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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011

108TH YEAR I ©2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

Gadhafi buried in secret desert location BY MARY BETH SHERIDAN

Washington Post Service

spilling across the border, has expanded its role in ways unthinkable five years ago, including flying drones over Mexican skies. The efforts have been credited with breaking up several of Mexico’s largest cartels into smaller — and presumably less dangerous — crime groups. However, the violence continues, as does the northward flow of illegal drugs. While using informants remains a largely clandestine affair, several recent cases have shed light on the kinds of investigations they have helped crack, including a plot earlier this month in which

TRIPOLI, Libya — Former Libyan strongman Moammar Gadhafi was secretly buried in a desert grave Tuesday, officials said, ending a four-day spectacle in which his bloody body was displayed to a public largely overjoyed about his ignominious end after decades of repressive rule. Like other leaders toppled in the Arab Spring, Gadhafi was despised as a corrupt authoritarian ruler. But he was viewed here as more cruel and capricious than the presidents of Egypt or Tunisia, a man who would suddenly nationalize companies or hang dissident students, and force their classmates to watch. That explains why most Libyans have been unfazed by cellphone videos showing a blood-spattered Gadhafi punched, kicked and possibly even sodomized by revolutionaries before he died in captivity. Human-rights groups have said the brutality surrounding Gadhafi’s death marked a troubling beginning for the new democracy emerging from an eight-month, U.S.-backed war. But many Libyans saw it as a fitting end for a tyrant. “Have you seen the mass graves they discovered? Did you know we had more than 50,000 people die during this revolution?” asked Muhammad al Jady, 53, an engineer walking near Tripoli’s downtown Martyrs Square, citing a widely quoted estimate. Al Jady described a litany of abuses his family suffered under the Gadhafi regime. The government seized four of his father’s villas after passing a law banning ownership of more than one home. Then, in 1984, al Jady was jailed for six months without explanation upon returning from college in Oregon, he said. “We are still hurting,” said the gray-bearded engineer. “I am still feeling that six months of my life. Yes, they should kill him.” Under Gadhafi, Libyans suffered some of the strictest curbs on freedom of expression in the Middle East. Munir Abdusalem Kridig, 25,

• TURN TO INFORMANTS, 4A

• TURN TO LIBYA, 2A

TRAPPINGS OF LUXURY IN GAZA, FORMER PRISONERS PAMPERED IN UPSCALE HOTEL BY ERNESTO LONDOO

Washington Post Service

ruin, heaps of garbage dot nearly every street and the Mediterranean shoreline is speckled by evidence of the tons of raw sewage dumped into the ocean every day. As he sat in the hotel’s dimly lighted courtyard on a recent evening, Ibrahim, a convicted bombmaker, struggled to describe how dramatically his luck had changed. “It has been a very overwhelming feeling for us,” he said as fellow ex-prisoners and their friends chatted animatedly at a nearby table. “Being in this hotel, I constantly have to ask myself: Am I seriously out of prison or not?”

GAZA CITY — A week ago, Yahya Dabassa Ibrahim was on a hunger strike, rotting away in an Israeli prison where he expected to spend the rest of his life. But the Oct. 18 prisoner swap between Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas landed the Bethlehem native in a surreal place: the Gaza Strip’s brandnew luxury hotel. The eight-story Al Mashtal Hotel, which opened in late July, is an oasis of fluffy white duvets, stunning ocean views, steaks cooked to perfection and sparkling swimming pools. Its splendor is startling in this blockaded territory where dozens of bombed buildings lie in • TURN TO PRISONERS, 2A

Above, freed Palestinian prisoner Wahid Arafa at a hotel in Gaza City. At left, Hamuda Saleh, originally from the West Bank city of Nablus, prays near the hotel pool. PHOTOS BY TARA TODRAS-WHITEHILL/AP

