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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

MONDAY, APRIL 25, 2011

108TH YEAR I ©2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

Reports of missing Syrians hint at wider crackdown BY ANTHONY SHADID

New York Times Service

because he was a staunch supporter of the Orange Revolution in Ukraine, the pro-Western uprising in 2004 that the Kremlin opposed. Adelaja, who has a boisterous laugh and a relentlessly sunny personality, tries to brush aside the insults. He said his church’s popularity showed that Ukrainians were on a spiritual quest after having weathered the statemandated atheism of the Soviet era. He said that more than 100,000 people attended services regularly at the main arena in Kiev or his affiliates across Ukraine, which has a population of 46 million.

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Dozens of residents have gone missing in Syria since Friday, many of them from the restive city of Homs and towns on the outskirts of the capital, Damascus, human rights activists said Sunday, amid signs that the Syrian government may widen its crackdown on a five-week uprising that has already killed hundreds. The disappearances are yet another indication that the government’s decision to lift draconian emergency rule, in place since 1963, may prove more rhetoric than reform. Though the government has touted the law’s repeal on Thursday as a sweeping step, the past few days have proven some of the bloodiest and most repressive since the uprising began. On Friday alone, at least 109 people were killed, as security forces fired on protesters in 14 towns and cities. At least 12 more were killed Saturday, when mourners sought to bury the dead from the day before. Another person was reported killed Sunday in Jabla, where security forces fired on residents after the visit of the governor. “We don’t trust this regime anymore,” one protester there said. “We’re sick of it.” Human Rights Watch called on the United Nations to set up an international inquiry into their deaths and urged the United States and Europe to impose sanctions on

• TURN TO UKRAINE, 6A

• TURN TO SYRIA, 2A

SPIRITUAL RENAISSANCE A NIGERIAN EVANGELICAL PREACHER’S MESSAGE CATCHES FIRE IN ORTHODOX UKRAINE

JOSEPH SYWENKYJ/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

The Rev. Sunday Adelaja, an immigrant from Nigeria who has built a thriving Christian evangelical church in the former Soviet Union, holds a Ukrainian flag during a prayer in Kiev. BY CLIFFORD J. LEVY

New York Times Service

Every Sunday, thousands of worshippers crowd into an arena here for a rollicking evangelical Christian service. A choir and rock band belt out gospel tunes in Russian. People sing along and clap and shimmy in the aisles. They dash up to the stage for a chance to grab the microphone and declare how their new faith has changed their lives. It is as if a Sunbelt megachurch had been transplanted to Kiev, birthplace of Slavic Orthodoxy, land of onion-domed cathedrals and incense-shrouded icons. But the preacher at the podium has little if any connection to the United States. Could

there be a more unlikely success story in the former Soviet Union than the Rev. Sunday Adelaja, an immigrant from Nigeria who has developed an ardent — and enormous — following across Ukraine? From his start with a prayer group in a ramshackle apartment soon after the Soviet collapse two decades ago, Adelaja has built a vast religious organization under the banner of his church, Embassy of God. He has become one of Ukraine’s best known public figures, advocating a Christianity that pairs evangelical tenets with an up-from-the-bootstraps philosophy found in religiously oriented self-help books. (Several of which Adelaja has published.)

Misrata rebels say they drove out Gadhafi forces

Opposition in Yemen divided over deal

BY KARIN LAUB AND BEN HUBBARD

Libyan rebel fighters search a building for pro-Gadhafi forces in Misrata on Saturday.

Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya — Rebel fighters drove Moammar Gadhafi’s forces to the edge of the besieged western city of Misrata on Sunday, taking control of the main hospital where government troops had been holed up, a resident said. Gadhafi loyalists fired dozens of rockets at Misrata on Sunday, said the resident, despite claims by the Libyan government that the army has held its fire since Friday. The resident asked to be identified only by his given name, Abdel Salam, for fear of retribution. At least 28 people have been killed and 85 wounded by fighting in the city Saturday and Sunday, said Dr. Khaled Abu Falgah, head of the Misrata medical committee.

