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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

ng HED i t a ebr IS

l L Ce MP MEN O O

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Introducing South Florida’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry of 2019


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4

LEGACY SOUTH FLORIDA’S MOST INFLUENTIAL & PROMINENT BLACK WOMEN IN BUSINESS & INDUSTRY, 2019

6 MAYOR'S REPORT

By Mack Bernard

THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT

Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh

8 BUSINESS REPORT

By Beatrice Louissaint

PALM BEACH COUNTY URBAN LEAGUE By Soulan Johnson

10 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

By Mary V. Davids

12 C  OVER STORY Risk, Faith and Balance Drive Legacy South Florida’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry, 2019 By Michelle F. Solomon

14 SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

Recently, I was invited to interview realty show queen NeNe Leakes, the star of Bravo’s “Real Housewives of Atlanta.” She was in South Florida to host a weekend summit called “Ladies of Success: Beauty, Brains and Business.” “The main focus of this event is for SUCCESSFUL entrepreneurs, CEO’s and all around business-

minded women across the world to network, uplift, connect, motivate and learn ways to increase their bottom line by networking with other likeminded woman,” NeNe wrote on Instagram. The interview never happened. Not that I didn’t try. Organizers asked me to meet NeNe at a posh Miami Beach restaurant on Biscayne Bay, where the fashionable women attending her summit were anxiously awaiting her arrival. As the restaurant’s double doors opened, NeNe and her entourage— which included her husband Gregg, former NBA star Lamar Odom, and his now fiancé Sabrina Parr (they got engaged four days later at Prime 112 restaurant in Miami Beach) — were formally announced to a chorus of cheers and a barrage of camera flashes as if royalty had entered the room. Too much chaos for any chance of me conducting an interview.

Fortunately, I need look no further than the pages of this issue for South Florida’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry, 2019. This year’s honorees run the gamut from a bank vice president to a chief human resources officer to a few high-powered attorneys. They now join Legacy’s exclusive circle of women achievers who also display beauty, brains, and a keen sense of business. They may not hold a Georgia peach — or in our case a Florida orange — like the cast of “Real Housewives,” but our honorees are building wealth, uplifting communities, and trailblazing a path right here. That’s our reality. Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

AFRICAN AMERICAN RESEARCH LIBRARY

By Makiba Foster

16 ENTREPRENEURSHIP CFO Clarke Focuses on Supporting Local Minority-Owned Businesses BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER

By Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq.

18 PALM BEACH COUNTY REPORT

By Ann Marie Sorrell

19

PROFILE IN LEADERSHIP From Fashion to HR, Marie Waugh says Mentorship, Support Keys to Success

By Christian Portilla

20 MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

By Stanley Zamor

ON THE COVER:

Pictured from left: Stacey Clarke, Atty. Sue-Ann Robinson, Thais Sullivan, Nicole Cummings, Atty. Rosalyn Sia BakerBarnes, Kitty Lundan, and Marie Waugh. The cover photo was taken by Joe Wesley. Cover makeup by Rory Lee.

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Shannel Escoffery Vice President

Sabrina Moss-Solomon Designer

Joe Wesley

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Cover Photo

Rory Lee

Cover Makeup Artist

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

South Florida’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry of 2019

COLONEL NICHOLE ANDERSON Undersheriff Broward Sheriff’s Office

MARY V. DAVIDS

Attorney and Shareholder Searcy Denney Scarola Barnhart & Shipley, PA

ROSALYN SIA BAKER-BARNES

Medical Doctor, Dr. Berry’s Organics for Premium CBD, Secure Your Fertility, Neuropathy & Pain Relief of South Florida

DR. JERISA BERRY, M.D.

VANIA BREDY, MSHCA, RHIA CEO, Bredy Physical Therapy and Sports Therapy, LLC

Chief Marketing Officer, Director of Business Development, Urban Pulse Direct & UPD Smart Solutions

LIA T. GAINES

RENÉE A. JADUSINGH, ESQ.

MS-HRM D&M Consulting Services, LLC

Periodontist and Implant Surgeon Delicate Periodontics and Implant Dentistry

DR. J’NELLE DELICA

EVAM.FRANCIS,MN,RN,CCRN,NEA-BC

KITTY LUNDAN

DR. TIFFANY MCCALLA BOTTORFF

CHARISE MORGAN-JOSEPH, ESQ.

NETONUA REYES, MSN, RN

SUE-ANN N. ROBINSON ESQ.

KATIA SAINT FLEUR

TIFFANY TAIT, LCSW, CDWF

CALIBE THOMPSON

Media Personality and Motivational Speaker The P.O.W.E.R. Group/ The People of Power Show

Chief Operations and Nursing Officer Broward Health Imperial Point

Owner & Chief Operating Officer The Detox Center

Medical Doctor TLJMS

Attorney/TV Legal Analyst Robinson Caddy Law

Creative Director Island Syndicate

President, Brilliant Healthcare Training and Consulting Inc.

Trial Attorney Zurich, N.A.

