-A-PORTER.COM

YOHJI YAMAMOTO

MOLLY GODDARD

ALEX MULLINS JERSEY T-SHIRT, £238, AT MACHINE-A


www.palmairasandals.com


CHLOE

VOGUEspy

BAUM & PFERDGARTEN COTTON TOP, £129

BEAUFILLE COTTON TOP, £575, AT AVENUE32.COM

BELLA FREUD COTTON SKIRT, £490

PLAY A BLINDER Whether in sharp cotton or stiff dark denim, a Seventies workwear midi never looks tired. Stay spring fresh in a snappy combination of navy and white TIBI

Quick SMART MIU MIU SILK/WOOL BLAZER, £1,460

TIBI LINEN/ COTTON TROUSERS, £545

POLISH UP YOUR DAYWEAR WITH FRESH HUES, SHARP SILHOUETTES AND A LITTLE STYLING SAVVY. BY NAOMI SMART

LOUIS VUITTON LEATHER BAG, £2,300 SEA NEW YORK COTTON TROUSERS, £405

TOD’S LEATHER SANDALS, £430

STAND TO ATTENTION An easy khaki army shirt, buttoned and tucked into this season’s must-have chinos, is the new word in smart. For extra panache, team with an LV bag

KENZO

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION COTTON-TWILL JACKET, £1,260

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VOGUEspy Quick SMART LORO PIANA CASHMERE POLONECK, £1,050

STELLA M CCARTNEY COTTON DRESS, £785

BOTTEGA VENETA

DOLCE & GABBANA CROCODILE, LEATHER AND SNAKESKIN BAG, TO ORDER

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION LEATHER BELT, £333

HOBBS COTTON SKIRT, £129

ISABEL MARANT COTTON TROUSERS, £378 MONSE

GO TO EARTH When your go-to polished wardrobe separates are rendered in an earthy palette of tobacco, khaki and stone, they’ll hit forever status

RULES OF PUNCTUATION Inject no-fuss silhouettes with sleek accessories. Our favourites are in black or pastels in soft, brushed suedes

J CREW LINEN SKIRT, £110

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS; PIXELATE.BIZ

BOTTEGA VENETA SUEDE WEDGES, £650

JW ANDERSON WOVEN LEATHER BAG, £1,695

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VALENTINO GARAVANI SUEDE SHOES, £770


Photography by Sarah Cresswell

w w w.carolinecharles.co.uk


VOGUEspy

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS DIAMOND NECKLACE, PRICE ON REQUEST

DELFINA DELETTREZ GOLD, PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, £4,135

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KIKI McDONOUGH AMETHYST AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, £2,600

CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY WHITE-ANDBLACK-DIAMOND RING, PRICE ON REQUEST

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DIOR JOAILLERIE DIAMOND AND EMERALD BRACELET, PRICE ON REQUEST

GO LOOPY FOR BOWS FASHIONED FROM SCENE-STEALING GEMS AND PRECIOUS METALS. BY CAROL WOOLTON o tie a pussy-bow, whether decorating a silk blouse or a swingy necklace, takes a certain skill. Pulled tight, you risk losing the volume and fluidity; too slack and it unfastens and falls apart. Inspired by the ribbon used to attach jewels to Renaissance garments, Graff has solved the problem by creating a perfectly tied bow in precious gemstones. Multiple layers of sculpted diamonds are fashioned into curves and domes, creating the voluminous effect of a bow tied by hand. Set in stone, it won’t unravel, instead sitting in place with a delicate fluidity. Meanwhile, other jewellers’ exquisite designs tie in to the theme. Q

CARTIER ANTIQUE ONYX AND DIAMOND BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST

TIFFANY KUNZITE AND DIAMOND BROOCH, £70,000

BOUCHERON RUBY, ONYX AND DIAMOND RING, PRICE ON REQUEST

MARTIN KATZ PINK-AND-WHITEDIAMOND BROOCH, PRICE ON REQUEST

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; CLAUDE VIRGIN

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Old-school TIES

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KARLIE KLOSS

Starting at £45


All prices are non-binding RRP’s including VAT. Prices are subject to change from time to time without prior notice. Please check with the participating boutique at the time of purchase. Karlie wears items priced from £45 to £125.


VOGUEcompetition

VOGUE Talent Contest

2017 Are you an aspiring writer? Vogue’s annual Talent Contest for Young Writers is one of the most prestigious awards in the industry. It has helped launch the careers of authors, playwrights and poets – as well as members of Vogue’s own staff. So what are we looking for? Journalists with an eye for a good story, who can tell it with originality, wit and structure. The winner will receive £1,000, and the runner-up, £500. If you are under the age of 25 and would like to enter, read on. PLEASE NOTE, YOU MUST COMPLETE ALL SECTIONS: 1. Write a descriptive interview with a person who is not

a member of your family. (800 words) 2. Write a social-observation piece. This can be a cultural

review, a commentary on current affairs, or an article about a fashion or beauty trend. (800 words) 3. Pitch three ideas for stories that would be suitable for Vogue. These can be related to the arts, beauty, fashion, a personality, or lifestyle orientated. You should briefly outline the proposal and, if you like, you may include visual prompts. (No more than 200 words each) Entries must be submitted via email. Please include a photograph of yourself as an attachment, while the main body of the message should list your name, permanent address, telephone number, date of birth and occupation. The judging panel will include Vogue’s editor-in-chief Alexandra Shulman, senior members of the magazine’s staff, and guest judges. Finalists will be invited to a lunch at Vogue, after which the winner will be decided.

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY 1. Entrants should not have reached their 25th birthday by January 1, 2017. 2. Entries must be submitted via email, to arrive no later than the closing date, to voguetalent2017@condenast.co.uk. 3. Copyright of entries belongs to the Condé Nast Publications Ltd. 4. The competition results will be announced in an autumn issue of Vogue and on Vogue.co.uk. 5. In the event of a tie, the prize money will be shared. 6. The editor’s decision is final. 232

VENETIA SCOTT

CLOSING DATE: FRIDAY, APRIL 7


Thistle Pewter by Vivienne Westwood

THERUGCOMPANY.COM


Your counterpoint to pretty lacework? A full floral skirt nipped at the waist. Note the soft ruffled mules – clashes can be understated and still striking Lace ruffle top, ��35. Skirt, £40. Shoes, £38. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk. Hair: Alexandry Costa. Make-up: Janeen Witherspoon. Model: Lauren de Graaf

Daydreamer Romantic lorals, bold prints and touches of rufle and lace take centre-stage in spring’s soft return. The new collection from V by Very hits exactly the right sartorial note – dreamy and sophisticated. We’re in love… Photographs by Estelle Hanania. Styling by Charlotte Collet


VOGUE PROMOTION Head in the clouds: for a softer look, layering is key to your spring arsenal. Floaty trousers, pleats, ruffles… no rules apply here Pleated midi-dress, £48. Trousers, £28. Shoes, £38. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk


Florals go for gold with a dress that stands out for all the right reasons. Pair with a black basic to step out in style Floral jacquard midi-dress, ÂŁ55. High-neck ruffle dress, worn underneath, ÂŁ55. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk


VOGUE PROMOTION

V BY VERY METALLIC LOAFERS, £25

Romantic rebel: hints of flamenco and pops of red inject drama into any rainy Wednesday Left: dress, £42, V by Very, at Very.co.uk

V BY VERY EMBROIDERED WINGED TOTE, £32

ESTELLE HANANIA

Wild flower: keep your look fresh-faced and let a bohemian floral print do the talking Below: ruffle midi-dress with cutout detail, £45, V by Very, at Very.co.uk


V BY VERY MINI TOTE WITH POMPOMS, £28

This season’s girl is soft and whimsical, smart and sophisticated, romantic and flippantly cool

A nod to nostalgia: Twenties-style suits with a sprinkling of sequins invoke times gone by, and good times to come Above: embellished top, £40. Frill blouse, worn underneath, £28. Jacket, £35. Trousers, £28. Metallic loafers, £25. All V by Very, at Very.co.uk

This is no time for paredback simplicity. Mix and clash colour, texture, stripes and prints. More is definitely more… Left: floral blouse, £30. Sweater, £28. Both V by Very, at Very.co.uk


VOGUE PROMOTION Ra-ra girl: prints and poppies make a cheeky combination. Add a bit of flounce and this is the dream party dress High-neck ruffle dress, £55, V by Very, at Very.co.uk

ESTELLE HANANIA


Vogue insider and fashion adviser to Diana, Princess of Wales, Anna Harvey lifts the lid on how to dress well at any age

“A no-nonsense, gimmick-free manual on how every woman at every age can dress well” – Lisa Armstrong, Stella Magazine, Sunday Telegraph

OUT NOW


VOGUEchecklist Get in to the swing of spring with bold colour, silhouettes and pattern Edited by JO HOLLEY

CHANEL LE ROUGE CRAYON DE COULEUR LIP PENCIL IN ROUGE, £28, CHANEL.COM

Pale fire

MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION

Other combinations come and go, but white on white (as seen at Michael Kors) never fails. Stick to fuss-free shapes and add just one colour to accessorise

BURBERRY LIQUID LIP VELVET IN REGIMENT RED, £26, BURBERRY. COM

TOM FORD LIP COLOR IN SMOKE RED, £39, AT SELFRIDGES. COM DIOR ROUGE GRADIENT LIP SHADOW DUO IN RED, £26, DIOR.COM

RED ALERT Matt or glossy, a bold-red-lip revival is under way… Wear it well in these standout shades and formulations.

MARIO TESTINO; PAUL BOWDEN

ELIE SAAB LEATHER BAG, £2,375, ELIESAAB.COM

COTTON BLOUSE, £925. CREPE TROUSERS, £725. LEATHER BELT, £240. LEATHER BAG, £800. LEATHER SHOES, £600. ALL MICHAEL KORS

BAUM & PFERDGARTEN TROUSERS, £159, BAUMUNDPFERD GARTEN.COM

GUCCI LEATHER AND BAMBOO BAG, £3,160, GUCCI.COM

BRIGHT IDEAS Step out with a new-season statement bag. This embellished duo will be guaranteed head-turners

LINKS OF LONDON DRIVER WATCH IN ROSE GOLD, £350, LINKSOFLONDON.COM VAGABOND LEATHER MULES, £55, VAGABOND.COM

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RUNNING LOW Say goodbye to balancing acts in skyscraper stilettos – this season’s chic, modestly proportioned heels are just as luxe as their lofty cousins.

DIOR PATENT LEATHER, £650, DIOR.COM

KURT GEIGER SUEDE, £180, KURTGEIGER.COM

Flat out Ugg has collaborated with Preen by Thornton Bregazzi for its s/s ’17 London show. Making their debut on the runway as a result? Two flatform styles blending comfort and urban cool. £350; Ugg.com/uk

SANAYI 313 SATIN TWILL, £855, AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

Match making

BERRY GOOD Embark on a purple reign with this neat mini MCM leather rucksack. £650, Mcmworldwide. eu

How to style stripes? Follow Akris’s lead and team them with a colour-matched Anouk clutch

ANNOUSHKA WHITE-GOLD, OPAL, BLUE-DIAMOND AND KYANITE EARRINGS, £10,500, ANNOUSHKA.COM

THE BIG DROP SILK COAT, PRICE ON REQUEST. COTTON JUMPSUIT, £2,555. LEATHER BAG, £590. BELOW: GEORGETTE SKIRT, £1,930. LEATHER BAG, £820. ALL AKRIS

THOMAS SABO SILVER, YELLOWGOLD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, £310, THOMASSABO.COM

EYE DO

Banish lines, dark circles and puffiness with one of the new generation of hardworking eye creams

AKRIS

CLARINS MULTI-ACTIVE YEUX, £35, CLARINS.CO.UK

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CAROL JOY HER EYES ONLY, £50, CAROL JOYLONDON. COM

SISLEY SUPREMYA YEUX LA NUIT, £175, SISLEYPARIS.CO.UK HELMUT NEWTON; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS

Jaw-grazing earrings are causing a stir – the longer the better


MAPPIN & WEBB CITRINE AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, £1,300, MAPPINAND WEBB.COM

BUTLER & WILSON SWAROVSKI-CRYSTAL EARRINGS, £78, BUTLERAND WILSON.CO.UK

CHASING RAINBOWS From scarlet to amber, jungle green to azure, when it comes to accessories this season, go as vibrant as you dare. Embrace the full spectrum with these eye-catching pieces

BULGARI PINK-GOLD, BLUE-TOPAZ AND DIAMOND BRACELET, £4,920, BULGARI.COM

HRH JEWELS WHITE-GOLD AND DIAMOND RING, FROM £31,648, HRHJEWELS.COM

CHANEL BEIGE-GOLD RING, £2,425, CHANEL.COM

CHOPARD WHITE-GOLD, RUBY AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, PRICE ON REQUEST, CHOPARD.CO.UK

DIOR YELLOW-GOLD, DIAMOND, YELLOWTOURMALINE, RUBELLITE AND LACQUER RING, PRICE ON REQUEST, DIOR.COM

SWAROVSKI RHODIUM-PLATED EARRINGS, £85, SWAROVSKI.COM

NIQUESA YELLOW-GOLD, AMAZONITE, RUBY, SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND RING, £16,000, NIQUESAFINA JEWELLERY.COM

MESSIKA YELLOW-GOLD AND DIAMOND BRACELET, £4,720, MESSIKA.COM

LARSSON & JENNINGS LUGANO, £215, LARSSONAND JENNINGS.COM

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS LADY ARPELS OISEAUX ENCHANTES, £81,103, VANCLEEF ARPELS.COM

Strap happy

HUBLOT BIG BANG, £12,600, AT HARRODS.COM

Make your wrist the focus with one of these technicolour timepieces. Straps take centre stage in jewel-bright leather, with dials to match 244

PATEK PHILIPPE SPRING SYMPHONY, PRICE ON REQUEST, PATEK.COM JOSH OLINS

DE GRISOGONO NEW RETRO, £29,400, DEGRISOGONO.COM CHAUMET LIENS LUMIERE, £14,280. STRAP, £250. BOTH CHAUMET.COM

SHOWSTOPPING COCKTAIL RING


LUISA CERANO · PHONE +44 (0) 207 323 6100 · GREAT BRITAIN

W W W. L U I S AC E R A N O . C O M


vogue

Left: “Printed Matter”, page 300. Below: “G Major”, page 250

COLIN DODGSON; CRAIG McDEAN; MERT ALAS & MARCUS PIGGOTT; MARIO TESTINO

Above: “The Ballad of East and West”, page 264. Right: “Kinky Nights”, page 278

BRIGHT and BREEZY

Leopard-print sequins, glittery Lurex, XL earrings; yes, spring’s barometer may be pointing to the Eighties and all its excess, but its needle also wavers to decades further back by way of optimistic zingy retro florals. Too… loud? Those seeking a dial down will ind a quieter but no less arresting appeal in earth-toned plissé pleats and divine easy-breezy dresses that spell freedom – and Gigi is the girl to really take it places 249


G MAJOR A STRONG WORK ETHIC, GOOD MANNERS AND THE ABILITY TO SPEAK OUT… A NEW AGE OF MODELS HAS DAWNED, GIGI HADID TELLS DEREK BLASBERG – AND THEY’RE KILLING IT Photographs by Mario Testino. Styling by Lucinda Chambers

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Gigi Hadid with her brother, Anwar. “Her life changed overnight,” he says Black and pewter dress, £1,795, Christopher Kane. Hair: Orlando Pita. Make-up: Tom Pecheux. Nails: Lisa Jachno. Production: GE Projects. Digital artwork: R&D. Models: Gigi and Anwar Hadid


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Draw out the inherent drama of next season’s body-swamping folds with Diane von Furstenberg’s metallic wrap star dress Opposite: sequined dress, £1,398, Diane von Furstenberg. Black skirt, £1,130, Toga, at Matchesfashion.com

“It reminds me of the supermodels,” says Mario Testino. “They’d live the life! That’s what’s exciting about girls like Gigi today. They are living that life” This page: cream and white pleated crêpe twotone top, £2,500. Offwhite pleated georgette trousers, £1,800. Both Chloé. Cotton belt, made by stylist

MARIO TESTINO

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Practical drawstring cords unexpectedly up the sex appeal for spring. Joseph’s parachute fabrics now serve to accentuate curves This page: nylon shirt, worn back to front, £345. Nylon dress, £445. Both Joseph. Leather sandals, £530, Isabel Marant

“I intentionally go to work every day and try to be someone people like to work with” Opposite: natural cotton top with brown leather waistband, £1,675. Matching cotton skirt, £775. Both Loewe

