Page 1

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

A Singular Voice in an Evolving City

WWW.MIAMITODAYNEWS.COM $4.00

COUNTY DEVELOPING ALL-IN-ONE APP TO STREAMLINE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, pg. 10 TRADE PACT CONCERNS: While President Donald Trump on Monday hailed a tentative trade deal with Mexico, Florida’s US senators, Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson, raised concerns about whether the deal would adequately protect Florida farmers. They suggested that the deal could face opposition in Congress if concerns of Florida farmers are not addressed. In a joint letter to US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, they requesting that he work “diligently to ensure Florida’s agriculture community is fairly represented in the forthcoming trade deal” and pointing to past issues that have hurt the state’s farmers. “As we have previously written, Florida is one of the few places in the US that can produce warm-weather fruits and vegetables in the winter, forcing our growers to bear the brunt of Mexican trade abuses. Without just relief, Mexican producers will continue to drive our growers out of business and eventually take full control of the US market during the winter.” (Canada points to Florida’s pivotal trade position, page 9.)

The Achiever

By Jesse Scheckner

HOTELS PACK ’EM IN: Miami-Dade hotels had record occupancies, average daily room rates and revenue per available room in the first seven months of this year, the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau reported this week. Citing figures from national research firm STR, the bureau reported total hotel occupancy in the county of 80.5% of capacity from January through July, up 1.9% from the 79% occupancy for the same months of 2017. The average daily room rate was fourth highest in the nation at $213.10, up 9.3% from $195.03 in the same period of 2017. And revenue per available room rose 11.4% to reach fourth highest in the US level of $171.59 per room, versus $154.03 in the same period of 2017. COUNTY BUDGET HEARING: Miami-Dade commissioners will hold a public budget hearing regarding the county’s tentative budget and proposed millage rates for fiscal 2018-19 in Commission Chambers at Government Center at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6. A second public hearing on the matters is scheduled for Sept. 20 at the same time and location. CARVALHO ON POLITICS: Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho last week said the “sometimes unholy dance” of politics has become “more difficult in recent years,” adding that he hoped to see “a rapid regression to political reason that advances the need of communities more than the partisan necessities of those who lead them.” Mr. Carvalho, a former school district lobbyist well acquainted with legislative processes in Tallahassee and on Capitol Hill, stopped short of naming names. “The divisiveness, controversy and rhetoric,” he said, “get in the way of the fair representation of the people.”

Alberto Carvalho

Photo by Cristina Sullivan

Striving to increase schools’ business links, state funding The profile is on Page 4

Coral Gables rolls scooter-sharing deals ahead By Katherine Lewin

Coral Gables’ ride-share scooter program scooted forward as the city commission took three unanimous votes Tuesday. The pilot program with Spin, a Californiabased dockless scooter-share, was extended 90 days. The commission also allowed electric scooter company Bird to operate starting in a month for a 60-day pilot run. City staff will pick scooter locations and numbers, though the total isn’t likely to top 150. The commission also voted to allow scooters on city sidewalks except along Miracle Mile and Giralda Plaza. That vote will be revisited in September. Skip Scooters and Lime Bike attended along with Spin and Bird. But Spin and Bird have already been in talks with the city, which previously penalized Lime for operating without permission. In July, the City of Miami served Lime a cease and desist order for placing Lime-S electric scooters throughout the city without permission. Coral Gables was the first Florida city to allow public scooter shares with its Spin pilot

Street lights may deliver free Wi-Fi

program, which collected data from Aug. 6-21, releasing up to 75 scooters in the city. Data show 674 users completed 1,550 rides, departing from about 16 designated spots. The average trip took 12.8 minutes and the average ride was a bit over 1½ miles. City staff said the main complaint on social media is about too few scooters. “We’ve been pleasantly surprised how the users have been here so far. I think we’ve only had a couple of scooters that we couldn’t find, and that’s because some of our users are hiding them temporarily because they want to use them in a couple of hours,” said Brian No, Spin’s head of public policy. “We haven’t gotten any requests to remove an illegally parked scooter.” Of trips starting Aug. 6, only 3% got negative ratings because of how or where the scooter was parked, Mr. No said. The bulk of rides come at the start of lunch hour and after a typical workday. In the next two days, Spin will survey registered Gables users on how to serve the city better, Mr. No said. Spin also plans to bring in a new model next month, along with a new app feature that incentivizes users to return scoot-

ers to more populated areas. Incentives could include free or discounted rides, Mr. No said. Vice Mayor Frank Quesada said he wants to bring the scooters into South Gables, though the city must work with South Miami, since scooters could easily end up there. Mr. Quesada described South Gables as an area with a “lot of foot traffic” that “we sometimes we forget we have.” City staff reaching out to South Miami during the meeting didn’t get a comment. Coral Gables is on a growing list of municipalities in South Florida that allow sharing companies. Between July and December 2017, Key Biscayne, Miami Shores and North Bay Village began contracts with Lime. In November, Spin made exclusive arrangements with Doral and Miami Lakes, and the City of Miami welcomed Beijing-based Ofo. Mr. Quesada said that in three months there should be enough data between Spin and Bird to request proposals for one or more operators in Coral Gables. “A lot of eyes are on Coral Gables in terms of how the city is approaching shared scooters,” Mr. No said. “I think the news to tell them is so far, so good.”

Miami-Dade is considering two options to bring free Wi-Fi to public transit: incorporate the technology into either new bus shelters or street lights, Miami-Dade Information Technology DirectorAngel Petisco said. Both options would work, he said Tuesday, but street lights, which allow for more widespread service, would be more versatile. “The one in bus shelters is very specific,” he said. “Lighting has a much larger footprint and can benefit more than the average bus rider.” A June request for proposals hasn’t yet yielded a contract, but Mr. Petisco is confident free Wi-Fi will arrive within five years, particularly due to imminent 5G technology. Representatives of Verizon, AT&T and other communications companies met last month with Mr. Petisco and others preparing Miami-Dade for 5G connectivity, which he estimates will be in use by 2020. The fastest wireless speed now, 4G LTE, peaks at about 45 megabits per second. New 5G networks could increase data speeds by more than 22,000%. About 300,000 “small cell” devices necessary for carrying 5G across areas of varying population density must be installed – double the number of cell towers built in the past 30 years. Connecting those devices to street lights, Mr. Petisco said, would be a fine solution. “Everyone wants to do 5G, and part of this allows organizations to put apparatuses on these fixtures so they can spread 5G into more of Miami-Dade County,” he said. “The fact that’s so prevalent and pushing industry so hard, the adoption for this will be significant.” In February, Massachusettsbased CIVIQ Smartscapes LLC terminated a deal to install free transit Wi-Fi, hundreds of Wi-Fienabled kiosks and security cameras throughout the county when the county didn’t provide enough kiosk locations. Advertising on kiosks would have funded the $20 million project at no cost to taxpayers, with the county getting a share.

TALKS AIM FOR COLLEGE TO CONTROL OLYMPIA TOWER...

2

ENFORCEMENT TEAM TO DOUBLE AS PARKING RATES RISE ...

8

RUBBER-TIRE TRAVEL ON TRANSITWAY GAINS TRACTION ...

3

IN NAFTA REVAMP, CANADA POINTS TO ITS FLORIDA TIES ...

9

VIEWPOINT: LEAVE MAIDIQUE’S NAME ON MAIN CAMPUS ...

6

SCHOOLS BLEED TEACHERS, BUT REVERSAL ON THE WAY ...

14

MIAMI TARGETS BEAUTIFICATION GRANTS FOR STREETS ...

7

PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ ENROLLMENT DROP TRACKS NATION’S ...