Principal Owner KSF & Associates

MARIE C. WAUGH

Chief Human Resources Officer - APTIM

Executive Director Center for Enterprise Opportunity

TINU PEÑA

Capital Improvement Plan Manager & CEO/Principal Designer, City of West Palm Beach & Motre, Co. LLC

SHEA S. SPENCER

STACEY CLARKE, MBA

Executive Director Delray Beach CRA

NICOLE CUMMINGS

RL10 Rocket Engine Deputy Program Manager Aerojet Rocketdyne

THAIS R. SULLIVAN

CEO The Homeless Coalition of Palm Beach County

First Vice President/Regional CRA & Community Lending Officer, Valley Bank

RHONDA WILLIAMS-TURNER

VERNIQUE WILLIAMS, MBA

Founder/ President, 4 Knowledge Is Power Inc./ National Coalition of 100 Black Women South Palm Beach County Chapter President

Senior Customer Advisor, Major & Governmental Accounts Next Era Energy, Inc. (FPL)


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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Congratulations Thais R. Sullivan

Your Valley family congratulates you on being recognized by Legacy magazine as one of South Florida’s 2019 "Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry."

Thank you for all the great work you do in our communities throughout Florida.

© 2019 Valley National Bank. Member FDIC. Equal Opportunity Lender. All Rights Reserved.

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

MAYOR'S REPORT

Advisory Commission Established to Help Improve Women’s Lives

BY MACK BERNARD

In February 2018, the Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution creating the Palm Beach County Advisory Commission on Women. The stated purpose of the Commission on Women is to be a resource for issues pertaining to women of all ages,

regardless of race, ethnic and cultural background, and socio-economic circumstances, who reside in Palm Beach County. It was envisioned that this forum would help increase the interaction between organizations, governmental agencies and institutions whose mission is to improve the lives of women. The Commission on Women is made up of 15 members, two appointed by each county commissioner and one at-large appointed by a majority vote of the BCC, which may also appoint a youth (age 15-18) representative to serve as an ex-officio member. Members must be residents of Palm Beach County and should reflect, to the greatest extent possible, the demographic and geographic diversity in the county. Further, the BCC endeavored to appoint members who represent the specific Commission on Women’s focus, as well as experts in

the field. The Commission on Women is solely an advisory body established to focus on matters pertaining specifically to women including, but not limited to, discrimination, employment, education, healthcare, homelessness, and addictions. In February 2019, the Commission on Women compiled information received from agencies that assist women in Palm Beach County and asked those agencies what it could do to help those agencies meet their goals and needs to assist women based upon our authority, responsibilities and duties. Their responses helped the commission identify the challenges women face. Armed with this information from various agencies, the Commission on Women scheduled interactive listening sessions throughout Palm Beach County during the month of September 2019. The goal for the listening sessions was to hear directly

from Palm Beach County residents. While the listening sessions suggest that some women have the same or similar concerns throughout the county, they also indicate that there are still some very distinct concerns of women in some areas of the county.  Input from Palm Beach County residents will assist the Commission on Women in making recommendations to the BCC on how the County Commission may address issues pertaining to socio-economic factors that impact women and the solutions that will aid in the development of individual potential and the encouragement of women to utilize their capabilities and assume leadership roles. The Commission on Women plans to compile this information in a report to present to the BCC in 2020.

Mack Bernard is mayor of Palm Beach County. n

THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT

Traci Lynn Changes Women’s Lives Through Economic Empowerment

BY DR. GERMAINE SMITH-BAUGH

In times of uncertainty, we often look to the leaders in our community for hope and inspiration. Particularly in the Black community, we must remember that women are the backbone of so many industries in our society. Businesses owned by Black women have experienced unprecedented growth in America within the last 20 years. The latest American Express

“State of Women Owned Businesses” report notes that Black women represented the highest rate of growth in the number of firms between 2017 and 2018 than any other group. Yet often times, our achievements and contributions to society go unnoticed. I have been the president and CEO of the Urban League of Broward County for more than 13 years. ULBC has been advancing the lives of African Americans and others in historically underserved communities since 1975. In that time, I have had the pleasure of watching powerful influencers rise and contribute to our community. One of these influencers has been Dr. Traci Lynn. Dr. Lynn is the CEO and founder of Traci Lynn Jewelry, a directsales company that gives women an opportunity to start their own business and achieve financial freedom through selling fashion jewelry and handbags. Traci Lynn Jewelry was established in 1989 in Philadelphia. Since moving her business to Fort Lauderdale in

2016, Dr. Lynn has been a leading light in the Broward community. Through the avenue of Traci Lynn Jewelry, Dr. Lynn has helped tens of thousands of women. She is a motivational speaker whose motto is Motivate, Inspire, and Change Lives. A measure of strong leadership is the ability to give back to the community and expand the access to resources for others. She has been incredibly supportive of the Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Center, which brings together an alliance of business owners, corporations, community partners and financial institutions to accelerate our efforts in giving minority entrepreneurs access to money, markets, and management. Beyond her own business, she also has been supportive of those entering the workforce through our Jobs and Training Division. Dr. Lynn generously donates professional clothing and jewelry to the Urban League’s quarterly job fair clothing boutique, which helps prepare job seekers for their next career.

