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FALL 2019

VOLUME 6

NAHSE FLORIDA

Empowering the Next Generation of Health Care Leaders Today

CHAPTER Highlights 4

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2 Brodes Hartley Article – A Civil and Human Rights Trailblazer

15 Breaking Down Healthcare Silos NAHSE Florida 2nd Annual Executive Leadership Forum kicks Cleveland Clinic Florida off the NAHSE STARZ Program

NAHSE Florida inaugural event at Orlando Health – The Business of Healthcare


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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A Farewell Message from South Florida Chapter President, Grant McGaugh Greetings Members, Someone once said, “Great leaders don’t set out to be leaders. They set out to make a difference. It is never about the role. It is always about the goal.” My fellow NAHSE South Florida Chapter members, it has been my esteemed honor to fulfill my duties as president of this chapter for the past two years. In this farewell message to you as president, please accept my gratitude, as I reminisce over just how far we have come together as a chapter and the pride that I feel looking forward to the future of this organization. Over the past 2 years, we have seen our Florida membership triple. Institutional and healthcare sponsorships have quadrupled, and we have expanded community relationships with local associations, hospitals, and community healthcare organizations. With this incredible growth, we are looking towards establishing a statewide chapter, since we have already expanded out of South Florida to Pensacola, Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Tampa, and Orlando. Thus, this will require our chapter to be renamed, NAHSE Florida. This growth and expansion were due to all the committees working together towards achieving the same goal of the success of this chapter. Together we have increased our outreach and marketing efforts. We have seen our social media footprint grow from 13 followers to over 10,000 over the past 2 years and have recently started a NAHSE Florida News online publication. We have also started two annual events, the Executive Leadership Forum and the Women’s Leadership Award Gala to recognize and grow our minority leaders in the State of Florida. As I vacate this position, I do so with pride and a sense of great accomplishment regarding what we managed to do together over the past two terms. However, I have an even greater sense of excitement looking forward as I will continue to serve NAHSE Florida dutifully under our incoming president, Natoia McGarrell. A strong and passionate leader, driven by the goals of advancing this chapter, my confidence in President McGarrell is unwavering. Thank you once more for the chance to lead this chapter for the past two years. Let us continue to move onward and upward. Best Regards, Grant McGaugh President NAHSE South Florida Chapter

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COLONEL BRODES H. HARTLEY, JR. President/CEO

Community Health of South Florida, Inc.

A Civil and Human Rights Trailblazer - Dedicated to Delivering Quality Healthcare to All BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON “I have enjoyed my tenure here and have been really blessed at this organization and where we have taken it,” said Colonel Brodes H. Hartley, Jr., President/CEO of Community Health of South Florida, Inc. (CHI). In an interview with NAHSE South Florida President, Grant McGaugh, Colonel Hartley reflected on his impressive career and his journey from a Civil Rights student leader, serving in various parts of the world while rising through the ranks in the U.S. Army Medical Services Corps, to his current career, bringing quality healthcare to the people of South Florida. Born in Jacksonville, Florida during Segregation, Brodes H. Hartley, Jr’s very conservative upbringing was heavily rooted in faith and respect for oneself. His father was a Baptist preacher and his very first mentor, having had a significant influence on his life. He also names Moses General Miles, former Dean of Students at Florida A&M University (FAMU), as another mentor who helped to mold him into a self-respecting man in a time when society made it difficult to do so. In 1952, Hartley graduated from Stanton High School, the oldest African American high school in Florida. There, he played in the band and sang in the choir. He received a band scholarship to attend Florida A&M College (FAMC), which became FAMU while he was a student there. As an undergraduate, he studied pre-med and was very active in student government as the president of the freshman and sophomore classes and president of the Student Government Association in his senior year. In 1956, during his senior year, Hartley called a meeting of the student body to begin a bus boycott that started the Tallahassee Bus Boycott after two co-eds were jailed, for refusing to give up their seats on a bus to a White passenger. Once the students started the boycott, the ministers organized, and the city followed. He experienced a racially integrated environment for the first time in his life when he attended the ROTC summer camp while still in college. At the end of his senior year, he was commissioned through the ROTC into the Army Medical Service Corps. His intent was to do his required

two years and get out. However, after doing his Basic Officer’s Course in FT. Sam, Houston, Texas and during his first assignment in FT. Benning, GA, an opportunity arose to go to Germany. So, he took that first assignment as a medical platoon leader and spent 40 months in Germany from 1958 to 1961. Hartley recalls this being a great experience and he received his first Army Commendation Medal. He was then sent back to school for a 9-month officer career course, before receiving his first hospital assignment as a hospital treasurer in California. Having only had field unit assignments before, he relished this assignment greatly. He truly enjoyed California. He even joined a flying club, flying the Cessna 150 and 172. In 1964, Hartley was assigned to the Army Surgeon General’s Office in Washington, DC. There, he worked in the Procurement and Qualifications Branch. After serving two years in this position, he pursued a Masters in Hospital Administration through Bailey University at the Academy of Health Sciences at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He then went back to the DMV area to complete his academic residency at Walter

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(CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)

SUMMER 2019 • VOLUME 6

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COLONEL BRODES H. HARTLEY, JR.