14


TODAY’S NEWS

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

MIAMI TODAY

3

Rubber-tire travel for South Dade Transitway gains traction By Jesse Scheckner

Support for bus expansion on the South Dade Transitway is mounting ahead of the pivotal vote today (8/30) to determine the fate of Miami-Dade’s southernmost transportation corridor, as the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce last week joined Mayor Carlos Giménez’s administration in throwing weight behind a rubbertire solution. On Aug. 21, the chamber’s board of directors voted 92% in favor of applying for a federal grant to support Gold Standard Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) development between the Dadeland Metrorail station and Southwest 344th Street in Florida City, chamber President Alfred Sanchez told Miami Today. “We’ve been studying this for a while. We didn’t go at this willynilly,” Mr. Sanchez said. “It’s the right transportation for the ridership available now.” Choosing bus today, he said, would permit future conversion to at-grade Metrorail, the other considered mode, should ridership eventually merit the expenditure. “We can have a faster solution and still not close the door to rail later on,” he said. “Many members came in thinking rail was the only option. A lot left saying Gold Standard was a no-brainer.” Though installing and maintaining rail on the transitway would exude a more permanent, “world-class” feel, the cost of doing so would run the county’s Strategic MiamiArea Rapid Transit (SMART) Plan into the ground financially, leaving very little funding for expansion in the plan’s remaining five corridors, said Sergio Abreu, chair of the chamber’s Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. “A rail solution in the south corridor – that being the longest corridor in the whole SMART Plan – would essentially consume 70% of the available financial resources for the entire plan,” said Mr. Abreu, who is director of local government, community relations and economic development for TECO Energy. It doesn’t make sense, Mr. Abreu said, to throw the preponderance of available funds toward a mode with not enough ridership to support it. “The ridership issue is the basis for federal funding,” he said. “All the experts we’ve talked to that have gone through this process have

‘Many members came in thinking rail was the only option. A lot left saying Gold Standard was a no-brainer.’

‘The problem with bus rapid transit is the word “bus.” For all intents and purposes, it’s rail on rubber tires.’’

‘Framing it as simply BRT versus rail, we kind of missed an opportunity to explore some combination of the two.’

Alfred Sanchez

Carlos Giménez

Javier Betancourt

told us the most important thing the federal government is looking for is that the transportation solution you adopt is consistent with the current ridership plus some projected number of growth based on current land use plans. Based on [that], the formula lends itself best to Gold Standard BRT.” The cost of southbound rail expansion along the corridor, once estimated to cost $700 million, has since swollen to $1.3 billion, according to Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) Executive Director Aileen Bouclé. That cost, including about $67 million in annual operating costs – almost double the existing $76 million it costs to run the current 25-mile Metrorail line – over 40 years would consume $4.3 billion. BRT over that same stretch would require just 12% of SMART Plan funds, or roughly $865 million. “It’s a smart investment,” Mr. Abreu said. “There are things you’re spending that money on – a good chunk of the capital investment – that are things that automatically become part of a rail solution in the future.” The chamber vote came a day after the county’s Transportation Planning Council OK’d amendments to Miami-Dade’s 2040 transportation plan and 2018-19 Transportation Improvement Program to allow for a $100 million infusion to construct “premium transit infrastructure” on the transitway. Once built, various planned components, including 12 weathercontrolled stations, terminal upgrades, crossing gates and signal preemption at all 45 transitway intersections, could accommodate future rail alterations. “That’s the idea – the convertibility, [which] could be done relatively easily,” said Albert Hernandez, assistant county transportation director. If the TPO Governing Board approves Gold Standard BRT today, it could be planned and built within three years and “in terms of passengers – the experience they ‘The time savings get – it’s as close to rail as can be,” for someone going from Mr. Giménez said. “The problem with bus rapid Florida City to Dadetransit is the word ‘bus,’” he said. land on BRT is the same “For all intents and purposes, it’s or better than it would be rail on rubber tires.” A gold standard designation with rail.’ would afford Miami-Dade an elite Alice Bravo status shared in the US only by Albuquerque, which in November

became the first system in the nation to earn the top rank from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy. Just 10 systems worldwide have a gold rating. Twenty-two, including systems in Cleveland and Hartford, CN, are rated silver. Systems in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh and Eugene, OR, are among 18 systems around the globe with bronze grades. To be rated gold, a BRT sys-

tem must score 85 or higher on a 100-point scorecard that lists having a dedicated right-of-way, off-board fare collection, platform-level boarding, traffic signal priority and basic necessities, according to the institute’s website. A gold-rated BRT corridor along the South Dade Transitway, with all the accompanying features – including proposed electric buses that would be substantially quieter than the county’s current compressed

natural gas buses or hybrid articulated buses – would be just as fast, efficient and convenient as Metrorail, if not more so, Transportation Director Alice Bravo said. “The time savings for someone going from Florida City to Dadeland on BRT is the same or better than it would be with rail,” she said, adding that BRT boasts operational flexibility that rail can’t compete with. “With rail, if a train breaks down with a medical emergency, the entire system is impacted. With BRT, you merely bypass the vehicle having the issue.” But wait, there’s a third option, said Javier Betancourt, executive director of the Citizens’ Independent Transportation Trust, which oversees the transit surtax. Last week, trust members adopted a resolution urging the TPO to consider a hybrid approach that would extend Metrorail 12 miles south from Dadeland to Southland Mall at 20505 S Dixie Hwy., where a BRT line could take travelers further south to Homestead. “This would essentially meet it halfway,” he said. “We could cut those costs considerably, but it would be more expansive than just BRT. Our members don’t believe that was fully considered as an option. Framing it as simply BRT versus rail, we kind of missed an opportunity to explore some combination of the two.”

Summer Savings Take advantage of these great rates and watch your money grow!

2.35 % 2.65 % APY

1

9-Month CD

APY 1, 2

13-Month CD

For more information call 305-569-5000.

1

Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of the date of publication. The minimum balance required to open a CD is $2,500. New money only. New money is funds not currently on deposit with Ocean Bank. Interest rates may change without notice. Initial CD deposit amount is required to be maintained each day to earn the APY disclosed. There will be a penalty for early withdrawals on CDs. Offer does not apply to IRA CDs. 2

For non-compounding CDs greater than 1 year term the distribution of interest is required annually and interest cannot remain in the account. Offer subject to change without notice and subject to change at any time.

©2018 Ocean Bank. Member FDIC.

oceanbank.com


6

MIAMI TODAY

VIEWPOINT

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

Miami Today is an independent voice of the community, published weekly at 2000 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 100, Miami, Florida 33133. Telephone (305) 358-2663

Leave Maidique name on main FIU campus and move on Florida International University’s trustees are to meet Sept. 5 on the Modesto Maidique Campus. Without shifting seats, they might end up on the University Park Campus. In the interim, trustees may vindictively rip from the campus the name of Dr. Maidique, a title they bestowed with fanfare just nine years ago as he ended a 23-year presidency. Such a decision would be catastrophic for the university. Removing his name would compound the error of naming the campus. It never should have been done – naming sites for living persons raises a danger of what they might do later – but removing his name would see a university revoke its word, taking back a gift while trampling on the academic freedom of a professor and former president. The university needs to live with its first error, grimace and move on. Forget any looming legal challenge by Dr. Maidique to stripping away a title that was a farewell gift to encourage him to step down. A court fight could cost the university millions, but it would pale in comparison to the damage to FIU’s reputation in taking back the title because Dr. Maidique has been critical of FIU’s recent vision and management – and that is the only real cause to erase his name, not a trumped-up

$100 million valuation of naming rights from some future donor when the most anyone has ever given FIU is $20 million. Dr. Maidique’s criticisms rankle trustees and administrators. They’ve every reason to be annoyed. None of us seeks public criticism, even if much of what Dr. Maidique has said seems right. This newspaper, like Dr. Maidique, has questioned the speed of FIU’s enrollment growth and its vision of what comes first, quality or quantity. But he is not some newsman but one of them. He built the university by adding schools of medicine and law and infrastructure and a national reputation. We are occasionally critics of FIU policies, but Dr. Maidique has the credentials to put his criticisms, appropriate or not, at center stage. The test in the case of the campus name is not validity of ideas. Even if he were totally wrong he’d have every right as an academic to speak out. Some would say he has the duty to do so. In the corporate world what the CEO, the president and the board say usually go unchallenged, often to the company’s detriment. But in government and universities, participants are held to higher standards and should be able to make their voices heard without penalty. In government we call it whistle blowing; in universities we call it academic freedom. If you can think of any university where academic freedom is inappropriate, it would probably be in a dictatorship where if you question the regime you are punished. But if FIU punishes its former president for being a critic – even criticizing heavyhandedly in the instance of a tragic bridge collapse – it is asking for approbation from