Dr. Lynn supports the idea that when we look the part, we feel empowered to walk into a room with confidence. Dr. Traci Lynn has been a relentless advocate for Black women in business and a shining example of community empowerment. Her inspirational messages, from the pulpit to the office, continue to resonate as we all work toward expanding business opportunities to the Black community. The Baughtom Line is this: Black women taking control of their economic destiny through entrepreneurship creates a positive ripple effect throughout our community. Our policies in both the public and private sectors must support, invest, and replicate models for success for women entrepreneurs. Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh is president and CEO of the Urban League of Broward County. n


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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NOMINATE AN ACHIEVER TODAY! The African-American Achievers Awards, now in its 28th year, recognizes those who have made an extraordinary difference in their community through hard work, dedication and compassion. An independent panel of judges from Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties selects honorees in the following categories:

Arts & Culture | Business & Entrepreneurism Community Service | Education Nominate online at AfricanAmericanAchievers.com

Deadline is November 29, 2019 SPONSORED BY

SAVE THE DATE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ACHIEVERS

Thursday, APril 23, 2020 BROWARD CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS For more information, visit AfricanAmericanAchievers.com, call 866-516-2497, or follow us on Facebook and Instagram

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

BUSINESS REPORT

Black-owned, Women-Led Companies Transforming South Florida’s Economy

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT

According to the National Association of Education Statistics, black women are the most educated segment of the United States population. They are also the nation’s fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs. South Florida is an epicenter for companies owned by black women. Meet some of these women and their companies: Ebony Smith worked in the operations and logistics sector of the corporate energy industry for many years, but she began to feel something

was missing. She ultimately launched Ebony Smith & Associates Inc., which provides leadership development and employee experience services through coaching, facilitation, workshops and talent development. The company teaches resiliency, leadership and relationship building, giving leaders practical skills that build their capacity and capability. Its clients include Ryder Systems, Revlon, Nike, Florida International University, and University of Miami Health System. www.ebenumequation.com/ebony-smithyour-coach After decades of specializing in issues pertaining to medically-complex children, Barbara Sharief founded South Florida Pediatric Homecare Inc. in 2001. The company cares for children and adults with medically-complex needs in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties, employing more than 600 specially trained professionals. The home health agency works closely with clients and their physicians to coordinate care in patients’ homes or home-like settings. Sharief holds a doctorate of Nurse Practice from the University of Pennsylvania, and earned both a Master

of Science in nursing and an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner degree from Florida International University. Sharief also advocates for affordable health care as Broward County Commissioner for District 8. www.southfloridapediatrics.com With a background as a creative director for a jewelry company, Tiffany Chimere launched her eponymous brand, proving she could succeed as an entrepreneur. Through Tiffany Chimere Inc., she sells a designer line of custom fashion shoes and accessories for women and children. Meanwhile, Tiffany Chimere Publishing has published two books: An Open Book: A Poetic Autobiography, and the children’s book I Am Beautiful, a collection of photos of diverse children. www.tiffanychimere.com After a stellar career at IBM, Linda Spradley Dunn launched Odyssey Media to connect multicultural female executives, providing them a voice and business retreat. As CEO, Dunn has established and cultivated a community of thousands of affluent and influential multicultural women, including senior corporate executives, attorneys,

physicians and entrepreneurs. They purchase exclusive memberships to access programs and resources, including conferences and boot camps, as well as philanthropic and travel opportunities. The yearly Odyssey Network Business Retreat attracts nearly 600 female executives and is sponsored by companies including Prudential, Johnson & Johnson and Starbucks. Headquartered in Singer Island, Florida, Odyssey has satellite offices in New York, Detroit, and California. www.odysseymedia.com

Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council, one of 23 regional councils affiliated with the National Minority Supplier Development Council. The FSMSDC serves as liaison between corporate America and government agencies and Minority Business Enterprises in the state of Florida. It also operates U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers serving southern and central Florida. Learn more at fsmsdc.org or call (305) 762-6151. n

PALM BEACH COUNTY URBAN LEAGUE

Black Women Emerging as Leaders in Sports Industry

BY SOULAN JOHNSON

In an industry that for decades has been overwhelmingly dominated on the field and in the boardroom by mostly all white men, there is a select group of black women who have made tremendous progress in breaking through and shattering the proverbial glass ceiling. These women occupy senior to mid-level roles in the NFL, NHL, NBA, and MLB, according to Jason Belzer of