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Throw caution to the wind: Louis Vuitton’s asymmetric draped jerseys afford ultimate freedom of movement Greyish-green asymmetric-sleeve jersey dress, £4,800, Louis Vuitton. Knickers, £8, Intimissimi

first met Gigi Hadid at Leonardo DiCaprio’s fortieth birthday party in a nightclub on New York’s Ninth Avenue. Despite all the models in the room, something about Gigi stood out. I recognised her from her cameos on The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills – guilty pleasure, don’t judge! – which starred her mother, former model Yolanda Hadid. But in the flesh Gigi was so much more marvellous. She had the pin-up charm of a bubbly American surfer girl mixed with the exoticism of an Egyptian sphinx. She was bright-eyed and eager, assiduously introducing herself to the supermodels and the other fashion influencers in the room. Three years later I’m conducting this interview squeezed next to her in the back of a cab, Gigi in head-to-toe Versace (motorcycle jacket and pegged leather trousers), joined by a driver, a security guard and an agent, en route to a cooking class in London. It’s the only sliver of time that her army of managers could carve into her busy schedule, which in the past month included the Victoria’s Secret show in Paris, a trip to Amsterdam to surprise her grandmother, and an international press tour to New York, Dubai, Tokyo and Berlin to promote Tommy x Gigi, a line she designs with Tommy Hilfiger. My first question is about where she’s been the past few weeks. “Honestly, I can’t even friggin’ remember!” she laughs. “I didn’t know Leo at the time or even how I got invited,” she says of our first being introduced at DiCaprio’s party, though adds they’ve since hung out and “he’s so nice. But I have a funny story from that night. I brought my friend from high school with me and she wore this big fur vest. The tables were low and had millions of candles on them. Do you remember a girl who caught fire? And some guy had to tackle her to the floor to put her out? That was us.” International Vogue covers, campaigns for Tom Ford, Versace and Max Mara, and walking the runway of every top luxury

fashion house, including Chanel, Fendi and Dolce & Gabbana, Gigi’s ascendence has been assured and swift. She scored the holy grail of modelling gigs, a cosmetics contract with Maybelline in 2015, and now has a portfolio that spans high-fashion editorials to presenting the American Music Awards. Not to mention being one half of pop’s most Instagrammable millennial couples. Her boyfriend (if you didn’t know already) is former One Direction bandmate Zayn Malik. She blushes when I mention his name. “He’s the best, he’s great. And he’s an amazing cook.” It was Gigi’s request that we go to a cookery class for this interview, and she plans to take a Yorkshire pudding back home to Zayn – but more on #Zigi, as they’re known on social media, in a bit. Anwar Hadid, Gigi’s brother, says her success meant her life “changed overnight”. But according to the model, none of it was by coincidence. “My mum always told me if you’re not the nicest, most hard-working girl in the room there’s always going to be someone prettier than you who’s nicer and more hard-working. I intentionally go to work every day and try to be someone people like to work with.” “Ambition sounds desperate, so I don’t mean it in a negative way,” Mario Testino explains of Gigi’s work ethic. “But she’s very ambitious. She makes the most effort possible to make something work. With me, she is like a mirror: I will say do this, and she will do this exactly how I said it, but better. She goes to the highest level she can take it.” Having pulled up outside the kitchen studio – where Isaac McHale of Shoreditch’s celebrated Clove Club has agreed to be on hand to improve Gigi’s culinary skills – a young girl spots Gigi emerge from the car and shyly approaches for an autograph. Once inside, another sheepishly asks for a selfie to which the 21-year-old happily obliges. Gigi and her friends Karlie Kloss and Kendall Jenner comprise a new breed of model mentality. Their motto is: happy to > 260 be here and easy to work with. 257


He’s my brother… Vivienne Westwood’s flyaway linens usher in a new era of body confidence This page and opposite: black asymmetricshoulder dress, £3,260, Andreas Kronthaler for Vivienne Westwood

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“She’s not a dumb blonde, she’s a fun blonde,” Testino proclaims. They’re on time and on brief, which is a departure from fashion’s obsession with blasé girls and models who act as if they’re too cool for school. “The first time Gigi ever modelled for me, she sought me out backstage after the show to thank me for using her. Do you know how rare that is?” says Tommy Hilfiger, on the telephone from New York. He’s impressed with the breath of fresh air that Hadid brings to the profession. “A lot of models want so badly to be cool. They walk down the runway with a stone face because they think that’s how to look glamorous. But Gigi has this energy. She has life!” Gigi grew up in Malibu, California. Her mother and father, Mohamed Hadid, a real-estate developer, divorced in 2000, but forged an amicable relationship raising their three children. In addition to Anwar, Gigi’s younger sister Bella is fast becoming a fashion favourite, with the requisite multimillion social-media following. She recently appeared alongside Gigi in the Victoria’s Secret fashion show. Gigi calls her siblings her best friends. “Gigi has always been the leader of our pack – organised, motivated and very serious about the things she’s passionate about,” Anwar says. “And at my birthdays, she’d always make the cake.” Gigi first began modelling when she was three, starring in a few Baby Guess ads. “I could immediately tell that she loved everything about the experience,” says Yolanda. But she always insisted Gigi put her career on hold so she could have the traditional American high-school life. “I believe it’s extremely important for any child to be given the time to mature. I didn’t want anyone judging her until I knew that she was strong enough to handle the rejection.” Yolanda was a supportive “mumanager” even before Gigi’s career in fashion. “She was the one sending me to the barn at 6am so I knew what dedication looked like,” Gigi says of her childhood equestrian ambitions. On summer break, Yolanda took her to an Olympic sports psychologist to learn how to think like a professional athlete. “With horseback riding, if the first jump would go wrong I’d have to teach myself to move on, not worry about what just happened but focus on what was next. My coaches would yell, ‘Change the channel!’ Same thing in modelling. Now if I need to find a new way to make a shot work, I know not to go back to the same thing over and over.” She has an apartment in New York, though she associates the city with work 260

and unwinds in California, which is where Malik also lives. “When I’m in LA I mostly stay in because it’s my time off and I like being with my boyfriend and doing art and cooking.” She laughs because she fulfils all the clichés of living on the West Coast: she and Malik go on hikes, they drink green juices and take wellness shots. “We like late-night movies and we order from this amazing place that does lattes and gingerbread cookies. I need coffee to stay up. I’m always like, ‘Babe, let’s go to a movie.’ Then I fall asleep halfway through and he’s like, ‘You’ve seen the first half of every movie out there and you have no idea how any of them end.’” Several times during our cooking session, she stops to Facetime Malik, showing off her haute cook’s uniform: a red Fendi crop top and oven mitts. She proves remarkably adept in the kitchen, getting into the batter-mixing with gusto. Gigi doesn’t diet – her go-to

“I get to work with people who have loved what they do for 30, 40, 50 years. That’s what I’m going to be like” meal is a bacon cheeseburger and she says New York’s JG Melon’s is still the best in the world – and her fitness regime is mainly boxing because she’s “useless” on her own in a gym. “I need the motivation of a class or a coach because I can’t think of anything more depressing than a treadmill,” she says. “And I model, which to most people’s surprise is actually a full body workout. Have you ever had to jump around in high heels for 12 hours?” In 2015, when Gigi was body-shamed in Instagram comments, she decided to respond with an open letter that celebrated diversity. “The response was crazy. From Victoria’s Secret Angels to my friends who are considered plus size, everyone texted me and said they appreciated me saying something. The world puts so much pressure on fashion, then judges models for succumbing to that pressure.” Gigi’s friend Olivier Rousteing, the creative director of Balmain, admires her ability to stick up for herself. When a so-called prankster grabbed her outside a fashion show in Milan last September, she elbowed him in the face. (“I can be as

feisty as fuck when I need to be,” she says about the incident.) “Gigi is a fighter,” adds Rousteing. “When she started out, she did not correspond to the code of fashion and she had to battle for her place.” For a time, the fashion industry turned its nose up at the likes of Kendall and Gigi – two kids of reality television stars who broke into the world of high fashion with their mainstream appeal and gigantic Instagram followings. Gigi currently has more than 27 million followers. In the past, models built a following within the industry to gain clout. Today, the cone of power is flipped and fashion brands come to girls who have their own networks. Last November, Kendall made headlines when she closed her Instagram account for a few days. Gigi says she understands why and recently announced she was also taking a break for one month. “I need time away. We’re so caught up in how one thing is going to be judged or perceived or written about in a headline – it’s almost suffocating.” Much talk has been made about the “return of the supermodel”. The difference is that where the big girls of the Nineties wouldn’t get out of bed for less than £10,000, the appeal of today’s supers is the 10,000 likes they can generate. “It reminds me of Linda [Evangelista], Naomi [Campbell] and Claudia [Schiffer],” Testino observes. “You would dress them up for a photograph but they wouldn’t change and put on jeans after the shoot. They would keep the hair and make-up and borrow the dress and go out on the town. They’d live the life! And that’s what’s exciting about girls like Gigi today. They are living that life.” We’ve finished our Yorkshire puddings. Gigi is so impressed with her crisp, golden offering, she announces she is taking it back to Malik and his mum – which, given that Malik is from Yorkshire, is confidence indeed. She needs to hurry back to the hotel to prepare for the British Fashion Awards at the Royal Albert Hall. Her date is Donatella Versace, and Gigi arrives that night oozing old-school glamour in draped, one-shouldered haute couture, tearfully and graciously accepting her award for International Model of the Year. Earlier that day, she told me she counts both Versace and Diane von Furstenberg as her godmothers, and that Testino is “like my big brother, or the favourite uncle you always want to have around. I’m inspired by all of them because they still have so much excitement for what they do. I get to work with people who have loved what they do for 30, 40 and 50 years. That’s what I’m going to be like,” she finishes. “I feel like I’ve found my tribe in fashion.” Q MARIO TESTINO


The modern approach to cut-outs? Expose mere triangles and take the length to the floor, courtesy of Céline Burgundy jersey dress, from £1,310. Off-white dress, from £1,010. Both Céline. Suede flats with ankle ties, £330, Stuart Weitzman


Support network: crinkle-ruched fabrics felt fresh at Lemaire – let them move with you This page: cream ruched cotton top, from £850. Nude cotton skirt, from £890. Both Lemaire

Gigi recently took a break from Instagram: “We’re so caught up in how one thing is going to be judged or perceived – it’s suffocating” Opposite: pleated silkcrêpe blouse, £1,330. Coated-cotton skirt, £1,080. Both Marni. Menswear, thanks to Beyond Retro, Frank & Eileen, Margaret Howell and Sunspel. Thanks to The Beverly Hills Hotel. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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MARIO TESTINO


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The ballad of

east and west Rewrite Japan’s Eighties style. Vivid lashes of scarlet, elevated layering and the stiffened belt define the new architectural mood Photographs by Colin Dodgson. Styling by Francesca Burns

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Never underestimate the power of a bold shoulder, or a streak of red about the waist. Jacquemus does both to perfection Opposite: cropped wool top, from £325. Asymmetric-hem cotton skirt, £805. Leather belt, from a selection. All Jacquemus, at Browns and Selfridges. Black stretch-cotton leggings, throughout, £340, The Row, at Net-a-Porter.com. Leather sandals, throughout, £350, Issey Miyake & United Nude. Red tights, throughout, £10, Jonathan Aston, at Amazon Fashion

Junya Watanabe’s cascading pleats outline the rules on exposure now. Add a crimson poloneck to pulseracing effect This page: sheer origami dress, £3,905, Junya Watanabe. Sheer ribbed sweater, £245, Joseph. Hair: Cyndia Harvey. Make-up: Lauren Parsons. Nails: Ama Quashie. Production: Laura Holmes Production. Set design: David White. Digital artwork: Lever Post. Model: Luna Bijl

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That warm fuzzy feeling comes naturally with JW Anderson’s tactile spin on the sheer white summer dress Opposite: pleated gauze dress, £950, JW Anderson. Sheer ribbed poloneck dress, worn underneath, £395, Joseph. Tights, throughout, £10, Jonathan Aston, at Amazon Fashion

Welcome a ceremonial edge to craftwork – the new day dress should feel as good as it looks This page: grey and yellow pleated cotton-mix dress, from £4,130. Brown leather belt, £575. Both Loewe. Beauty note: architectural styling calls for a simple but strong crop. Smooth with John Frieda Frizz Ease Secret Agent Touch-Up Crème, £5.99

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Tradition meets the track trouser: Bottega Veneta’s voluminous pair set the new relaxed rhythm. Just add a cinched leather belt Opposite: stretch-knit bra top, worn back to front, £290. Men’s coated silk/cotton trousers, £490. Both Bottega Veneta. Belt, as before

Raise your dress game. Hermès’s embellished design takes on a sporting edge thanks to luxe leggings This page: embroidered cotton-organdie dress, £23,960, Hermès. Belt, as before. Silk shoes, to order, Helena Manzano

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Thinking cap: Gucci’s softly spooling hat recalls Issey Miyake’s endlessly innovative experiments with volume Hat, £1,220, Gucci. Crop top, from £235, Ottolinger, at Machine-A and Selfridges. Leggings, as before, The Row

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COLIN DODGSON


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The perks of a good fashion memory? Everlasting pleats, courtesy of Issey Miyake This page: stone accordion jacket, worn back to front, ÂŁ1,945, Issey Miyake

Revise your silhouette; the pillowcase sleeve is the thing for spring Opposite: linen dress, ÂŁ1,870, Ralph Lauren Collection. Shoes, as before

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Do away with fussy fastenings: all eyes are on the fresh simplicity of Céline’s high-collar cotton dress Opposite: poplin dress, from £1,350, Céline. Beauty note: seeing red – fiery tones on the eyes evoke a sense of power and play in equal measure. Try Nars Matte Multiple in Siam, £29

Spring’s evening cape comes with new addenda: inky-black leggings and graphic white geta sandals This page: navy cotton cape, £1,750, Dior. Sandals, as before

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Easy does it: your style shortcut is Giorgio Armani’s fluid jumpsuit This page: black silk jumpsuit, worn back to front, £2,300, Giorgio Armani. Black beret, from £165, Jacques Le Corre. Belt, as before

Reddy-to-wear: scarlet and midnight black (via Sportmax) are the colour duo to covet now Opposite: black sweater with cut-out, £485. Red knit top, £370. Asymmetrichem skirt, £365. All Sportmax. Thanks to Spring Studios. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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nights

This spring’s retro resurgence finds its blueprint in the lamboyant fashions that filled Kinky Gerlinky, London’s most notorious club night. It’s time to dress to excess again – and who better than Vogue contributing fashion editor Kate Moss to show us how? Photographs by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott. Styling by Kate Moss 278


The best accompaniment to Miu Miu’s flasher mac? Patent-bow boots and miles of leg Opposite: patent-leather coat, £2,020. Shorts, £360. Both Miu Miu. Vintage Rachel Auburn shirt, courtesy of Contemporary Wardrobe. Patent-leather boots, from £430, Dorateymur. Vintage clip earrings, £55, Gillian Horsup. Hair: Sam McKnight. Make-up: Isamaya Ffrench. Nails: Trish Lomax. Production: Across Media Production. Casting: Piergiorgio Del Moro, Samuel Ellis Scheinman. Digital artwork: Dreamer Postproduction. Models: Lily Donaldson, Issa Lish, Stella Lucia, Dillon Storey Above: blissful Bowery – Kate Moss swaps her role on this shoot as stylist for model in an original Leigh Bowery costume, created for Michael Clark’s 1987 ballet Because We Must

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Knock-out evening looks now require dedication: Rodarte’s crimson metallic lace calls for matching red accoutrements, while Gucci’s fabulous fringing demands tassel earrings Stella wears sequined tulle off-the-shoulder top, £1,866. Matching skirt, £1,758. Both Rodarte, at Modaoperandi.com. Swarovski-crystal earrings, £48, Butler & Wilson. Issa wears fringed silk coat, £8,910, Gucci. Embroidered tulle corset top, £5,795. Wool/silk trousers with lace detail, £745. Both Alexander McQueen. Studded cap, £124, Atsuko Kudo. Tassel earrings, £385, Oscar de la Renta, at Net-a-Porter.com. Lily wears stretch-leather and tulle top, £3,100, Jitrois


There’s power in the phantasmagorical: Gucci’s precision pink frills feel startlingly snappy Lurex shirt, £2,030. Matching trousers, £1,300. Both Gucci. Resin and crystal earrings, £365, Mimi Wade and Vicki Sarge, at Selfridges

MERT ALAS & MARCUS PIGGOTT

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Saint Laurent’s look-at-me leather is the first lesson in how to be a provocateur Black asymmetric leather dress, £3,425. Crystal heart, £770. Small crystal clip earring, £600. Long crystal earring, £1,025. All Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello. Cap, £454, Atsuko Kudo. Crystal bracelets, from £165 each, Reine Rosalie

