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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 2011

108TH YEAR I Š2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

TROUBLE BREWING COLOMBIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COFFEE PRODUCTION SUFFERS SETBACKS

Wisconsin assembly approves union curbs BY MONICA DAVEY

New York Times Service

PHOTOS BY PAUL SMITH/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

VALUABLE CROP: Workers tend to a variety of coffee plants on Luis Garzonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffee farm in Colombiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cauca region. Coffee yields are plummeting here as a result of rising temperatures and unpredictable rains. BY ELISABETH ROSENTHAL New York Times Service

TIMBIO, Colombia â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Like most of the small landowners in Colombiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lush mountainous Cauca region, Luis Garzon, 80, and his family have thrived for decades by supplying shade-grown, rainforestfriendly Arabica coffee for top foreign brands like Nespresso and Green Mountain. A sign in the center of a nearby town proclaims, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The coffee of Cauca is No. 1!â&#x20AC;? But in the past few years, coffee yields have plummeted here and in many of Latin Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other premier coffee regions as a result of rising temperatures and more intense and unpredictable rains, phenomena that

many scientists link partly to global warming. Coffee plants require the right mix of temperature, rainfall and spells of dryness for beans to ripen properly and maintain their taste. Coffee pests thrive in the warmer, wetter weather. Bean production at the Garzonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; farm is therefore down 70 percent from ďŹ ve years ago, leaving the family little money for clothing for toddlers and â&#x20AC;&#x153;thinking twiceâ&#x20AC;? about sending older children to college, said Garzonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 44-year-old son, Albeiro, interviewed in a yellow stucco house decorated with coffee posters and madonnas. The shortage of high-end Arabica coffee beans is also being felt in New York supermar-

kets and Paris cafes, as customers blink at escalating prices. Purveyors fear that the Arabica coffee supply from Colombia may never rebound â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that the world might, in effect, hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;peak coffeeâ&#x20AC;?. In 2006, Colombia produced

HARD WORK: Luis Garzon turns coffee beans drying in the sun at his farm in Timbio, Colombia.

more than 12 million 132-pound bags of coffee and set a goal of 17 million for 2014. Last year the yield was 9 million bags. Brands like Maxwell, Yuban and Folgers have increased the retail prices of many grinds by 25 percent or more since the middle of last year in light of m ttight supply and higher wholessale prices. ProďŹ ts of high-end coffee chains like Starbucks and c Green Mountain have dipped. G Coffee futures of Arabica, the high-end bean that comes preh dominantly from Latin America, d have risen more than 85 percent h ssince June, to $2.95 a pound, partly over concerns about supply, weather and future quality,

MADISON, Wis. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; After weeks of debate over legislation to sharply curtail bargaining rights for government workers, the state Assembly here voted 53-42 Thursday to pass the measure, sending the bill to Gov. Scott Walker who promised to sign it as soon as possible. The legislation passed following hours of debate. As the vote was taken, Democrats stood and jeered, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No,â&#x20AC;? and people watching from the gallery began a chant of â&#x20AC;&#x153;shame!â&#x20AC;? as the Republicans ďŹ led out. The minority leader, Peter Barca, said he believes the vote will not stand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even though we are very disappointed, we do have recourse in the courts,â&#x20AC;? he said. The State Senate approved similar legislation Wednesday with only Republican members casting votes; the chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Democratic minority, who ďŹ ercely oppose the measure, remain out of the state. Thousands of demonstrators converged on the Capitol throughout the day creating a taut atmosphere in which Republican State Assembly members were seeking to maintain order long enough to vote on a bill that sharply curtails bargaining rights for government workers. The State Assembly had been scheduled to vote on the bill Thursday morning, but the the protesters forced a delay of a few hours. Earlier Thursday, some of the missing Democrats indicated that they would likely be returning to Wisconsin from Illinois soon, given that there was no longer a need to prevent a quorum. But State Senator Fred Risser, said he and at least a few of the other 14 Democrats planned to remain away from