Forbes Magazine. Atop that list is Michele Roberts, executive director of the National Basketball Players Association. As the first woman to lead a major professional sports union in North America, the 62-year-old Roberts, a U.C. Berkeley Law graduate and former trial lawyer for Skadden Arps, now plays a pivotal role in representing the interests of more than 350 NBA players and more than $3 billion in league salary distributions. Roberts already serves as a tremendous inspiration for aspiring female sports executives everywhere. Then there’s NFL’s Corporate Communications and Public Affairs Senior Vice President Traci Otey Blunt, who has worked in two separate capacities in the sports industry. She is responsible for key strategic areas within the league including current affairs, business operations, government affairs, NFL Media, player health and safety, and social responsibility. Blunt advises women to, “Always know that somebody

is watching. If someone asks you to do something that is not in your job function, do it. Your organization will always see you as a go-getter.” I’ve seen it first-hand in my 10 years of working for Super Bowls XXXVI, XXXIX and XLI. Black women must work to prove our success. We face welldocumented adversities ranging from socio-economic hurdles to unconscious bias and discrimination. A recent Harvard study found that when an organization is failing, black women leaders are evaluated more negatively than black men, white women or white men. The good news — black women are beginning to emerge as leaders across all industries, academia, government, non-profit organizations, and yes, sports. This trend is particularly evident in the creation of new businesses. At the Urban League of Palm Beach County, we encourage our young women to follow their dreams, no matter the obstacles. Through our NULITES, National Achievers Society

and other youth and education programs, our emphasis is on helping young people expand their horizons, establish leadership skills, build self-confidence and improve their education. This holds especially true for our girls. There is no lack of qualified women to fill leadership roles. Women, for instance, earn the majority of university degrees at every level except for professional degrees, and more women are in the workforce today than ever before. Our presence and opinions are valuable to organizations. We must help ourselves and seek out mentors from different demographics to broaden our perspectives about our career goals. There are many examples of black women leaders succeeding in ways unthinkable just a few decades ago. Let’s celebrate our successes as we continue to move forward. Soulan Johnson is vice president of Development and Marketing for the Urban League of Palm Beach County Inc. n


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CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

You Can Avoid and Overcome Five Obstacles to Success

BY MARY V. DAVIDS, MS-HRM

Your definition of success can vary depending on where you are in life, but no matter where you are, one of these five things has shown up to interfere with your progress. 1. Procrastination. This is probably my most challenging area, especially as a writer. When you have a gift or talent,

it’s easy to convince yourself that you can always get it done later because you are only relying on your talent or gift and not on other people to get the job done. The problem is procrastination steals your full engagement and the energy you could be giving to the things that don’t come naturally. The “I’ll do it later” routine is a dangerous game to play, mostly because you end up being the one who never does what they could always do later. The next time you think about procrastinating, ask yourself - what does tomorrow have that today doesn’t?

shouldn’t stop you from trying your best. Remember, however scared you may be, there are people waiting on your genius and you owe it to them to not give up.

2. Fear. There are two kinds of fear. The first is that you won’t succeed. This type of fear can be resolved by humility and understanding that failure is inevitable and necessary to succeed. The second is a fear that you will succeed. “What if I can’t live up to what others think of me?” “What if I let people down?” These are natural thoughts, but they

4. Knowing When to Outsource. Stop trying to do everything on your own. Some things need an expert to handle. When you spend too much time doing things you don’t have to do, you delay reaching your goals. Outsource to an expert that will help your life to become easier on a day to day basis. Hire a coach, a maid, a blog writer, website

3. Doubt. This battle is totally fought in the mind, much like all the others listed here. No one can teach you how to stop doubting yourself. You must learn that all on your own. Doubt is a distraction. It toils with the mind, keeping it busy, too busy to make progress. The best way to overcome doubt and believe is to start. Keep starting until you finish.

developer, etc. You get the idea. 5. Lack of Consistency. Robert Collier says: “Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out.” Without having a consistent drive towards reaching small goals daily, there can be no achievement of the greater goal. Consistency also builds trust. It allows your network to see that you believe in your work and you can be trusted to carry out any work they may send your way. Don’t let this year become another year where you should’ve done something you had time to do but never did. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.marydavids.com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram or Twitter. n


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

COVER STORY

Risk, Faith and Balance Drive Legacy South Florida’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry, 2019 BY MICHELLE F. SOLOMON

Work hard, take risks, have faith, give back to the community, find balance, and love what you do are what Legacy South Florida’s “Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry of 2019” share as their credos for success. “You have to fail your way to success,” says Kitty Lundan, founder of POWER Group and one of Legacy South Florida’s honorees. “There are so many women I know that are holding themselves back. I think I’m here right now serving for God to say, ‘You know what? We’re going to start erasing some of these restrictions and breaking some of these chains.” Lundan, Roslyn Sia BakerBarnes, Sue-Ann Robinson, Thais Sullivan, and Marie Waugh are among the trailblazing women in the 2019 distinguished class of Legacy honorees. “We select these women each year to recognize their professional and civic achievements in order to spotlight accomplished leaders who are influencers in our community and beyond,” said Dexter Bridgeman, CEO of MIA Media Group LLC, publisher of Legacy Miami and Legacy South Florida.