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A Civil and Human Rights Trailblazer - Dedicated to Delivering Quality Healthcare to All (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2)

Reed National Military Medical Center. The Vietnam War took him back overseas. Now, as an executive officer, he ran a facility for one year in Vietnam before returning to the Army Surgeon General’s Office. From 1971 to 1974, Hartley, who by then had a wife and two children, was stationed in Japan. During those years, the family travelled throughout the Pacific on space available flights. Now a widower after 55 years of marriage to his college sweetheart, Jacquelyn, Hartley recalls those memories with special fondness. Upon his return from Japan in 1974, he was assigned to the post of executive officer of the hospital at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. He then applied and attended Florida State University for a doctoral program. In 1977, he went back to the Academy of Health Sciences to do research on pharmacy services for army hospitals. He returned to Nuremburg, Germany in 1980 and on January 1, 1983, after 26 years of active military duty, he retired with the rank of colonel. Now a civilian, Colonel Hartley went back to his alma mater, FAMU, to work as an assistant dean at the School of Allied Health Sciences. However, he did not stay there for very long. He soon received a call from Odell Johns, who was then Chairman of the Board of CHI, regarding a vacancy for the executive director position. Colonel Hartley expressed interest and was hired. He has been with CHI for the past 35 years. CHI has grown immensely under his leadership. “When I arrived in 1984, there were only 2 health centers. Today we have 11 sites and we are in 35 schools,” Colonel Hartley proudly announced. CHI is considered a onestop shop for a variety of clinical services such as primary care, obgyn, pediatric, behavioral health, dental, labs, and radiology. CHI is the only health center in the State of Florida that has been HRSA designated as a teaching health center. That sets it apart from every other health center in the state. This means that physicians can receive their specialty training in obgyn, family medicine, and psychiatry through CHI. Colonel Hartley is proud of the high standards that CHI must adhere to in order to become a teaching facility. They are ACGME accredited, federally subsidized through HRSA and funded through HRSA’s Bureau of Primary Care. At CHI, all their physicians are board certified and they have received numerous awards for quality service such as the Governor’s Sterling Award. They have been also accredited by the Joint Commission and have been

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given a NCQA Level 3 recognition. Colonel Hartley would like the public to know that CHI serves everyone who walks through their doors. “We have universal access,” he said, “we are not only here for the uninsured and the poor.” He would also like to dispel some of the myths that people tend to hold about healthcare. Especially that you should only see the doctor when you are sick. “We need a different view of the healthcare system,” explains Colonel Hartley, “we need to stress that early screenings and preventative care work to prolong our lives.” This trailblazing military veteran and healthcare executive sees healthcare not only as a human right, but also as a civil right. He reflects on his 35-year tenure at CHI, that healthcare has certainly gotten better in many ways. “We exist because in the early years, the Hispanics and the Black people could not get care at the local hospitals. They had to go all the way to Jackson Main. Doris Ison, CHI’s founder, was tired of these children dying on the way to Jackson Memorial Hospital. Thus, this operation started out of 2 double wide trailers in 1971.” In the next five years, Colonel Hartley predicts that more people will be insured, thus having greater access to care. He expects more early detection and prevention of disease and chronic illnesses and the de-emphasizing of hospitals as primary care facilities. He sees the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as having had a positive impact on healthcare delivery as it has funded the expansion of community health centers across the nation. Through the ACA, the emphasis is on primary care as a way of reducing the total cost of healthcare in America. Taking care of the population before they get sick is a valuesbased care approach that makes sense to a man who has dedicated his life to the service of others. n

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2nd Annual Executive Leadership Forum FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

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CAITLIN BECK STELLA

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CAITLIN BECK STELLA, MPH

Chief Executive Officer, Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital

A “Volunteer Times Ten” - Helping Families Navigate Healthcare BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON “I’m here at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital to grow, expand, develop, and take the great things that have been accomplished here to the next level,” says Caitlin Stella, Chief Executive Officer of Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital (JDCH), in an interview with NAHSE South Florida Chapter President, Grant McGaugh. Stella was hired for the CEO role in June of 2018. “JDCH already has a well-established culture of kindness and patient family centered care. Our outcomes are excellent, our teamwork is like nothing I have experienced in my career – it’s my job to maintain all of the best of Joe D. and continue to drive the ship forward.” Yet, Stella is doing more than just driving the ship, she’s making waves. By focusing on the patient and viewing the hospital experience through the eyes of children, she’s able to use her natural problem-solving skills to improve what can be very difficult situations. “I’m a true believer in what we do here at the hospital. We are here to deliver care in a way that helps children and families feel comforted,” she says. Stella was initially empowered, she believes, growing up in a family of hard-working people who exceeded what was expected, particularly of women, at the time. By the age of seven, the Pittsburgh native was already working and learning life lessons alongside her grandmother in the family-owned nursery and landscaping business. At 15, she realized she wanted to work with children after volunteering at a children’s hospital shortly after her grandfather’s death. It was then, Stella knew she wanted to pursue a career in healthcare. She took college courses while still in high school and attended Virginia Tech on a scholarship, studying child development. On the path to UCLA for graduate school, she spent six months at the University of New Mexico taking sign language and volunteering at a children’s hospital in Albuquerque. During her early work experiences in Los Angeles, Stella’s professional future began to reveal itself. She was working as a research assistant at a child development lab for autism at a time when very little was known