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Early bath: the wackiest club kids spent longer getting dressed up to the nines than dancing. Slip into Balenciaga’s jewel-toned Spandex and prepare to float Lily wears jersey minidress, £885. Jersey trouser boots, £1,795. Both Balenciaga. Crystal earrings, £275, Vicki Sarge. Stella wears patent-leather cape, to order. Jersey top, £485. Spandex trouser boots, £1,795. Both Balenciaga

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Lipstick vogue: Chanel subverts its signature quilting by rendering it in neon-stitched patent leather. Take it on the town with a chunky belt, and expose a boudoir body Leather jacket, £6,820. Swimsuit, £1,035. Both Chanel. Vintage leather belt, courtesy of Contemporary Wardrobe. Satin turban headband, from £100, Eugenia Kim. Crystal necklace, from £295. Crystal bracelet, from £150. Both Reine Rosalie

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Release your inner punk and embrace rebellion. Try Toni & Guy High Definition Spray Wax, £7.49, for double-bun perfection Sequined bolero jacket, from £7,170. Matching trousers, from £6,330. Both Dolce & Gabbana. Gold vermeil earrings, £385, Susan Caplan

MERT ALAS & MARCUS PIGGOTT

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Marabou and ostrich trimmings sprouted exuberantly from hems and fastenings at Prada’s spring show. Give in to extravagance: pair their feathery charms with an oversized bicorn hat Chiffon jacket with ostrich feather trim, £1,245. Matching trousers, £1,030. Both Prada. Tricot hat, to order, Stephen Jones for Ryan Lo. Resin clip earrings, £375, Oscar de la Renta, at Net-a-Porter.com. Gold ball pendant, £225. Vintage Lion necklace, £395. Vintage gold chains, from £95 each. All at Susan Caplan

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Lace, velvet, tulle and leather: Marc Jacobs’s texture rave defines the new hotheaded attitude Organza dress with lace trim, £3,130. Leather boots, £1,120. Both Marc Jacobs. Earrings, as before

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Strike a pose: Giorgio Armani delivers a louche take on the evening shirt Sequined shirt, £13,500, Giorgio Armani. Swimsuit, £210, Melissa Odabash. Leather belt, £80, Black & Brown London. Patent-leather courts, £475, Christian Louboutin. Chainmail earrings, £885, Lanvin

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Nothing epitomises confidence quite like a classic red lip. Use Dior Addict Lacquer Lipstick in American Girl, £26.50, to unleash your inner exhibitionist Embroidered long evening dress, £9,750. Cut-out body, £550. Both Louis Vuitton. Gloves, stylist’s own. Vintage velvet cap, courtesy of Contemporary Wardrobe. Dillon wears Christopher Kane, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci and MISBHV. With thanks to Alina Gencaite and Ian Hundley. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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The more things change, the more they stay the same‌ Vogue charts the return of an Eighties mood, while musician Viv Albertine reveals how she transformed her life in post-punk Britain

Let’s go round

AGAIN


GETTY/DAVID CORIO; PETER LINDBERGH

Opposite: Yasmin Le Bon in Victor Edelstein, photographed by Peter Lindbergh, Vogue October 1987. This page: home at last… after years spent living in squats, Viv Albertine – guitarist with post-punk, all-girl band the Slits from 1976 until 1981 – bought her first property in 1983

I

t struck me at midday on November 9, 1981, that I might die poverty-stricken, alone and crazy. I’d woken up in a squat, on a stained mattress that I’d found in a skip. I detected a faint ticking sound and saw a tiny mouse under a table in the corner, nibbling an orange. My first thought was, “I didn’t know mice ate oranges.” My second was, “It really is time I got my life together.” Better late than never, I suppose. I was 27. Until that day I was pleased I didn’t pay rent, have a mortgage or spend my weekends in B&Q. I never expected or hoped to get on the housing ladder. Having a comfortable, well-fed life was not an aspiration – I was an artist. I lived in and enjoyed the present. I’d been experimenting with life and trying to express myself creatively since leaving school: dropping in and out of art colleges, signing on, and playing guitar in the all-girl post-punk band the Slits. I saw myself as a pioneer, inventing a new way of living for girls. But when Margaret Thatcher became prime minister in 1979, the whole political and financial climate in Britain changed, and by 1981 my way of life was over, unless I wanted to starve to death. The arts had changed, too: Royal College of Art students were being taught business management and how to present their work to curators. The musicians I passed in the foyer of CBS, our record company, wore suits and carried briefcases, not guitars. It seemed that everyone had become assiduous and acquisitive overnight, working all hours, having breakfast meetings. Men even started wearing deodorant (do you remember the smell on the Tube before the Eighties?), and women – not just ladies who lunched – had manicures. We were turning into Americans. It was all a bit of a shock to the system. The Slits played their last gig at the Hammersmith Palais in 1981. I wore a black pinstripe maxi skirt, fitted pinstripe waistcoat and white organza shirt from Stephen Linard’s Reluctant Emigrés collection, just shown at his Saint Martin’s graduation. The suit looked odd with an electric guitar but I was making a point: I’m moving on. I don’t intend to be a punk relic, dressed in rags with no roof over my head. I wasn’t qualified to do anything, so I decided to get a film degree. I had heard of only two female directors, but the pioneering theorist Laura Mulvey – who wrote about “the male gaze” and how to deconstruct signs and meanings in film – taught at the London College of Printing. I applied there. Next, I moved out of my squat and back home with Mother. This was not a cosy option – my mother lived in a housing co-op in north London, but she at least had a > 291


bathroom. Then I went to Molton Brown, the Mayfair hairdresser, and sat for three hours while a patient woman combed out my peroxide dreadlocks. She washed and finger-dried my hair (hairdryers weren’t allowed and they only used natural products, which was rare in those days). I returned monthly, and a year later I had long, lustrous locks coveted by women with proper jobs.

I

could afford a fancy hairdresser because I’d started earning money teaching aerobics. Bridget Woods, who owned the high-street fashion label Strawberry Studio, discovered Jane Fonda’s aerobics classes when visiting LA and was so enthused that she started teaching them in London. I attended Bridget’s classes at the Dance Centre in Covent Garden, got good, and she recruited me as her substitute. (This was in the good old days before regulations and certificates.) I also taught at Bodys in King’s Road, owned by model Jane Birbeck and her boyfriend, the racing driver James Hunt, and the Fridge nightclub in Brixton (run by Andy Czezowski and Susan Carrington, owners of London’s first punk club, the Roxy). I set my exercise routines to tracks by Grandmaster Flash, Madonna and Frankie Goes to Hollywood. It sounds funny, an expunk teaching aerobics, but girls didn’t go to gyms in the early Eighties and you couldn’t walk, let alone jog, without being verbally harassed. We never looked sweaty or red in the face; it was considered unfeminine. It was so rare for women to become physically strong back then that it felt like a radical act. Meanwhile, music was becoming less radical and more commercial. Tribes like the punks were disappearing, everyone seemed to be listening to the same songs and wearing the same clothes. Those entrepreneurial times did allow lots of interesting clubs to start up though. My favourite was the Language Lab, the first hip-hop night in London, run by Tom Dixon. I met Tom in New York long before he was a designer, when the Slits and his band, Funkapolitan, supported the Clash. The Pony Club and Gaz’s Rockin’ Blues (still going, still good) were also great. The most glamorous night was run by photographer Nick Fry at the Café de Paris, with its sweeping staircases, gilded balconies and chandeliers. Wednesday nights were rammed with “faces”, from Neneh Cherry and Grace Jones to John Galliano and Andy Warhol – it was the place to be seen. I could only hang out in these circles because I knew the promoters from my music days. I bought a lot of Katharine Hamnett – her simple shapes and natural fabrics appealed to me, as did her slogan tees echoing Vivienne Westwood’s confrontational >

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1987

BETWEEN the walls NOW

DIOR

Fashion PROTESTS

S/S’17

When Margaret Thatcher met Katharine Hamnett at a 1984 Downing Street reception (below) she is said to have gasped in horror at the designer’s anti-nuclear tee. For her debut Dior collection (right), creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri returned an equally bold message to the catwalk

1984


giants

1988

NOW

MOBILE

BLUE steel From Margaret Thatcher (left) to Theresa May (right), Britain’s female prime ministers have always appreciated the authority of royal blue and the power conveyed by a sharp shoulder

CHANEL

S/S’17 33cm

13cm

11cm

REPEAT purchase

10cm

12cm

16cm

ESTATE OF JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT/ARTESTAR, NEW YORK; ALAMY; ALPHA; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JOHN FROST NEWSPAPERS; MPTV; PA IMAGES; REX FEATURES; PIXELATE.BIZ

Record-breaking: Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (1982) sold for $4.5 million the year it was painted, and $57.3 million at Christie’s New York in 2016

JOSEPH

DSQUARED2

S/S’17

S/S’17

80s

ZINE scenes The ethos of DIY-magazine making still rules the underground

1988 HEATHERS

NOW

1988 WORKING GIRL

1985 DESPERATELY SEEKING SUSAN

FILMspiration Spot the catwalk muse… This season, three Eighties films set the sartorial tone

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NOW

1986

THEN

TOP OF the pops

GUCCI

S/S’17

Order of the day? Bold, big-voiced female singers, who wear their hearts on their Burberry sleeves: Alison Moyet (above left) performed at the label’s s/s ’16 show, while Adele (above right) continues to bring the house down on her 25 tour in bespoke Christopher Bailey designs

THEN

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

S/S’17

Sex still SELLS

TAFFETA toffs Audacious gowns, the sort sported by Sloane Rangers at Eighties Gatecrasher Balls, reappeared on the s/s ’17 catwalks

NOW

Thirty-one years after Riders, novelist Jilly Cooper proves that guilty pleasures remain as thrilling now as they were then

Super POWER Back in the Eighties, supermodels averaged one follower each: a bodyguard. Between them, today’s supers Cara Delevingne, Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid have amassed 131 million followers and counting – on Instagram

NOW

1981

Screen SHOTS 2017

Above: Linda Evangelista, Naomi Campbell and Christy Turlington in New York, 1989. Right: Cara Delevingne, Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid in 2015

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ALAMY; DAFYDD JONES; GERALD SCARFE; GETTY; JASON LLOYD-EVANS; JOHN FROST NEWSPAPERS; PIERRE-ANGE CARLOTTI; REX FEATURES

THEN


1988

Divided BRITAIN 2016

punk T-shirts. There were also short skirts with tulip and ruched hems in my wardrobe; I was often stopped by passers-by and told that my dress was caught in my knickers. It was still easy to shock in those days. I went to parties in purple and orange Romeo Gigli, clingy Alaïa and shifts cut from furnishing fabrics by my favourite designer, Crolla. Handbags were from Ally Capellino, and shoes by Stephane Kélian and Maud Frizon. I morphed into a different creature; some might say I sold out.

D PIN-ups THEN

Brooke Shields

NOW

Kaia Gerber

1986

The play’s THE THING Siouxsie Sioux

Lotta Volkova

The country’s best satirical playwrights have always been fearless in their portrayals of contemporary political and social issues. Caryl Churchill’s Serious Money explored the rise of the City wide boy, while in Great Britain, Richard Bean took on Murdoch’s phonehacking red tops

NOW Tina Turner

Beyoncé

Diana, Princess of Wales

The Duchess of Cambridge

espite my sexy clothes and expensive shoes, this was not a successful decade for me regarding sex itself. I was celibate for three years – I didn’t know who I was, so I didn’t know who I wanted to attract. Then I had a silly affair with a married advertising director (so Eighties), which I regret to this day. I found out his wife kept herself waxed and smooth, even after years of marriage, which was a revelation to me – I still had a big bush, but no one turned their nose up at that back then. This was followed by a fling with a man sporting a micro-penis (my first), who kept trying to strangle me during sex. I’d never encountered that sort of thing before and wondered if he did it because he was cross with himself or felt inadequate. The Eighties were a time of huge change. In 1985 I was at college, studying hard and collecting money for the striking miners, but by the time I left in 1987 those days of workers’ rights and solidarity seemed to have disappeared forever. I started directing pop videos for indie bands, and as MTV was new to Britain and needed content, my films were broadcast every week. The boarded-up shops in Soho and on Oxford Street transformed into media companies, brasseries and boutiques. London was booming. I put down a deposit on a one-bedroom flat in Balham (the interest rate was 15 per cent), and my mother and I renovated it ourselves. We plastered the walls, sanded the floors and carried kitchen cabinets home on the Tube one at a time. I found the marble for my kitchen counter leaning against a wall in front of Selfridges. It took 10 years to turn my life around: by the end of the Eighties I had shiny hair, a profession, a property… But I don’t think I’ve ever been so bored as I was then. I couldn’t hack it for long. I eventually gave it all up and went back to being a slacker. But although it’s still possible I’ll die alone and crazy, I won’t – barring a catastrophe – die penniless. Much to my amazement, I’ve started to make a bit of cash out of the chaos. Q 295


DISCO LASHES Light up an evening look with that Eighties classic: coloured mascara. For a high-voltage blur of blue, try Bourjois Volume Clubbing Mascara in Disco Bleu, £4.99, curling lashes first for maximum flutter. Make-up artist Val Garland modernised the look with statement brows, using Anastasia Beverly Hills Pro Series Brow Duo, £17, and the ruby-red lipstick Mac Retro Matte Liquid Lipcolour, £17.50, which gives a liquid-suede finish. In fact, the shade – Chateau M – was inspired by Helmut Newton. Drop earrings, £230, Paula Mendoza & Esteban Cortazar, at Harvey Nichols. Hair: Syd Hayes. Make-up: Val Garland. Nails: Jenny Longworth. Digital artwork: D Touch. Beauty director: Nicola Moulton. Model: Maartje Verhoef


VINYL SHINE High-gloss in hot pink... For this look, Val Garland expertly fused another Eighties obsession – fuchsia lipstick – with her most recent find: holographic lip gloss. Sigma Lipswitch is a shade-shifting, colour-bending “oil-spill effect” lip gloss that recently blew up on Instagram (earning Val’s coveted #validated hashtag). She outlined lips with Sisley Phyto-Lèvres Perfect Lip Pencil in No 9 Modern Fuchsia, £33.50, filled in the colour with Ciaté London Liquid Velvet in Sassy Pot, £17, then layered the hologram gloss over the top. Patent-leather cropped jacket, £9,970, Chanel

FULLY charged There’s an electric current running through this season’s Eighties-inspired make-up. Get ready to plug and play Photographs by Charlotte Wales. Styling by Verity Parker 297


ULTRA YELLOW “Eighties beauty means playtime!” says Val Garland. “I can play with everything but the kitchen sink.” Canaryyellow eyeshadow was all over the runways this season, reigniting a make-up craze not seen since the Eighties. Take a fearless approach: blend eyeshadow well into the corners of the eyes and right up to the brow bone. Val Garland blended Make Up Forever Artist Shadow in 402 Mimosa, £13, over the entire brow area then intensified the effect by circling eyes with two eye pencils, both by Mac: Chromagraphic Pencil in Marine Ultra and Primary Yellow, £14 each. Cady dress, from £1,130, Emanuel Ungaro

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RAZOR-SHARP CHEEKBONES A stripe of blusher says Eighties beauty in all its graphic glamour. Known by make-up artists as “the Mars Bar” (because Ziggy Stardust made it famous), the look imparts colour, attitude and instant cheekbones. For Val Garland “it is a statement screaming the ultimate power contouring.” Not one but three blushes created the look: Nars Blush in Taj Mahal, £23, is the russet shade you see by the temples; Sigma Aura Powder in Sigma Pink, £19, is the almost-neon colour creating that cutting edge; then Mac Extra Dimension Skinfinish, £24, is a “white highlighter that breaks violet” and was used to blend the whole thing together. Oh, and the smoky eye is reimagined in fuchsia, too, courtesy of Make Up Forever Artist Shadow in Matte Finish M-856 Fresh Pink, £13. Because for Eighties beauty, too much was never enough. Plissé blouse, £1,610, Gucci. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

CHARLOTTE WALES

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PRINTED

matter A subversive Sixties wind blows through this season’s cult patterns; now spring’s splashiest combinations have a touch of the psychedelic Photographs by Craig McDean. Styling by Kate Phelan

Flower of the flock: pump up the nostalgic power of Prada’s wallpaper prints via shards of clear crystal Jersey dress, £1,890. Rubber belt, £170. Both Prada. Patent-leather sandals with detachable vinyl over-the-knee socks, £935, Gucci. Crystal pendant, £90, Pebble London. Crystal cuff, on model’s right arm, from a selection, Maison Margiela. Crystal cuff, on model’s left arm, £196, Caitlin Price & Ellie Mercer. Hair: James Pecis. Make-up: Francelle. Nails: Yuko Tsuchihashi. Set design: Gerard Santos. Production: Gracey Connelly. Digital artwork: Gloss. Model: Anna Ewers