Success in Leadership According to the 2018 Harvard Business Review article titled “What Black Women Know about Getting to the Top: Beating Odds,” emotional intelligence is one of three ways, along with authenticity and agility, that is an indicator of success in leadership roles. Marie Waugh, chief human resources officer for APTIM, has a track record for this innate sense of emotional intelligence. Her proficiency for creating order out of chaos has been part of the steady climb in her career as a human

According to a 2019 study published in the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, black women currently earn nearly twothirds of bachelor’s degrees, 70 percent of master’s degree and more than 60 percent of doctorates attained by African Americans. Black women also outpace Black men with enrollment into law, medical, and dental schools. While learning about the Civil Rights Movement as a student, Sue-Ann Robinson took note of From left: Roslyn Sia Baker-Barnes, Stacey Clarke, Thais Sullivan, Nicole Cummings, Kitty Lundan, Marie Waugh, and the activists that were Sue-Ann Robinson. promoting positive resources director for large energy said she started out loving fashion change, and those that and financial organizations. The and wanted to become a fashion were defending them. global HR professional not only designer, but she ultimately found “I realized attorneys were transforms and motivates within her career purpose through a mentor helping society be better, so I wanted the corporate world, but also puts who saw her potential and rallied for to do that.” her keen people skills to use in her her to continue her education. The founder and managing many civic activities. Waugh serves While working during the day at attorney of Robinson Caddy Law, what was then Barnett Fort Lauderdale, Robinson’s Bank and attending advocacy doesn’t stop when she Barry University at leaves the courtroom. She volunteers “There are so many women I know that are night, Sullivan said countless hours with various holding themselves back. I think I’m here the bank executive/ community-based cultural and right now serving for God to say, ‘You know mentor inspired her to educational activities. give the industry a try Palm Beach County attorney what? We’re going to start erasing some and encouraged her to of these restrictions and breaking some of complete her bachelor’s Rosalyn Sia Baker-Barnes admits that balancing a career and family these chains.” degree in business. She many days is like walking a tightrope. She’s coined the term Kitty Lundan did. She said that the “blending” when it comes to equal Founder of POWER Group day Valley National Bank hired her as a CRA parts work and home life. She insists Officer was the day she both need to be a priority. “stopped working.” It “I think you have to consciously on the executive board for the Urban no longer became a job, but something make time for your work and your League of Broward County. She is she knew she was meant to do. family. I believe that when we take also a commissioner on the North time for our families, it makes us Choices and Mission Broward Hospital District board. better in our careers and better Education propelled many of the Thais R. Sullivan, first vice people.” honorees along their path to success. president at Valley National Bank, n


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

SOCIAL MEDIA

Social Storytelling is a Marketing Strategy

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

Who doesn’t love a good story. We have been telling them since the beginning of time. Before there was written language, cultures, for millennia, have learned through storytelling. Social media is now allowing people to share their stories with the entire world. Whether you are a

corporate organization, a non-profit, or a personal brand, incorporate strong storytelling into your digital marketing strategy because digital storytelling opportunities are endless. With social media, you are never limited to just one medium. You can tell stories with pictures on Instagram, video on YouTube, or do it in real time with Facebook Live, and so on. Today’s buyers are becoming less likely to act on hard sells, data driven tactics, and banner type advertising. Because of this, the future of content marketing is leaning more and more in favor of a storytelling strategy because social media is social first. At the end of the day, people are people. The reason why we connect to stories is because we resonate with them on a human level. Make your story more impactful by tapping into this. Some best practices to ensure that you are telling the right stories that get

you results are:

1. Decide what stories work best for your audience. Not every audience responds the same to every story. Does your audience prefer a more warm and fuzzy feeling story? Do they appreciate factual statistics and bottom line type stories? Know your audience and plan your social storytelling strategy according to what they need to hear in order to take action with your business and/or brand. 2. Make sure the caption (i.e. the

story) matches the action (i.e. the image).

If you are using text to share stories on social media, before they ever read the story, they will look at the picture. Make sure the image you use is high quality, captivating, and relevant to the story you are telling.

3. Don’t be afraid to share the

micromoments. Time

matters in today’s world. Now, more than ever, people aren’t always available to read a 2,000-word post or watch a 10-minute video to share a good story. To capture them, you can utilize micromoment social platform features like Instagram Stories to tell a story in the moment. Storytelling is translating your sales and marketing message into a narrative form that will captivate your audience in a new way. Don’t neglect this powerful marketing tactic that will allow your fans and followers to join you on a journey. In a world of constant swipe and scroll, storytelling can be the thumb-stopping content your brand needs to break through the digital noise of the 21st century.

Dr. Tracy Timberlake is an awardwinning business coach. Instagram: @tracytimberlake n

AFRICAN AMERICAN RESEARCH LIBRARY

New Leaders Establish Legacies for Future Generations

Makiba Foster

Dear Reader: The African American Research Library and Cultural Center extends its sincere congratulations to Legacy magazine’s 2019 “Most Influential and Prominent Women in Business and Industry.” Your service, dedication, creativity, passion, and expertise are important and your contributions matter as we all continue the work of progress and uplift.