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Caitlin Beck Stella, MPH

about the disorder. The National Institutes of Health was providing grant money to centers like UCLA’s and Stella worked with the team there to position their facility as a deserving grant recipient. Upon the awarding of the dollars, she became the first administrator for the Center for Autism Research and Treatment at UCLA Health. “During this time, there were few answers for families coping with autism and I kept thinking there must be a way to make this easier for them. That became my mission,” said Stella. Seeing what she had accomplished in autism, a mentor encouraged Stella to get into the “business side” of healthcare. “Don’t go into psychology, go into public health,” Stella recalls him advising her. “If you go into psychology, he said, you’ll help one person at a time. If you go into public health, you’ll help groups or populations of people instead. You can have a bigger impact.” The advice resonated and not long after, Stella set her sights on earning a master’s degree in public health. “It was a perfect fit for me,” she said. After graduate school, she joined (CONTINUED ON PAGE 6)

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A “Volunteer Times Ten” - Helping Families Navigate Healthcare (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5)

PricewaterhouseCoopers (now PWC) as a hospital operations consultant, learning the inner workings of how to run hospitals and understanding finances and strategy. After several years at PWC, Stella transitioned to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles as an internal project manager. She rose through the ranks and created the building blocks of a pediatric health network within the Los Angeles market as Director of Provider Program and Outreach. Then, an opportunity to go back to UCLA came along, first as the Executive Director of Women’s and Children’s Services and later as Chief Administrative Officer. In this role, the Center for Autism Research and Treatment was under her purview once again. It was a unique situation, being able to see what the program she helped start had become over the years in her absence. “If you find something you’re passionate about and do it with love and heart, everything else follows,” said Stella of her philosophy. “Many people along the way opened doors for me and I never felt limited. I am very fortunate to have had great mentorship along my path.” That path led to Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, part of the Memorial Healthcare System. At a time when Stella and her husband were already thinking of moving east to be closer to family, she was recruited for the CEO position in South Florida, near where her husband had grown up. Stella also appreciated the hospital’s belief in the healing power of play, which matched her own belief in how to best serve children and families. “With every opportunity in my life and career, things have always fallen into place. I’m where I’m supposed to be here at Joe D. and I love our team. It’s the best group of people I have ever worked with and we all genuinely love children. We try to make the

environment as fun and positive as we can,” said Stella. Despite the CEO title, Stella still sees herself as a volunteer in the hospital and does that in any way she can. She feels it’s important not to be confined to the office. “I like to hit the floors and talk to children and parents. I will happily help push a wheelchair or get a toy for a patient in a waiting room. It’s great to be able to influence how things are done, because I’ve been on the patient/family side, either in my own family or with families who have become like family to me. In this job, I feel like I’m a volunteer times ten,” she said. She is a woman constantly trying to find solutions, including a “Kidcierge” program that will have hospital navigators assist children and families who need help accessing resources and services within the system. “I like to tell families, ‘You worry about your child, our team will handle the system.’ We can, at least, alleviate that stress when they’re in our care. We can find a way through it together.”

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HEALTH TALK

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Breaking Down Healthcare Silos

BY SASHAH DAMIER Did you attend this quarter’s educational event in South Florida? If you did not, you missed a very dynamic discussion focused on working well with physicians in healthcare delivery systems. Cleveland Clinic Florida was gracious enough to host the Chapter at their Weston location on Thursday, September 26th. The Chapter, in partnership with the Florida State Medical Association presented the Breaking Down Healthcare Silos event, sponsored by Systems Evolution, Inc. which featured a panel of subject matter experts, including physicians and healthcare administrators, as they had an open discussion centered around understanding how physicians and administrators can better collaborate in providing quality care while continuously improving patient outcomes. The night began with a few words from thought leader, Osmel “Ozzie” Delgado, MBA, PharmD, FASHP, who currently serves as the Chief Operating Officer (COO) for the Cleveland Clinic Florida Region. Raised in South Florida, Delgado has over 18 years of experience in healthcare, with a progression of leadership roles within Cleveland Clinic Florida that have included being the Director of Pharmacy, the Administrative Director of Clinical Operations (which involved oversight of numerous clinical departments such as Respiratory Therapy, Cardiovascular services, Neurological services, and the Sleep Lab), and the Senior Director of Operations (which expanded his oversight of non-clinical support services such as Plant Operations/Facilities

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Management, Environmental services, Supply Chain Management, Security, and Construction Management). The moderator for the night was Ryan O’Quinn, who is a manager in Deloitte’s Healthcare Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) practice. Ryan has experience leading over 25 margin enhancement projects for large health care provider systems and academic medical centers across the country. Ryan specialized in programmatic cost reduction and performance improvement initiatives in areas including nursing services, pharmacy, supply chain, information technology, marketing, quality, and valuebased care and serves his clients with expansive knowledge and experience in clinical productivity, corporate shared services, revenue cycle management, and business plan development. The panelists included Lanetta Bronté-Hall, MD, MPH, MSPH, Daniel Edelman, D.O., Matthew “Matt” Garner, MHA, Yvette King-Archer, BSN, RN, and Oyinkansola “Bukky” Ogunrinde, MHSA. Lanetta Bronté-Hall, MD, MPH, MSPH who a Physician and serves as President and CEO of the Foundation for Sickle Cell Disease Research (FSCDR), Chief Health Officer (CHO) of the Sickle Care and Research Network, (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)