U.S. infiltrating criminal groups across Mexico BY GINGER THOMPSON

New York Times Service

WASHINGTON — U.S. law enforcement agencies have significantly built up networks of Mexican informants that have allowed them to secretly infiltrate some of that country’s most powerful and dangerous criminal organizations, according to security officials on both sides of the border. As the United States has opened new law enforcement and intelligence outposts across Mexico in recent years, Washington’s networks of informants have grown there as well, current and former officials said. They have helped Mexican authorities cap-

ture or kill about two dozen high and midlevel drug traffickers, and sometimes have given U.S. counternarcotics agents access to the top leaders of the cartels they are trying to dismantle. Typically, the officials said, Mexico is kept in the dark about the United States’ contacts with its most secret informants — including Mexican law enforcement officers, elected officials and cartel operatives — partly due to concerns about corruption among the Mexican police, and partly because of laws prohibiting U.S. security forces from operating on Mexican soil. “The Mexicans sort of roll their

eyes and say we know it’s happening, even though it’s not supposed to be happening,” said Eric Olson, an expert on the Mexican security matters at the Woodrow Wilson Center. “That’s what makes this so hard. The United States is using tools in a country where officials are still uncomfortable with those tools.” In recent years, Mexican attitudes about U.S. involvement in matters of national security have softened, as waves of drugrelated violence have left some 40,000 people dead. And the United States, hoping to shore up Mexico’s stability and prevent that country’s violence from

Poverty surging in U.S. suburbs policing, putting out fires and re- cities have, and how to get those pairing roads — are confronting residents to services without PARMA HEIGHTS, Ohio a new set of issues, namely how public transportation. — The poor population in the to help poor residents without United States’ suburbs — long a the array of social programs that • TURN TO POVERTY, 2A symbol of a stable and prosperous middle class — rose by more than half after 2000, forcing suburban communities across the country to reevaluate their identities and how they serve their populations. The increase in the suburbs was 53 percent, compared with 26 percent in cities. The recession accelerated the pace: Twothirds of the new suburban poor were added from 2007 to 2010. “The growth has been stunning,” said Elizabeth Kneebone, senior researcher at the Brookings Institution, who conducted the analysis of census data. “For the first time, more than half of the metropolitan DUSTIN FRANZ/NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE poor live in suburban areas.” As a result, suburban munici- The abandoned Randall Park Mall opened in 1976 as the palities — once concerned with largest indoor mall in the country, in North Randall, Ohio.

BY SABRINA TAVERNISE

New York Times Service

COLOMBIAN MEN SENTENCED IN KIDNAPPING OF U.S. CITIZEN, 4A

PERRY UNVEILS PLAN TO SLASH TAXES, FEDERAL SPENDING, 5A

LOW MORTGAGE RATES ELUDE ‘UNDERWATER' HOMEOWNERS, BUSINESS FRONT

European leaders press banks to take bigger losses BY STEPHEN CASTLE AND JACK EWING New York Times Service

European officials are desperate to avert. That has prompted a search for so-called complementary measures which might help to sweeten the deal for the bankers. Italy, meanwhile, has come increasingly under the spotlight as investors doubt the government’s commitment to reduce the country’s ¤1.9 trillion ($2.6 trillion) debt. EU leaders want Italy’s Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to present firm plans on growth and debt reduction in time for the meeting. Italian news agencies reported Tuesday that Berlusconi had reached an accord with the Northern League, his principal coalition partner. The league’s leader, Umberto Bossi, said earlier in the day that Berlusconi’s government

BRUSSELS — European officials scrambled Tuesday for a way to entice banks to accept much deeper losses on their Greek bonds as debt crisis talks went down to the wire, prompting the cancellation of one ministerial meeting scheduled ahead of Wednesday’s crucial gathering of European leaders. With less than 24 hours before the summit meeting of government chiefs in Brussels, banking representatives and European officials were locked in negotiation over what losses banks should accept. The banks have taken a hard line and warned that the write-off of debts they are being asked to accept — of about 55 percent — could result in a default or similar shock to the financial system, something • TURN TO EUROPE, 2A

RANGERS WIN GAME 5 OF WORLD SERIES, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX NEWS EXTRA..............3A WORLD NEWS ...........6A OPINION........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES ...6B


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THE MIAMI HERALD 26 de Octubre