As we celebrate the achievements and welcome this new class of “Most Influential and Prominent Women in Business and Industry,” what resonates with me is the idea of legacy. Legacy, as defined by MerriamWebster Dictionary, is “something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past.” Thinking about the work of the AARLCC and the concept of legacy, I am reminded of our mission, which is to provide our community with the vast resources necessary to educate this generation and future generations about the rich and colorful African, AfricanAmerican and Caribbean heritages, cultures and histories. For my organization, that means understanding that our existence is because of legacies left by those who came before us. There would be no AARLCC were it not for the legacies of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Howard

University’s the Moorland Spingarn Research Collection, or Auburn Avenue Research Library. Therefore, it is my library’s duty to help educate in the present with the goal of impacting future generations about Black freedom fighters, artists, scholars, business leaders, and everyday people on whose shoulders we stand.  As a library and archive, it is important to document the work of the community. Hence, it makes sense that Legacy magazine, whose existence strives to center the voices and stories of the diverse Black experience related to business, careers, politics, education, and culture, should be included in our archive.  Legacy magazine has left an indelible mark on media, providing a platform that amplifies expertise and the good works happening in the Black community across South Florida. So, as we collectively celebrate your success, the AARLCC will archive this moment of recognition.

What that means is that future users of the archive will see your early contributions to legacy building. Finally, as we all strive to make the concept of legacy applicable in our lives, we should remember that our legacies are not for us but for the benefit of someone else. To the 2019 class of “Most Influential and Prominent Women in Business and Industry,” my wish is that you continue benefiting from the legacy left to you by those that came before you and may you continue to build on your legacy, which will impact generations to come after you! Be encouraged to keep doing the work of creating legacies that will positively affect the future of your communities and the lives of your descendants. Makiba Foster is manager of the African American Research Library & Cultural Center. n


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP

CFO Clarke Focuses on Supporting Local Minority-Owned Businesses

BY KALLAN LOUIS

In its 2019 “Best Small Business City in America,” report, Biz2Credit named Miami as the No. 1 market for small business growth. Access to Latin America, tourism, construction, real estate and Miami’s growing IT sector were identified as key contributors to Miami landing the lead spot. “Small businesses” were defined as companies having fewer than 250 employees or less than $10 million in annual revenues. While the annual Biz2Credit ranking does present itself as a great opportunity for South Florida small business owners, Stacey Clarke, vice president and chief marketing officer at Urban Pulse Direct and UPD Smart Solutions, said there is still a need to focus on increasing customer-awareness about minority companies. “What I saw was that there were

Stacey Clarke, vice president and chief marketing officer at Urban Pulse Direct and UPD Smart Solutions.

a lot of minority-owned businesses that had a great product or a great service but couldn’t afford broadcast media and the types of planning committees or focus groups that are required for them to be able to get the resources that they need to grow or be sustainable in the market,” Clarke explained.

Clarke, a former Cox Media Group consultant and her husband, Martin, created UPD three years ago. The company is a full-service small business development company specializing in building and supporting minority-owned small businesses. UPD has a partnership with the Small Business Administration for the South and Central Florida regions, where it handles marketing for a number of initiatives. In September, UPD worked with the City of Miami with its Opportunity Zone Summit to educate residents and businesses in federally identified low-income communities about resources to help develop their neighborhoods. “It’s really important for our community to continue to have more people go into business, continue to employ members of our community, and have our dollars circulate inside

and outside our community,” Clarke said. UPD also manages the Overtown Marketplace at the Urban, a local event that kicked off in May featuring diverse local businesses, food, and entertainment. UPD is currently working on partnerships with educational institutions, local municipalities and community organizations to assist local business owners. Additionally, the company is planning upcoming activities at the Overtown Marketplace to drive more traffic to the event by showcasing local vendors. “We’re really passionate about our community,” Clarke emphasized. “We’re passionate about supporting small business owners and building their own legacy. That’s really the driving mission of what we do.” n

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER

Chamber Working to Ensure Black Businesses Benefit from Penny Surtax

Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq.

BY SHAHEEWA JARRETT, ESQ.

In November 2018, Broward County voters approved a local one-cent, 30-year surtax to increase mobility and address transportation challenges in the county. The detailed plan is designed to reduce traffic congestion, improve roads and bridges, enhance traffic light timing, develop safe sidewalks and bike paths, expand mass transit, fully fund special

needs/on-demand services, fully fund community shuttles, connect greenways, enhance school safety zones and fund a variety of city transportation projects. On a motion made by Broward County Vice Mayor Dale Holness in September 2018, the Board of County Commissioners required that 30 percent of the money raised from the tax go to small businesses registered with Broward County Government, whether it is a county or city project. According to Chamber research this summer, only about 13 municipalities out of 31 currently have a small business program. But in order to use the surtax money, each city will have to comply with the 30 percent small business spend. This will be a huge opportunity for small businesses in the county. The new surtax took effect on January 1, 2019 and is projected to raise $15.6 billion over the 30-year life of the tax. The Chamber constantly emphasizes and advocates for our government entities to spend locally and with