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NAHSE FLO RID A Breaking Down Healthcare Silos (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7)

FSCDR, LLC, an independent full- service outpatient medical treatment and clinical trials center that offers medical care and coordinated care for underserved populations. Dr. Bronté-Hall, MD, MPH, MSPH is responsible for strategic planning, scientific, and administrative oversight of the FSCDR. She is a leading national and international researcher and population health scientist in the field of sickle cell disease, rare blood disorders, community-based participatory research, and chronic disease management. Dr. Bronté-Hall has extensive experience in developing programs that are closely aligned with the recruitment and retention of underserved and underrepresented populations for treatment of sickle cell disease and breast cancer research and clinical trials. Daniel Edelman, D.O. serves as the Regional Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Population Health Officer. Dr. Edelman joined Martin Health System as a hospitalist physician in 2004. Since that time, his passion for analytics and systems methodology has driven him to his current role. He received his medical degree from Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in 2001 and completed his residency in internal medicine at Mt. Sinai Medical center / University of Miami in 2004. As a hospitalist, he introduced the Florida State medical students to the Martin System and was recognized as being an outstanding clinical educator in 2009. During the conversion of Martin Health Systems to the Epic electronic medical record in 2010, Dr. Edelman became immersed in information technologies. Since that time his focus has been on driving quality and information to the forefront of medical care. Matt Garner is the Chief Operating Officer at Florida Medical Center. He is responsible for overseeing various departments within the hospital including Rehabilitation Services, Food and Nutrition Services, Environmental Services, Plant Operations, Pharmacy, Radiology, Cardiopulmonary Services, Laboratory Services and Information Systems. He also has administrative responsibility for Tenet Imaging Services and is the chair of Tenet’s Miami-Dade Rehabilitation Services Subcommittee. Matt started with Tenet Healthcare in May 2013 and served as the assistant administrator at Sister hospital, Delray Medical Center. Matt is a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives and received his Bachelor of Science in Health Services Administration from the University of Central Florida and his Master of Health Administration from the University of Florida.

Yvette King – Archer is a Corporate Patient Safety Officer. She works to integrate patient safety across Baptist Health South Florida, an elevenhospital health system. Yvette’s passion for creating safer healthcare processes shines through the many successful initiatives she leads. She recently coordinated a Patient Safety Symposium where more than 400 healthcare professionals focused on patient safety and were inspired by the keynote speaker, Jennifer Arnold, MD. The symposium received rave reviews for its theme, Journey to Zero Harm being brought to life at every moment of the day. Before devoting her work fulltime to patient safety, Yvette worked as a risk manager and nurse manager, implementing programs to inspire and empower teams to excellent outcomes. Oyinkansola “Bukky” Ogunrinde is the Founder and Chief Practice Transformation Officer for FUNMI Healthcare Consulting, LLC, a consultancy specializing in the management of physician practice and ambulatory services. With about 11 years in healthcare administration and management, she specializes in providing leadership and management services in the areas of general administration, operations, financial management, business development, project management and strategic planning. Currently, she serves as a management consultant to physician practices and ambulatory centers and has a great passion for optimizing the work environment to maximize physician effectiveness. The night’s discussion looked at some of the challenges related to administration and physicians working relationships, how those challenges impacted care delivery to and advocacy for patients. The panelist later discussed the causes of those challenges and eventually formulated some solutions to those challenges. Some of the underlying themes that kept surfacing during the discussion was the need for properly guided communication and trust, and how there is a need to drive towards unified goals on both the physician’s part and the part of administration so that we can better listen and understand each other’s needs and form a better relationship. We hope to see you at the next event. n

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MAYLEE SANCHEZ

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MAYLEE SANCHEZ Chief Information Officer Health Choice Network

Breaking Barriers All the Way to The Healthcare Technology C-Suites BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON Maylee Sanchez always wanted to fix things. She tinkered with everything she could get her hands on as a little girl and sometimes got in trouble for doing so. But in fact, she was really trying to be a problem-solver. She wanted to become an engineer but didn’t draw well and realized quite early that she wanted to be in information technology (I.T.). She shared her incredible professional journey as one of the few minority females to make it to the c-suites in healthcare technology, with NAHSE South Florida Chapter president, Grant McGaugh. Sanchez is a native Floridian who was born and raised in Miami. She attended a small military high school in South Miami where she excelled in math and graduated at age 16. She then attended Miami Dade Community College where she earned an Associate Degree in Computer Programming before moving on to Florida International University (FIU), for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Maylee Sanchez Computer Science. to work as a senior database administrator for ABC While in college, she started as a temporary worker Distributing, a mail order retail company in North Miami. doing data processing at Miami Dade County She learned a lot about the retail business during her 4 Corrections Department (DOC), where her mother was years with this company. While still on Oracle, she also also employed. Soon, she was hired permanently. While became a Certified Administrator while there. there, she became certified in Oracle. “Every opportunity Her first management role was at Applica, a consumer I got, I tried to learn more. I kept getting certifications,” products manufacturing company, as a database Sanchez recalls. manager. Sanchez was met with resistance by the mostly She soon transitioned from data processing to the I.T. male team. She had to work to earn everyone’s trust and Department. “I wanted to learn how everything worked,” to gain their respect. She remained with this company she said. The most pivotal part of her early career was for 5 years. During this time, she was involved in some learning that even the most minimal things that she did very large projects and learned that technology isn’t well on the computer in her cubicle, really had an impact on accepted into the manufacturing world. the people who had nothing to do with technology. She She then started consulting. She does not describe knew that what she did, really did make a difference as it made other people’s work easier and it motivated her to herself as a good consultant as she said she was not good at selling and was often too honest. As do her work better. a consultant, she took on a data architect role and Sanchez remained with Miami Dade County for 9 years. eventually as Director of Data Services, working in She was still an analyst after all this time and realized that various types of industries. It was as a consultant, that there were no more opportunities for her if she remained she first ventured into healthcare. She was asked to there. “Risk is a big component of progressing. You have give an assessment of the organization’s EMR system. to be willing to take a chance,” reflected Sanchez. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 10) She took a chance on a private company and went