L etters Miami is a major city so it needs strong mayor

Most large and major American Cities use the strong mayor, where the mayor is the chief executive and there is total accountability for the city’s progress or pitfall. Voters in large cities understand this and want their mayors to be results oriented, which the strong mayoral system is designed to do with an executive branch and a legislative branch (commissioners). The alternative is the weak mayor system that is now in place where the mayor has no authority outside the commission and the mayor cannot directly appoint or remove officials, and lacks veto power over the commissioners. The city manager in effect runs the city, although appointed by the mayor and approved by the commissioners, and responds to both. The weak mayoral system is what you find in small and mid-size cities. Isn’t Miami a major city like NYC, Chicago, Houston, Boston and more? Carlos Ferré

Formula One fan warns race isn’t good for Miami

I am a huge fan of Formula One, never miss a race on TV no matter the time, and I try to see one race at least live ever year. But I think the Miami race is a bad idea. No word about the costs or the impact on the Miami residents. Other host cities pay

the academic world. Already the Chronicle of Higher Education, the newspaper of the university community nationally, is writing about FIU’s designs on taking back the campus name from an outspoken former president. If trustees persist in misguided efforts to punish Dr. Maidique, the criticism will be national, and faculty and student recruitment will suffer for years. It would be different were a crime involved. Communities here have had to take down street signs with the names of persons who later became felons – examples of why names of living persons do not belong in public places. But Dr. Maidique’s only crime was in exercising his academic freedom. If you say he has been heavy-handed in public criticisms, we would agree. His own predecessor, the late Gregory Wolfe, sometimes disagreed with Dr. Maidique’s actions and privately said so. Dr. Wolfe was equally gentlemanly in his private criticisms of current President Mark Rosenberg. Dr. Maidique, however, has never avoided the spotlight. That was true before the campus was named for him and has been true since. He has not changed. If outspokenness concerned trustees, they ought to have considered it before naming a campus for him, not nine years later. His only sin that we can see is being true to himself. That’s no reason to break a promise, violate academic freedom and hold a public university up to national ridicule. Academic freedom should be paramount. FIU is not a trade school. It’s among the nation’s 10 largest public universities in enrollment. Start muzzling the faculty and it’s lost.

to the

How to Write

Letters for publication may be sent to the Editor, Miami Today, 2000 S. Dixie Hwy, Suite 100, Miami, FL 33133 or e-mail to letters@miamitodaynews.com. Letters may be condensed for space.

$25 million a year to Liberty Media Corp., the owner of the F1 show. Those events have a huge impact on the city when held on a street course. Weeks of preparation to the track with all the closed roads that come with it. After year one there will be pretty hefty protests by the residents, I guess. I was watching the Formula E race a few years ago. You cannot compare those two events. That race was held on a super boring Micky Mouse track and super poorly organized. If that’s what the city has in mind for the F1 event, they will be super surprised by the demands of that show, in pure logistics to start with. Bernd Bauer

Assume for the moment that the trustees trump up some new reason and remove the name next week. What will they then do with campus naming rights, land bank them until they can someday find a buyer? What exactly would that gain over finding the buyer first and then going to Dr. Maidique and cutting a deal for him to relinquish the name? He has already said he would do it for a $200 million donor. He has also said he thought at most he’d get his name on the law school. Those statements show that he is not intractable. In making an agreement later, with a buyer at hand, Dr. Maidique would be the hero, the man who late in his career allowed the university he built to become even greater. He and the university would jointly save face and jointly gain, because it would not be a punitive measure but a chance for everyone to do the right thing for the right reason. But don’t back him into a corner and steal back a gift that was willingly and publicly given to him just to land bank a name for a donation that might never appear. FIU’s provost told trustees that universities don’t name campuses for people, presumably making it proper to take the name back. But universities do in fact name campuses for people – FIU’s trustees named one for Mitch Maidique. Unless and until Dr. Maidique willingly turns that name over to a major donor, that’s the way it ought to stay. Meanwhile, let his criticisms continue to flow on the Modesto Maidique Campus. Argue him down if you like and if you can, but don’t try to muzzle a critic of the university – especially the critic who is still on the faculty and who was pivotal to physically and academically building FIU.

E ditor

Somebody needs to investigate Transit traffic lanes on busy Biscayne Boulevard to find out why they’re disregarding and will aggravate traffic congestion. Redesign systematically destroying Miami-Dade the median and leave the traffic lanes alone. Transit. Under this leadership since 2010, William P. Martin transit has taken a nosedive. Calvin Stewart

Move to close golf course meet city’s needs Broken buses jam traffic; doesn’t So let’s shut down all the libraries, no wonder ridership falls which lose money and serve a relatively Got caught in traffic jams twice yesterday because of broken buses on Biscayne Boulevard, one going north, one going south, and one on 125th Street near Biscayne Boulevard. Amazing. No wonder ridership has dropped. I pity the poor people who have to use our buses. DC Copeland

Circulator buses luring riders from county’s buses

It’s shameful that a large metro area like Miami has such a terrible public transportation system. When voters approved the half-penny tax it was supposed to go to public transportation. But, where did it go? It went to jitney-type buses that run on the same routes as the Miami-Dade County It’s obvious the people in leadership routes, charging nothing for the rides. So don’t want to fix transit. Other cities have where do you think the rider will go? VM Perez laid the format but for some reason our transit director and our mayor do the opposite. Mrs. Bravo stated in the article that ridership is up on trolleys that have added service. That should ring a bell. Added service works, not cutting routes. Are these people brain dead? Reducing

Our leaders don’t want transit so they destroy it

Fewer Boulevard lanes will add to the congestion

few people. Do we need another shopping center? Is the future of Miami to have no green space? Why a no-bid contract? Can you say “banana republic”? Dan Draper

miamitodaynews.com FOUNDED JUNE 2, 1983 VOLUME XXXVI No. 14 ENTIRE CONTENTS © 2018

To contact us: News Advertising Classifieds Subscriptions Reprints

(305) 358-2663 (305) 358-1008 (305) 358-1008 (305) 358-2663 (305) 358-2663

Editor and Publisher / Michael Lewis Vice President / Carmen Betancourt-Lewis

MIAMI TODAY (ISSN: 0889-2296) is published weekly for $145 per year; airmail: to Europe $190 per year, the Americas $145 per year. Published by Today Enterprises Inc., 2000 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 100, Miami, Florida 33133, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Miami, FL. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MIAMI TODAY, 2000 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, SUITE 100, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133.


WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

TODAY’S NEWS

MIAMI TODAY

9

In NAFTA revamp, Canada points to its ties with Florida Just before Mexico and the US reached a partial agreement in Washington on Monday to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement and Canada waited to join the talks, Canada unveiled a detailed study of how important the nation is to Florida’s economy. The timing was clearly linked to efforts to harmonize recently jangled relations among the three nations that comprise the trade pact. “Let’s wrap up NAFTA and let’s remove the tariffs so that both our businesses can continue to thrive,” Laurent Morel-à-l’Huissier, Canada’s Miami-based consul for foreign policy and diplomacy service, wrote in a letter to Miami Today accompanying the 48-page “2018 Canada-Florida Economic Impact Study.” There was no mistaking the intent of that report: the subheading said “Canada is Florida’s most important economic partner.” Earlier studies of CanadaFlorida economic ties in 2011 and 2014 made the same point, but the updated version released this month offered powerful new statistics. Among highlights: ■Canadian exports to Florida jumped from $4.3 billion in 2013 to $4.6 billion in 2016, while Florida’s exports to Canada fell from $3.5 billion to $2.7 billion in the same period. ■Canadian residential real estate purchases in Florida soared from $4.6 billion in 2013 to $7 billion in 2016. ■Canadian annual tourism spending in Florida rose from $6 billion in 2013 to $6.5 billion in 2016. ■Combining tourism, trade and real estate purchases, the annual economic impact of Canada in Florida climbed from $18.4 billion in 2013 to $20.8 billion in 2016. The report was issued days before weekend talks ended with Mexico and the US agreeing on key portions of the NAFTA overhaul. Canada is to join in the talks in coming days. “One way or another we’ll have a deal with Canada,” President Donald Trump said Monday. Whether the new agreement will erase the recently imposed tariffs to which Mr. Morel-à-l’Huissier referred will be left to upcoming negotiations. This year, the US slapped tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from many countries. Canada initially was bypassed, but at the end of May, the US hit Canadian steel and aluminum with tariffs. Now there is a 25% tariff on steel and a 10% tariff on aluminum that enters the US from Canadian producers. By July 1, Canada and the US had imposed billions in tariffs on each other’s goods. The future deal with Canada will “either be a tariff on cars or it’ll be a negotiated deal,” Mr. Trump said Monday. “Perhaps the other would be much better for Canada.” A spokesman for Canada’s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada was “encouraged” by the “optimism” shown by the US and Mexico but cautioned that a full three-way NAFTA deal was not a foregone conclusion. Mexico and the US needed to resolve complicated bilateral issues before modernization of NAFTA could move forward, Ms. Freeland

