Page 1

MiamiHerald.com HOTEL COPIES: A copy of The Miami Herald will be delivered to your room. A credit of US$0.25 will be posted to your account if delivery is declined.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2011

108TH YEAR I ©2011 THE MIAMI HERALD

Obama goads GOP to explain opposition to jobs bill BY SCOTT WILSON AND DAVID NAKAMURA Washington Post Service

STEVEN SENNE/AP

U.S. President Barack Obama urged U.S. senators Thursday to pass his jobs bill and warned Republicans who oppose the measure that they will have to explain their opposition “to me, and more importantly, to their constituencies” at a time of mounting economic uncertainty. During a late-morning news conference, Obama emphasized the support that elements of his $447 billion job-creating proposal have received from both parties in the past. But he also issued an explicit warning to senators, particularly in the Republican Party, that he would make any “no” vote a political issue in the emerging 2012 campaign. Obama also said he was comfortable with a proposal by Senate Democrats to help fund the package through a surcharge on income above $1 million — a provision unlikely to pass. “I think it’s fair to say that I have gone out of my way in every instance — sometimes at my own political peril and to the frustration of Democrats — to work with Republicans to find common ground to move this country forward,” Obama said. “Each time, what we’ve seen is games-playing, a preference to try to score political points rather than actually get something done.” After weeks of campaigning outside Washington on behalf of his plan, imploring audiences both in swing states and in GOP territory to urge Congress to “pass this bill,” Obama said he expected the Senate to do so as the economy stalls, dragging down his own political prospects. The vote had been scheduled for next week. But, as Obama spoke, Senate Democrats agreed to a Republican request to put the president’s legislation to a vote later Thursday. “If it turns out that there are

Above and below, mourners pay tribute to the iconic co-founder of Apple at the company's stores across the world.

Visionary Jobs redefined the digital age BY JORDAN ROBERTSON AND RACHEL METZ Associated Press

Steve Jobs was mourned around the world Thursday through the very devices he conceived: People held up pictures of candles on their iPads, reviewed his life on Macintosh computers and tapped out tributes on iPhones. One day after his death, two days after Apple introduced the latest incarnation of a touchscreen phone that touched pop culture, sadness and admiration poured out — not for a rock star, not for a religious figure, but for a U.S. corporate executive. “He was a genius,” Rosario Hidalgo said outside an Apple Store on the Upper West Side of Manhattan while her daugh-

generation, Jobs was remembered as their Elvis Presley or John Lennon. Perhaps even their Thomas Edison. “It’s like the end of the innovators,” said Scott Robbins, 34, who described himself as an Apple fan of 20 years and who rushed to an Apple Store in San Francisco when he heard the news. Apple announced Jobs’ death Wednesday night and remembered him as a “visionary and creative genius.” The company announced no cause of death, but Jobs had been diagnosed with a rare pancreatic cancer HIRO KOMAE/AP seven years ago and had a liver By people who have grown transplant in 2009. He was 56. ter, 21-month-old Carlotta, used On Thursday, the Apple an iPhone to play an app that up in a world where iPod headteaches children to match ani- phones are as ubiquitous as wristwatches were to a previous • TURN TO JOBS, 2A mal sounds to animal pictures.

• TURN TO OBAMA, 2A

Gadhafi urges resistance to Libya’s new leaders BY KIM GAMEL AND HADEEL AL SHALCHI Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya — Moammar Gadhafi called on Libyans to take to the streets and wage a campaign of civil disobedience against the country’s new leaders Thursday — the first word from the fugitive leader in just over two weeks. Gadhafi said the National Transitional Council, which has assumed leadership of the country since then-rebel forces swept into Tripoli in late August, has no legitimacy because it was not nominated or appointed by the Libyan people. He called on his countrymen to “go out in new million-man marches in all cities and villages and oases.” “Be courageous, rise up, go out in the streets,” he said. “Raise the green flag in the skies . . . the conditions in Libya are unbearable.” Gadhafi made the appeal in a poor quality audio recording and it was not possible to verify his identity, but it was broadcast on Syrian• TURN TO GADHAFI, 2A

