Issuu on Google+

,035(62 < ',675,%8,'2 325

FWYVGHGyODU

MiamiHerald.com HOTEL COPIES: A copy of The Miami Herald will be delivered to your room. A credit of US$0.25 will be posted to your account if delivery is declined.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011

108TH YEAR I Š2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

DOUG MILLS/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

U.S. urges caution over â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;extremely highâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; radiation in Japan BY DAVID E. SANGER AND MATTHEW L. WALD New York Times Service

William Allman, chief White House curator, in the Green Room of the White House. Behind Allman are two paintings, Sand Dunes at Sunset, Atlantic City, by Henry Ossawa Tanner, top, and Independence Hall in Philadelphia, by Ferdinand Richardt.

THE WHITE HOUSE

A LIVING MUSEUM BY RANDY KENNEDY New York Times Service

WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reduced to its bare particulars, it can sound like one of the strangest museums in the world. It holds no special exhibitions in-house. It has no website of its own. Admission to the public is free, but it can take as long as six months to get in. For those who succeed, there are treasures on the order of John Singer Sargent, Asher B. Durand and Jacob Lawrence to be seen. But works by two of the most famous artists in the collection â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cezanne (a still life and a handful of landscapes) and Monet (a gauzy view of the Seine) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are kept out of public view. For a few years the collectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lone Grandma Moses painting was seen almost exclusively by a pre-teenage girl from Georgia named Amy and her friends. Add to all this the longstanding tradition that privileged guests are allowed to use some of the historical artifacts as desks and to eat off of others, and it can be a curatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nightmare. But it is nev-

run screaming, telling somebody, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put those hot television lights up against the portrait of Washington!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; You worry about someone spilling a drink on something. Sometimes somebody breaks a piece of furniture. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the nature of it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a place where people actually live.â&#x20AC;? As if to underscore his point a black-and-white blur â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bo, the Obamasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Portuguese water dog â&#x20AC;&#x201D; could be seen through the

er boring, caring for the collection of the 210-year-old museum that one of its residents, Thomas Jefferson, described as palatial enough for â&#x20AC;&#x153;two emperors, one pope and the Grand Lamaâ&#x20AC;?, and a later one, Harry S. Truman, bemoaned as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a great white jailâ&#x20AC;?. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a museum but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the White House, and so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a working house,â&#x20AC;? said William G. Allman, who has worked in the curatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce here for 35 years, and has been chief curator since 2002. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are times when you

6TURN TO WHITE HOUSE, 2A

Lighter Relieving a Steamboat Aground by George Caleb Bingham, hangs in the Green Room at the White House.

NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

Disabled leader inspires Ecuador BY JIM WYSS jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

QUITO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The ornate lobby of Ecuadorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice presidential palace is teeming with people in wheelchairs and on crutches, mothers leading the blind and the developmentally disabled. Many are here because they believe that the man upstairs is one of their own. Ever since a thiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bullet ripped through his spine 13 years ago, Ecuadorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president, Lenin Moreno, has been paralyzed from the waist down. When he was elected second-in-command of this Andean nation in 2007, he became one of the highest ranking politicians in Latin

American history to have a visible disability. Sitting in a wheelchair behind a wooden desk at his ofďŹ ce, Moreno, 58, is quick to downplay his historic role. There have been congressmen and judges in wheelchairs before, he said. There have been Latin American MORENO presidents with speech impediments, and Joaquin Balaguer, the former president of the Dominican Republic, was in his 90s and legally blind when he won a third term.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all handicapped at some moment in our life â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as children or as seniors,â&#x20AC;? Moreno told The Miami Herald. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not the only one.â&#x20AC;? What is certain is that Moreno and President Rafael Correa have done more to promote the rights of people with serious disabilities in Ecuador than any administration in recent memory. The vice presidency spearheaded the ďŹ rst door-to-door survey to locate and identify disabled people; the administration has increased the budget for disabled care from about $100,000 a year to $65 million per year, and

Gregory Jaczko, the chairman of the commission, said in Congressional testimony that the commission believed that all the water in the spent fuel pool at the No. 4 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station had boiled dry, leaving fuel rods stored there exposed and bleeding radiation. As a result, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe that radiation levels are extremely high, which could possibly impact the ability to take corrective measures.â&#x20AC;? If his analysis is accurate and Japanese workers have been unable to keep the spent fuel at that inoperative reactor properly cooled â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it needs to remain covered with water at all times â&#x20AC;&#x201D; radiation levels could make it difďŹ cult not only to ďŹ x the problem at reactor No. 4, but to keep workers at the Daiichi complex from servicing any of the other problem reactors at the plant. Jaczko said radiation levels may make it impossible to continue what he called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;backup backupâ&#x20AC;? cooling functions that have so

WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission gave a signiďŹ cantly bleaker appraisal of the threat posed by Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nuclear crisis than the Japanese government, saying on Wednesday that the damage at one crippled reactor was much more serious than Japanese ofďŹ cials had acknowledged and advising to U.S. citizens to evacuate a wider area around the plant than the perimeter established by Japan. The announcement marked a new and ominous chapter in the ďŹ ve-day long effort by Japanese engineers to bring four side-by-side reactors under control after their cooling systems were knocked out by an earthquake and tsunami last Friday. It also suggested a serious split between Washington and Tokyo, after U.S. ofďŹ cials concluded that the Japanese warnings were insufďŹ cient, and that, deliberately or not, they had understated the potential threat of what is taking place inside the nuclear facility. 6TURN TO JAPAN, 2A

Oil money helping Gadhafi buy support BY JEFFREY GETTLEMAN New York Times Service

Administrative Moammar GadhaďŹ , the gleaming new $100 million government complex that GadhaďŹ is helping pay for and that bears his name â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even though it is for Maliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government, not Libyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Mali, a desperately poor country near Libya, is a case in point of the allegiance GadhaďŹ has bought in Africa. He has tapped Libyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vast oil reserves to liberally sprinkle billions of dollars around subSaharan Africa, playing all sides and investing in almost anything â&#x20AC;&#x201D; governments, rebel groups, luxury hotels, Islamic organizations, rubber factories, rice paddies, diamond mines, supermarkets and the countless OiLibya gas stations. From Liberia to South Africa to Madagascar, Libyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holdings are

BAMAKO, Mali â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elhadj Maiga is a Moammar GadhaďŹ recruiter and a proud one at that, scrambling to assemble a pipeline of young men from Mali to go and ďŹ ght for The Great Leader. At this stage, without cash for guns or transport, Maigaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group of about 200 young men is more of a fan club than a militia. But like other pro-GadhaďŹ groups that have sprung up here since the rebellion in Libya began, what it lacks in logistics it makes up in loyalty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all ready to die for him,â&#x20AC;? Maiga said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done so much for us, after all.â&#x20AC;? Just look at Maigaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life: He prays at a mosque in Bamako, Maliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital, that GadhaďŹ built; he watches television on the Malian national network that GadhaďŹ set up in the 6TURN TO LIBYA, 2A 1980s; and he admires with a feel- n Gadhafi forces attack rebel stronghold in ing nothing short of awe La Cite the west, 3A

A Malian Gadhafi supporter holds a flier that asks people to support the leader in Bamako, Mali.

6TURN TO ECUADOR, 4A

NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

U.S. drones fly deep into Mexico to gather intelligence for drug war BY GINGER THOMPSON AND MARK MAZZETTI New York Times Service

WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stepping up its involvement in Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drug war, the Obama administration has begun sending drones deep into Mexican territory to gather intelligence that helps locate trafďŹ ckers and follow their networks, according to U.S. and Mexican ofďŹ cials. The Pentagon began ďŹ&#x201A;ying highaltitude, unarmed drones over Mexican skies last month, U.S. military ofďŹ cials said, in hopes of collecting information to turn over to Mexican law enforcement agencies.

GADHAFI FORCES ATTACK REBEL STRONGHOLD, 3A

Other administration ofďŹ cials said a Homeland Security drone helped Mexican authorities ďŹ nd several suspects linked to the Feb. 15 killing of Jaime Zapata, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent. U.S. President Barack Obama and his Mexican counterpart, Felipe Calderon, formally agreed to continue the surveillance ďŹ&#x201A;ights during a White House meeting March 3. The assistance has been kept secret because of legal restrictions in Mexico and the heated political sensitivities there about sovereignty, the ofďŹ cials said. Before the outbreak of drug vio-