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CRAIG MCDEAN


Riccardo Tisci’s Givenchy collection was inspired by nature and sensuality: play the coquette in clinging jersey and flirty flares Opposite: jersey dress, from £1,340. Crêpejersey flares, from £1,510. Both Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci. Faux-leather heels, £445, Stella McCartney

Time to reconsider retro Staffordshire prints. Chloé’s chocolate-brown iteration has never looked so enchanting This page: cropped cotton top, £500. Cotton skirt, £670. Both Chloé. Plexiglass necklace, £880, Stella McCartney. Cuff, as before

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Gucci pioneers the retro-cumRenaissance look. The prized buy? Alessandro Michele’s trippy party dress, sprinkled with egg-sized crystals This page: belted silk dress with jewelled buttons, £3,230. Sandals with detachable vinyl over-the-knee socks, as before. Both Gucci

Accentuate a daring Seventies print with a heavy splash of contrasting colour above the eyes. Use Chanel Ombre Essentielle Soft Touch Eyeshadow in Spring, £23 Opposite: jacquard coat, £3,695. Crêpe-dechine shirt, £950. Both Michael Kors Collection. Crystal pendant necklace, £75, Pebble London. Sandals with detachable vinyl over-the-knee socks, as before

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CRAIG MCDEAN


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Pucci’s new groove mines the exuberant glamour of the Sixties Italian jet-set. Note how skin-tight gold boots serve to up the ante This page: jersey dress, £1,390, Emilio Pucci. Spandex trouser boots, £1,795, Balenciaga

Positive energy: the ditzy optimism of Miu Miu’s retrofantasy aesthetic finds full force in its enthralling towelling coat Opposite: coat, £1,375. PVC belt with plexiglass buckle, £180. Wool turtleneck, £360. All Miu Miu. Crystal pendant necklace, £75, Pebble London

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CRAIG MCDEAN


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CRAIG MCDEAN


Acid test: brash blooms in intense brights ruled at Balenciaga. Embrace the colour hit Opposite: jersey dress, £1,045. Spandex trouser boots, as before. Both Balenciaga. Crystal and amethyst necklace, £240, Pebble London

Celebrate a sense of freedom through your hair as well as your clothes. Try Studio Pro Curve It Curl Mousse from L’Oréal Paris, £4.49, for gloriously tumbling waves This page: Perspex chainmail dress, £9,990. Jersey poloneck, £297. Both Mary Katrantzou

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Flower power: monochrome doesn’t have to read middle of the road. Work it anew via sensual appliqué This page: daisy dress, £3,445, Christopher Kane. Cuff and necklace, as before

Look into my eyes: Paco Rabanne’s plastic droplets work their sci-fi magic on Mary Katrantzou’s hypnotic circles Opposite: crystal chainmail dress, £12,150, Paco Rabanne. Jersey poloneck, £297, Mary Katrantzou. Thanks to the Ludlow Hotel, New York. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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CRAIG MCDEAN


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“One bad show and it’s done” To win in today’s fashion landscape requires dedication bordering on insanity. Jonathan Anderson tells Emily Sheffield about the magic, the madness and staying grounded Portraits by Venetia Scott

F

His taste is immaculate… Jonathan Anderson, pictured with Japon Driving, a 2009 oil painting by Rose Wylie

inding a chink in Jonathan Anderson’s diary to slide yourself into is quite the challenge. His hours, days and weeks are so carefully spliced between his own label and the luxury brand Loewe – both of which he is driving forward with ferocious energy – that there are no obvious gaps for me to inhabit. Anderson’s PR emails me a snapshot of two peripatetic weeks in the diary of the slight, handsome 32-year-old Northern Irish designer. It includes a Loewe store- and exhibition opening in Madrid with a big launch party, a two-day dash to Art Basel in Miami Beach, and numerous book signings around Europe for an exquisite (and extremely hefty) volume of archive Loewe imagery edited by Luis Venegas. And there are two trips to New York, one of which is to shoot the Loewe autumn/winter 2017 campaign with the fashion photographer Steven Meisel. Jonathan’s schedule demonstrates what designers have to achieve in today’s fashion landscape. Hard work does not even come close. More like insanity. Because these were just the extras slotted into his normal itinerary, which revolves around weeks subdivided between cities and design studios. Every Sunday afternoon he travels to Paris to work at Loewe’s atelier until Tuesday night, whereupon he returns to London and his JW Anderson studio in > 313


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It’s working: everywhere at Loewe there is a feeling of lightness, of Balearic air being blown through this once moribund house, of layered complexity and new excitement. It has also grown 40 new points of sale worldwide and doubled the size of its Madrid factory. Blinding winter sunshine streams into the large, airy space behind us. Downstairs, a cantilevered Georgian staircase curves elegantly around central pillars, while the back wall is dominated by a vast, richly coloured abstract by the British painter Howard Hodgkin, and the new Loewe bags – the bestselling Puzzle, the neat, boxy Barcelona, the logoed Joyce – create further splashes of luscious colour. Jonathan designed this, as he did new stores in Milan, Miami and Tokyo, and he lists the details: the pale Capri stone, the agate screen that hangs from the upper ceiling… His distraction dissipates as he talks about the artworks showcased inside, all chosen by him for Loewe’s art collection, which he established when he became

“My biggest fear is not being relevant… Or worse, to feel you are relevant when you’re not” creative director. He laughs sheepishly (quickly interrupted by another coughing spate) when I suggest he has been on one hell of a shopping spree. But his taste is immaculate: porcelain vessels by Edmund de Waal are in plexiglass frames near a tiny, striking oil painting by the Northern Irish artist William McKeown. In the changingroom is a hanging light by Noguchi, and Jonathan urges me to test the weight of a wooden chair, disconcertingly heavy given its feathery proportions. “I have a boyfriend who works in art, so he’s been very influential,” he admits. “When I arrived here, I found display tables being commissioned for £40,000. Why wouldn’t you invest that money in something more lasting?” With Jonathan, topics tumble over one another, sentences unravel like spools of thread as he darts to the next topic. He is slightly manic and impatient – charming, but you sense ruthless organisation and ambition underpins it all. “He’s very productive. He is extremely organised and he’s super-agile,” agrees Pierre-Yves Roussel, LVMH’s chairman and CEO, of his protégé. “And the creative energy he

comes up with for all these collections? It is quite remarkable…” You feel simultaneously exhausted and energised in his presence. He flings endless references at you, reels off artists you’ve never heard of, lists projects he is planning… Even trying to write this profile became a nightmare of editing the endless layers he creates around both brands. Should I mention, for instance, the beautiful bonsai tools he commissioned for the new Loewe florist, adjacent to the store? Or the collection of Constance Spry vases he bought at auction to decorate it, “which she made with Giacometti’s brother”? It feels wrong not to. He became “absolutely obsessed” by Spry, he says with a shrug. “And when I get obsessed by something, I devour it. I like to bounce from one thing to the next. But it all has a language, somehow…” As one fashion critic knowingly commented, “Precision and chaos is the kind of dialogue Anderson cherishes.” The store was also conceived for commercial reasons: “I liked the idea that you can buy something for 5…” Even if it is only a few tulips. “He’s obsessive about things and then he’s done with it,” says Andrew Webster, smiling knowingly, of his friend and boss. Now head of image at JW Anderson, Webster first met Jonathan when he was 18, dressed in Dior jeans and a Comme des Garçons sweater. “He was skinny, very good-looking and charismatic,” he recalls. “He wants it, then he spits it out. It’s like the catwalk shows, it’s everything, everything, everything, then he’s over it and he can’t even bear to look at the collection any more. “He’s also a perfectionist and expects everything to be just so. Meetings are fast, which we love; he just says what he wants and it’s done. And then we go away and we panic about everything!” he says, laughing.

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t is a few days after our meeting in Madrid and Jonathan is back in his JW Anderson studio, a warren of whitewashed rooms, each packed with staff (now numbering 50), rails of samples, or piles of the bestselling Pierce and Logo bags (accessories, including shoes and bags, make up 60 per cent of sales). “For me, my biggest fear in life is not being relevant,” he tells me. “Do you know what I mean? Even worse than that is to feel you are relevant when you’re not and not to have realised it. So ultimately, pressure does not come from LVMH at all, the pressure comes from you. You set the bar.” The tour over, we have left Webster and retired to a tiny meeting room, black bars on the windows. He has recovered, he says, from the party in Madrid, and he looks healthier; his gaze is direct and engaged. “And it has >

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; MITCHELL SAMS. DIGITAL ARTWORK: STUDIO RM

Dalston from Wednesday to Friday. Every day is then further diced into meetings, each allocated 45 minutes (with cigarette breaks). Three trusted personal assistants, with access to one of Jonathan’s three iPhones, battle to keep the divisions intact – even in his personal life. Today’s ready-to-wear schedule demands four collections a year (spring/summer, autumn/winter and two pre-collections). Do the maths: multiplied by two, that is eight; add menswear for both labels and you have 16 in total. Never mind the accessories – the bags, the shoes, the burgeoning jewellery ranges – which all need his unfaltering eye and absolute attention. On top, there are myriad cultural projects and collaborations which he spearheads, be it the Loewe Foundation art collection or its new craft prize, launched in 2016; Meisel’s stunning photographic floral still lifes; the JW Anderson Workshops (collaborations with other artists, from ceramicists to A$AP Rocky); and his forthcoming exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield gallery, Disobedient Bodies (his selection of art on the theme of the human body). And at the centre is Jonathan, like a maniacal Lego master builder, dreaming up fantastical new worlds we can buy into. When we finally meet, in Madrid at the new Casa Loewe store, it is little surprise, then, that there is an undercurrent of stress. Despite his easy uniform – Nike trainers, blue sweater and pale denim – he looks itchy and restless in his own skin, his face flushed from a hacking cough (even as he pops outside for another cigarette). “It’s been a rough couple of days,” he admits wryly. “There are some moments when I don’t know if I am coming or going.” Jonathan paces the pavement outside Casa Loewe – oblivious to the admiring glances of the VIP customers inside, enjoying their first view of the three-storey flagship store – and between deep drags on his Marlboro Light rapidly explains his mission to cloak Loewe with cultural references again (he has set the LVMHowned Spanish leather-goods company ablaze since he revealed his first collection two years ago in the Isamu Noguchi garden at the Unesco building in Paris). “When you begin at a brand you become obsessed,” he admits, still pacing. “People forget it’s not just a show. The reason some go ‘bang’ and then ‘poof ’ is that there’s no other substance; it is just a catwalk show. There’s no culture to it, there’s no giving back, there are no other angles. That is why I have brought loads of different things into both brands, so if one element comes out, it doesn’t all fall. I put the same effort into a blanket as I do into a bag or an art exhibition…”


“When I get obsessed by something, I devour it,” says Jonathan of his passion for collecting. Pieces from his London home include, above, this Delft portrait tile, a fishshaped mould resting on four marbled tiles and a plate by the Dutch artist Magali Reus, and, left, a traditional wooden stick chair, a vintage art book and a cup by the St Ives potter Joanna Wason, who also made the stoneware bowl, below. Right: Loewe s/s ’17

Left: JW Anderson s/s ’17. Right: two copies of Wyndham Lewis’s seminal Vorticist magazine Blast and a triangular book by Richard Tuttle. Below: Joanna Wason’s ceramics, made exclusively for JW Anderson Workshops. Still lifes photographed by Marius W Hansen

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“I have brought loads of different things into both brands, so if one element comes out, it doesn’t all fall,” says Jonathan Anderson. “I put the same effort into a blanket as I do into a bag or an art exhibition”

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never been trickier: because we have social media, you need to give much more,” he continues, matter-of-factly assessing the colossal challenges designers must navigate today. “You do one bad show and it’s done. Because bad things collect more bad things, and you lose people on the beat.” Not that he would know much about bad shows. It has been four years since LVMH took a minority stake in his namesake label, and only two years since he debuted the first Loewe collection of featherweight pale suede wide-legged trousers and trenches and bright-poppy leather pieces to a rapturous reception from the fashion press. But he knows that its attention – and to a lesser extent the attention of the international buyers – quickly drifts to the Next Big Thing. (Two days later, as if to further demonstrate his point, despite Jonathan being nominated five times at the Fashion Awards in London, it is Demna Gvasalia of Vetements and Balenciaga who picks up two gongs, including International Ready-to-wear Designer.) “There are two audiences here. There is fashion – a very niche group of people, a 0.0000001 per cent of people; very judgemental, incredibly difficult, has the attention span of a small fly and will move on because they are bored… But that is not what I’ve ever gone out to get. For me it is about the everyman, too; it is about being able to prove for the first time that I can take a business and make it make big money.”

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onathan admits that it is isolating at the top. “When you work in a field that is incredibly competitive, incredibly manipulative – I’m being very honest – you can’t be friends with everyone, and you can’t be the nice guy all the time. Because ultimately you are responsible for two companies. We need to make money and support people’s jobs.” He shrugs when asked if he was wary of the responsibility of juggling two brands, and the danger it might pose to him personally – many designers have crumpled under the pressure in recent years. “There was just no option to fail,” he says simply.“I know my positives and negatives. I see myself as pretty aggressively grounded. And when Delphine [Arnault, director and executive vice president of Louis Vuitton] advised me to continue being an entrepreneur, it was the best advice because that’s who I am.” Describing the splitting of the two labels, he says, “JW Anderson is the cultural aggravator – it aggravates things to get a solution – whereas Loewe has to harness culture. And we agreed there would be no cross-overs between the two. And each brand had to be a different consumer group. VENETIA SCOTT

One had to be cheap, one had to be more expensive. All these technical things.” His three grey iPhones are on the table. I wonder how he manages to not lose them? “Well, I do,” he grins. “I’ve heard there’s a new app so you can put everything on one phone. I’m looking forward to that.” There have been other adjustments in order to cope with his creaking schedule, not all welcome: “I have two English pointers, and when I took the job I was like, ‘This is not going to work.’ It was awful. My mother now has both.” He misses their walks, especially because he has just bought a weekend retreat in the country. Wise to the dangers of burning out, he created a rural escape. (He stumbles, however, when I ask what he does with his free time. In the past, he has admitted that the idea of a holiday doing nothing is torture.) The fact that the house – an architecturally designed cottage – is two and a half hours’ drive from London is probably less convenient. This morning he was up at 6am to make the office by 10. “I think I’m very good at delegating, which I never used to be,” Jonathan continues, on managing his workload. “As much as I am a control freak, I do like to empower people.” And there is something around his obsessivecompulsive behaviour; his addiction to collecting constantly feeds inspiration and

“For me it is about being able to prove that I can take a business and make it make big money” helps siphon off his surplus energy. “He often gets me to look for ceramics,” says his assistant Lily Matthews. “We’re always on the hunt for John Ward’s. He loves finding antiques dealers or visiting auction houses,” she emphasises. “When I went to Loewe recently for a fitting day, he was on the phone to Christie’s, bidding on these chicken pots. He gets such a kick out of winning, he gets into a little adrenaline frenzy.” He is also about to move into a new house in London, “which is going to be incredibly cluttered”. How does his boyfriend cope with the clutter? “He’s just as bad,” he shoots back, laughing. “If there’s any addiction I do have, it is collecting things; it has become a problem. I like discovering the relationships between things…” Antique door knobs is his current distraction. Jonathan’s route to fashion stardom was not obvious. He grew up in the small town

of Magherafelt in Northern Ireland, with a younger sister and brother, James – who is equally good-looking and statuesque, and a director at JW Anderson from its inception. His mother was a schoolteacher, while his father was a colossus in the world of Irish rugby, first a rugby union international, then a coach. Jonathan says he refused to let his dyslexia hold him back at school (even today he does not read or send emails, and can make little sense of phone texts, either), excelling at art and eventually making his way into one of the top Irish grammar schools. Holidays were spent with his grandparents in the wild countryside around Omagh, and he vividly recalls the day the Real IRA bomb went off, as his mother was in town and narrowly missed the explosion. “And my sister got bitten in the face by a dog!” His desire to collect began young – James recalls the menagerie of pets Jonathan insisted they keep at home: “There were chinchillas, guinea pigs, rabbits, ducks, a parakeet; he even had an aviary and a pet lamb in the garden shed at one point. And he was very driven from a young age,” he adds. “The whole family are. And our parents have always supported us in doing whatever made us happy.” (They took this to the point of investing in JW Anderson.) Jonathan earned money collecting eggs after school to fund his fashion buys from TK Maxx, be it Gucci shoes or a Dolce & Gabbana jacket. It was acting, however, not fashion, that he experimented with first, before swinging back to his first love and securing a place on the menswear course at the Royal College of Art. But he credits his true education as working in the visual merchandising department at Prada during college, under the influential Manuela Pavesi. “I did windows, and ultimately by doing windows I was aware of the end of the process, which does steep the whole thing in some sort of reality.” As Webster, who worked with him in visual merchandising at Prada, agrees: “I think he really learnt about how the luxury fashion business works at the final touch point, which is selling. He learnt how to present everything, and he learnt a playfulness from Prada and from Pavesi.” It was also where he learnt the commercial value of fashion trinkets – key rings, charms, all of which Prada was selling by the bucket load then (there are JW Anderson trinkets to buy on its website, too). As Jonathan notes, “When I was younger, I was trying to engage with luxury products but it was quite complex. So, for me, it is how can you have different price categories? You have to consider that in today’s world.” > 350 317


