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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Bill Clinton provides critique of Obama, GOP in new book

108TH YEAR I ©2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

U.S. fears new surge of al Qaeda terrorism in Iraq

BY ANNE E. KORNBLUT

Washington Post Service

U.S. President Barack Obama and his Democratic allies made two key political missteps in recent years, according to former president Bill Clinton in a new book to be released Tuesday. First was not raising the federal debt ceiling in the first two years of the president’s term, when Democrats still had a majority in Congress, and then failing to devise an effective national campaign message during the midterm elections of 2010. Clinton also suggests, obliquely, that Obama’s criticism of Wall Street has been too harsh and counterproductive. The 42nd president periodically surfaces with cheerful tips on how he managed the economy and offers these observations in his book entitled Back to Work: Why We Need Smart Government for a Strong Economy. The volume is dense with criticism of Republicans; it devotes substantial attention to what Clinton describes as the GOP’s relentless “antigovernment ideology,” which he identifies as the cause of the anemic economy, high unemployment and U.S. inability to compete on the world stage. But the subtext of the book is that Obama has struggled, both to identify workable economic policies and to outmaneuver his Republican foes. “The Democrats did not counter the national Republican message with one of their own,” Clinton writes of the Democratic losses in 2010. “There was no national advertising campaign to explain and defend what they had done and to compare their agenda for the next two years with the GOP proposals.” He compares it with his own congressional defeats in 1994.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011

BY MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT AND ERIC SCHMITT

New York Times Service

PHOTOS BY RODRIGO ABD/AP

People search for scrap metal at the bottom of one of the biggest dumps in Guatemala City, known as ‘The Mine.’ Below, a ‘miner’ stands on top of a mound of garbage.

GOLD FROM GRIT GUATEMALA’S TRASH ‘MINERS’ RISK LIVES TO FIND GOLD

BY ALBERTO ARCE Associated Press

GUATEMALA CITY — A torrent of gray, toxic water spews from a drainage tunnel and surges along the ravine, tumbling along garbage that has fallen from the Guatemalan capital’s main landfill 1,000 feet above. Despite the foul odors, the danger of unstable piles of garbage collapsing and the chance for heavy rain to suddenly raise the water level, dozens of people are busily at work searching for jewelry and other metal scraps knocked loose from the trash. They call the ravine the “mine,” and refer to themselves as “miners.” Every day, about 300 hike to the bottom of the ravine and

wade into the water in search of rings and bracelets made of silver or gold. The water sifts and carries away the lighter garbage, leaving heavy metals on the stream bed. “I make more money coming here than going to a company where they would continually scold me,” says 41-year-old Eddie Miranda. He says he finds scraps worth 150 quetzals, or $20, almost every day. He got lucky on a recent day. “I

found a bracelet with 9 grams of gold. I got 2,000 quetzals ($256) for it.” It may not seem like much, but it’s almost as much as the monthly $270 minimum wage in this Central American nation. At dawn, the scavengers arrive much as if coming to a regular work place. Many are wearing clean, ironed shirts and even whistling. They carry shovels and backpacks filled with their garbage bags, snacks and change of clothes. They leave their dry clothes at an improvised camp and start looking for treasures. • TURN TO THE MINE, 2A

• TURN TO CLINTON, 2A

BAGHDAD — As the United States prepares to withdraw its troops from Iraq by year’s end, senior U.S. and Iraqi officials are expressing growing concern that al Qaeda’s offshoot here, which just a few years ago waged a debilitating insurgency that plunged the country into a civil war, is poised for a deadly resurgence. Al Qaeda allies in North Africa, Somalia and Yemen are seeking to assert more influence following the death of Osama bin Laden and the diminishing role of al Qaeda’s remaining top leadership in Pakistan. For its part, al Qaeda in Iraq is striving to rebound from defeats inflicted by Iraqi tribal groups and U.S. troops in 2007, as well as the death of its two leaders in 2010. Although the organization is certainly weaker than it was at its peak five years ago and is unlikely to regain its prior strength, U.S. and Iraqi analysts said the al Qaeda franchise is shifting its tactics and strategies — like attacking Iraqi security forces in small squads — to exploit gaps left by the departing U.S. troops and reignite sectarian violence in the country. The group, which is also known as al Qaeda in Mesopotamia, has shown surprising resilience even as its traditional supply lines of foreign fighters through Syria have been disrupted by the turmoil in that country, U.S. intelligence officials say. It conducts a little more than 30 attacks a week, carries out a large-scale strike every four to six weeks, and has expanded its • TURN TO AL QAEDA, 2A