ARMY DEFECTORS AIM TO OVERTHROW SYRIAN REGIME, 3A

Palestinian anger at U.S. rising over U.N. veto threat diplomatic convoy in the West Bank town of Ramallah, chanting “shame on you” and hurling a shoe outside a U.S.-hosted reception at a local restaurant. Some senior politicians and well-known opinion makers have publicly written off the United States as a credible broker, tapping into a broad sentiment among Palestinians that going to the United Nations, in defiance of Washington, was the right move. Washington’s threat to block U.N. recognition of Palestine is an “act of aggression,” said writer Hani al Masri, who boycotted the Ramallah reception by U.S. diplomats. Other invitees said they

BY KARIN LAUB AND MOHAMMED DARAGHMEH

Associated Press

RAMALLAH, West Bank — Palestinians have long been skeptical of the United States’ ability to help them win independence. But low expectations have turned into frustration and in some cases outright anger after the United States threatened to derail a bid for U.N. recognition of an independent state and Congress put on hold $200 million in aid. Protests have been small so far, from burning a few U.S. flags and pictures of President Barack Obama to editorials blasting U.S. policy and portraying Washington as beholden to Israel. This week, about 30 people accosted a U.S. • TURN TO PALESTINIANS, 6A

NASSER SHIYOUKHI/AP

Palestinians shout slogans at a U.S. diplomatic vehicle during a protest in the West Bank city of Ramallah.

Monument in Czech Republic honors Woodrow Wilson BY PATRICIA SULLIVAN

Washington Post Service

Almost a century after his election, Woodrow Wilson may not be the most-remembered former U.S. president in his native land. Sure, there’s a presidential library and museum in rural Virginia, an international center for scholars in

Washington and a big bridge over the Potomac. But ask the average person on the street to tell you something about Wilson, and you may not get much. In the Czech Republic, however, Wilson is a rock star. In Prague this week, a monument of Wilson, one of the few

U.S. MISSILE DEFENSE SYSTEM HITS 2 TEST TARGETS AT ONCE, 5A

statues of a U.S. president on foreign soil, was dedicated at the main train station, which is also named after him. The ceremony was part of a week-long series of events in Prague commemorating Wilson. Wilson was once considered the foster father of Czechoslova-

U.S. TELLS LATIN AMERICA TO HELP POOR PROSPER, BUSINESS FRONT

kia for championing its independence after World War I. “The admiration of the people for him amounts almost to hero worship,” Tomas Masaryk, Czechoslovakia’s first president, said years later. The statue was raised Sept. 8, • TURN TO WILSON STATUE, 2A

CARDS, DBACKS FORCE GAME 5s, SPORTS FRONT

INDEX THE AMERICAS ...........4A WORLD NEWS.............6A OPINION ........................7A COMICS & PUZZLES ...6B


ADVERTORIAL

TBY LANCE BRASHEAR LBRASHEAR@HOY.COM.EC

                                                                                                   ­      €     ‚­               ‚         ƒ         „                           …    ­                †  ‡    ˆ  ‰ Š               ‡  ­                                     ‚­                          ‚   ‹          ˆ     Œ ‚Ž             –                                 ‚ SAME GREAT MENU

­           Š  „               ‚­      „         ‚                                Œ             ‚‘           Ž      ‚   ‚­      „            ‚      ’“                ‚‚  ’     “                ˆ Œ           

  ­               Œ ‚‡   ‚ ’  ‰“   

                      

           ‚          ‘‡   ‡’                ‚   ­         ­                        ‚­          Ž    

              ‚     „'     ‚Ž            ‚    ‚Ž         ‚

  ‚   ‡        ­                  …        ˆ   ­                      ‚                  ‚ ­                                                ‚           ƒ   ‚ ­        ˆ ’“  † ˜™ˆ€  ‡ Š     š ˆ ™›  €ˆš€™œ ‘                  ™ˆ       žœ    ž    

FAMILY BUSINESS

Ž                               —  '   ‚      

Visit Miami Herald Ecuador online.

SAME GREAT TRADITION The new Mi Cocina location offers the same great national and international dishes.

        


THE MIAMI HERALD 7 de Octubre  

The Miami Herald 7 de Octubre