The Instainfluencers: from left, Pernille Teisbaek, Leandra Medine, Chiara Ferragni, Sofia Sanchez de Betak, Camille Charrière

@manrepeller 1.6m followers

@pernilleteisbaek 435k followers

@chiaraferragni 7.7m followers

Under the

INFLUE


They’re flown around the world by designers and can charge thousands for an Instagram post – but just how do today’s new fashion influencers make it work? By Sarah Harris

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@chufy 105k followers

@camillecharriere

JASON LLOYD-EVANS; GETTY

494k followers

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ou couldn’t make it up. It’s brunch time in Mayfair and I’m sitting with influencer Camille Charrière (Instagram followers: 494,000 and rising) on a plush teal velvet-upholstered chair. She’s wearing Vetements and Gucci, and we have frothy lattes and two orders of poached eggs and smashed avocado on toast before us. It’s an Instagram cliché come to life, and one that Camille might have posted, except there’s no Wi-Fi here. The irony. But in any case, faded Levi’s, slip dresses and sweatshirts are more her shtick than smug tabletop breakfast scenes. She knows this – duh – because her Instagram Insights tell her so. “I know what works and what doesn’t,” she says. “I know that if I want 8,000 likes on an Instagram post then I need to be wearing jeans and a T-shirt with Converse. In general, people like simplicity. They’re looking for reality, because that’s something they can emulate and buy into. That’s how bloggers took off,” she adds. “Whereas fashion magazines were showing clothes in glamorous shoots, we were showing how to wear them on the street.” Do those numbers matter? “Your highest currency right now seems to be your number of followers,” she answers. “It’s more important than anything else you can add to your CV, and yes, perhaps that’s a bit sad, but it’s the way the world works. It has become your worth.” But it’s also about having the right followers. Eighty-one per cent of Camille’s are women aged between 25 and 35 who live in London, New York or Paris. That’s a loyal demographic with good spending power; hence her appeal to brands. Camille is part of a relatively new industry: that of the fashion influencer. These publishing dynamos are paid to turn up to events, designer dinners and fashion shows; they wear the clothes they’re generously paid to; and they typically charge £2,000 to £5,000 for a post on their > 319


Instagram feeds, with the high scorers (those with multiple millions of followers) regularly demanding upwards of £30,000. Lord knows what they might actually spend that money on, since their lifestyles – their wardrobes, their holidays, their handbags – are pretty much paid for. “Yes, it’s a weird job,” she admits. “You’re marketing yourself and sharing yourself, yet you’re smart enough to know it’s a bit cringe, but it opens some incredible doors. There is no way I would be living this life if it weren’t for this.” “There’s no denying the attraction of the influencer relationship for any brand,” says Sara Byworth, founder of her own PR and communications agency. “As traditional editorial space shrinks, this is a brilliant way to reach wider audiences. The girls at the top of their game are smart; they know the big bucks come from the less desirable and more commercial brands. But they know they need to temper the big-money jobs with the cooler initiatives,” she says, adding, “Remember, all of the girls we engage with started out in this because they love getting dressed in the mornings, and while they can charge large sums for a tag on an Instagram post, they also frequently post a cute shirt from a young design duo who lent them a slightly worn sample from the runway that they will expect back the following week.” Along with various other brand alliances, Camille forms part of the #Mangogirls line-up, a campaign that enlists some 50 influencers across the globe, each of whom chooses her favourite pieces from the brand’s collections and then Instagrams herself wearing it, with all the requisite hashtags. Mango’s communications director, Guillermo Corominas, admits there’s no real skill in drawing up the list. The names are suggested by the “fashion fanatics” working at Mango’s headquarters, who all follow these influencers. The list, which includes Julia Restoin Roitfeld, Giorgia Tordini, Gilda Ambrosio and Blanca Miro, is constantly edited, but Guillermo insists it generally isn’t about the number of followers they have but more about the fit between the style of the influencer and the brand. “In fact, we’ve rejected several girls who have a huge number of followers because they aren’t credible as Mango girls. It’s important to us that their style is admired and feels unique, but they also have to like the brand in order for it to not feel forced.” Furthermore, they have complete freedom to choose the clothes. He mentions a long

coat that several girls happened to select; you might think that’s bad marketing, to promote the same piece over and over again, but it went viral and was a huge sell-out. But did it sell out because the influencers were promoting it? Or did it sell out simply because the Mango customer also considered it to be the best piece in store? In other words, would it have sold out regardless of any social-media post? “Can we insist that there is a clear correlation between an influencer’s post and these sales? It’s really difficult to say,” he acknowledges. He also agrees that it’s hard to gauge the success of the campaign in terms of financial figures, but has it succeeded in terms of brand awareness, perception and buzz? Unequivocally, yes. The #Mangogirls hashtag has more than 4,600 posts, 80 per cent of which are spontaneous content generated by customers. “These are Instagram users who we don’t even know, and that’s a great indicator.” Secondly, Guillermo has a way of calculating the engagement of a post: add up the number of likes it has together with the number of comments and divide that by the total number of followers. For example, a girl with 100 followers who has 10 likes and 10 comments equals 20 out of 100, so the engagement rate is 20 per cent. “It isn’t scientific, but it’s a ratio to see if you’re going up or down; we can see that anything with a #Mangogirls hashtag has a big engagement rate. It means we’re doing the right thing.” Jimmy Choo must also think it’s on to a winner, as it’s currently investing hundreds of thousands into its influencer trips – in 2014, it flew eight influencers to Marrakesh; in 2015, to Zermatt in Switzerland. The brand followed these up this year with a trip to India, hosting seven global top-tier bloggers with a combined reach of 6.5 million. A representative there says these trips are an important part of the brand’s social-media strategy, with the objective of creating aspirational and unique content for Jimmy Choo’s audience, but regrettably there is nothing solid to prove a link between this kind of marketing and consumer sales, although they think there is a correlation. But some stats are more easily measured. Matchesfashion.com has a Shop With initiative in place whereby influencers, roughly once a month, make their own edit of merchandise, cast a model and style it all into 12 outfits, which are splashed on Matchesfashion.com and across the

7,044 likes #TommyxGigi

Above: Camille Charrière promoted Tommy Hilfiger’s Gigi Hadid line on the understanding that she could style it her way. Pernille Teisbaek (below, second left) at Tibi, s/s ’17

“Your number of followers is more important than anything on your CV”

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#Chootravels Blogger Gala Gonzalez (above, second right) in Agra with the other “ladies who Choo”

PASCAL GAMBARTE; GALA GONZALEZ; CAMILLE CHARRIERE; GETTY; MANGO

71.1k views


20.1k views Hotel Ritz, Madrid

Above: Charrière in Madrid for Loewe’s 170th-anniversary celebrations

26.8k likes

#Mangogirls

34k likes

The #Mangogirls campaign features 50 influencers – including Julia Restoin Roitfeld (above), Giorgia Tordini (left), and Jeanne Damas and Pernille Teisbaek (below) – taking their pick of the label’s pieces

21.9k likes

influencer’s social channels. There’s no upfront fee, but they earn their money on the commission that comes from the sales of their edit when the customer purchases via the Shop With page. That’s all easily traceable. So, too, are other nuggets of information – like the fact that, on average, customers spend twice the amount of time on the site after visiting the Shop With pages; they visit double the number of pages, 12 versus six; that nearly 40 per cent of the Shop With traffic is from new customers; that the AOV (average order value) on Shop With is 30 per cent higher than the company’s typical AOV. In short, customers are spending more money and time on these pages because they’re more engaged with the content.

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he influencers we feature have a global audience, and yes, so do we, but that’s one of the ways we’ve managed to get that global audience,” says Jess Christie, global communications director at Matchesfashion.com. “Years ago we were a bit of a cult secret in Notting Hill; people used to find us and then go back to New York or wherever and tell their friends about us. This is the digital version of that physical experience,” she explains. “When we accelerated in the US we got to know that market via partnerships with its influencers. But who is that person in Korea? Who is that person in Hong Kong? It’s about finding those poster girls who also have a global reach, who we can work with, and who can introduce us to their audience.” Another bonus is that it can shift lesssearched-for brands. Just as some influencers will inevitably choose eight pieces of Balenciaga for their edit (“We thought that might be a problem at first, but we can’t interfere with their edit, we have to let them run with it or it wouldn’t be authentic,” says Simone Parchment, head of affiliates and partnerships at Matchesfashion.com), others, such as Leandra Medine (followers: 1.6 million through her account @manrepeller), home in on an obscure Anglomania shirt that wasn’t exactly flying off the shelves. She styled it with flared chinos, layered a poloneck underneath, rolled up the sleeves and added a bangle to each wrist. Said shirt promptly sold out in hours, with all consumers having landed on the Shop With page prior to checkout. In that instance it’s easy to see the connection – but it hasn’t always been that way. Amber Venz Box discovered a way of proving that correlation, and then monetising it, when she launched the affiliate programme Rewardstyle. Her backstory: while working as a personal

stylist and earning a good wage from store commissions, she started her own fashion blog. But what she didn’t foresee was how it would cannibalise her business. Her clients would browse her blog for style inspiration and then purchase the featured items direct from the stores, meaning Amber was losing out on any commission from those sales. Within six months she had lost the majority of her business. It encouraged her to discover how other bloggers were making money. So she asked Leandra Medine. “She said she wasn’t, that she just got a lot of free clothes and got invited to stuff,” recalls Amber, on a phone call from her offices in Dallas. “I couldn’t believe that no one was making money from their platforms.” Her idea was simply to prove to stores that they only got specific sales via an influencer’s recommendation. And so, at the age of 23 – together with the man who is now her husband, who at the time was working at a hedge fund for tech investment – she launched Rewardstyle. “We built a platform to track online sales,” she explains. “Stores would then pay us a commission, and we would essentially be the bank and distribute a percentage [typically five to 20 per cent] to the influencer driving that sale.” In 2011, Net-a-Porter signed on, and the rest followed. She has signed 4,000 global retailers in total, covering a million brands among them. “We are an army of content creators who are driving sales on a daily basis, actively bringing in customers, at scale.” Rewardstyle’s influencers create content for about 30,000 products daily. On a monthly basis they drive 230,000 retail sessions an hour during busy seasons, which added up to about $700 million in sales last year alone. Right now, Rewardstyle drives between five and 13 per cent of all traffic to some of the world’s largest brands. But when social media moved away from blogs and on to Instagram, there was no way of linking out to shop, so Amber launched Liketoknow. it, which tracks that engagement through to sale. Consumers register for the service, and whenever they like a post they receive an email that gives them the shopping information, enabling them to click through and buy. “In 2016, Liketoknow.it drove more than $140 million in sales for our partners. It’s a huge piece of our business.” No wonder influencers want in. Rewardstyle is invitation only, and to date has received more than 100,000 applicants, but is currently working with 11,000. Once accepted, they have access to pre-negotiated brand relationships all around the world. “But we prune,” she adds. “If they aren’t actively driving a high enough volume of sales then we remove them from the platform.” Amber has several influencers > 321


who are now Rewardstyle millionaires: “They make more than $100,000 a month on commission, and these are girls who don’t go to Fashion Week, who live in Middle America.” She’s also noticed that the number of followers of an account is not in line with retail sales driven. “Some of our top accounts are those who have around 30,000 followers. That isn’t a huge number.” “Smarter brands are now looking beyond social stats,” says one fashion marketing and communications executive. “Look at the Victoria’s Secret girls,” she continues. “They look incredible, they have millions of followers, but I think engaging with them isn’t about them posting on their feed – because how much of that is just going to be pervy guys creeping on their vacation snaps?” Amber agrees: “I was talking with a British celebrity’s agent recently who said the brand she had worked with the previous evening wasn’t happy with the outcome, and the talent said, ‘Well, they paid me to show up, I showed up, what else do they want from me?’ That idea is akin to buying a display ad.” Likewise, several of the influencers now agree that simple product placement – paying a girl to post a photo of a handbag – is an outdated initiative. “How interesting is that for a brand? I don’t think they get much from that any more – perhaps, when there was less of that on Instagram, and generally less imagery going through our lives, I think it used to work, but I find it a bit overwhelming. It also makes me feel a bit sick about the amount of stuff I get sent,” discloses Camille Charrière, who donates high-street gifts to charity and resells anything designer. Influencer Sofia Sanchez de Betak (followers: 105,000 on her account @chufy), who also works as an art director and is the face of a new Roger Vivier campaign, agrees. “It’s intoxicating. I like to have things I would have bought myself at full price. Otherwise it’s a waste of their time sending it, my time returning things, and a waste of my square-footage in my New York apartment! I think the idea of blindly tossing a bag at someone is so dated; it surprises me how many brands haven’t understood that yet. They just send random products with no relationship – I don’t remember them and I feel no warmth towards them.” Camille grew up in an English-speaking household in Paris. Her mother is an environmental scientist and her father works as an engineer. She studied for a bilingual master’s degree in law before moving to London, where she worked at a hedge fund

for a year. She was earning good money, but was bored and unhappy. “I hated the culture of that male environment. TT – Tiny Tits – was my nickname.” She started her blog as a creative outlet, and in 2010 applied for a French fashion writer position at Net-aPorter. She continued with her blog alongside her full-time job at Net, which offered her a credibility that most bloggers didn’t have. After 18 months she was poached by Matchesfashion.com, accepting a role on its social-media team, but by that point, her blog had gained traction, opportunities were flooding in – luxury travel, brand collaborations – and she was earning more from it than from her job. So she quit within a month, before her probation period ended. “It was a scary decision – to go from a career that is respected within fashion to choosing the only position in this industry that even those working in this industry think is the pits. But at the same time, there was a part of me that knew it was exciting, fun and new. We were paving the way for a whole new industry and a whole new way of communicating. But there was a price to pay,” she adds. “You had to accept that people assume you’re an airhead or super narcissistic.” I ask her if opinions have changed, to which she bats back, “Did you read the American Vogue piece?” Much hype surrounded Vogue.com’s rant about bloggers and street-style stars peacocking at the biannual ready-to-wear shows, or, shock horror, those in the front row. It branded them as desperate, pathetic and embarrassing. Several weighed in on the debate, but blogger Shea Marie (followers: 1 million) was quick to point out the irony of American Vogue’s most commented-on post “by a landslide” on its Instagram account: a street-style snap of her with Caroline Vreeland, both in leather jackets. The industry may dismiss them, but it must take responsibility for its part in fuelling their profiles. “I was surprised at that story,” says Camille. “Because actually I credit American Vogue’s Sarah Mower for my success – she wrote a piece for Vogue.com about this cool group of French girls living in the UK, she name-checked my blog and that was a turning point. After that, I was gold.” The ready-to-wear shows are as much a feeding frenzy for influencers as they are for editors and buyers, except their focus is largely centred on the theatre of being photographed. Everyone has to start somewhere, says influencer Pernille Teisbaek (followers: 435,000), adding, “Of course you

“You have to accept that people assume you’re an airhead or narcissistic”

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dress up for the shows – everyone does, don’t they? But I rarely wear the designer to their show any more. I used to, but it isn’t practical to change so many times a day and it feels fake; you get smarter.” It’s tricky to ascertain who is paying for what when it comes to the shows: some influencers are paid by designers to sit on their front row, but it happens less and less these days. Others self-fund their trips entirely, but most at least have travel expenses paid for by brands. “Like any startup company, during those early days you have to invest in it,” says Pernille.