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NAHSE FLO RID A Breaking Barriers All the Way to The Healthcare Technology C-Suites (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9)

She was honest and the client liked her honesty. It took several years before she was to work directly in healthcare, but she was intrigued at how challenged healthcare was with technology and how resistant they were to change at the time. During her time as a consultant, she was involved in founding the South Florida Chapter of the Data Warehouse Institute. This is a global organization focused on education and research of data warehousing and business intelligence in all industries. She was eventually told that there was an opportunity at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. She started there as Manager of Enterprise Business Intelligence, reporting directly to the Director. After a month in that position, the Director left, and the teams were redistributed. She was then offered the Director role and in addition to the Enterprise Systems Team, was also responsible for the management of the Web Development Team. Sanchez reports that there were always doubts to her abilities to lead, not only from the teams, but from the internal departments as well. So, just as she had done in prior situations, she asked what their challenges were, and worked hard to win their trust and respect. It helped that she had a good rapport and support from her CIO and she eventually earned everyone’s respect. Even though Nicklaus had an impressive 5 of 7 female directors, Sanchez was the only one that was in a technical role. Her teams focused on non-clinical systems and among other key projects, helped to modernize the outdated financial system by implementing Oracle’s Peoplesoft Suite of business applications. In her position, she had to learn how to communicate to her business and technical teams in ways they can understand. “one of the critical pieces of leadership is not just how to know what your team does, but to speak to their needs on their terms. You must know what they do. You have to know how to speak to the business.” The resistance and doubts have become commonplace in a male dominated field. “I have tough skin and I am prepared to face resistance simply because I am one of a few in this space that is a woman and a minority, “says Sanchez, “That is the reality. People have assumed a lot of hurtful things. I have gotten that for my 30 plus year career, so I have learned to wait it out and prove myself. I know what I know, and I don’t have to put on a façade.” Setting goals were always important to Sanchez. One such goal was to reach the CIO position. She was

approached about this position at Health Choice Network (HCN) after 6 years at Nicklaus. After 2 months of meetings, she was hired. She brought with her an extensive 30 plus year vault of knowledge and technology expertise and spent her first-year learning about HCN. “Having a great collaboration and relationship with your leaders is one of the best things that you can have. After a while, you have to let your history speak for itself.” She describes her move to HCN as one of the best decisions she has ever made. Sanchez believes that the mission of community health centers is inspiring as so many people could die if they did not exist. She understands the role of technology in delivering quality healthcare. “I really want to be able to empower our centers, our physicians, and our providers,” says Sanchez, “I want to really give them the tools they need from the I.T. standpoint, to give the people standing in front of them, the help they need.” Sanchez offers this sound advice to those seeking to climb the corporate ladder in the technology field, “Do not focus so much on the tech part of I.T. Learn the problem. You need an analytical mind to recognize what’s wrong. Throwing technology at a problem for the sake of throwing technology will not fix the problem. I.T. should not dictate what happens with technology, the business does. I.T. facilitates the solution.” n

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TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION

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SO YOU HAVE A TECH IDEA, WHAT NEXT? BY CAMILA MORRISON NAHSE TECH CHAIR Camila Morrison, Chair of the Tech Committee and Member of the South Florida Women of Color Empowerment Institute, united the two organizations, at the amazing Women of Color Empowerment Conference held last month in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This Annual three-day destination conference focuses on educating and motivating dynamic Women of Color to lead more effectively. Hundreds of multicultural affluent and influential women leaders from across the country convened for the 9th year and girls 10-17 years of age, participated in the Microsoft sponsored Stem Program. Sponsorship, panel presentations and attendance included our very own NAHSE members. Aliya Aaron (CEO and Founder of AMR Consulting), Tia Dibussion (President of Data Transformation and Co-Founder of Belle Fleur Technologies) and Allan Daisley (Managing Director of Startupbootcamp Digital Health SCALE), participated in the What’s Hot in Technology panel, moderated by Camila Morrison (CEO and Founder of CGM IT Group). Participants walked away with tools and fundamental principles to consider if you have ‘A tech idea, what’s next’, as well as a plethora of real life experiences shared by the panelists. Aliya, from the bedside as an RN to a software developer, highlight the impact she has made by creating tools to be used by Healthcare Professionals. Tia brought to fruition how data in cloud services can be used to drive business practices through Amazon Web Services (AWS). Everyone always wants to know how to get started and