)TURN TO COFFEE, 2A )TURN TO WISCONSIN, 2A

Libyan rebels flee port under regime barrage BY PAUL SCHEMM

Associated Press

civilians and mutinous army units that only days before had been conďŹ dently charging west, boasting they would march the hundreds of miles to â&#x20AC;&#x153;liberateâ&#x20AC;? Tripoli. It came even as the opposition was making gains on the diplomatic front. France became the ďŹ rst country to recognize the rebelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; easternbased governing council, and an ally of President Nicolas Sarkozy said his government was planning â&#x20AC;&#x153;targeted operationsâ&#x20AC;? to defend civilians if the international community approves. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said she would meet with opposition leaders in the United States, Egypt and Tunisia. But there was no concrete sign of Western moves toward military assistance that the opposition has been pleading for. A rebel spokesman went beyond repeated calls for a no-ďŹ&#x201A;y zone to prevent GadhaďŹ â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s air force from harrying opposition ďŹ ghters and said the West should carry out direct strikes against regime troops. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have requested for all steps to be taken to protect the Libyan people. We believe the U.N. can do that. The bombardment of mercenaries and GadhaďŹ troop camps are among our demands,â&#x20AC;?

RAS LANOUF, Libya â&#x20AC;&#x201D; With ďŹ erce barrages of tank and artillery ďŹ re, Col. Moammar GadhaďŹ â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loyalists threw rebels into a frantic retreat from a strategic oil port Thursday, using overwhelming force in a counteroffensive that reversed the oppositionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advance toward the capital Tripoli and now threatens its positions in the east. Hundreds of rebels in cars and trucks mounted with machine guns sped eastward on the Mediterranean coastal road in a seemingly disorganized ďŹ&#x201A;ight from Ras Lanouf as rockets and shells pounded a hospital, mosque and other buildings in the oil complex. Doctors and staff at the hospital were hastily evacuated east along with wounded from ďŹ ghting from the past week. In Tripoli, GadhaďŹ â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Seif al Islam vowed to retake the eastern half of the country, which has been in the oppositionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands since early on in the 3-week-old uprising. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have two words to our brothers and sisters in the east: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming,â&#x20AC;? he told a cheering crowd of young supporters, depicting Libyans in the east as being held â&#x20AC;&#x153;hostageâ&#x20AC;? by terrorists. The rout was a heavy blow for the ragtag rebel forces of armed )TURN TO LIBYA, 2A

DALAI LAMA GIVES UP POLITICAL ROLE IN TIBET, 3A

Spending bills from both parties rejected BY LORI MONTGOMERY AND PAUL KANE

Washington Post Service

WASHINGTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The U.S. Senate has rejected a Republican plan to sharply cut spending this year, as well as a far more modest Democratic proposal, clearing a path for negotiations toward a compromise that could streamline government without damaging critical services. Senate Democratic leaders are

pressing to expand the talks beyond the small slice of the budget that funds government agencies, arguing that any serious effort to reduce record deďŹ cits must also include cuts in entitlement programs and higher taxes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this vote out of the way, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do some serious negotiations now,â&#x20AC;? said Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to fund the government the rest of this year, and then out-

years. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just for the next few weeks. We want to try to get a universal deal and do something good for the country.â&#x20AC;? Senior White House ofďŹ cials joined GOP leaders in questioning the practicality of that approach, however, saying policymakers must break the impasse over funding for domestic agencies through Sept. 30 before )TURN TO SPENDING, 2A

A precipitous plunge for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spider-Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; director BY PATRICK HEALY

New York Times Service

AP

HANGING ON: Spider-Man is suspended in the air in a scene from Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.

POLICE OPEN FIRE AT PROTESTERS IN SAUDI ARABIA, 6A

nically ambitious musical ever on Broadway, the $65 million SpiderMan: Turn Off the Dark, its producers announced Wednesday night. They named a new director to replace her and a script doctor to rewrite the show, as they prepared to overhaul the production during the next three months â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including adding two new songs by the composers, U2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bono and the Edge. On Wednesday night, the producers, along with Bono and the Edge, told the Spider-Man cast that Taymor was out.

NEW YORK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In 1996, Disney Theatrical Productions took a chance on a little-known director of experimental theater named Julie Taymor. They handed her a musical based on their hit ďŹ lm, The Lion King, and they found themselves with a billion-dollar hit. Taymor became the theater worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s star auteur. Now, all of a sudden, she is something else entirely. After nine years of work, Taymor is stepping aside as director of the most expensive and tech- )TURN TO TAYMOR, 2A

MOODYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DOWNGRADES SPAINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEBT RATING, BUSINESS FRONT

BATTLE LINE HARDENS OVER NFL FINANCIAL DATA, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS...........4A U.S. NEWS.....................5A OPINION........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES...6B 5


  

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THE MIAMI HERALD 11 MARCH 2011