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former model, and then fashion editor on a Danish magazine, Pernille started a blog, and her profile rose when she presented the fashion slot on a morning television show in Denmark. Her blog was blowing up and she asked her publisher if he would consider joining forces. He said no. “I remember thinking, ‘Who can’t see the future in this?’ He said, ‘I don’t believe in social media. You have to pick a side: stay here or leave and do your blog.’ I thought he was crazy, so I left.” She’s now busy building her own empire. Not least because, as for models, the role of the fashion influencer generally comes with an age limit, as she points out: “The idea of standing in front of a camera when I’m too old is a bit tragic.” She’s currently six months pregnant, and says it’s becoming harder to feature herself. Can she still do this job with a baby? “I’m self-employed – there’s no one paying for my maternity leave! My plan right now is to take a few weeks off, and then I’ll probably be back at it.” She’s also considering how much of that side of her life she will want to share; up until now it’s remained very private. Pernille’s days are varied. Today, she’s sitting on the judging panel for the H&M Design Award, and tomorrow she flies to Madrid for Loewe’s flagship opening (which she isn’t getting paid for, but she has collaborated with the house before, styling its Hammock bag). Typically, when at home in Copenhagen, she wakes up at 6.30am, immediately checks her phone for news (but not for emails), meditates for 15 minutes using the Headspace app, then exercises, reads her emails over breakfast and is in her office by 9am. Right now she’s working with Sportmax and Matches, so she spends her days working on content and ideas for those brands, in addition to her consultancy role on the board for Copenhagen Fashion Week. She usually posts on Instagram twice a day; like many other influencers she’s closed her blog due to dwindling traffic, or rather, traffic moving across to other platforms such as Instagram. She makes the point that with the loss of


ROGER VIVIER; KRISTA ANNA LEWIS/MAN REPELLER; CHIARA FERRAGNI; GETTY

the blog comes the loss of advertising revenue, but without the upkeep of it to worry about she has more time on her hands for new ventures, such as co-founding her own agency, Social Zoo, representing a group of younger influencers. Camille, too, has other projects in the works, including a series of podcasts that aim to shed light on areas of the fashion industry, produced by Stephen Fry’s team. But there’s no denying that for the moment, it’s brand alliances that pay the rent. More and more, influencers are negotiating those contracts on their own terms. When Tommy Hilfiger approached her to promote its Gigi Hadid capsule collection (from Hilfiger’s perspective, why hook up with only one influencer when you can enlist another to cross-promote it all?) she wasn’t convinced, but won’t pretend that the five-figure fee being offered wasn’t appealing. (Incidentally, she has turned down lucrative contracts before, specifically, a campaign for Macy’s worth £100,000, because she couldn’t get on board with the clothes.) “At the end of the day, I’m selling my taste and my eye – if I do things off-brand I will lose the respect.” Regardless, she looked at the Hilfiger collection: cartoony hamburger patches on denim didn’t resonate with her French aesthetic, so she went back to them and asked if they would allow her to do it her way. “I approached it like a consultancy job. I sourced the photographer and I art-directed it all to create a fashion shoot that most would think doesn’t look typically like Hilfiger.” She staged it on the streets and balconies of Paris and styled it up à la Balenciaga/Vetements, layering a slip dress over Hilfiger’s sweatshirt. “They paid a lot, and I delivered a lot. There has to be return on investment for them, there will be people in that office looking at those statistics as they roll in; they will be gauging the results of click-throughs that come via me.” Which in turn, Camille can track, too: “My engagement on that project was through the roof. I got 9,000 likes on an Instagram post of a pair of jeans with a palm tree patch on them.” For a successful influencer, integrity is everything. “I won’t compromise,” she says. “I won’t do head-to-toe, that’s not my job – get a model to do that.” The projects that are turned down are perhaps more crucial than those agreed to. A good agent will see past dollar signs and help strategise. “Tiffany could come along with a great offer, but if your dream is to work with Cartier, then maybe you say no to Tiffany,” explains Camille. “I achieved my goals thanks to all the nos that I gave, which was difficult at the beginning of my career, but now I recognise how important it was to turn down so many

offers,” says 29-year-old blogger turned businesswoman Chiara Ferragni (followers: 7.7 million). Known as the Blonde Salad, she is the world’s most popular fashion blogger – she has even had a Harvard MBA case study written about her. Ferragni has gone on to launch e-commerce on her own blog, selling exclusive product that she has co-designed with brands such as MSGM and Olympia Le-Tan in addition to her own shoe line, Chiara Ferragni Collection, which is stocked in more than 300 stores. It’s a huge business built from little more than the desire of someone on the outside looking in, a blog, and a series of Instagram posts. “I need to Insta,” admits Camille. “You get used to the likes and the validation that comes with it. It makes you feel good, there’s no point denying it. I’m addicted to my phone, it’s scary,” she says, suddenly realising how unhinged it all sounds. “I have a pool in my building in London that I use once in a while. Last time, I left my phone on the side, and all I could think about was this countdown to when I could look at it again, to check messages, Whatsapp, emails, Instagram. I was thinking, ‘In six minutes I can look at my phone, in four minutes, in two minutes…’ and so on. I thought, ‘Holy fuck, what have I done to my brain?’ If my phone dies during the day I will walk into Apple and buy a charger because I can’t cope with it being dead. It’s a physical addiction.” Camille is single and says her job is partly to blame. “I bounce around the world, I’m never here because my career is my priority, but it’s very insular. It can be lonely. Also,” she adds, “the element of make-believe that comes with it can really screw you up. When my career took off, my personal life was shit. I was going through a break-up and felt completely empty inside. You’re filtering your life to make it look a certain way. It isn’t your life; you’re creating a version of your life to appeal to other people. You’re not a model or an actress; you’re being you, and yet it isn’t you. You have to know how to give enough to be appealing, but not give enough so it takes over your real life, and that’s a hard balance.” She continues: “Look, everything in fashion is a trend, but with a job like this you feel like you’re a trend and at any moment it could stop. The media and those following you, they are the ones choosing to put you in this position. So it isn’t about you, it’s about who is choosing to let you do it. I don’t have control over that. So why me? I know I’m not the hottest, the coolest or the best writer – I’m just the one who decided to do it.” As one marketing executive surmises: “Even the most successful influencers, they’re just girls who were desperate to be part of the industry. Nothing more.” Q

Above: Amber Venz Box promoting her Rewardstyle programme at Shanghai Fashion Week. Right: Sofia Sanchez de Betak in Roger Vivier’s s/s ’17 campaign

Sold out Man Repeller blogger Leandra Medine curated her own edit for Matchesfashion. com’s Shop With initiative

Above: Chiara Ferragni draws the paparazzi at Paris Fashion Week. Left: Ferragni – aka the Blonde Salad – wearing Dior in her hotel bathroom

140k likes #theblondesalad goestonewyork


The sun and the reign

Her character in Versailles is eclipsed by the egomaniacal Sun King, Louis XIV – but off screen, Elisa Lasowski burns fiercely bright, finds Olivia Marks Photographs by Scott Trindle Styled by Verity Parker

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The black leather jacket goes uptown and tailored for spring: all it needs now is a frosting of crystals to set it singing Leather jacket, ÂŁ2,565. Crystal brooches, from ÂŁ600 each. All Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello. Hair: Syd Hayes. Make-up: Lucy Burt. Nails: Jenny Longworth. Production: Rosco Production. Set design: Thomas Petherick

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“The glamorous side of my work is fairly new,” says Lasowski. “I’m an actress, so the relationship with clothes is about transformation” White V-neck sweater, £2,420. Black and white beaded crêpe-de-Chine slip dress, to order. Leather sneakers, £520. All Chanel

Shirting’s easy urban update? Let it hang louche, and add Valentino’s gently gritty leather camisole Cotton shirt, £610. Leather camisole top, £1,585. Satin trousers, £880. Drop earrings, £290. All Valentino

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No one is better placed than Dolce & Gabbana to deliver a dose of wardrobe exuberance: play off jewelled delights with carefully distressed denim Jewelled jacquard jacket, from £14,870. Embroidered denim jeans, from £765. Both Dolce & Gabbana. Cotton T-shirt, £60, Sunspel. For stockists, all pages, see Vogue Information

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mouth on its release last year, across the Channel controversy was less centred on the rampant activity between the royal sheets and more on the fact it was filmed in English. “People like to make a fuss and love to be outraged. They seek it, it’s more fun. In France, they were like, ‘How dare they, it’s our history! Louis XIV was French, he should be played by a French actor,’” laughs Lasowski. “The idea that history only belongs to one particular country is ridiculous. The courts were completely international, so why not have a coproduction and an international cast?” Indeed. The first 10-part series, which cost around £26 million to make and is thought to be France’s most expensive, has now been sold across the globe, so clearly

e was the sun and she was the shadow,” says Elisa Lasowski of Louis XIV and his long-suffering wife, Queen Marie-Thérèse. It’s a fair, if melancholic, description of the Sun King’s marriage to the Spanish Infanta. And Lasowski should know – she has spent the past two years researching and inhabiting the queen’s world for the sumptuous, multimillion-pound BBC series Versailles. “They worked well as a partnership. He had respect for her as royalty, as a queen. But not as a woman or his wife.” Stripped of the bespoke jewel-toned corsets and vertiginous wig she wears for work, Lasowski cuts a low-key figure in the Soho restaurant where we’re having breakfast. She has the frame and long, elegant limbs of a trained dancer – a body and ability she likely inherited from her tapdancing Polish grandfather. Today, her inkyblack hair is tied back from her fresh, make-up-free face, and she has paired jeans with a well-worn white T-shirt, a practical Puffa jacket and rucksack thrown over an empty chair. Certainly she looks less regal than her on-screen persona, but no less lovely. The series, a British-FrenchCanadian co-production, follows the Top: Elisa as the queen of France in Versailles, alongside early, stormy reign of a young Louis George Blagden as Louis XIV. Above: as the mysterious XIV and the decadent goings-on in moon maiden in David Bowie’s “Blackstar” video his courts. But, as with all period dramas, how much is fact and how much is, the collaboration between countries has well, fiction, is a fuzzy, blurred line. If there’s paid off. And if anyone is au fait with the one thing that the show’s creators have kept benefits of leading an international life, true to the time, then surely it’s the sex – it’s Lasowski. Born in France, she grew up specifically the sheer amount of it that went in the Netherlands with a stint in north on, with little care for who you were doing Africa and has spent the past 12 years in it with or who knew about it. “Of course, sex London, although she also calls Amsterdam sells, but I think in Versailles it is part of the and Paris home. Her background is story as well,” says Lasowski, who actually reflected in her soft, pan-European accent, plays one of the more chaste characters in in which she answers questions thoughtfully, the show, although there is an early scene meditatively – it does not come as a surprise with a dwarf that hints at her “darknesses”. that one of the aspects of acting she “Mistresses and religion; morality and likes best is the hours of reading and debauchery: those are the themes of the research it requires to get inside a role. For show, so it makes sense that sex is in there.” Versailles, Lasowski spent days in the While Versailles’ full-frontal displays of British Library, finding out as much about lasciviousness had Britain frothing at the Marie-Thérèse as she could. SCOTT TRINDLE

“The appeal of London was the theatrical tradition and the desire to be in an environment that was multicultural, because that’s where I came from,” says Lasowski of her decision to settle in the capital. “I went to a school where every single one of my friends was half something and half something else. They were from all over the world.” No prizes, then, for guessing how she felt after the referendum result last summer. “It’s heartbreaking,” she says, shaking her head over her bowl of black rice and coconut milk. “To vote against the spirit of diversity and togetherness is pretty insane.” Lasowski clearly feels an affinity with Britain: her career has, thus far, been largely carved in British arthouse films and television, from Shane Meadows’s Somers Town and the gritty, London-set Hyena to parts in Skins and Line of Duty. “We’re definitely in a very good position working in TV nowadays. You don’t get pigeonholed into being a ‘TV actor’ – quite on the contrary. It opens doors to other things.” One such being her role as a tailtoting creature in David Bowie’s valedictory music video, “Blackstar”. “It was very secretive,” Lasowski says of receiving the casting call. “There was only so much they could tell me, but they said ‘You’ll have a tail and walk around the moon’. I said ‘Great, I’m there’.” She didn’t get to meet the musician, owing to his illness, but still felt “honoured to tell a bit of that final story”. Then there’s her burgeoning relationship with the fashion industry – specifically with Chanel, for whom she has modelled in several shoots and been a front-row guest. “The more glamorous side of my work is fairly new,” says Lasowski, who seems slightly bemused, albeit grateful, at the attention from the French fashion house. “I think like most women I love clothes, but I’m an actress, so the relationship with clothes is costumes, it’s about transformation.” When she is not in a wig and corset for work, Lasowski likes to keep her wardrobe neutral, as if waiting to don her next character. She’s played prostitutes in Game of Thrones and David Cronenberg’s Eastern Promises, so you can see why being typecast might be a concern. But Lasowski insists the women in Versailles, especially in the second series, are much more than mere objects to be enjoyed by men. “It’s still male-driven – as it would have been at the time and how the world largely still is today, although that is changing. But they are interesting female parts. We play full people, not just a representation of a male fantasy.” Q 329


“Stately scene: Chatsworth, where this summer’s most sensational dance will be held… marking the 21st birthday of the Marquess of Hartington, heir to the Duke of Devonshire,” wrote Vogue in June 1965. “There’ll be 800 guests, a train to take them from London, and back at dawn.” The caption accompanied this image of Jean Shrimpton – in diamonds and Dior – shot by David Bailey on the south lawn


Cache in the attic When Laura Burlington decided to search the Chatsworth storerooms for a christening gown for her son, she also found five centuries of fashion… and an exhibition was born. By Violet Henderson

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ometime before 1932, Adele Astaire, Fred’s elder sister and, for a while, his celebrated dance partner, first visited Chatsworth. A uniformed butler showed her into one of the many grand staterooms, and there, at its furthest end, a phalanx of po-faced Cavendish women waited – if not exactly to welcome Astaire, then at least to receive her. After all, an American! an actress! a dancer! would not have been their own first choice of belle for Charles, heir apparent to the Duchy of Devonshire and its many estates, including the jewel among them – the jewel among all British houses – Chatsworth. Picking up on the distinct chill emanating from across the room, Astaire (a woman of tiny proportions who liked to wear manly Mainbocher suits) sprang from her feet to her hands and cartwheeled over to meet them. “It was certainly an icebreaker! They loved her after that,” says Laura Burlington, who had no need to resort to acrobatics when she first met her own in-laws, Chatsworth’s current incumbents, the 12th Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Laura, a former model, stylist and seamstress for the young Roland Mouret, is sitting before me in a vividly blue drawing room, her

herringbone Balenciaga jacket discarded over her knee, heavy-duty lace-up Louboutin boots crossed politely. Outside, through 18th-century windows edged in gold, Chatsworth’s Emperor Fountain projects a quill of water – once the highest in the world, it was created to make an impression on Tsar Nicholas I. But, for now, Laura is focused on Astaire’s short entry into Chatsworth’s long history, which began in 1553 at the behest of the redoubtable Bess of Hardwick, a woman who amassed four husbands in her lifetime, one of whom was fortuitously a Cavendish. Astaire, says Laura, soon married Charles, but she neither became the Duchess nor moved into Chatsworth, as he died before inheriting the title. Nevertheless, Laura did discover a little of the dancer stowed away in the house that was never to be her home. In the bedroom where she always slept, in some long-closed drawers, were her old copies of Vogue, annotated with her handwritten comments. “How charming!” she exclaimed beside a snap of Noël Coward in the society section. They had not seen daylight for more than 80 years. This spring, Astaire’s copies of Vogue, a handful of her formal portraits and a short film of her dancing (the only reel of her > 331


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round 365 average-sized threebedroom houses could fit inside Chatsworth, according to Deborah “Debo” Devonshire, the wife of the 11th Duke and youngest of the Mitford sisters, who died in 2014 and whose inimitable style saw her segue from dramatic Oscar de la Renta to prim tweed suits. Laura was acutely aware that calibrating Chatsworth’s fashion was not a task for one person, so she called up her friend Hamish Bowles, American Vogue’s international editor-at-large and connoisseur of couture. She knew Bowles from her modelling days; he had once dressed her in Vivienne

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Westwood, she had fainted, “and he had been so delightful about it”. Bowles was thrilled by the project that Laura mooted, but, after seeing for himself its magnitude, he insisted the costume historian and exhibition curator Patrick Kinmonth and his creative partner Antonio Monfredo join the party. A team was born. “The size of the exhibition today owes so much to how big Patrick dreamt,” says Laura. We are now standing in the house’s Baroque chapel, where, beneath the white marble altarpiece, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire once knelt to say her prayers. Her marital arrangements are some of the most famous in British history: she lived in Chatsworth with both her husband, the 5th Duke, and his girlfriend, her close