Bullet to throat ended FARC rebel’s reign BY JIM WYSS

jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

POPAYAN, Colombia — The three-decade career of FARC guerrilla commander Guillermo Leon Saenz, better known as Alfonso Cano, ended with a bullet to the throat as he tried to run a gauntlet of Special Forces soldiers and bomb-sniffing dogs. As new details emerged about Friday’s operation that left Latin America’s oldest rebel group without a visible leader, analysts said the blow could lead to a wave of guerrilla defections even as the FARC remains a lethal force. Still wearing headbands stenciled with their blood-type and weary from staying up all night flush with adrenaline, soldiers lined up on an airbase in the southern province of Cauca on Saturday to be congratulated by President Juan Manuel Santos. He called Cano’s death a severe blow to the

FARC that would “undoubtedly change the history of the country.” “I want to tell the FARC, this is the time for them to demobilize, this is the time for them to lay down their arms,” he said. “The alternative, as we’ve said many times before, is either the prison or the grave.” Operation Odyssey had been in the works since mid-October and was focused on pushing Cano out of his traditional redoubts and into areas “where he didn’t have any support and he was forced to make errors,” Santos said. Thanks to multiple intelligence sources and FARC insiders, Cano, 63, was finally pinpointed in a rugged valley in northern Cauca. According to several officers involved in the raid, jets began pounding Cano’s hideout at 8:30 a.m. on Friday. Eleven minutes later, the first wave of 20 Blackhawk helicopters, carrying

Alfonso Cano’s death has left Latin America’s oldest rebel group without a visible leader.

SCOTT DALTON/ AP FILE, 2000

WRITER WHO JOINED LIBYAN REBELS RETURNS TO U.S., 3A

07PGA01.indd 1

Special Forces troops, descended. With nowhere to land, soldiers rappelled onto the jagged hillsides as the helicopters took fire. Seven Blackhawks and two support helicopters were hit. Ultimately, about 900 soldiers were placed on the ground with mine-sniffing dogs, said Army Brig. Gen. Javier Rey, the commander of the aerial assault. The men were facing about 70 to 100 FARC guerrillas. As the soldiers gave chase, they found hastily abandoned camps where Cano had left his wallet and spectacles behind. As they drew closer to their target, Cano shed his security detail, took cover and waited until nightfall to try to break though the encircling troops. At about 8:45 p.m. he made a run for it and was gunned down, Rey said. Ricardo Colorado, the head of one of the Special Forces brigades, said he got news of Cano’s death over the radio. One of his soldiers simply said “Colombia, we’ve accomplished it.” In preparation for the raid, Colorado said he studied photographs of Cano with and without a beard, overweight and skinny. Even so, when they finally found him — dressed in a black sweat-suit, boots and clean-shaven — Colorado had doubts the corpse was their man. “He wasn’t easy to recognize,” Colorado said. “We were about 80 percent sure it was him.” It took police investigator Eleazar Gonzalez until 10:30 p.m. to • TURN TO CANO, 4A

INITIAL AGREEMENT REACHED IN GREECE POWER-SHARING , 6A

SYRIA CRACKDOWN AIDED BY ITALIAN FIRM, BUSINESS FRONT

KELVIN MA/BLOOMBERG NEWS

Bob Langer at his lab in Boston. Langer is developing a gel that can replicate the action of human vocal cords.

Gel could give new voice to throat-cancer patients BY ELIZABETH LOPATTO Bloomberg News

Julie Andrews. More than 13,000 people diagnosed each year in the United States with throat tumors may end up being helped by the effort of the singers, the scientist and the surgeon who brought them together, Harvard University’s Steven Zeitels. Langer and Zeitels plan to test the gel next year in a cancer patient. “Unless you’ve been touched personally, it’s difficult to see, but there are millions of people who have no voice whatsoever,” said Daltrey, who was operated on for precancerous lesions in his throat

NEW YORK — Bob Langer may be the last, best hope for aging rockers. Just ask Roger Daltrey, lead singer for The Who. Langer, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher whose work has created two dozen biotech startups, is developing a gel that can vibrate up to 200 times a second — replicating the action of human vocal cords — to rejuvenate the damaged voices of singers such as Daltrey and Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler, both of whom have contributed funding for the project, along with actress • TURN TO VOICE, 2A

DOLPHINS PICK UP FIRST WIN OF THE SEASON, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS ..........4A U.S. NEWS ....................5A OPINION........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES ...6B

11/7/2011 5:35:41 AM

THE MIAMI HERALD 07 NOVEMBER 2011  

Edition, 07 november 2011

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