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Work In Process


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CONTENTS

Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................4 Fast good ....................................................................................................................................................6 Mediatheque ..................................................................................................................................................20 Architectural Sketches ..................................................................................................................................................34 Navy Yards ..................................................................................................................................................36 Facade Study ..................................................................................................................................................48 Resume ..................................................................................................................................................53

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My name is Micah David McKelvey. I was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1989 and moved to Kent, Ohio in 2007 receiving a Bachelors of Science degree in Architecture from Kent State University in 2011. I want to be a part of the creation of a more inclusive world. The work in the following pages reflects an ongoing process of the construction of my design identity and an attitude of perpetual readjustment.

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FASTgooD Tasked with designing a plug-in prototype restaurant for Ferran Adria’s newest culinary venture, the Fast Good restaurant was to provide space for both fast and slow eating. Investigations began by documenting and translating a specific moment in both space and time - a quick meal between classes. This event was transcribed and translated into multiple traditional and digital medias resulting in a process of incomplete and recurring loops that informed the final prototype. The Fast Good restaurant is located at the corner of W. 25th street and Gould Ct. in Ohio City, Cleveland, Ohio.

With professor Kathryn Strand. Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design, Fall 2009.


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Meal mapping showing the progression of time in relation to the meal, people present, and body position. Original Composition, 18� x 24� Mixed media collage.

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Fast Good


Kent State University, Fall 2009

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This spread: Based on the initial investigation of site, two images of the event were selected and manipulated based on the ideas explored. Limiting the process solely to paper, a graphite clutch, and techniques of hand rendering, the ideas of restricted movement set up by the condition of the rail to the suspended ramp in an otherwise vast and open space became the primary focus.

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Fast Good


Kent State University, Fall 2009

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The process continued by scaling down one of the augmented illustrations and extending the frame to encompass a multiplicity of imagined and interconnected situations. The extended composition was then sampled and rescaled to create a diptych that attempts to bring the initial ideas back into focus. This hand rendering process also brought an experiential phenomenon of vertigo into the project. Original Composition 19�x 24� Graphite on Vellum.

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Fast Good


Kent State University, Fall 2009

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Halfway through the design process the site was introduced. Here, the site is a plug in condition in the Ohio City neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. The position angles first explored in the initial investigation generate the architecture for the restaurant prototype. First in plan, to designate the programmatic space, then in section. The tubes created recall the forms rendered in the first graphite drawings.

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Fast Good


Kent State University, Fall 2009

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This page: First Floor plan. 1 Entry 2 Dining tube 3 Bar seating 4 Bathroom 5 Kitchen 6 Mirror 7 W. 25th Street

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Opposite: Longitudinal section through dining tubes. A mirrored surface at the bottom of the tube extends the perception of the space, placing diners within a vast expanse.

Fast Good


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Kent State University, Fall 2009

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Fast Good


Above: Interior view from the ‘front of the house.’ Opposite Top: View from W. 25th heading south toward the West Side Market. Opposite Below: Looking skyward through a suspended clear polycarbonate table.

Kent State University, Fall 2009

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Mediatheque The design of a new-media library for Florence took place while living and studying in the city as part of a semester study abroad experience. The over arching programmatic function for the mediatheque required that the new building become an asset to the city at large as well as a contemporary forum for the public life of the city. The results of the semester-long studio were showcased in an exhibit in collaboration with AND Magazine with the intent of revealing the full-fledged cultural exchange happening between the city of Florence and many American universities that use Florence as a laboratory for academic experiments.

With professor Alberto Francini. Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design, Spring 2010.


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Mediatheque


Initial investigations of the proposed mediatheque site centered around the analogy that the Fortezza da Basso is not only a historical fortress wall, but a present day barrier to the activities that occur within. The orange represents the wall as it stands and has stood since the 16th century, but presently buttressed and fortified by a ring of multilane vehicular and rail traffic. This relentless opacity to the interior activities is used as the springboard for the methods of the new mediatheque which hope to encompass ideas of openness, transparency, and public activity.

Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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This spread: After observation of the piazza by locating main axis’ of travel and entrances to buildings, these travel vectors across the fortezza piazza are imagined as paths of activity. In order to explore the potential site of the mediatheque, different networks of vectors are highlighted and compared to find an advantageous combination.

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Mediatheque


Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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Opposite Top: The selected vectors create a meshing of potential built piazza (mediatheque) to open piazza, provide integrated circulation, and break the vast former piazza into smaller public spaces that can develop specific functions and identities. This resultant shape also gives relief to existing buildings and echoes the acute angles of the original fortezza wall. Above and Opposite: In intentional opposition to the fortezza wall, the mediatheque becomes “a wall full of life�. This single wall is pierced by activity (programmatic elements) and then wrapped along the previous vectors. This process results in unexpected interaction and overlap between programs.

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Mediatheque


Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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Above: Ground floor plan.

Opposite Above: First floor plan showing the first elevated level of the access controlled mediatheque.

1 Main Entry / Bookstore 2 Ramp to 1st level 3 Performance / Exhibition Space 4 Lobby 5 Cafe

1 Restrooms 2 Library 3 Mediatheque 4 Conference Room 5 Ramp to 2nd level Opposite Below Interior rendering of the resultant performance and exhibition space created below layers of overlapped program.

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Mediatheque


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Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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Above: Second floor plan. 1 Outdoor Patio 2 Library 3 Mediatheque 4 Reception 5 Offices 6 Restrooms 7 Archives / Storage

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Above Opposite: Section perspective showing ramp from the piano nobile to the secondo piano nobile within the access controlled mediatheque library. This “library” is both circulation space and leisurely reading space that connects all the other programmatic functions together. Opposite: Bird’s eye rendering of the new mediatheque with surrounding buildings.

Mediatheque


Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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Mediatheque


Top: Interior rending showing main entrances into the public bookstore. Below: Exterior rendering of the main entry piazza framed by the new mediatheque.

Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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Field sketches in Florence, Italy completed during a semester study abroad program.

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Architectural Sketches


Kent State University Florence Program, Spring 2010

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navyyards Part of a senior-level comprehensive design studio, the 250,000 ft2 Navy Yards mixed-use development is one component of a large master plan to redevelop the area South-east of the Capitol Building and to utilize and reconnect Washington D.C.’s urban life with the Anacostia waterfront. The final design takes the embedded systems of the site to create an adjustable and reactive response: a building that first passively navigates its context and then gently adjusts its active systems to synchronize its functions with the city and the waterfront. Combining 100,000ft2 of prime office space, 40,000ft2 of speculative office space, and 40,000ft2 of retail the new building is located at the intersection of Water and 3rd Streets SE.

With professor Joseph Ferut, in collaboration with Christopher Schoenlein. Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design, Spring 2011.


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Above: Form finding diagrams. Left: Final parti model in context model. Opposite: Site plan.

As a response to its physical surroundings and situated between two large public green spaces, the building splits diagonally in two creating a continuous flow of pedestrian activity from the city at the northwest, to the park at the southeast. The resultant urban canyon, in response to the program, creates one building dedicated to the primary tenant for easy brand identification and one smaller building for speculative tenant occupancy. This public splice also strategically and physically opens the city to its lost waterfront as well as allocating heat-gain exposures of the building skin primarily to the south and west facades. To further address varying environmental concerns the building reacts by sloping the south exposure to create a self-shading wall and implementing the use of self-adjusting ETFE pillows on the west elevation that create variable and responsive sun shading dependent on need and light conditions. A light well for keeping lease spans consistent at a maximum width of 35 feet for day-lighting doubles as a funnel for reclaiming rain water that feeds a gray water recycling system. These strategies together with day-lighting sensors for the conserving energy usage and plantable roof space for habitat integration bring life to a building that continuously reacts to the environmental and social input of the context.