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Alan told them how by sharing real life tools to lead to innovation and entrepreneurship, and also included blunders and pitfalls to consider. As the moderator, Camila shared a number of beneficial apps such as the CamCard for business cards and the Keeper for password reminders. She also, gave a special mention to the new Teleconnection tool developed in conjunction with Women of Color called, “Tell-A-Professional,” a video chat mentoring session with a Professional, now available from the nationalwomenofcolor.com. The stem group was so fortunate to have the contributions of Microsoft by NAHSE member, Damon House. He coordinated the program providing the 30+ girls, an 8 hour session on coding with Microsoft Surface tablets and

experts from local Microsoft stores. Our very own, President, Grant McGaugh, was a Speaker to the participants of the STEM program, educating them on careers in Technology with a donation of $500 presented to Women of Color as sponsorship and support making this event even more special. n

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

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DAVID CLARK

Senior Vice President of Operations | Broward Health

“Dare to Be Different” – A Case Study in Planning, Discipline, Integrity, and Focus BY SHELLY-ANN M. PARKINSON “Invest in your character, because your character will protect your reputation.” David Clark, Senior Vice President of Operations at Broward Health, shared this sage advice as part of an interview with NAHSE South Florida Chapter president, Grant McGaugh. Clark’s character and reputation has been built on years of hard work, determination, and values instilled in him by his single mother, Dorothy J. Clark, who raised her only child with a system of preparation, discipline, integrity, and respect. A South Florida native, Clark grew up in West Little River. He attended Montessori school in Hollywood, FL until the end of the 4th grade before entering public school at Miami Park Elementary. Clark was a part of the self-proclaimed, “first-fifty,” to be bussed from West Little River and its surrounding neighborhoods, to Ruben Dario Middle School in Kendall, in an effort to desegregate the school. Thanks to a newly formed math and science magnet program at Ruben Dario Middle School and David’s excellent grades, he was selected. With the high South American migration in South Miami at the time, this came as a serious culture shock to a young David Clark, but despite the long commute and 12-hour plus days, he stayed in South Miami for high school as well. Clark attended Coral Park High School in Sweetwater because they had an engineering magnet program. Clark expressed, “At that time, I wanted to become a world-renowned architect and be like Frank Lloyd Wright, drawing and designing everything.” He excelled in math and science and his mother saw his potential. He wanted to go to Miami Northwestern at one time because his friends were there, so he somehow got himself accepted into the medical magnet program. Even though he had absolutely no interest in medicine, he was willing to overlook that minor detail. Fortunately, his mother knowing how much his interest really did lie in engineering, stepped in, and insisted on the engineering program at Coral Park. It was his mother, who taught him to take care of the little things. She instilled in him that he must put things into motion while taking steps to plan ahead

David Clarke

from the ground floor up, and not procrastinate. Always a disciplined scholar, Clark transferred his intensity to the football field as well. He entered athletics by participating in junior varsity football, then varsity. This paid off as he earned a football scholarship to Tennessee State University, where he played both sides of the ball. He entered as an outside linebacker and graduated playing tight end. Clark expressed that he had an awesome experience attending Tennessee State in Nashville, TN, one of the nationally recognized Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). It had a very good engineering program, which enabled him to graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Architectural & Facilities Engineering. While in college, he took advantage of internship opportunities that made him realize he lost his passion for architecture. Thus, when he graduated, David realized he could eliminate that as a focus. Right out of college, Clark returned home to South Florida. His first job at CIVIL-CADD ENGINEERING, INC., a minority firm, coincidentally led to his first healthcare project at Broward General Medical Center. He worked on the four-story expansion with the Trauma

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

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Helipad and other improvements. Between 2003 and 2007, he also worked on projects at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital and at Memorial West. From 2007 to 2010, Clark was a project manager for Phoenix Construction Group, managing approximately $10 million in construction projects for Jackson Health Systems. During this time, he was also earning an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. Armed with his MBA, a turning point in his career occurred when an opportunity took aim at him at a pivotal moment. Reggie Jordan, a vice president at Jackson, gave him a chance to work directly for the healthcare organization rather than their subcontractors’ construction companies. He seized the opportunity and took full advantage of the upward trajectory it offered for his professional career. Clark considered his nine years at Jackson to be a blessed path of growth, “I came in as a senior manager, then to intern director, director, corporate director.

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I left as Associate Vice President of Design and Construction.” Clark explained that he left Jackson only to pursue his love and passion for hospital operations on a larger scale. After a very brief 90 days at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, where he was hired as Executive Director of Facilities, Clark received a phone call from Broward Health offering him a position there. He wanted to give his new position at Boca a chance, but after two phone calls and the tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Clark acquiesced and accepted the offer to join Broward Health. Once there, he knew he made the right decision. There were some exciting projects already in motion when he came onboard. The organization had just invested $64 million at Coral Springs General Hospital for a new tower and $78 million at Broward North with for an emergency department expansion, an operating room renovation and hardening project. He is very pleased with the leadership pipeline in place at Broward Health, “It is a seasoned group of skilled and knowledgeable people who are innovative thinkers in doing business the non-traditional way and not always the traditional way.” Clark stresses, “In project management, you are always a part of a team. You can’t build and manage any part of a project alone. You are no stronger than the link that’s next to you.” In the next five years, Clark wants to look back and measure the improvements that he has managed: the departments’ efficiencies and the professional development of those department leaders under his stewardship. Looking forward five years, Clark states, “I would like to catapult myself into the next chapter of my career – still in healthcare operations, picking up a few more non-clinical healthcare departments. Additionally, I want to do more in the community, especially meeting some of its intangible needs such as education, socioeconomic issues, and distrust.” McGaugh asked Clark to share his advice to any child who may be looking for a blueprint for success. David Clark broke it down succinctly, “You must first have a plan that makes sense, then work that plan. How? Write it down. As you get older, your plan may change. That’s ok. Don’t be afraid to share your plan and your ideas with those who you know and trust, and who have your best interest at heart. Execute that plan. Invest in yourself. Dare to be different.” n