“Once the bilateral issues get resolved, Canada will be joining the talks to work on both bilateral issues and our trilateral issues,” said Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland before Mexico-US accord Monday.

said Friday. She said the three nations had agreed Canada would rejoin the talks once Mexico and the US resolved bilateral matters. “Once the bilateral issues get resolved, Canada will be joining the talks to work on both bilateral issues and our trilateral issues,” Ms. Freeland said then. The agreement between Mexico and the US reportedly requires that a larger portion of automobiles traded on a tariff-free basis be made in higher-wage factories, but it left unresolved a US demand that the treaty be renegotiated every five years. The impact of the agreement, whatever its shape, will be felt in Florida, which is closely aligned with Canada in four economic spheres: tourism, trade, residential real estate investment, and corporate investments and operations. The Canadian report concludes by quoting Manny Mencia, the Coral Gables-based senior vice president of international trade & business for the state’s economic development agency, Enterprise Florida: “Canada is by far the number one partner the State of Florida has. It is largest and most important for the state across all levels of economic engagement.” The report says almost 500 Canadian companies operate in Florida, “drawn by the low cost of doing business, excellent logistics infrastructure, and close international opportunities with Latin America and the Caribbean.” It lists 19 Canadian companies with Latin American headquarters in South Florida – 11 of them in Miami-Dade County. Those 11 are ADF International in Miami Gardens, Air Canada Cargo in Miami, Apple Express in Doral, Avison Young realtors in Coral Gables, CAE in Miami Springs, Chemo International in Miami, Gildan Active Wear in Miami, PBB Local Logistics in Doral, Quebec International in North Miami, Teknion in Coral Gables, and Wasteco in Miami. The report highlights efforts by a Canadian-Colombian company involved in a public-private partnership to help get Miami’s traffic moving faster. Rokk3r Labs in March 2017 launched a $150 million investment arm, Rokk3r

Fuel, to help fund the next wave of Miami-based startups moving through the company’s Miami incubator. Then the company and Citi.moov were named by the Fastrack Institute to build a technology solution to incentivize Miamians to share rides or use public transit. The founders of that effort told Miami Today this

month that they aim to debut the new product soon. The Canadian report says that the nation is “responsible for upwards of 620,000 jobs in the state.” And, it says, “Canadian tourism to Florida contributed $686.56 million to state and local coffers in 2016 alone.” When those Canadian tourists fly to Florida, Miami is third on the list of their choice of destinations. Orlando gets 30% of the Canadian air passengers, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood 28% and Miami International Airport 14%. When Canadians are buying residential real estate, however,

they look first to South Florida, which gets 45% of the residential sales to Canadians, far ahead of second place Tampa-St. Petersburg at 12%. “The residential property portfolio has grown to over $53 billion – annually this means another half billion dollars in tax revenues,” Mr. Morel-à-l’Huissier wrote to Miami Today. “With NAFTA being renegotiated and with tariffs imposed and more looming,” he wrote, “we thought it would be vital for you to better understand just how important Canada is to Florida and why Florida matters to Canada.”

Fight the bite!

Use larvicide granules to treat plants that hold water to keep mosquitoes from breeding.

DRAINCOVER &

To report a mosquito nuisance, visit www.miamidade.gov/311direct, call 311 or download our free 311 Direct Mobile App. @305Mosquito #DrainAndCoverMiami #FightTheBite