small businesses, as black companies overwhelmingly fall into this category. The Chamber is going to do everything it can to ensure that inclusion and equity are paramount in the spending. But we will also make sure that our companies are ready for this opportunity. We cannot let this pass us by. Understanding this urgency, the Chamber launched our Get Listed certification series in January and started with Broward County Government. We will host a Certification Wrap Up Session on December 7, 2019 at the Tamarac Library to push the message that we must take swift action to get into that 30 percent vendor pool. We will review the certification process for Broward County and help attendees complete the application, much like we did last December. In addition to getting on the certification lists, it is imperative that our companies are ready for these new opportunities. On October 1, the Chamber launched a Business Assessment Tool

with our partner Broward College to help business owners analyze their companies. If you want your company to grow and get better, you must understand the strengths and weaknesses of your company. We hosted a session on October 29 to provide participants with their written assessment results and to determine the next steps. The Chamber is here to help. We will roll out a new educational series based upon some of the feedback we received from supplier diversity professionals and others who administer small business programs, and to specifically address some of the weaknesses identified in the assessment results. The year 2020 is around the corner. We want to be sure that your company is poised for success. See Eventbrite or our calendar on BrowardCountyChamberOfCommerce. com for all event details. Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq. is president of the Broward County Black Chamber. n


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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“The Home of Black Intellectual Capital and Providers of News and Information to South Florida’s Black Affluencers and Influencers!”

PUBLISHERS OF LEGACY MIAMI, LEGACY SOUTH FLORIDA AND MIA MAGAZINES

CREATORS OF DIGITAL PRODUCTS

SUCCESS PROFILES

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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PALM BEACH COUNTY REPORT

Jadusingh Promoted to Executive Director of Delray Beach CRA

Renée A. Jadusingh, Esq.

BY ANN MARIE SORRELL

Recently promoted from assistant director, Renée A. Jadusingh, Esq. is now the new executive director of the Delray Beach Community Redevelopment Agency. She is responsible for the implementation and oversight of the City of Delray Beach Community Redevelopment Plan, which provides the framework for projects and activities intended to revitalize and improve conditions within the Community Redevelopment Area that covers more than 1,900 acres of land (approximately 20 percent of the city). Included within the boundaries are the entire Central Business District, the adjacent neighborhoods east of I-95 between Lake Ida Road and S.W. 10th Street, and much of the area north of downtown, east of Seacrest Boulevard, and along the U.S. 1 corridor to the Boynton Beach city limits. Jadusingh oversees a $42 million annual budget. Alongside her work with the Delray Beach CRA, she serves on the board of directors for the Florida Redevelopment Association. Prior to working with the CRA, Jadusingh was staff counsel for the Southeast Overtown/Park West Community Redevelopment Agency, where she oversaw all legal matters and was responsible for drafting grant agreements, leases, board resolutions, and other legal documents. While working at the SEOPW

CRA, Jadusingh participated in the negotiation and drafting of contracts for large scale projects within the boundaries of the SEOPW CRA such as: the Miami World Center project, the Marriott Marquis Miami Convention and Expo Center, and the rehabilitation of more than 500 residential units. She has extensive experience in the public and private sector, working with redevelopment and management in the South Florida area. Jadusingh received her juris doctorate and LL.M. in Intercultural Human Rights (cum laude) from St. Thomas University School of Law and serves on the board of directors for Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse. The City of Delray Beach, with its picturesque moniker, the Village By the Sea, has gone through a dramatic economic and redevelopment evolution over the past 30 years, including strategic planning and active leadership in community building, creating a more sustainable downtown, revitalizing neighborhoods, promoting economic development, and preserving the heritage of Delray Beach. Today, Delray Beach is a thriving hub with quality places to live and where families and businesses want to be. Recently completed projects include an eight-screen IPIC theater, which opened in March in the heart of downtown; and Arts Warehouse, a 15,000 sq. ft. arts incubator with accommodations for artists including studio rental, gallery space, classrooms, special events and facility rental. There is a lot going on within the CRA District. Hard at work to improve the lives of Delray Beach residents, Jadusingh and her team are leading the charge — from developing affordable and workforce housing, to renovating commercial space for small businesses, and partnering with local businesses to continue the redevelopment of the Community Redevelopment Area.n