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH SERVICES EXECUTIVES FLORIDA CHAPTER


FAMU

NAHSE FLO RID A

ON SEPTEMBER 10, 2019, the School of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Management (HCM) hosted a networking reception and program in conjunction with the National Association of Health Services Executive (NAHSE) South Florida Chapter. “NAHSE is a non-profit association of Black health care executives founded in 1968 for the purpose of promoting the advancement and development of Black health care leaders, and elevating the quality of health care services rendered to minority and underserved communities” (http://www.nahsesouthflorida. org/about-us.html). The goals of the networking event were to: •C reate an experience for our graduate students (Master in Health Administration- MHA) to gain an understanding of, and to interact with a variety of health care professionals; •E ncourage NAHSE membership and participation among our students and local health care administrators in order to host future educational programs in Tallahassee. The keynote message was delivered by FAMU alumnus Colonel Brodes H. Hartley, Jr., President & CEO of Community Health of South Florida, Inc. Miami, FL. Colonel Hartley has been a pioneer in health care

delivery, providing primary health care services to the uninsured and underinsured of South Florida. He delivered an inspiring message. In addition to local health care professionals, Masters in Health Administration (MHA) students, faculty, alumni, the Dean of Allied Health Sciences, Dr. Cynthia Hughes Harris, and several NAHSE representatives attended this inaugural networking event. NAHSE representatives from Jacksonville and South Florida included: •G rant McGaugh, President, NAHSE South Florida • Arlicia Jones, Marketing Chair, NAHSE South Florida •N icole Thomas, CEO Baptist Hospital, Jacksonville- S. Florida Advisory Council Member • Darren Brownlee, NAHSE National Parliamentarian This event was held at the H. Efferson Manning Student Union. The Marching 100 kick off our program with several selections, and the FAMU Jazz Quartet provided entertainment and background music for the guests. Co-chairpersons were Marisa Lewis, MHA Graduate Program Coordinator and Robbya GreenWeir, Undergraduate Program Coordinator. We anticipate this networking event will become an annual event hosted in Tallahassee, FL. n

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ORLANDO HEALTH

NAHSE F LO RID A

ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2019, Orlando Health hosted a networking reception and program in conjunction with the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) South Florida Chapter. “NAHSE is a non-profit association of Black health care executives founded in 1968 for the purpose of promoting the advancement and development of Black health care leaders, and elevating the quality of health care services rendered to minority and underserved communities” (http://www. nahsesouthflorida.org/about-us.html). The goals of the networking event were to: • Discuss the Readmissions, Reimbursement & Reality: The Business of Healthcare from the perspective of the 3 C’s; C-Suite, Clinician and Care Management.

diversity and inclusion personnel, and a variety of Orlando Health and Advent Health leaders, the event was attended by:

• Encourage NAHSE membership and participation among our early careerists and local health care administrators in order to host future educational programs in the Central Florida Region, specifically with Orlando Health.

• Grant McGaugh, President, NAHSE Florida (South)

The program was moderated by Julie Hamilton of Deloitte. Julie brought a fluidity to the program, drawing each of the participants into the dialogue to ensure an understanding of the issues from each participant’s vantage point. Our esteemed speakers were Nicholas Archer, CEO of the Fulcrum Group AdventHealth, Rosa Saumier, Director of Care Management, Orlando Health, and Michele Rhodes, RN, Entrepreneur and Healthcare consultant. They effectively delivered an interactive dialogue that included a question and answer session at the end of the 3-hour program.

•M ichelle Taylor; Membership and Sponsorship Chair, NAHSE Florida (Central)

In addition to local health care professionals, master’s in health administration (MHA) students, faculty,

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•N atoia McGarrell, President Elect, NAHSE Florida (South) • Kadesha Nicholas, Secretary, NAHSE Florida (South)

•D ave McLeod, Business and Entrepreneur Committee Chair. NAHSE Florida (South) This event was held at the Orlando Regional Medical Center - 52 West Underwood Street in Orlando Florida. Co organizers include Marisol Romany, Director of D & I Business Development, Orlando Health & the NAHSE South Florida team. We anticipate this networking event will become an annual event hosted in Orlando FL. n