www.miamidade.gov/mosquito


WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

Public Public Notice Notice

MIAMI TODAY

NOTICE IS GIVEN that a meeting of the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners will be held on Wednesday, September 5, 2018, at 9:30 AM, in the Commission Chambers, located on the NOTICE Floor IS GIVEN thatStephen a meeting of theCenter, Miami-Dade BoardMiami, of County Commissioners willother be held on Wednesday, September 5, 2018, at 9:30 AM, in the Commission Second of the P. Clark 111 N.W.County First Street, Florida, wherein, among matters to be considered, a public hearing will be held at such time thatChambers, the item islocated called on on the the Second Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. First Street, Miami, Florida, wherein, among other matters to be considered, a public hearing will be held at such time that the item is called on the following: following: Resolutions and Ordinances: Resolutions and Ordinances: t 3FTPMVUJPODPEFTJHOBUJOHUIBUQPSUJPOPG/8UI"WFOVFCFUXFFO8FTU'MBHMFS4USFFUBOE/8OE4USFFUBTA:PMBOEB&EFO8BZ t t 3FTPMVUJPODPEFTJHOBUJOHUIBUQPSUJPOPG/8UI"WFOVFCFUXFFO8FTU'MBHMFS4USFFUBOE/8OE4USFFUBTA:PMBOEB&EFO8BZ 3FTPMVUJPODPEFTJHOBUJOHUIBUQPSUJPOPG48UI"WFOVFCFUXFFO48UI4USFFUBOE48UI4USFFUBTA+PT├П.BSJB.JKBSFT8BZ t t 3FTPMVUJPODPEFTJHOBUJOHUIBUQPSUJPOPG48UI"WFOVFCFUXFFO48UI4USFFUBOE48UI4USFFUBTA+PT├П.BSJB.JKBSFT8BZ 0SEJOBODFBVUIPSJ[JOHJTTVBODFPGOPUUPFYDFFE  .JBNJ%BEF$PVOUZ 'MPSJEB5SBOTJU4ZTUFN4BMFT4VSUBY3FWFOVF#POET QVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPOPG0SEJOBODF/P GPSQBZJOHDPTUT t 0 SEJOBODFBVUIPSJ[JOHJTTVBODFPGOPUUPFYDFFE  .JBNJ%BEF$PVOUZ 'MPSJEB5SBOTJU4ZTUFN4BMFT4VSUBY3FWFOVF#POET QVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPOPG0SEJOBODF/P GPSQBZJOHDPTUT PGDFSUBJOUSBOTQPSUBUJPOBOEUSBOTJUQSPKFDUTQSPWJEJOHUIBUEFUBJMT UFSNTBOEPUIFSNBUUFSTSFMBUJOHUPCPOETCFEFUFSNJOFEJOTVCTFRVFOUSFTPMVUJPOTBVUIPSJ[JOHVOEFSUBLJOHPG5SBOTJUBOE5SBOTQPSUBUJPO PGDFSUBJOUSBOTQPSUBUJPOBOEUSBOTJUQSPKFDUTQSPWJEJOHUIBUEFUBJMT UFSNTBOEPUIFSNBUUFSTSFMBUJOHUPCPOETCFEFUFSNJOFEJOTVCTFRVFOUSFTPMVUJPOTBVUIPSJ[JOHVOEFSUBLJOHPG5SBOTJUBOE5SBOTQPSUBUJPO 1SPKFDUTJO1FPQMFT5SBOTQPSUBUJPO1MBO t 1SPKFDUTJO1FPQMFT5SBOTQPSUBUJPO1MBO 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUJOUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ485FSSBDF BOE t POUIF8FTUCZ48$PVSU LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUJOUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ485FSSBDF BOE POUIF8FTUCZ48$PVSU LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU t 3FTPMVUJPOSFMBUJOHUPUIF#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUMPDBUFEFOUJSFMZXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT BOECPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ4PVUIXFTU4USFFU POUIF&BTU t 3 FTPMVUJPOSFMBUJOHUPUIF#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUMPDBUFEFOUJSFMZXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT BOECPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ4PVUIXFTU4USFFU POUIF&BTU CZ4PVUIXFTU$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ4PVUIXFTU5FSSBDF BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ4PVUIXFTU$PVSUUSBOTGFSSJOHUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUUPUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFTJOBDDPSEBODFXJUI4FDUJPO CZ4PVUIXFTU$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ4PVUIXFTU5FSSBDF BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ4PVUIXFTU$PVSUUSBOTGFSSJOHUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUUPUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFTJOBDDPSEBODFXJUI4FDUJPO of the Code the Code t of 3FTPMVUJPODBMMJOH4QFDJBM&MFDUJPOJOUIF#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUMPDBUFEFOUJSFMZXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT BOECPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU PO t UIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ485FSSBDFBOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48$PVSU BO0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUQVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPO ' PGUIF$PEF BOEB 3FTPMVUJPODBMMJOH4QFDJBM&MFDUJPOJOUIF#BOZBO%SJWF4FDVSJUZ(VBSE4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUMPDBUFEFOUJSFMZXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFT BOECPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU PO UIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ485FSSBDFBOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48$PVSU BO0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUQVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPO ' PGUIF$PEF BOEB 3FTPMVUJPOEFTJHOBUJOHUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFTBTUIFHPWFSOJOHCPEZPGUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUQVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPOPGUIF$PEF t 3FTPMVUJPOEFTJHOBUJOHUIF$JUZPG$PSBM(BCMFTBTUIFHPWFSOJOHCPEZPGUIF4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUQVSTVBOUUP4FDUJPOPGUIF$PEF 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOE t 0 SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOE POUIF8FTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUI%#VJMEJOH4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3 POUIF8FTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUI%#VJMEJOH4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3 t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHBQSFMJNJOBSZBTTFTTNFOUSPMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUI%#VJMEJOH4USFFU-JHIUJOH t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHBQSFMJNJOBSZBTTFTTNFOUSPMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUI%#VJMEJOH4USFFU-JHIUJOH 4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF 4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM48"WFOVF t 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPO t UIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUIMBOE***.VMUJQVSQPTF.BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPS 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPO UIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUIMBOE***.VMUJQVSQPTF.BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPS FYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF t FYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHB1SFMJNJOBSZ"TTFTTNFOU3PMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUIMBOE***.VMUJQVSQPTF t .BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHB1SFMJNJOBSZ"TTFTTNFOU3PMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUIMBOE***.VMUJQVSQPTF .BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ 48"WFOVFQSPWJEJOHUIBUBTTFTTNFOUTNBEFTIBMMDPOTUJUVUFBTQFDJBMBTTFTTNFOUMJFOPOSFBMQSPQFSUZBOEQSPWJEJOHGPSUIFDPMMFDUJPOPGTVDIBTTFTTNFOUT t 48"WFOVFQSPWJEJOHUIBUBTTFTTNFOUTNBEFTIBMMDPOTUJUVUFBTQFDJBMBTTFTTNFOUMJFOPOSFBMQSPQFSUZBOEQSPWJEJOHGPSUIFDPMMFDUJPOPGTVDIBTTFTTNFOUT 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ t UIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUIMBOE*7.VMUJQVSQPTF.BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPS 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ UIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT4PVUIMBOE*7.VMUJQVSQPTF.BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOHQSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPS FYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF t FYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHB1SFMJNJOBSZ"TTFTTNFOU3PMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUIMBOE*7.VMUJQVSQPTF t .BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOEPOUIFXFTUCZ 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHB1SFMJNJOBSZ"TTFTTNFOU3PMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF4PVUIMBOE*7.VMUJQVSQPTF .BJOUFOBODFBOE4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOEPOUIFXFTUCZ UIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF t UIFPSFUJDBM481MBDF 0SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU ,JOHT)JHIXBZ BOECZUIFPSFUJDBM485FSSBDF POUIF&BTUCZ$BOBM$SJHIUPG t 0 SEJOBODFDSFBUJOHBOEFTUBCMJTIJOHB4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU ,JOHT)JHIXBZ BOECZUIFPSFUJDBM485FSSBDF POUIF&BTUCZ$BOBM$SJHIUPG XBZ POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVFBOECZUIFPSFUJDBM481BUI LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT.BSBM)PNFT4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOH XBZ POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVFBOECZUIFPSFUJDBM481BUI LOPXOBOEEFTDSJCFEBT.BSBM)PNFT4USFFU-JHIUJOH4QFDJBM5BYJOH%JTUSJDUXBJWJOH QSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPSFYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF t QSPWJTJPOTPG3FTPMVUJPO/P3BOEQSPWJEJOHGPSFYDMVTJPOGSPNUIF$PEF 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOmSNJOHB1SFMJNJOBSZ"TTFTTNFOU3PMMQSPWJEJOHGPSBOOVBMBTTFTTNFOUTBHBJOTUSFBMQSPQFSUZMPDBUFEXJUIJOUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIF.BSBM)PNFT4USFFU-JHIUJOH t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOH BEPQUJOH BOEDPOm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assessments assessments t 0SEJOBODFHSBOUJOHQFUJUJPOPG5XP-BLFT$PNNVOJUZ%FWFMPQNFOU%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/84USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ/84UBUF3PBE/P * POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU  t 0 SEJOBODFHSBOUJOHQFUJUJPOPG5XP-BLFT$PNNVOJUZ%FWFMPQNFOU%JTUSJDU HFOFSBMMZCPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/84USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ/84UBUF3PBE/P * POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU  BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF UPFYQBOEUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIFEJTUSJDUCZBDSFT BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF UPFYQBOEUIFCPVOEBSJFTPGUIFEJTUSJDUCZBDSFT t 3FTPMVUJPOUBLJOHBDUJPOPOB$MBTT*1FSNJUBQQMJDBUJPOCZUIF/BUJPOBM5SPQJDBM#PUBOJDBM(BSEFO *ODUPUSJNBOEBMUFSNBOHSPWFUSFFTJOBDPBTUBMCBOEDPNNVOJUZUPNBJOUBJOOBWJHBCJMJUZBMPOHBOFYJTUJOH t XBUFSXBZBOEGPSQFEFTUSJBODMFBSBODFPOBEKBDFOUVQMBOETBUUIF,BNQPOHBU48"WFOVFJOUIF$JUZPG.JBNJ 3FTPMVUJPOUBLJOHBDUJPOPOB$MBTT*1FSNJUBQQMJDBUJPOCZUIF/BUJPOBM5SPQJDBM#PUBOJDBM(BSEFO *ODUPUSJNBOEBMUFSNBOHSPWFUSFFTJOBDPBTUBMCBOEDPNNVOJUZUPNBJOUBJOOBWJHBCJMJUZBMPOHBOFYJTUJOH XBUFSXBZBOEGPSQFEFTUSJBODMFBSBODFPOBEKBDFOUVQMBOETBUUIF,BNQPOHBU48"WFOVFJOUIF$JUZPG.JBNJ Resolutions Approving Plats: Resolutions Approving Plats: t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG$PSBM-BLFT1MB[B CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

t 3  FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG$PSBM-BLFT1MB[B CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG$FOUVSZ1BSL1MBDF'JSTU"EEJUJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOE t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG$FOUVSZ1BSL1MBDF'JSTU"EEJUJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUCZ48$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZUIFPSFUJDBM48-BOF BOE POUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

POUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG1BMNFSB&TUBUFT8FTU CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG48-BOF POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTU t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG1BMNFSB&TUBUFT8FTU CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG48-BOF POUIF&BTUCZ48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTU BQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

BQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG#BQUJTU)PUFMBOE8FTU$BNQVT CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG#BQUJTU)PUFMBOE8FTU$BNQVT CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU /PSUI484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

/PSUI484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4VOTFU1PJOUF"QBSUNFOUT CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/84USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG/8"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUIPG t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4VOTFU1PJOUF"QBSUNFOUT CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/84USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG/8"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUIPG /84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

/84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4PVUIMBOE***4VCEJWJTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUI t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4PVUIMBOE***4VCEJWJTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUI PG#BJMFT3PBE BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