“Hubert de Givenchy told me not to make it all about couture and grand things” friend Lady Elizabeth Foster. Under House Style’s guise the chapel will be a meditation on life and death, beginning with those fateful christening gowns, ending with a selection of historic mourning clothes. A further 25 of Chatsworth’s staterooms will be made use of, with more than a hundred mannequins employed, displayed in 10ft-high curved-glass cabinets. It promises all the showmanship of the V&A’s 2015 sell-out Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty, all the intellectual frisson of Valentino: Master of Couture (another of Kinmonth’s feats of execution). As he later tells me over the telephone, “I took inspiration from the present Duke and Duchess, who have introduced so much contemporary art and sculpture to Chatsworth. I wanted this exhibition to reflect that, to be modern in its presentation.” There will be a room devoted to punk, another devoted to gold. Dominating the long South Sketch Gallery will be an image – shot by Mario Testino for the May 2006 issue of American Vogue – of Stella Tennant in a dress worthy of Georgiana, and beside it the pale green gown she wears in the picture, on loan from Dior. Close by, Elizabeth I will look equally resplendent, standing in a portrait of 1592, swathed in an ornate gown given to her by her dear friend Bess of Hardwick, and beside her will be another version of the gown, as reimagined by Alessandro Michele. (Gucci is House

Style’s principal sponsor, a relationship that began last year when Glen Luchford photographed the label’s 2017 cruise collection in the house and grounds.) Using historic photographs as reference, the jeweller CW Sellors is remaking a lost headdress of ostrich feathers, amethysts and pearls that once crowned Duchess Louise for the 1897 Devonshire House Ball, which she threw with the 8th Duke in London to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. Chatsworth still has the dress, a chartreuse and ivory concoction embroidered with fine 19th-century bling and a sweeping train, made for the Duchess by the House of Worth. The party was themed: Duchess Louise wore this dress as costume, she was Zenobia, the warrior Queen of Palmyra. In fact, the Devonshire House Ball’s fancy-dress code induced social hysteria: the British Library, overrun by young women seeking to research historical costume, had to turn them away. And yet for all its big production, House Style promises to have a great deal of charm. An attribute that, says Laura, owes much to Hubert de Givenchy: she met him in Paris to talk not only about the exhibition but also his relationship to Debo, for whom he made so many clothes. “He told me not to make it all about couture and grand things – personal things, he said, are as important as great craftsmanship – and that I should look for Andrew Devonshire’s embroidered slippers.” Reworked and repatched a hundred times, these slippers, which were eventually discovered in the archives, say much about the Devonshires’ situation after the Second World War when, following the unexpected deaths of both Andrew’s brother and father, Andrew suddenly found himself with a dukedom and an inheritance-tax bill that amounted to 80 per cent of the estate’s total value. Land was sold, art handed over, every iota of energy went to keeping Chatsworth in the family and not as a Derbyshire offshoot of the V&A, which was a very real threat. In a letter discovered in the archives, it is noted that the ermine on the ducal gowns is getting a bit dog-eared – but, of course, ermine is prohibitively expensive. Could, perhaps, Debo solve the situation by rearing some white rabbits? The writer Charlotte Mosley remembers another instance of the Duke and Duchess’s make-do-and-mend approach. They were sitting together to watch a nativity play, when an angel entered in a beautiful gown. Debo turned to her, thrilled, and whispered conspiratorially, “The angel is wearing my old Givenchy.” Q “House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth” will be at Chatsworth House from March 25 until October 22

CECIL BEATON ARCHIVE; DEVONSHIRE COLLECTION; MARIO TESTINO; THOMAS LOOF

dancing that still exists) will be displayed at Chatsworth alongside other sartorial jewels, including the 7th Duke’s first shoe (dated 1808) and Stella Tennant’s nose ring (famously captured by Steven Meisel for Vogue’s December 1993 story “Anglo-Saxon Attitude”) in Chatsworth’s first fashion exhibition, House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth. “Everyone knows about the Hans Holbein the Younger, the Gainsboroughs, the Reynolds that are here,” says Laura. “I hope that this exhibition will bring a new audience to Chatsworth.” Six years ago, even the Cavendishes, a family of historic collectors, were not aware of the full extent of the fashion that they owned. Laura only guessed at it when she went looking for a christening gown for her eldest son, a search that began with a knock on the door of the house’s textile department – if anything is a barometer of grandeur, it is surely this. A member of its full-time staff led her through the bowels of the building into a windowless storeroom, just one of dozens. From a shelf packed with many long white boxes, down came a long white box, and inside it were not one but tens of robes, wrapped in tissue paper each with tantalising handwritten labels: “Christening robe made for Nancy Mitford by her mother Lady Redesdale in 1907. Also worn by her brothers and sisters.” Laura was delighted. “My first thought was, what else is there here?” she says. “I was desperate to look inside.” Laura knew from experience that this was a family that liked to dress. It was only in 2004, after the current Duke and Duchess took up residence, that the tradition of changing into black tie for every dinner was relaxed. While the 11th Duke – considered a dandy at Cambridge University before the austerity of war curtailed his spending (just a little) – very literally expressed himself through his clothes: he had made for himself 22 navy jumpers, each of them bearing one of his slogans: “All passion spent”, “Never argue with a Cadogan”, “Never marry a Mitford” (which, of course, he did).


Mario Testino’s image of Stella Tennant in Dior Haute Couture will appear – alongside the gown itself – in the South Sketch Gallery, which will be themed “the Georgiana Effect”

A late-19th-century christening robe, worn by the 11th Duke of Devonshire and successive generations of the Cavendish family Left: Adele Astaire and Cecil Beaton in 1931. Adele, sister of Fred Astaire and wife of the second son of the 9th Duke of Devonshire, cartwheeled her way into the Cavendish women’s affections. Below: the 11th Duke’s silk Turnbull & Asser pyjamas and oft-worn, much-repaired John Lobb slippers. Right: the Duke in one of his bespoke jumpers


VOGUEbeauty SHORT stories THE SEASON’S STANDOUT LOOK IS CUT AND DRIED, SAYS NICOLA MOULTON hort hair is having a moment. There are many reasons, but the main one appears to be this: it just doesn’t seem that big a deal any more. Gone are the days when, if you were a model, a radical haircut involved meetings, moodboards and an appointment planned around next season’s campaigns. Gone, even, are the days of the career-changing cut, when visionary hairstylists such as Guido, Sam McKnight and Eugene Souleiman could send a model’s profession into the ascendancy simply by lopping off her hair: think Agyness Deyn’s blonde crop, Ruth Bell’s buzzcut and Peyton Knight’s pageboy. Now, for a model,

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having your hair cut is entirely unremarkable: this season, seven girls, including Cara Taylor and Amber Rose Witcomb, had their hair shorn into the Bloomsbury-style bob backstage at Prada, while at Alexander Wang no fewer than 18 models (Alexandra Elizabeth, Ysaunny Brito and Impy among them) were given a Seventies surf-inspired shaggy bob. And it’s not just models making the cut. A new generation of actresses – Lily Collins, Nora Zehetner, Millie Bobby Brown, Katherine Waterston and actress and Vogue cover girl Lily-Rose Depp – are finding shorter hair is a red-carpet standout. “It adds a coolness that you just don’t get any more in those long, beachy tonged waves,” says Larry King, whose new South Kensington salon is becoming a go-to for the “done/undone” crop. He believes the trend is in part an example of fashion’s new androgyny: “Now we see girls with boyish crops and boys with Alexa hair,” he says, but it is also simply a matter of practicality: “So many girls went for that long bob recently. Going shorter is the natural evolution of that.”

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“Now we see girls with boyish crops and boys with Alexa hair”

Partly as a result, salons are moving away from blow-dries and championing the return of bolder haircuts, too, devising menus to make finding the right haircut easier. Luke Hersheson, a hairdresser who has been championing the “return of the cut” for some time now, has a new “thickening haircut” service aimed, mostly, at women who have spent years bleaching and are now looking for ways to create the illusion of thicker, weightier hair. “It’s an evolution of a Seventies shag and builds in a complex structure of layers, creating

mass in the mane,” says Scott Ade, the hairdresser who designed the cut. At Daniel Galvin’s salons, a new Cuts for Curls menu tackles the age-old problem of creating a defined shape in unruly hair, while George Northwood’s Curated Cuts menu ingeniously divides a haircut into four parts: choose your fringe, your length, your texture and your base and ends from an array of options. So are you ready for the chop? Turn the page to see why going for it might be the easiest hair decision you’ve ever made. > 335


VOGUEbeauty The short and curly

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Possibly our favourite short cut is when it is combined with a riot of curls. The model muses: Dilone, whose hair was the standout at so many spring shows, Damaris Goddrie, Afrodita Dorado, Ari Westphal and Renata Scheffer. In fact, the cuts are all quite different: Damaris’s verges on a conventional shoulder-length bob; Renata’s is shaped classically around the ears; Dilone’s embraces the new “man cut” – long on top and short everywhere else. More than any of the others, this look requires a great technical cut (see Daniel Galvin’s Cuts for Curls menu) and choice products: try Bumble & Bumble Texture Cream, £23; Aveda Be Curly Style Prep, £21.50; and John Frieda Dream Curls Curl Perfector, £5.99.

Short fringe, long hair Still wedded to long hair? A micro-fringe is a new play on proportion, seen here on models Lululeika Liep (above left) and Maria Clara (above right). Wear in a flat colour (no high- or lowlights) with strong brows.

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Cream of the crop, from top: Damaris Goddrie, Dilone, Afrodita Dorado, Renata Scheffer, Isabella Emmack and Ari Westphal

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NEW WAYS TO DETOX HAIR

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MY SHORT-HAIR LIFE

EDIE CAMPBELL Guido usually cuts my hair. I just wait until I’m working with him or he comes over for the Christopher Kane show or something. I use stuff from this great Paris salon called David Mallett – it’s so nice. In the summer you can sit on the balcony and let your hair cook in the sun and have a coffee. He has really good products, a great salt spray and an excellent volume spray. Then I just put a bit of serum on the ends.

What used to be thought of as hair’s annoying in-between stage is now an end in itself: you can have it cut to make it look as if it’s growing out with an over-long fringe and apparently haphazard layers, as seen on Julia Nobis, Jamie Bochert and Arizona Muse. Push hair over to one side to create asymmetry and tap into the Eighties trend; or pin one side back but leave the other loose for a pleasingly off-kilter look.

DAVID MALLETT HAIR SERUM, £50, AT NETA-PORTER. COM DAVID MALLETT AUSTRALIAN SALT SPRAY, £25, AT NET-APORTER.COM

Short hair is prone to styling-product build-up, as the shorter layers can be harder to clean thoroughly. Try the new micellar shampoos; their formulations bind molecules together more easily than conventional shampoos, offering exceptionally deep but extremely gentle cleansing. In addition, Kérastase has launched an in-salon service that borrows technology from its sister brand Clarisonic – a special cleansing device to deep-clean the scalp at the backwash. (It also seems to keep roots oil-free for longer.) Visit Kerastase.co.uk for salons

CHARLES WORTHINGTON MICELLAR SHAMPOO, £5.99

KERASTASE BAIN MICELLAIRE SHAMPOO, £20

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MY SHORT-HAIR LIFE

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Any hairdresser will tell you that a major difference between long and short hair is that shorter styles require you to consider every angle. Change the length at the back, and you need to think about the front. Emphasise the crown, and the temples need changing. And so on. This season, it’s a good time to be thinking about upping your profile, as Sam McKnight proved when he bedecked the sides of models’ heads at Fendi with studs and spikes. Considering how your hair works round the ears (hairdressers and physiologists call it the “temporal area”) is as important as how it works at the front: can you tuck it behind your ears? Should you, as with Lara Mullen, have sideburns shaped in a V? Or, like the models at Armani, will one ear be on show, the other concealed?

ISABEL MARANT

The perfect profile

The spike

REDKEN SHAPE FACTOR 22, £13

TRESEMME KERATIN SMOOTH BEAUTIFYING OIL, £6.99

THE SHORT-HAIR KIT LIST

PANTENE VITAMIN E DRY OIL, £3.99

CHRISTOPHE ROBIN INTENSE REGENERATING BALM, £29

L’OREAL PROFESSIONNEL TECNI ART DUAL STYLERS BOUNCY & TENDER, £11.95

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JOHN FRIEDA SEA WAVES SEA SALT SPRAY, £6.99

GUTTER CREDIT PAUL BOWDEN; PIXELATE.BIZ JAMES COCHRANE;

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The newest super-short crops look less elfin than spiky, removing all hints of femininity from the hair: it’s boyish hair minus the “ish”. The differences are in the way the styling cues come from men’s, rather than women’s, haircuts – short fringes are worn forward rather than swept to the side, sideburns are left to grow around the ears and the “short back and sides” approach means there’s barely anything left to grow at the nape of the neck. To make the statement more emphatic, these mannish styles are being worn in strong, monotone colours. The model Ruth Bell, whose grade-one buzzcut was a talking point last season, has been wearing hers longer on top this season, in a sort of teddy-boy quiff. Other muses are Vetements stylist Lotta Volkova and models Litay Marcus and Shujing Zhou.

I’ve had short hair since my early twenties. With short hair, you’re always on a ONIRA journey; you’re thinking ORGANICS THE MASK, about the back, the front, £60 the length, the sides and always looking for balance. When I was modelling full-time, I felt pressure to keep my hair short. It was my thing. My hairdresser, Raphael Salley, cuts it dry. I think that’s the best way with short hair because you can watch the movement and see how it falls. I’ve never used conditioner, but now my hair’s the longest it’s ever been – shoulder length – I use the Onira hair mask. Onira is all organic but very luxurious. Its founder, Jessica Pires, is French – she also has chic, short hair!


Terre de Lumière he New Fragrance


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VOGUEbeauty

Learning the ROBES IS THERE SUCH A THING AS THE PERFECT BATHROBE, NICOLA MOULTON WONDERS miling out from the cover of his 2014 album Girl and surrounded by a bevy of models, all of them clad in white towelling robes, Pharrell Williams has the contented demeanour of a man who could quite easily, should the fancy take him, cancel all appointments and spend the day wearing nothing but his bathrobe. Enviable, one might think. But, for me, the notion is problematic. The perfect bathrobe (or, indeed, dressing gown) evades me, and has done my entire life. I envy those such as Vogue’s fashion features editor, Ellie Pithers, whose red Arsenal dressing gown has been a loyal friend since the age of 16. For me, a bathrobe is always too… something. Too hot, too cold, too bulky, too scratchy, too long, too short, too fleecy, too fancy. And for a beauty editor, for whom the art of bathing is a matter of professional pride, it’s a problem. It really is. Around 15 years ago, I went to the Kenzo spa in Paris. It is one of those high-concept, futuristic places of which the French are inordinately fond. Called La Bulle (the bubble), its treatments take place in round pods within which you can have intriguing

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and slightly otherworldly body therapies, using rice scrubs and milk baths. Back then, the robes that they gave you were equally high concept. On the outside they looked like beige linen kimonos, but the inside was lined with the sort of plush faux fur of which teddy bears are made, and seemed to hug you with similar devotion. So reluctant was I to take mine off, I think I may even have bought the one I was wearing. Back in London,

Once hair is dry, I think we enter dressing-gown territory however, it soon transpired that it weighed as much as a small child. Another dis-robe. Because as well as cocooning, a robe needs to be practical. Sumptuous yet serviceable, pampering yet practical. For me, there’s a difference between a bathrobe and a dressing gown. The former, unsurprisingly, is the one you put on after the bath (or, yes, shower). It needs to be thick, warm and somewhat absorbent. How absorbent, though, is open

to debate: I was shocked to discover, in the course of researching this piece, how many people don their bathrobe while still soaking wet, skipping the towel-drying stage completely. This has never been my MO. For me, a bathrobe is post-towel but prehair drying. Once hair is dry, I think we enter “dressing gown” territory. These are thinner, and to my mind should have more personality. Colour, print, an interesting back story pertaining to its procurement on some amazing trip – that’s what I want from a dressing gown. The bathrobe du jour is the one found at Oxfordshire’s Soho Farmhouse. It is made for them by the fabled linen company Frette, and is a soft sea-green colour in a sort of spun fleece that feels like velvet. Its trick is that it is both exceptionally light yet incredibly warm. Practically everyone I know who’s been there has bought one (including me). It was designed with the spas in mind, so doesn’t have pockets (people often remove jewellery before treatments, put it in their dressinggown pocket and then forget to take it out again) and the belt is sewn on so that it > 341


VOGUEbeauty doesn’t get lost in the washing machine (a detail of which I approve), but I mark it down for its hood, something I always find bulky and unnecessary. And if I’m honest, I like my bathrobes white, which adds to the “home spa” vibe – although there are exceptions, such as the classic Missoni printed towelling robes. But don’t even mention waffle, which is an aberration introduced from America and still sends my estimation of very good New York hotels plummeting when I find one in the bathroom. For five happy winters I had a long grey cashmere wrap from M&S, which became a sort of dressing gown with benefits. It saw me through two maternity leaves, during both of which it was removed so infrequently that I’d probably have to calculate its cost per wear using Monopoly money. It was cosseting enough to make night feeds almost bearable, yet chic enough to answer the door in. But even that wasn’t perfect. It had bell-shaped sleeves, which you couldn’t roll up and which got wet every time you washed your face, and the belt wasn’t stitched on so it was forever going missing. It was also, if I’m honest, a bit… grey. Because there’s something about this garment that, if it’s doing its job right, should herald the advent of a great day or evening ahead. It should radiate positivity. In outfit terms, it’s

the one before the one. It should not, therefore, limp apologetically towards the main event like a sort of bad support act. I like the idea of a cashmere robe because I’m always cold. Brora’s silvery cashmere robe is a joy, as is the one by Harrods, which comes in a variety of lengths. Now M&S’s offerings come under its Rosie Huntington-Whiteley collection, but weirdly hers comes with a satin belt, as if it can’t make up its mind whether it’s trying to be girl-next-door or glamourpuss. Perhaps, like Rosie, you can be both. Because a good dressing gown should

