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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

MONDAY, APRIL 9, 2012

109TH YEAR I ©2012 THE MIAMI HERALD

Dispute over jets likely topic of Brazil, U.S. talks

Syria foils truce plan with fresh demands

BY VINOD SREEHARSHA

McClatchy News Service

SAO PAULO — When Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff meets with U.S. President Barack Obama on Monday at the White House, the two leaders are likely to publicly use phrases like “deepening friendship” and “partnership” and highlight collaborations in science and education. They are less likely to call attention to a recent source of tension between the two countries — a dispute involving U.S. military jet procurement. The conflict began in December when Brazilian’s top aviation company and one of the world’s largest plane manufacturers, Embraer, partnered with Sierra Nevada Corporation of Sparks, Nev., to win a U.S. Air Force contract for $355 million to make 20 fighter aircraft for Afghanistan’s military. The losing bidder, HawkerBeechcraft Defense, based in Wichita, Kan., complained of unfair treatment and sued. After the Department of Justice found documentation errors, the Air Force suspended the contract and is now conducting an internal investigation. The about-face created consternation in Brazil. The country’s foreign ministry expressed surprise and cautioned that “this development is not considered conducive to strengthening relations between the two countries on defense affairs.” Embraer is not a state company. But similar to U.S. officials lobbying foreign governments on behalf of U.S. firms, Brazilian leaders promote their own country’s interests. Brazil’s minister of trade and development, Fernando Pimentel, recently told reporters that he expects Rousseff to raise the issue with Obama. The case is important to Brazil. At a time when the country’s economy remains highly dependent on the export of commodities such as soy beans and orange juice, and its manufacturing sector is losing out to Chinese imports and an overvalued currency, Embraer is a great source of pride here, a reminder of Brazil’s industrial and technical capabilities. • TURN TO TALKS, 2A

BY KARIN LAUB

Associated Press

New York Times Service

• TURN TO SYRIA, 2A

U.S. alert as China’s cash buys inroads in Caribbean BY RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD New York Times Service

NASSAU, the Bahamas — A brand new $35 million stadium opened here in the Bahamas a few weeks ago, a gift from the Chinese government. The tiny island nation of Dominica has received a grammar school, a renovated hospital and a sports stadium, also courtesy of the Chinese. Antigua and Barbuda got a power plant and a cricket stadium, and a new school is on its way. The prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago can thank Chinese contractors for the craftsmanship in her official residence. China’s economic might has rolled up to the United States’ doorstep in the Caribbean, with a flurry of loans from state banks, investments by companies and outright gifts from the government in the form of new stadiums, roads, official buildings, ports and resorts in a region where the United States has long been a prime benefactor. The Chinese have flexed their economic prowess in nearly every corner of the world. But planting a flag so

released on his death as part of the online feature The Last Word. Wallace created enough such moments to become a paragon of television journalism in the heyday of network news. As he grilled his subjects, he said, he walked “a fine line between sadism and intellectual curiosity.” His success often lay in the questions he hurled, not the answers he received. “Perjury,” he said, in his staccato style, to President Richard Nixon’s right-hand man, John D. Ehrlichman, while interviewing him during the Watergate affair. “Plans to audit tax returns for political retaliation. Theft of psychiatric records. Spying by undercover agents. Conspiracy to obstruct justice. All of this by the law-andorder administration of Richard Nixon.” Ehrlichman paused and said, “Is there a question in there somewhere?”

Mike Wallace, the CBS reporter who became one of the United States’ best-known broadcast journalists as an interrogator of the famous and infamous on 60 Minutes, has died. He was 93. On its website, CBS said Wallace died at a care facility Saturday in New Canaan, Conn., where he had lived in recent years. Wallace, who was outfitted with a pacemaker more than 20 years ago, had a long history of cardiac care WALLACE and underwent triple bypass heart surgery in January 2008. A reporter with the presence of a performer, Wallace went head to head with chiefs of state, celebrities and con artists for more than 50 years, living for the moment when “you forget the lights, the cameras, everything else, and you’re really talking to each other,” he said in an interview with The New York Times videotaped in July 2006 and • TURN TO WALLACE, 2A

U.S. DEFINES ITS DEMANDS FOR IRAN TALKS, 3A

• TURN TO CARIBBEAN, 4A

PHOTOS BY JASON HENRY/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE

Construction workers on the site of the $3.5 billion Baha Mar, which will be one of the region’s largest megaresorts, in Nassau, Bahamas. Below, Chinese workers gather to watch television after a day of work on the Baha Mar.

Mike Wallace, CBS pioneer of ‘60 Minutes,’ dies at 93 BY TIM WEINER

Most analysts do not see a security threat, noting that the Chinese are not building bases or forging any military ties that could invoke fears of another Cuban missile crisis. But they do see an emerging superpower securing economic inroads and political support from a bloc of developing countries with anemic budgets that once counted almost exclusively on the United States, Canada and Europe.

BEIRUT — A U.N.-brokered plan to stop the bloodshed in Syria effectively collapsed Sunday after President Bashar al Assad’s government raised new, last-minute demands that the country’s largest rebel group swiftly rejected. The truce plan, devised by U.N.Arab League envoy Kofi Annan, was supposed to go into effect on Tuesday, with a withdrawal of Syrian forces from population centers, followed within 48 hours by a ceasefire by both sides in the uprising against four decades of repressive rule by the Assad family. But on Sunday, Syria’s Foreign Ministry said that ahead of any troop pullback, the government needs written guarantees from opposition fighters that they will lay down their weapons. The commander of the rebel Free Syrian Army, Riad al Asaad, said that while his group is ready to abide by a truce, it does not recognize the regime “and for that reason we will not give guarantees.” Annan’s spokesman had no comment on the setback. The envoy has not said what would happen if his deadlines were ignored. Even before the setback, expectations were low that the Assad regime would honor the agreement. Russia, an Assad ally that supports the cease-fire plan, may now be the only one able to salvage it. The rest of the international community, unwilling to contemplate military intervention, has little leverage over Syria. In recent days, instead of preparing for a withdrawal, regime troops have stepped up shelling attacks on residential areas, killing dozens of civilians every day in what the opposition described as a frenzied rush to gain ground. Activists said at least 21 people were killed in violence on Sunday and as many as 40. “Mortar rounds are falling like rain,” said activist Tarek Badrakhan, describing an assault in the central city of Homs on Sunday. He spoke via Skype as explosions were heard

close to the United States has generated intense vetting — and some raised eyebrows — among diplomats, economists and investors. “When you’ve got a new player in the hemisphere all of a sudden, it’s obviously something talked about at the highest level of governments,” said Kevin Gallagher, a Boston University professor who is an author of a recent report on Chinese financing, “The New Banks in Town.”

WATSON TRIUMPHS AT AUGUSTA MASTERS

DAVID J. PHILLIP/AP

Louis Oosthuizen, left, of South Africa, congratulates Bubba Watson on the 18th green following Watson’s win at the Masters golf tournament on Sunday, in Augusta, Ga.

OBAMA PRAISED, PUMMELED ON MATTERS OF FAITH, 5A

BANKS, ONCE MORE BUYING BONDS, SEEN AS VULNERABLE, BUSINESS FRONT

REBELS WHO CHANGED WOMEN’S TENNIS REUNITE, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS ..........4A WORLD NEWS ............6A OPINION........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES....6B

HOY l MIAMI HERALD l 2012-APRIL-09  

HOY l MIAMI HERALD l 2012-APRIL-09

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