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Welcome

NEW MEMBERS VICTOR MORGAN

SAMMY KING

Administrator North Miami Beach

Chief Financial Officer Fort Lauderdale

ISHMEET KUMAR

ANNIE NEASMAN

ELLICE MAE SANCHEZ

KEBBI KELLEY

IVAN BEARD

National Account Manager Malvern

Project Manager Hollywood

President & CEO Miami

Student Orlando

Tallahassee

SUSAN ABRAHAM

Student Champions Gate

DELVENA THOMAS

JHUNELLE MORRISON

Physician Fort Lauderdale

Student Tallahassee

JAMES STUART

DEREK JACKSON

VP Strategic Solutions Tampa

CELESTE SCOTT

Software Developer Miami Beach

CAROLYN SAMUELS

Operations Director Miami Beach

Vice President Tallahassee

ELYSE LIBETTI

Student Monticello

DANIEL ARDAYA

MHA Canidate Tallahassee

LEAH CARPENTER

NESTHA SIL

CEO Pembroke Pines

Student Orlando

DAVID CLARK

MAXINE SHOEMAKER

SVP Operations Fort Lauderdale

KRISTIN CARTER

Adminisrator Oncology Services Miami

Sr. Financial Analyst Jacksonville

CHRISTOPHER GALLOWAY

Account Executive Coconut Creek

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NAHSE F LO RID A

NAHSE ADVISORY PUBLIC POLICY & WRITE UP

ON SEPTEMBER 29TH 2019, the Advocacy Team for NAHSE Florida walked for the cure and attended the Pink Walk hosted by The Breast and Heart Initiative of South Florida. The Pink Walk took place at Aventura Mall with over 300 walkers in attendance. In the picture is Arianna Silcott Lo Committee Member, Albert Lo, Glendora Silcott a two time Stage 4 Cancer Survivor and Dr. Celesia Valentine of Ivantage.

A V E N T U R A M

A

L

L

DUCKFACEPHOTOBOOTH.COM In addition to the walk, Congratulations to NAHSE Florida on winning the $1,500 Hologic Grant. This grant allows NAHSE Florida to donate this to the community and provide more Breast Cancer Screenings which helps save lives with early detection.

UPCOMING EVENTS

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http://www.nahsesouthflorida.org/calendar.html

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DEC

NOV

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NAHSE STARZ Development Program

NAHSE Second Annual Women in Leadership Award Ceremony

– Featuring Former CEO Patricia Maryland – South Florida

http://www.nahsesouthflorida.org/calendar.html

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH SERVICES EXECUTIVES FLORIDA CHAPTER


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2019 SPONSORS Chapter Sponsors PRESENTING

GOLD

SILVER

PATRON

Event Sponsors

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH SERVICES EXECUTIVES FLORIDA CHAPTER

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NAHSE 34th EDUCATION CONFERENCE

NAHSE F LO RID A

AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE

This year I had the pleasure of spearheading our 2nd annual student essay competition that sponsored two graduate students to attend NAHSE’s national conference that took place this year in Washington DC. Our sponsorship package included lodging and a conference admission ticket. Daniella Gilet The winners for this year were Awards and Scholarship Sade Taylor ( University of Committee Chair Central Florida) and Takeira Lewis ( Florida A&M University). With this initiative our chapter is aiding in bridging the gap that exists

between early/ mid-careerist and senior executives, all while challenging each individuals writing acumen and capabilities. At our chapter we believe that by sponsoring students for the national conference we are becoming the catalyst that drives transformative networking that is imperative for ones professional advancement. The national conference provides opportunities for exposure and community for all

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levels of professionals. I attended my second national conference with NAHSE this year. As a first time DC guest I was blown away by the progressiveness of the city, the cultural diversity, and the various workshops held that catered to different interest such as improved health comes for patients via systematic approaches or

propelling your career forward as an early/mid-level careerist. The networking and sense of community observed during the conference only enhanced my experience further. Moreover, visiting the African American history museum was quite humbling, it was refreshing to be educated about our rich history and culture and encouraged me to visit and research my history. n

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH SERVICES EXECUTIVES FLORIDA CHAPTER


NAHSE FLO RID A

MEDIA & MARKETING COMMITTEE UPDATES BY KADESHA NICHOLAS, MHA NAHSE South Florida continues to produce dynamic social media and marketing content for event and educational opportunities. This quarter has been filled with a lot of buzz and excitement as we have hosted several events throughout the state of Florida. The Media & Marketing committee continues to work diligently to produce aesthetically pleasing and informative content for our event coordinators as well as our social media followers. It has been a pleasure to collaborate with

our friends at FAMU, Orlando Health, and Cleveland Clinic for various events put together by the NAHSE South Florida team. We also had the opportunity to create an ad for the ICABA Hall of Fame Weekend, and work on content for the NAHSE STARZ Program. Our popularity on social media has allowed us to incorporate specialized tracking and analytical tools on our social media platforms to give us insight as to what our followers are interested in. The goal is to ensure that YOU enjoy the content we share so we can continue to keep you informed. Here’s a look at our latest social media trends. n

LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT THE STATS

LINKEDIN Connections: 295 (Sept - Oct) Favorite Post: 7,161 views

INSTAGRAM Followers: 28 (Sept - Oct) Favorite Post: Business of Healthcare video

FACEBOOK Followers: 12 (Sept - Oct) Favorite Post: Orlando Health Team photo

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH SERVICES EXECUTIVES FLORIDA CHAPTER

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NAHSE FLORIDA

Empowering the Next Generation of Health Care Leaders Today

Your future, your time is now!

JOIN today!

For more information please visit

www.nahsesouthflorida.org

(305) 562 1825


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