AP

“The last 24 hours have been one of the hardest and saddest days in the last 65 days,” he said. Libyan officials have said in the past two days that the military is pulling back in Misrata, ostensibly

Misrata, the only rebel stronghold in Gadhafi-controlled western Libya, has become the most dramatic battleground in the Libyan uprising, which began in February after similar revolts in Tunisia and Egypt ousted longtime leaders. Fighting elsewhere in the country is at a stalemate, even with NATO airstrikes that began last month. Hundreds of people have been killed in two months of a government siege backed by tanks, mortars and snipers firing from rooftops. Late last week, snipers either fled or were flushed out of an eightstory downtown building on a main thoroughfare, Tripoli Street, in a setback for Gadhafi loyalists who had controlled the city center.

to enable tribal chiefs from the area to negotiate with the rebels. Late Saturday, Deputy Foreign Minister Khaled Kaim said troops remained in their positions in the city, but • TURN TO LIBYA, 2A claimed they halted all activity.

Haitians forced out of tents to homes just as precarious BY RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD New York Times Service ALLISON SHELLEY/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

SANA’A, Yemen — (AP) — Deep divisions within Yemen’s opposition appeared to doom an Arab proposal for the president to step down within a month, raising the prospect of more bloodshed and instability in a nation already beset by deep poverty and conflict. President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who has ruled for 32 years, agreed Saturday to the Gulf Cooperation Council’s formula for him to transfer power to his vice president within 30 days of a deal being signed in exchange for immunity from prosecution for him and his sons. A coalition of seven opposition parties generally accepted the deal. But thousands stood their ground Sunday in a permanent protest camp in part of the capital, Sana’a, and their leaders said they suspect Saleh is just maneuvering to buy time and cling to power. The protesters say the established opposition political parties taking part in the talks with Arab mediators do not represent them and cannot turn off the rage on the streets. “President Saleh has in the past agreed to initiatives and he went back on his word,” said Khaled al Ansi, one of the youth leaders organizing the street protests. “We have no reason to believe that he would not do this again.” So far, Saleh has outrun more than two months of protests pressing for him to immediately step

He has throngs of admirers, but is also reviled by some in the Ukrainian establishment who resent a black man from Africa luring white Slavs away from their religious traditions. The Ukrainian Orthodox Church calls him a cult leader, and law enforcement officials have repeatedly investigated him, once accusing him of involvement in a pyramid scheme. Around Kiev, it is not hard to find racial caricatures of him. The Russian government, too, has taken offense, barring him from entering the country, though he has a growing number of adherents in Russia. Adelaja said he believed that he was declared persona non grata

Marie Nicoles Meus with her baby daughter in a hut she shares with another family, in Croix-des-Bouquets, Haiti.

driven into tent cities and makeshift camps by the January 2010 earthquake have moved out of them, officially bringing down the displaced population to 680,000 from a peak of 1.5 million, according to the International Organization for Migration. But what may seem like a clear sign of progress, officials warn, is also a cause of concern. Very few of the people who left the camps — only 4.7 percent, by the group’s estimate — did so because their homes had been rebuilt or repaired. Instead, a vast majority appear to have been forced out through mass evictions by landowners, or to have left the camps on their own to

PORT-AU-PRINCE — The way Robert Darvin sees it, he is one of the lucky ones. After being evicted from a tent camp a few months ago, he, his wife and their three children crammed into a rebuilt home the size of a small U-Haul trailer. But at least a roof shelters their heads, even if a flimsy one that allows the rain to pour through. “It is made of cheap cement,” Darvin said, pointing to fresh cracks in the walls. He sounded at once relieved at having found a place and fretful over what another earthquake or hurricane might do to it. “If you think too much about it, you lose your mind.” More than half of the Haitians • TURN TO HAITI, 2A

• TURN TO YEMEN, 2A

NEARLY 115 DEAD IN SOUTH SUDAN CLASHES, 3A

IN EASTER MESSAGE, POPE URGES DIPLOMACY IN LIBYA, 6A

IMPACT OF FED’S STIMULUS DISAPPOINTS ECONOMISTS, BUSINESS FRONT

76ERS RALLY TO BEAT HEAT IN GAME 4, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS..........4A U.S. NEWS ...................5A OPINION .......................7A COMICS & PUZZLES ..6B


THE MIAMI HERALD 25 ABRIL 2011