PG#BJMFT3PBE BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4JGSB.DTT4VCEJWJTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG/84USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG/8"WFOVF POUIF4PVUI t BQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUIPG/84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG4JGSB.DTT4VCEJWJTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG/84USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG/8"WFOVF POUIF4PVUI BQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU/PSUIPG/84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG#).&BTU&OFSHZ$FOUFS&YQBOTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF t 4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG#).&BTU&OFSHZ$FOUFS&YQBOTJPO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF 4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG'1-2VBSSZ4VCTUBUJPO CPVOEFEUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM/85FSSBDF POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM/8$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG'1-2VBSSZ4VCTUBUJPO CPVOEFEUIF/PSUICZUIFPSFUJDBM/85FSSBDF POUIF&BTUCZUIFPSFUJDBM/8$PVSU POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUCZ UIFPSFUJDBM/8"WFOVF

UIFPSFUJDBM/8"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG(SBQFMBOE)PTQJUBMJUZ%FWFMPQNFOU CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ1BMNFS-BLF POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG/84PVUI3JWFS%SJWF POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU  t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFQMBUPG(SBQFMBOE)PTQJUBMJUZ%FWFMPQNFOU CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ1BMNFS-BLF POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZ GFFU8FTUPG/84PVUI3JWFS%SJWF POUIF4PVUICZ/84USFFU  POUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

POUIF8FTUCZ/8"WFOVF

Resolutions Approving Waiver of Plats: Resolutions Approving Waiver of Plats: t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG5JNNZ)PBOH % CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/&4USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG/&"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG5JNNZ)PBOH % CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUICZ/&4USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG/&"WFOVF POUIF4PVUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU /PSUIPG/&4USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG/PSUI.JBNJ"WFOVF

t /PSUIPG/&4USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG/PSUI.JBNJ"WFOVF

3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG3)PNFT--$ % CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG3)PNFT--$ % CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF POUIF 4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

t 3FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG"SJFM.JMMBOBOE.JMBHSPT.JMMBO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF  t 3 FTPMVUJPOBQQSPWJOHUIFXBJWFSPGQMBUPG"SJFM.JMMBOBOE.JMBHSPT.JMMBO CPVOEFEPOUIF/PSUIBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU4PVUIPG484USFFU POUIF&BTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU8FTUPG48"WFOVF  POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

POUIF4PVUICZ484USFFU BOEPOUIF8FTUBQQSPYJNBUFMZGFFU&BTUPG48"WFOVF

"MMJOUFSFTUFEQBSUJFTNBZBQQFBSBOECFIFBSEBUUIFUJNFBOEQMBDFTQFDJmFEJOBDDPSEBODFXJUIUIF#PBSET3VMFTPG1SPDFEVSF "MMJOUFSFTUFEQBSUJFTNBZBQQFBSBOECFIFBSEBUUIFUJNFBOEQMBDFTQFDJmFEJOBDDPSEBODFXJUIUIF#PBSET3VMFTPG1SPDFEVSF The proposed ordinances listed below will have a Second Reading to be considered for enactment by the Board at the time and place speciямБed above. The ordinances listed below will have a Second Reading to be considered for enactment by the Board at the time and place speciямБed above. t 0proposed SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUPWFIJDMFTGPSIJSFSFWJTJOHSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSWFIJDMFTVTFEBTQBTTFOHFSNPUPSDBSSJFSTSFWJTJOHWFIJDMFBHFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSQBTTFOHFSNPUPSDBSSJFSTQSPWJEJOHDJSDVMBUPSTFSWJDFPS t mYFESPVUFTFSWJDFBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOPGUIF$PEF 0SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUPWFIJDMFTGPSIJSFSFWJTJOHSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSWFIJDMFTVTFEBTQBTTFOHFSNPUPSDBSSJFSTSFWJTJOHWFIJDMFBHFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSQBTTFOHFSNPUPSDBSSJFSTQSPWJEJOHDJSDVMBUPSTFSWJDFPS t mYFESPVUFTFSWJDFBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOPGUIF$PEF 0SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUP;POJOHQFSNJUUJOHEJHJUBMQPJOUPGTBMFTJHOTBUDFSUBJOCVJMEJOHTGPSQVCMJDBTTFNCMBHFNBLJOHDPOGPSNJOHBNFOENFOUTBOEUFDIOJDBMDIBOHFTBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOE t PGUIF$PEF 0SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUP;POJOHQFSNJUUJOHEJHJUBMQPJOUPGTBMFTJHOTBUDFSUBJOCVJMEJOHTGPSQVCMJDBTTFNCMBHFNBLJOHDPOGPSNJOHBNFOENFOUTBOEUFDIOJDBMDIBOHFTBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOE PGUIF$PEF t 0SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUP;POJOHSFWJTJOHSFHVMBUJPOTQFSUBJOJOHUPIPNFPGmDFVTFSFEFmOJOHIPNFPGmDFBTIPNFPDDVQBUJPOQSPWJEJOHDPOEJUJPOTVOEFSXIJDIIPNFPDDVQBUJPOTBSFBMMPXFEJOSFTJEFOUJBM t 0 SEJOBODFSFMBUJOHUP;POJOHSFWJTJOHSFHVMBUJPOTQFSUBJOJOHUPIPNFPGmDFVTFSFEFmOJOHIPNFPGmDFBTIPNFPDDVQBUJPOQSPWJEJOHDPOEJUJPOTVOEFSXIJDIIPNFPDDVQBUJPOTBSFBMMPXFEJOSFTJEFOUJBM BSFBTJOUIFVOJODPSQPSBUFEBSFBBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOEPGUIF$PEF BSFBTJOUIFVOJODPSQPSBUFEBSFBBNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOEPGUIF$PEF t 0SEJOBODF SFMBUJOH UP 4BGFUZ 3FHVMBUJPOT BOE *OTQFDUJPO PG7FIJDMFT 1FSGPSNJOH 4QFDJBM5SBOTQPSUBUJPO 4FSWJDFT QSPWJEJOH B NFDIBOJTN BOE SFRVJSFNFOUT GPS TFMG DFSUJmDBUJPO PG WFIJDMF JOTQFDUJPOT t BNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOEPGUIF$PEF 0SEJOBODF SFMBUJOH UP 4BGFUZ 3FHVMBUJPOT BOE *OTQFDUJPO PG7FIJDMFT 1FSGPSNJOH 4QFDJBM5SBOTQPSUBUJPO 4FSWJDFT QSPWJEJOH B NFDIBOJTN BOE SFRVJSFNFOUT GPS TFMG DFSUJmDBUJPO PG WFIJDMF JOTQFDUJPOT BNFOEJOH4FDUJPOTBOEPGUIF$PEF "MMJOUFSFTUFEQBSUJFTNBZBQQFBSBUUIFUJNFBOEQMBDFTQFDJmFE "MMJOUFSFTUFEQBSUJFTNBZBQQFBSBUUIFUJNFBOEQMBDFTQFDJmFE "QFSTPOXIPEFDJEFTUPBQQFBMBOZEFDJTJPONBEFCZBOZCPBSE BHFODZ PSDPNNJTTJPOXJUISFTQFDUUPBOZNBUUFSDPOTJEFSFEBUJUTNFFUJOHPSIFBSJOH XJMMOFFEBSFDPSEPGQSPDFFEJOHT4VDIQFSTPOTNBZ "QFSTPOXIPEFDJEFTUPBQQFBMBOZEFDJTJPONBEFCZBOZCPBSE BHFODZ PSDPNNJTTJPOXJUISFTQFDUUPBOZNBUUFSDPOTJEFSFEBUJUTNFFUJOHPSIFBSJOH XJMMOFFEBSFDPSEPGQSPDFFEJOHT4VDIQFSTPOTNBZ OFFEUPFOTVSFUIBUBWFSCBUJNSFDPSEPGUIFQSPDFFEJOHTJTNBEF JODMVEJOHUIFUFTUJNPOZBOEFWJEFODFVQPOXIJDIUIFBQQFBMJTUPCFCBTFE OFFEUPFOTVSFUIBUBWFSCBUJNSFDPSEPGUIFQSPDFFEJOHTJTNBEF JODMVEJOHUIFUFTUJNPOZBOEFWJEFODFVQPOXIJDIUIFBQQFBMJTUPCFCBTFE .JBNJ%BEF$PVOUZQSPWJEFTFRVBMBDDFTTBOEFRVBMPQQPSUVOJUZJOJUTQSPHSBNT TFSWJDFTBOEBDUJWJUJFTBOEEPFTOPUEJTDSJNJOBUFPOUIFCBTJTPGEJTBCJMJUZ'PSNBUFSJBMJOBMUFSOBUFGPSNBU BTJHOMBOHVBHF .JBNJ%BEF$PVOUZQSPWJEFTFRVBMBDDFTTBOEFRVBMPQQPSUVOJUZJOJUTQSPHSBNT TFSWJDFTBOEBDUJWJUJFTBOEEPFTOPUEJTDSJNJOBUFPOUIFCBTJTPGEJTBCJMJUZ'PSNBUFSJBMJOBMUFSOBUFGPSNBU BTJHOMBOHVBHF JOUFSQSFUFSPSPUIFSBDDPNNPEBUJPO QMFBTFDBMMPSTFOEFNBJMUPagendco@miamidade.govBUMFBTUmWFEBZTJOBEWBODFPGUIFNFFUJOH JOUFSQSFUFSPSPUIFSBDDPNNPEBUJPO QMFBTFDBMMPSTFOEFNBJMUPagendco@miamidade.govBUMFBTUmWFEBZTJOBEWBODFPGUIFNFFUJOH  )"37&:367*/ $-&3, )"37&:367*/ $-&3,  $)3*4501)&3"(3*11" %&165:$-&3,  $)3*4501)&3"(3*11" %&165:$-&3, For legal ads online, go to http://legalads.miamidade.gov For legal ads online, go to http://legalads.miamidade.gov