The right dressing gown should herald the advent of a great day or evening. It should radiate positivity definitely allow you to assume a different role. My fantasy dressing-gown life is the one offered up by the Toast catalogue, in which a girl in an interesting robe will have found herself in a disused Welsh barn at daybreak on a Sunday morning, possibly throwing some clay pots. They could conceivably be described as “boyfriend” dressing gowns. Merci also sits under this category, with a beautiful washed-linen robe that comes in everything

from the softest eau de nil to the brightest acid yellow. Recently I bought Toast’s delft flannel gown, made from warm brushed cotton, long enough to graze the ankles and floral on one side, stripy on the other. Still, no one gets the sleeves right, and even if you turn the cuffs back, they are still too draughty. Others prefer those ankle-length silk dressing gowns that call to mind Greta Garbo. Gillian Anderson gave good dressing gown in the recent series of The Fall, the silk robe having replaced the silk shirt as her sartorial expression of latent sexuality. The queen of these is French designer Carine Gilson, whose exquisite silk gowns have such a couture sensibility that she shows them on the runway. Olivia von Halle is a nightwear designer attempting to bridge the gap between retro glamour and modern practicality. She calls herself a “dressing-gown obsessive”, and has forged a new niche for silk robes inspired by “those worn by debonair gentlemen in the Roaring Twenties”. But best of all, her conviction is that dressing gowns should never be confined to the bedroom. “Ours look just as good the morning after, heading out to brunch over jeans and a white tank for a restorative bloody Mary,” she says. Maybe that’s where I’ve been going wrong all these years. After all, when in robe… Q

UNDER WRAPS The perfect bathrobe or dressing gown can be elusive. Let Vogue be your guide

P LE MOULT COTTON, FROM £175

LA PERLA SILK, £279

SOHO HOME TOWELLING, £55

MISSONI HOME TOWELLING, £188, AT AMARA.COM OLIVIA VON HALLE SILK, £650, AT MYTHERESA.COM

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TOAST COTTON, £125


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HOURGLASS AMBIENT LIGHTING POWDER IN DIFFUSED LIGHT, £40 A clever powder that imitates a flattering light upon the skin. At Libertylondon.com

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN NAILS IN LOUBI CHROME, £36 The shimmering colour of this polish will leave you mesmerised

MAC STROBE CREAM IN REDLITE, £24.50 Do not be fooled by its creamy colour; red shimmer pigments appear when in contact with skin

GIVENCHY HYDRA SPARKLING MOISTURIZING & EMBELLISHING FOAM MASK, £40 A mask with a twist: its foam solidifies on the skin

UBTECH ALPHA 1S HUMANOID ROBOT, £399, AT HARRODS.COM. PAUL BOWDEN

OPI PLUMPING VOLUMIZING TOP COAT, £14.50 Creates a gel-like effect with a high-gloss finish on any nail polish

3INA THE CREAM EYESHADOW IN 301, £8.95 Apply thinly for a glimmer, or layer for highly pigmented block colour

YSL BABY DOLL KISS & BLUSH STROBING CREAM, £25 Gives sparkle to lips and subtly highlights cheeks

CHANEL LE TOP COAT IN BLACK METAMORPHOSIS, £20 Use to add richness to your nail colour

ILLAMASQUA POWDER EYESHADOW IN CASCADE, £16.50 Swipe the white powder across your eyelids and watch it turn an iridescent blue

NIOD MASTIC MUST MASK, £27 Use like a normal face mask but dry with a hairdryer for extra glow

TEMPLE SPA TRUFFLESQUE ULTRA HYDRATION & RADIANCE MASK, £50 A richly infused, golden anti-ageing treatment that becomes solid gold when dry

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VOGUEbeauty ELIZABETH ARDEN CERAMIDE CAPSULES DAILY YOUTH RESTORING SERUM, £39

VOTARY SUPER SEED FACIAL OIL, £70

OILIXIA EXPLORER BLEND FACIAL OIL, £43

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t’s igniting debate among makeup artists, dermatologists and beauty editors alike. It’s flooding social media (one vlog by Instagram superstar Huda Kattan has garnered close to three million views). It’s cheap, it’s easy and is said to brighten the skin. It’s also a tiny bit frightening. Introducing dermaplaning: the world’s weirdest skincare trend. It may sound modern, scientific and intriguing, but in reality it is simply the clinical name for shaving – yes, shaving your face to exfoliate the top layer of dead skin cells and increase the efficacy of skincare products. Don’t reach for that Gillette Venus just yet, though. Dermaplaning is usually done with a sterile, supersharp, single blade held at a 45-degree angle and followed by a skin-soothing oil. “It sounds scary because it involves a blade,” says Dr Colbert, one of New York’s most respected dermatologists, “but it needn’t be.” Advocates say it is often less inflammatory than products that upset the skin’s pH level and more abrasive treatments such as microneedling, and point out that the treatment also whips off any unwanted peachfuzz, leaving skin ultra-smooth and perfectly prepped for make-up, so it

ESTEE LAUDER ADVANCED NIGHT REPAIR INTENSIVE RECOVERY AMPOULES, £86

Shaving FACE THE LATEST BIG SKINCARE TREND IS TRULY CUTTING EDGE, SAYS LOTTIE WINTER takes on an “airbrushed” finish. As for the old wives’ tale that shaving makes your hair grow back twice as fast and twice as thick, clearly no one told them that facial fuzz is vellus hair – rather than the dark, thick terminal hair that grows elsewhere. “Shaving does not in any way cause vellus hair follicles to transform into terminal hair follicles – that’s just not possible,” explains cosmetic surgeon Dr David Jack, one of the first doctors to bring the treatment to Britain. This is all in theory, of course. In practice, it is scary – I tried it. A single blade is surprisingly sharp and even a slight flick of a heavy hand could

COLBERT MD ILLUMINO FACE OIL, £110, AT SPACENK.COM

result in disaster. Luckily for me, it didn’t, but that’s not to say it was a roaring success either. I’ve never noticed any hair on my face so was expecting more dead skin and less hair but was met with a palm full of facial fluff balls and not much else. Visually, there was little difference between the two sides (I only shaved one side of my face to be able to assess the results) and I noticed no difference when applying my foundation. My skin was smoother to the touch, though, and it was tingling afterwards, meaning that at least circulation was boosted – but I think I’ll stick to my existing skincare routine for now, thanks. Q 347


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Note PERFECT an the rose really be reinvented? Well, yes… and no. Sisley’s beautiful new perfume seeks less to redefine the industry’s most ubiquitous flower and more to capture the essence of a rare specimen. The house’s scents, like Jo Malone’s and Annick Goutal’s early fragrances, work so well because they’re governed by the tastes of one woman: Isabelle d’Ornano, to whom the company belongs and for whom perfume is a passion. Traditionally, it has only launched chypres (“because that’s what I prefer,” Isabelle explains) such as Soir de Lune and Soir d’Orient. Its new perfume, Izia, however, has all the complexity of its predecessors but wrapped around a glorious bouquet of roses. The flower in question grows around the tennis court of the family house in the Loire Valley, and was brought to France from Poland by her ancestors. “It has the most incredible scent – better than any rose I have ever smelt – but it only flowers once a year,” says Isabelle. “As soon as I know it’s blooming, I try to go straight there and bring huge bouquets back to Paris.” Q

TIM WALKER; PAUL BOWDEN; PIXELATE.BIZ. SCENT PRICES QUOTED ARE FOR SMALLEST AVAILABLE QUANTITY

SPRING IS AWASH WITH GREAT SCENTS. THEY MAY NOT BE RADICAL, BUT THEY’RE JUST RIGHT FOR NOW, SAYS NICOLA MOULTON

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NARCISO RODRIGUEZ FOR HER FLEUR MUSC, £40 TOM FORD VELVET ORCHID, £76

SISLEY IZIA, £69

DIAL IT UP Sometimes, what you want for spring isn’t a radical plunge into something new, but a little tweak on a beloved classic. The same as before only more so is the trend, and it’s easy to see why, as in the case of Dolce & Gabbana’s blockbusting Light Blue. Wearers’ biggest criticism seems to be that it doesn’t have much staying power, so in this new Intense version, it has added long-wearing oomph. Miu Miu has also taken blue as its inspiration for its new spring scent, L’Eau Bleue, which is a sparkier take on the lily of the valley original.

DOLCE & GABBANA LIGHT BLUE INTENSE, £43

CHLOE LOVE STORY EAU SENSUELLE, £47

MIU MIU L’EAU BLEUE, £49

ALL CHANGE Spring normally heralds lighter, fruitier versions of scents, but this year some of the best new variations are pinkier rather than perkier, with a raspberry makeover for Narciso Rodriguez’s signature scent, purple for Tom Ford’s new Velvet Orchid, and lipstick hues for Marc Jacobs Daisy Kiss. 348

MARC JACOBS DAISY KISS EDITION, £55

JO MALONE BLUE HYACINTH, £46 VIKTOR & ROLF MAGIC LAVENDER ILLUSION, £145

If you’d prefer something entirely new, Jo Malone’s The Bloomsbury Set collection is, for my money, its best ever limited-edition line-up, particularly the Blue Hyacinth and the Leather & Artemisia. Jo Wood is also bringing back her lovely, all-natural scents: Usiku is spicy, while Amka is citrussy. Either will put a spring in your step, or at the very least, on your wrist.

JO WOOD ORGANICS AMKA, £59

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<317 JONATHAN ANDERSON

Webster tellingly relates how, before his first job interview with Pavesi, Jonathan closely questioned him on what she was wearing at that time (her wardrobe was legendary). “I described the full pyjama outfits worn with crocodile wedges and diamond earrings. And the next day he arrived for his interview in a vintage paisley dressing-gown that he had hacked and frayed at the knee.” When I question Jonathan on his motives, he nods: “Of course, I was trying to impress her – to get the job.” It is an attention to detail that he still applies. In 2008, immediately after graduating and aged just 22, he launched his first menswear collection. Two years later, his first womenswear collection debuted in London to feverish press attention. His partnership with the then French Vogue fashion stylist Benjamin Bruno produced covetable avantgarde pieces – instant hits included the leather whip-stitched shirting, Neoprene Fifties skirts and latex-trimmed paisley pyjama suits. Crucially for sales, the designs also flattered the figure and didn’t quite break the bank. In quick succession, there followed a bestselling Topshop collaboration and a one-off collection for Versus (premiered at a flashy show in New York). And he won the prestigious emerging talent award for readyto-wear at the British Fashion Awards. In the midst of this dizzying activity, Louis Vuitton’s Delphine Arnault called. “I was living in a very peculiar house, which had a kitchen the size of this table,” he motions. “I used to get a bad phone signal, and an unknown number came up and I answered it. ‘Hello, this is Delphine Arnault. Would you be interested in meeting with me, because I was thinking, you know, would you like investment?’ I was like, OK…” “What struck me from the very beginning was that he considered his brand from a 360-degree perspective,” says Pierre-Yves Roussel of LVMH’s decision to invest. “There was a concept: he had worked on the branding and logo, and he had already brought in a cultural dimension. It was also very directional, and he was not typical – he had not been to Saint Martins; he was fearless in experimenting…” Roussel had first met Jonathan two years before, just after his second womenswear collection, when he was scouting for new creative directors at Kenzo. “I liked his way of looking at things. He had all that experience at Prada doing visual merchandising,” he says, echoing Andrew. “I followed his work from then.” In a twist of fate, Roussel was simultaneously seeking a new designer for the helm of Loewe, recently vacated by another UK designer, Stuart Vevers. It 350

was a position he openly admits that in normal circumstances he would never have considered Jonathan for. “His brand was very young, super-directional on readyto-wear, and he had zero experience on bags, so he was not the obvious fit,” he smiles, during a meeting at LVMH House in Mayfair, the day after the Fashion Awards. His languid charm belies the immense respect Roussel commands (it was he who hired Phoebe Philo for Céline). “And the job was not an easy brief,” he continues of Loewe. “It’s difficult to find a great bag designer who is also capable of being a great creative director. And it was in Spain.” But during negotiations over LVMH’s investment, he happened to mention his dilemma. And Jonathan immediately said he was interested. “It was quite amazing what he came up with,” Roussel continues, admiringly, of the presentation Jonathan gave one week later. “Not only because he touched on a lot of aspects within the brand that are difficult to pull together, but you felt that it was the beginning of a journey and you wanted to know more.” “I didn’t promise anything,” says Jonathan, restlessly tugging and pulling at the sleeves of his sweater, when I ask what he said he would deliver. “I’m very lucky because I have someone like Pierre-Yves, who I think is a bit of a reality dreamer. They had nothing to lose – bar a lot of money,” he laughs. “But Pierre-Yves trusted me, and I felt like I could go to him if I had a problem. And he let me change the logo and work on the stores, and we did things that were quite abstract with the campaigns [such as persuading Meisel to let him republish some of the photographer’s archive pictures as Loewe campaigns], and I think that level of trust is quite rare.” Jonathan is notoriously adept at collecting talent, stitching together the creativity of others to bolster his own talents and create a new whole, deftly charming anyone who will further his goals. He credits his father for this ability – “Teamwork is all about creating the right mindset. My dad was very into positive thinking. He reads people well, and that’s something I got from him.” Consultant and stylist Benjamin Bruno, the only employee to work symbiotically across both brands, likens Jonathan to Andy Warhol for his instinct for surrounding himself with fresh talent: “He likes to be in a room and gets turned on by people – he hosts their creativity because you can’t know everything. But it’s also a very benevolent relationship. And his tastes morph as he meets people.” Pascale Lepoivre, Loewe’s new CEO and former executive at Céline, said that what had impressed her most about Jonathan’s tenure was his ability “in a short period of time to

convince and inspire super-creative profiles in multiple fields, as well as skilled craftsmen and long-time Loewe collaborators.” Jonathan’s current team includes both industry titans and youthful aggravators – from Meisel to casting director Ashley Brokaw, DJ Michel Gaubert, renowned art directors Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag of M/M, and photographer Jamie Hawkesworth, who shoots all the JW Anderson campaigns. “I was photographing this guy for the magazine Man About Town, and Jonathan was styling the shoot,” recalls Hawkesworth, when asked how he’d best describe Jonathan’s talents. “And there was a piece of carpet rolled up under this man’s toe,” he continues in his low tenor. “And as I said, ‘Wow, that looks great!’ so did Jonathan. I realised we had the same sensibility. Just noticing that level of detail, I suppose.” Only later, over dinner in the Ace Hotel, after a JW Anderson Workshop held with the Ipswich-born photographer, does Jonathan admit the portrait was of a naked male porn star – there is a lot of low chuckling as the pair rummage around on Google to find the image, Jonathan constantly ribbing his friend. Admittedly, the tuft of carpet is not the first detail that catches my eye. Something else dominates that picture. Bruno is also present at the dinner, flashing white teeth in the restaurant gloom. I was meant to have sat in on a design meeting that afternoon for pre-autumn ’17, but it descended into a shouting match. There is no sign of lingering tension now. “He is the only person that I can have a screaming argument with and have the most creative day ever,” says Jonathan of the whip-thin, edgy, darkhaired Frenchman sitting beside him. “In the beginning we used to get physical,” admits Bruno, “and chase each other down the corridor, but if you pretend everything is good enough, then you are fucked! We fuel each other up,” he continues, talking, if it is possible, even faster than Jonathan does. “He doesn’t know so much about fashion,” he says with brutal honesty. “We first met at the London Showroom in Paris,” he recalls. “He just had a couple of menswear pieces and these T-shirts. But they were the most beautiful T-shirts I had ever seen. I liked his explanation of why he had done them – it was very romantic. But mostly it was that broad Irish smile making you believe anything was possible. And I wanted to be proud of us,” he finishes with another flash of teeth, adding he is “obsessed” with a new hygienist he sees in London, laughing uproariously at his own foibles. As for Jonathan, I don’t see him again. Two more meetings are cancelled, as the whirl of his schedule swallows him up. Q


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Vogue - March 2017 UK