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Navy Yards


BOILERMAKER SHOPS

TINGEY STREET SE

TINGEY SQUARE

FUTURE HOTEL

SPEC TOWER

3RD STREET SE

2ND STREET SE

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FOUNDRY LOFTS

PRIME TOWER

WATER AND SEWAGE AUTHORITY

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THE YARDS PARK

Kent State University Senior Comprehensive Studio, Spring 2011

PARK PAVILION

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Navy Yards


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Opposite top: Birds eye view of roof showing the photovoltaic array and panelized roof design. Opposite below: View from waterfront of the west and south facades of the prime tower. Above: Section of prime tower through the rain collecting light well.

Kent State University Senior Comprehensive Studio, Spring 2011

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Above: First floor plan. 1 Restaurant 2 Prime Lobby 3 Mechanical 4 Storage 5 Electrical Room 6 Telecom Room 7 Recycling / Garbage 8 Loading Dock

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9 Loading Storage 10 Coffee Shop 11 Cafe 12 Bike rack 13 Spec Lobby 14 Gallery 15 Clothing Retail 16 Security 17 Fire Command Room 18 Light Well 19 Water Main 20 15 kW Elec Entry

Navy Yards

Opposite: View looking through the urban canyon toward the public porch and waterfront park.


Kent State University Senior Comprehensive Studio, Spring 2011

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Navy Yards

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Top Opposite: Second floor plan. 1 Restaurant 2 Light well 3 Prime Lobby 4 Reception Desk 5 Security Office 6 Generator Room 7 Main Electrical Room 8 Janitor’s Closet 9 Electrical Room 10 Telecom Room

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11 Retail Bridge 12 Spec Lobby 13 Reception Desk 14 Gallery 15 Clothing Retail 16 Shower Room 17 Public Porch 18 Storage Above: Typical floor plan. 1 Prime Office Space

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2 4K Office Space 3 8K Office Space 4 Men’s Restroom 5 Women’s Restroom 6 Janitor’s Closet 7 Mechanical Chase 8 Waiting Area 9 Electrical Room 10 Telecom Room 11 Light well 12 Balcony 13 Space for Break Room

Kent State University Senior Comprehensive Studio, Spring 2011

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Navy Yards


Kent State University Senior Comprehensive Studio, Spring 2011

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Perforated Metal

ETFE Pillow

Vining Plant Trellis

After completing our project at Kent State University, Chris Schoenlein and I had the opportunity to take our work to the University of Kentucky College of Design to participate in a design charrette they hosted with Gregory Romine of Axis Facades and Martin Summers of Morphosis. The weekend focused specifically on the rethinking of our previous facade design through the charrette process used at Axis Facades.

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ETFE Pillow

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Perforated Metal

During the design charrette, we realized that the most productive thing that could be done to advance the design was to accept that, given the building typology and restraints imposed by speculative office space, there is sometimes no way to design away the undesirable traits of a building program. More specifically, as tenants build their own office layout within a rented space, vertical subdivisions at the exterior facade become a necessity. Thus, our use of the diagrid mullion patterning becomes Vining Plant Trellis

Navy Yards


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problematic since there is no way to vertically subdivide the facade to accommodate interior walls that need to terminate at the building perimeter. Through the course of our discussions other concerns arose including that the use of ETFE pouches directly in the office space would pose a security risk as well as the building skin within the urban canyon should mitigate the sound that would inevitably be created in that space. Instead of creating an entirely new design rationale and aesthetic, it became apparent that if we were to keep both our diagrid patterning and ETFE pouches a part of the design, the facade needed to lift off the surface of the building allowing for a standard curtain wall system to be concealed behind the outermost building skin. This new design peels the diagrid structure away from the building and simultaneously employs a gradient from 100% exposure for the retail spaces at the base with the peeled skin

University of Kentucky Facades Workshop, Fall 2011

branching into 100% sun shading devices for the office spaces on the upper floors. The diagrid structure now employs the use of ETFE pouches, a metal mesh screen, or a wire plant trellis (to soften the building both visually and acoustically) dependent on need. These changes strengthen our original design intent and create a better symbiosis for the retail and office spaces while addressing the practical needs of the building’s skin.

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Navy Yards


University of Kentucky Facades Workshop, Fall 2011

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Work In Process