11


MIAMI TODAY

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

13

Education Trends Public schools near windfall downtown headquarters deal By Jesse Scheckner

Negotiations to develop school board land across from the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts are nearing completion, according to Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. “We are well on our way,” Mr. Carvalho told Miami Today. “We selected one business entity and partnership with the Arsht Center, as well as the county, and in the coming months we’ll be able to announce a final agreement.” In June, the school board was negotiating the development of one of 10 total acres across Biscayne Boulevard the board plans to develop, the success of which would “catapult forward” development of the nine other acres. Mr. Carvalho in March wrote of the school board’s intention to transfer title of the land, valued at $20.6 million, to Miami-based urban real estate firm Crescent Heights, which owns a 1.13-acre adjacent parcel, in exchange for 100,000 square feet of office space valued at $42 million. Plans for the combined two parcels, encompassing two-plus acres, include a mixed-use development incorporating school board office space, about 1,100 multifamily rental apartments and a 49,075-square-foot parking garage with 1,100 spaces.

The school system expects to announce in the coming months a final deal for its headquarters, above.

“What we have moving forward, first, is a lot of partners at the table,” Miami-Dade Schools Chief Financial Officer Lisa Martinez said in June. “The school district has to finalize our work in negotiating agreements with Crescent Heights. Embedded with their agreement with us is their agreement with [Omni CRA].” As part of the agreement, 600 of the 1,100 parking spaces will be given to the Omni Community

Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for shared use by the school board and the Arsht Center, which will have “complementary scheduling needs” for parking, according to Mr. Carvalho’s March memo. “Without this, we can’t begin to unencumber our parcels, both on the parking side and our administrative offices,” Miami-Dade Public Schools Chief Facilities Officer Jaime Torrens had said. Mr. Carvalho said the deal,

which would establish the school board one of several tenants at the planned building, could substantially benefit school headquarters operations. “[It] would provide us with an opportunity to relocate from this old and not-so-attractive building [and] be part of a larger structure, but not the only tenants, saving millions annually in operational costs and maintenance,” he said. “[We would be] a good partner,

providing long-term parking solutions for the Arsht Center and the surrounding community and monetize the roughly 10 acres we’d abandon here.” The board had previously tried to sell or develop its properties three times – twice in 2011 and once in 2014 – drawing interest from several noteworthy investors, including casino and resort giant Genting Group, which alone owns about $500 million in Omni real estate. In May 2015, school board members agreed to explore land development options for the 10 contiguous acres it owns along Northeast Second Avenue and Biscayne Boulevard, which contains several buildings, two schools, parking lots and WLRN radio and TV stations. At a Nov. 15, 2017, meeting, the school board authorized Mr. Carvalho to seek a collaborative deal and negotiate the sale of the one-acre parcel. According to Mr. Carvalho, the first developmental step is close to being taken. “We’ll begin the process of relocating our own presence here downtown,” he said, “delivering on much-needed parking availability for the Arsht and downtown community and embracing a significant business deal to monetize the roughly 10 acres of much soughtafter downtown property.”

University enrollments track the economic rollercoaster By Katherine Lewin

Miami-Dade colleges and universities have seen enrollment trends both rise and decrease over the past five years, probably stemming from factors that include unemployment rates and an improving economy. The University of Miami has stayed consistent since 2011, with fall enrollment numbers staying in the 16,000-student range for undergraduates and graduate students combined, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The 2016 total showed an increase from 2011, with 16,744 total students enrolled, and fall 2017 showed another jump for total enrollment to 17,003, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. FIU has shown a steady increase in total students each fall since 2011, from 44,616 students then to 56,886 in 2017, according to data provided by FIU and the National Center for Education Statistics. Florida Memorial University has seen total enrolled students steadily decline from 1,735 in 2011 to only 1,339 in 2016, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics.

‘We’ve even recruited from Catholic high schools outside of South Florida, as far as Ocala and Orlando. That paid off in terms of increasing our freshman enrollment.’ Alfredo Garcia Miami Dade College has also seen a drop in the past five years, from 63,736 total enrolled students in 2011 to 55,206 in fall 2016, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Archie Cubarrubia, vice provost of institutional effectiveness for Miami Dade College, said

there’s a relationship between enrollment and unemployment. “A researcher, Nate Johnson, found that for every 1% change in unemployment rate, there’s typically a 2.5% change in fall enrollment,” Mr. Cubarrubia said. “If people are unemployed, they typically go to local community colleges. During the recession, we had a large spike in enrollment. That enrollment has slowly been going down for the last couple of years.” St. Thomas University saw its enrollment numbers double since 2011, from 2,472 fall students to 4,662 students in 2016, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. In the past three years, St. Thomas has seen a 40% increase in freshman enrollment alone, said Alfredo Garcia, the acting provost. In fall 2017, 231 freshmen entered, which was a 16% increase over 2016. Mr. Garcia said the improvement can be attributed to a variety of factors. “Our outreach and recruitment has been more focused. It’s highlighted the uniqueness of our campus life and our emphasis on developing ethical leaders for life,” Mr. Garcia said. “We’ve also made a concerted effort to recruit more students from the

‘After revamping our recruitment strategy, incorporating new technology, and revisiting our business processes, we were able to turn the tide in 2016....’ Roxanna Cruz archdiocese and Catholic high schools. We’ve even recruited from Catholic high schools outside of South Florida, as far as Ocala and Orlando. That paid off in terms of increasing our freshman enrollment.” Barry University saw a slight decrease in the last five years in total enrolled students, from 8,905

fall students in 2011 to 7,404 in 2016, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics. But according to Roxanna Cruz, associate vice president, recruitment and admissions, Barry has seen an increase in new freshman enrollment the past three years, despite total student numbers declining slightly. “Our freshmen numbers declined in years 2013 to 2015 but had been steadily at around 650 prior to that. After revamping our recruitment strategy, incorporating new technology, and revisiting our business processes, we were able to turn the tide in 2016 and gradually bring our freshmen numbers back to where they were 10 years ago,” Ms. Cruz said via email. “We are also beginning to see slight improvement in our new transfer enrollment this year. We are more data driven and strategic in our efforts than we ever were in the past. This has made all the difference in helping us shape our class to be the right size and the right combination of diverse, highly engaged, and forwardthinking students.” In 2017, Barry University enrolled 671 new freshmen and it’s on track to exceed this number this coming fall, Ms. Cruz said.