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2019

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PROFILE IN LEADERSHIP

From Fashion to HR, Marie Waugh says Mentorship, Support are Keys to Success the best life ever,â&#x20AC;? added Waugh, who credits designer Jackie Taub for the push into major retail. Waugh is now the go-to person at Aptim to secure partnerships and talent for environmental projects that help communities recover and rebuild after natural disasters. It specializes in engineering, program management, environmental services, disaster recovery, complex facility maintenance, and construction services. Waugh said her transition from retail to human relations came when Margaret Hoffbeck, head of HR at Bloomingdales, told her that her role in life was to be an HR professional. Marie Waugh chief human resources officer for APTIM. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went into HR kicking and screaming,â&#x20AC;? she reflected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I BY CHRISTIAN PORTILLA said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Are you kidding me? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a buyer, I like fashion. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Marie Waugh is not the typical want to be HR people.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I wound chief human resources officer. The up being the HR person for the psychology majorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path to her warehouses that had unions. current career was anything but Fast forward, I thank Margaret conventional. every day without thinking about â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went through the it because I Bloomingdales love HR. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m training an industry program and â&#x20AC;&#x153;For people who are agnostic. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve it was one done everything considering HR, my best of my top from fashion to advice, especially for people experiences,â&#x20AC;? wastewater.â&#x20AC;? said Waugh, who are in senior levels, is Waugh who heads that they have to be able to says to succeed human relations be confidential while sharing in HR, she had for Aptim, an the combination engineering and information.â&#x20AC;? of mentorship environmental Marie Waugh and a powerful services Chief human resources officer for APTIM Jamaican mother provider. to balance â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was her out. She an associate tells young mentor buyer. I went on to do professionals that mentorship and this at several other stores, and I partnership goes a long way. thought that was my life. I thought Waugh explained that anyone I was going to be a menswear who wants to succeed in work buyer when I grew up, and this was needs â&#x20AC;&#x153;a tribe.â&#x20AC;?

One of her life hacks is to have a personal board â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a team of people who provide guidance, career advice, and balance in decision making. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My leadership style is collaborative,â&#x20AC;? Waugh says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For people who are considering HR, my best advice, especially for people who are in senior levels, is that they have to be able to be confidential while sharing information. I also had a friend tell me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Marie, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re beginning to be the only one in the room that looks like you. Make sure in your climb to the top you climb and pull. Always be pulling someone behind you. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily need to look like you, but make sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re inclusive in your climbing

and pulling.â&#x20AC;? Community is also a passion for Waugh. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been appointed to be a commissioner at Broward Health Medical Center and serves on the Board of the Urban League of Broward County, a community-based organization dedicated to advancing the lives of African-Americans and others in historically underserved communities. Waugh said her secret to balance and service came from her late mentor Tom Mullen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enjoy what you do. The moment youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not enjoying what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing in your career youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working.â&#x20AC;? n

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MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

How We Choose to Respond to Conflict Is an Art

Response Styles: Competition (I Win/You Lose): The competing styles always feel the need to exert their perceived power. When presented with the fact of having long-term effects detrimental to “their business,” alternatives are often acceptable. Avoidance (I Lose-You Win): This style often stonewalls an issue or is even prone to self-sabotage. Creatively approaching this style with written concrete goals often stops them from shutting completely down.

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

After three hours of spirited negotiations where the parties and their attorneys remained in separate rooms, I invited both attorneys to speak in the hallway, separate from their clients. As they discussed their points of contention, I realized that both seemed to be debating points that supported why or how the contract was breached instead what resolutions were possible given their client’s interest in resolving the matter. I decided to switch the approach and asked both attorneys to consider having the parties discuss the matter further with everyone together in one conference room. Both attorneys did not agree at first, claiming that the parties could not remain calm enough to be in the same room, but after I described how we could have a controlled discussion, they agreed. As the parties came together, I did exactly as I described to the attorneys. Forty-five minutes later, the attorneys began drafting an agreement the parties found mutually acceptable. I assisted the parties with moving towards resolution by identifying then responding to each of their conflict response styles and needs. Rather than continue debating positions, I realized by approaching the parties through their conflict response styles, they were able to express their interests. Being able to express their interests changed their tone and reduced the barriers of conflict, eliciting more solution-oriented discussions. The following are Conflict

Accommodating (I Lose Some-You Lose Some): While this style can lead to making peace and moving beyond the conflict, it must be recognized that their efforts can lead to resenting the other party. Compromising (I Win Some-You Win Some): Compromising is challenging both sides to look for common ground while negotiating larger points and letting go of the smaller points. Beware of passive-aggressive tactics that are misleading. Collaborating (I Win-You Win): One of the most overlooked skills that leads to better negotiations outcomes is having the ability to listen. Genuinely listening to the other parties usually promotes empathy and the willingness to collaborate Collaborators creatively find resolution and usually leave the conflict feeling respected and usually mend relationships. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer and qualified Arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/arbitration rosters and mediates with the Agree2Disagree Mediation Group. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, crosscultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants.com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n

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To find a physician, visit BrowardHealth.org/Find-Doctor.

Congratulations to Commissioner Marie Waugh (on cover) for being recognized as one of Legacy’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry.

BrowardHealth.org • Follow us:


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MAGAZINE’S

Top Black Healthcare Professionals IN MIAMI-DADE, BROWARD & PALM BEACH

If you are a healthcare professional who is accomplishing great things professionally and civically, then you could be one of Legacy Magazine’s 2019

“Top Black Healthcare Professionals.” Please submit your nomination by November 25, 2019 If you are interested in nominating someone as one of “South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals” please visit https://www.123formbuilder.com/form-4536829/ and fill out the on-line form. YOU MAY NOMINATE UP TO 3 INDIVIDUALS.

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2019 - Most Influential & Prominent Black Women in Business & Industry  

2019 - Most Influential & Prominent Black Women in Business & Industry  

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