DEA SEIZES GEORGIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SUPPLY OF KEY LETHAL INJECTION DRUG, 5A

lence in Mexico that has left more than 34,000 dead in the past four years, such an agreement would have been all but unthinkable, they said. Pentagon, U.S. State Department, Homeland Security and Mexican ofďŹ cials declined to comment publicly about the introduction of drones in Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s counternarcotics efforts. But some ofďŹ cials, speaking only on the condition of anonymity, said the move was evidence of the two countriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; deepening cooperation in efforts to prevail over a common threat. In addition to expanding the use

U.S. PANEL ISSUES MIXED VERDICT ON BAILOUT, BUSINESS FRONT

of drones, the two leaders agreed to open a counternarcotics â&#x20AC;&#x153;fusionâ&#x20AC;? center, the second such facility in Mexico, where Mexican and U.S. agencies would work together, the ofďŹ cials said. Before Obama met with Calderon at the White House, diplomatic tensions threatened to weaken the cooperation between their governments. State Department cables obtained by WikiLeaks had reported criticism of the Mexican government by U.S. diplomats, setting off a ďŹ restorm of resentment in Mexico. Then in February, outrage in Washington over Zapataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mur-

der prompted Mexican ofďŹ cials to complain that the U.S. government paid attention to drug violence only when it took the life of a U.S. citizen. In the end, however, mutual interests prevailed. Calderon told Obama that his country had borne the brunt of a scourge driven by U.S. guns and drug consumption, and urged the UnitedStates to do more to help. Obama, worried about Mexico falling into chaos and about violence spilling over the border, said his administration was eager to play a more central role, the ofďŹ cials said.

MADRID, CHELSEA MAKE IT TO CHAMPIONS LEAGUE QUARTERS, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS ...........4A WORLD NEWS.............6A OPINION........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES...6B 5


              

  

BY LANCE BRASHEAR LBRASHEAR@HOY.COM.EC

                        

       

       

 

         !    "  #    

         

 $      

      %                    &                 

   '      

    (   )                 &   *            *         

+   ,    &  ,      & +  - %  .   . &      

       

   ! /    .   . 0 /  12 

      



       3    4 

                  *                 * +  - %   

  !  " ñ              

 +  (       

            ,      5 %     *6      *

 !  *(     

               * 7             

   + 8 HOW THEY DO IT

   



" ! '  

7 )  5     ,    

    % !  7 ) 

1:,    ;      %   ( 

        

 

 

       

           ,   

! "  #  $   %  

                                  '    

  *(  

           

4  , 

         ,  * ñ  

        

    â&#x20AC;&#x201C;                   %  ,   



 ! 

* &   * 7 

   

                 

   *                   +  - 4 (   

                 * A    

 

   

       

       ,  $        ñ        ,  

     

           

   , 7  

       ,   & ,                  $  *B        , 

  * CLEARING A PATH

  %

      

            7 )                   &  $             ñ 

  ,   

                  

      

           +               (  4       %    

              $          ,   ,     ,    &                 ( ñ           

    (          

         

  4       ,             

  $  % /            

    (

  ,                   * ´

ECUADOR FOR ALL,

  % %  6>>&121  A    ;  (= CDE2F > >>2&@>>' G  HUASQUILA AMAZON LODGE,

 )  <  & 6 & +  ; = >&>E:'E1 < = &21:>'@ <= :@':E' G )  WINGS ON WHEELS,

    , 0 /   ''&1&E'D&:@1111 G    ,           ,    <                â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

         )              * (        , & ,     

'      8 

     &

  /               

  ,   / '

  = * '           ,    *

COMMITMENT

(  $           +  - % ,    

             0 

             ! ñ   

   >'?@ 7

   



 ' 4   %        

   %  >1

  "6          " A  %  (    / 7 ,         +     &&,

   ñ  . 7 , 4  

     

     

 *( 



       ,  4      !

     

     * %    

 +  - % 

             

           /  "6   +  - %  7 )  5        -         

-    KEYS TO SUCCESS

 )         ! ñ



      

%             

 ñ           *           +   ,     ,  *    +   %    %(7 &    %

 ( 

7     +6%( â&#x20AC;&#x201C; + 6,  %

 (     4            % ñ          7        ,       

 (     

  

  &        ,

        " 

     

   

 / ñ  



   7 

            

  *(     

  * /    ) ,       

                     !       .   .  ,      &>>   

  *(  '    

 '      '    '  *          

 

+       .8 % /              

  )   *(        , *


THE MIAMI HERALD 17 MARCH 2011