22

MIAMI TODAY

TODAY’S NEWS

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

Miami city budget to add few jobs but two new departments By John Charles Robbins

The proposed budget for the City of Miami’s next fiscal year adds a few new jobs while eliminating others that have remained vacant for some time. The proposed budget for fiscal year 2018-19 also creates two new departments for the growing municipal government. When the reorganizing is complete, and if the proposed budget is adopted next month, it will mean 19 new full-time positions overall, rising from the current 4,412 employees to 4,431. It is a much smaller jump in employment than the previous year, when the employee headcount rose by 66 positions. City officials are looking forward to the two scheduled public hearings on the proposed budgets. The first is Sept. 13 and the second is Sept. 27. The hearings are set for 5:05 p.m. in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive. The city’s proposed budget for the new year was released in July by Mayor Francis Suarez and City Manager Emilio T. González. They presented the city commission with a proposed 201819 General Fund Budget of $750,686,000, which is $23.858 million more than the current adopted General Fund Budget of $726,828,000. “This is the part of the budget that funds the largest number of City functions, has the least number of restrictions on how the funds can be spent, and therefore has the most pressure upon it,” Mr. González wrote in his cover letter. The city’s proposed Operating Budget for the coming fiscal year amounts to $1.086 billion, and

MIAMI FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES

includes a $14 million reserve for labor negotiations and $5 million for beautification projects. The city manager described the new departments in his cover letter. “To be more efficient and to provide a greater breadth of wrap-around services to the City’s most vulnerable, we are proposing the creation of a Department of Human Services. This new Department will not create any new positions or grow costs in any way. Rather, by re-organizing the functions of Homeless Services, workforce Opportunity Centers, veterans affairs, childcare services, and Live Healthy Little Havana, the City can create

synergies and provide better services to those most in need. Mr. Milton Vickers will be named to head this Department,” wrote Mr. González. The second change is to merge the Office of Film and Entertainment into the existing Communications Department. “Again, this will not create any new positions or grow costs in any way. Rather, it will make these functions more efficient by combining their strengths and contacts to improve their coordination,” he wrote. Mr. González said they are also proposing to eliminate 59 vacant, non-sworn positions from across almost every department

and freezing 24 vacant sworn positions (15 in the Fire-Rescue Department and 9 in the Police Department). All of the sworn positions and most of the civilian positions have been vacant for more than a year. This means that the real impact on services should be minimal and departments will have to find a way to get the job done with these changes, he said. Personnel costs, including wages and employee benefits, represent the largest general fund expenditure category. These costs account for almost three-quarters of the total general fund expenditure budget. In the proposed 2018-19 Gen-

eral Fund Budget, effective Oct. 1, salaries and wages amount to $323.3 million, or 43.1% of expenses, and employee benefits total $217.2 million, or 28.9% of expenses. More than half of general fund spending is allocated to the provision of public safety services. The Police Department and the Fire-Rescue Department together comprise 51.4% of the general fund expenditure budget. By looking at expenditures by function, the proposed budget has public safety expenditures amounting to $386 million; resilience and public works totaling $85.1 million (11.3%); general government totaling $78.1 million (10.4%); other departments amounting to $65.5 million (8.7%); planning and development totaling $22.9 million (3.1%); and non-departmental accounts amounting to $109.5 million (14.6%). The proposed overall millage rate in the city, used to calculate property tax bills, will remain unchanged for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. The city commission on July 26 set the overall millage rate for fiscal year 2018-19 at 8.0300 mills. Final approval of the millage rate, expected in late September, will mark the first time in seven years the city hasn’t lowered the overall millage rate. For comparison, the city’s overall millage rate in fiscal year 2011 was 8.6441 mills. The city’s proposed Capital Budget for fiscal year 2018-19 is $526,375,000. The proposed operating and capital budgets are available at the city’s website at www.miamigov. com/budget.

Supreme Court slows suit to bar votes on six amendments By Jim Saunders The News Service of Florida

The Florida Supreme Court on Tuesday sent to a lower court a lawsuit that seeks to prevent six proposed constitutional amend-

ments from going on the November ballot. Justices tried to make clear they were not ruling on the underlying issues in the case, saying in an order that the transfer to Leon County circuit court “should not

Arts Culture &

2018

September 20

The world of Arts and Culture is constantly changing and now more than ever it’s being tested, whether it’s in the performance hall or the halls of government. Where funding decisions are being made – From the Performing Arts Center to the Book Fair; from our fabulous ballet to the theater; unique symphony to the museums – Miami Today will highlight the latest developments and trends in an authoritative special report. Consider the advantages of advertising with MIAMI TODAY: • We reach 68,000 plus influential readers. • Mean household income $259,499 • 98% college educated • Average reading time is more than 22 minutes

For space reservation contact our advertising department at 305-358-2663 Deadline is Tuesday, September 18, at noon.

be construed as an adjudication or comment on the merits of the petition.” But the order, along with a decision against holding oral arguments, means that the Supreme Court will not immediately take up the dispute. Plaintiffs, including former Supreme Court Justice Harry Lee Anstead, filed the case Aug. 14 as a challenge to six proposed constitutional amendments placed on the November ballot by the Florida Constitution Revision Commission. The challenge is based on arguments that the commission improperly tied together unrelated issues in single ballot proposals. Attorney General Pam Bondi’s office, however, filed a response last week calling on the Supreme Court to reject the case. Among the arguments raised in the response was that the plaintiffs had not offered a “compelling reason” why the case shouldn’t follow a rule of being filed in circuit court. “That rule serves a broad range of policies conducive to the proper administration of justice,” Ms. Bondi’s office argued. “For example, it affords this [Supreme] Court the benefit of at least one carefully considered lower court decision addressing the same issues; allows for the creation of a fully developed record facilitating this [Supreme] Court’s review

of that lower court decision; and ensures that Florida’s highest judicial authority will not be tasked with resolving important questions of law until the issues presented have already been clarified and refined by multiple rounds of adversarial briefing, including briefing supplied by interested non-parties.” The Supreme Court order Tuesday did not explain justices’ reasoning for sending the case to the lower court. The 37-member Constitution Revision Commission meets every 20 years and has unique power to place proposals on the ballot. The commission this spring approved eight amendments for the November ballot, though the proposals have faced a barrage of legal challenges. The case filed Aug. 14 on behalf of Mr. Anstead and fellow plaintiff Robert J. Barnas challenged six of the eight proposals and alleges that they violate voters’ First Amendment rights by tying together unrelated issues. The case raises the specter of voters having conflicting views of issues in the same ballot proposal – for example, on a ballot proposal that combines a ban on offshore oil drilling with a ban on vaping or using electronic cigarettes in workplaces. “This is logrolling and a form

of issue gerrymandering that violates the First Amendment right of the voter to vote for or against specific independent and unrelated proposals to amend the Constitution without paying the price of supporting a measure the voter opposes or opposing a measure the voter supports,” the case said. “This [Supreme] Court has acknowledged that the right to vote is a fundamental right that may not be abridged in the absence of a compelling and narrowly drawn state interest.” But Ms. Bondi’s office argued that such arguments don’t have a basis in legal precedents or history. “Moreover, even if the First Amendment included the right petitioners’ claim, the CRC had an entirely rational basis for bundling some of the amendments for inclusion on the 2018 general election ballot,” Ms. Bondi’s office argued in the response last week. “According to election officials, long ballots often discourage citizens from voting at all, and if the CRC had listed all the proposed amendments separately, there would appear 25 questions on the ballot this fall. … In other words, the CRC acted reasonably and with the proper intention of minimizing ballot fatigue when it decided to bundle proposed constitutional amendments.”


24

WEEK OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2018

MIAMI TODAY

On your desk

At the office

or in your pocket

or on the road

Be informed, stay informed. Miami Today e-paper is always with you Subscribe to our E-paper only $60 a year • Easy to read and navigate • Unlimited access to 12 years of searchable archives • Available before print edition GET YOURS AT MIAMITODAYEPAPER.COM

MiaMiToday A Singular Voice in an Evolving City

Miami Today: Week of Thursday, August 30, 2018  

Special section on Education Trends. Just a preview of some of our top stories this week. Includes editorial page. To subscribe, visit www.m...

Miami Today: Week of Thursday, August 30, 2018  

Special section on Education Trends. Just a preview of some of our top stories this week. Includes editorial page. To subscribe, visit www.m...

Advertisement