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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

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IS NDE SU R E 40

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

Introducing South Florida’s 2019 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow


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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019


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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

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EDITOR’S NOTE 4  LEGACY SOUTH FLORIDA’S 2019 40 UNDER 40 HONOREES 5 LEGACY’S 40 UNDER 40 BOARD OF DIRECTORS 6 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids

MIRAMAR REPORT By Miramar Staff

8 BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER By Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin

9 D  RIVING BROWARD’S ECONOMY FORWARD By Tatyana R. McCall

10 COVER STORY

Millennials Lead the Way in Legacy South Florida’s 2019 Class of ‘40 Under 40’ By Zach Rinkins

12 ENTREPRENEUR

West Palm Beach Designer Buera Gamble Makes Custom Apparel for ‘Boss’ Women By Christian Portilla

On the cover, we feature six of our talented 40 Under 40 honorees. They recently spent one weekday morning under bright lights for the photo shoot, which was set at the luxurious Acqualina Resort and Spa in Sunny Isles. I enjoy these photo shoots because it allows me to really get to know the honorees on a personal level. Take honoree Buera Gamble of West Palm Beach. Standing just under 6-feet tall without heels, I couldn’t miss

her as she walked into the palatial lobby at the oceanfront resort. It is fitting that this fashion designer actually models her own apparel, which you can see online at eminentb.com. At 38 years old, Buera started her career later in life. She told me didn’t begin sewing until she was 30 and she has never attended fashion school. She credits her mother for putting the pressure on her, which helped to turn her natural talents into a career. “That’s kind of what it felt like,” said Buera, which is pronounced Bur-RAY. “My mom bought me a sewing machine and said ‘don’t waste my money.’” It’s apparent that Buera’s mother didn’t waste one dime. Several of the items on her clothing website are sold out and she’s been running a successful business for the last seven years. At the photo shoot, I also learned that two of the honorees are members of Black Greek Letter Organizations. Honoree Paul Moore is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. He proudly displayed his fraternity pin on his lapel. Of course, I jokingly had to give him a hard time since I’m a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. But Moore was outnumbered. I learned that

Honoree Jamil Newell is also an Alpha Man as well as Legacy publisher Dexter Bridgeman. When I first met honoree Boris Seymore, he was sitting in the makeup chair preparing for the photo shoot. At first glance, I thought he might have been a professional athlete, however, I soon learned that this gentle giant enjoys spending his time in the kitchen as an executive chef of BDS Catering & Productions. Honoree Alexcia Cox was a familiar face. She reminded me that she was previously honored in Legacy’s “Power” issue. And finally, honoree Aura Thomas is legislative assistant to the vice mayor of Miramar. She couldn’t wait to head to her next appointment to show off the master work of our make-up artist. I look forward to meeting all of our 40 Under 40 honorees at an upcoming event dedicated to them. It will be yet another opportunity for us to network, relish the moment, and get to know each other outside of our busy professional lives.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com

THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT By Germaine Baugh-Smith

13 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP Alexcia Cox Seeks Justice for Victims of Domestic Abuse By Michelle Solomon

14 SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

By Stanley Zamor

15 PALM BEACH URBAN LEAGUE By Soulan Johnson

AFRICAN AMERICAN RESEARCH LIBRARY By Makiba Foster

16 ABOUT TOWN  Scholarships on the Seas

Women’s Power Caucus The Broward Education Foundation Pumps, Pearls, and Politics

18 LEGACY BRIEFS On the cover: (standing, l-r) Paul Moore, Aura Thomas, Boris Seymore; (sitting l-r) Alexcia Cox, Jamil Newell, Buera Gamble. The cover photo was taken courtesy of Acqualina Resort and Spa, 17875 Collins Ave., Sunny Isles, FL.

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Shannel Escoffery

Director of Operations

Sabrina Moss-Solomon Designer

Joe Wesley

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Cover Photo

Rory Lee

Cover Make-up Artist

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

Legacy South Florida’s 2019 40 Under 40 Honorees

ANTHONY T. BARBER I CEO Troy’s BARBEQUE

WILNEEDA A. EMMANUEL, J.D.

TIAUNDRA BELL, LCSW

YONEL BREDY, MSPT

Coordinator for Specialized Children’s Programs Community Health of South Florida, Inc

COO Bredy Physical Therapy and Sports Rehab, LLC

CORENZO ENGLISH

CARLA ELIZABETH ERSKINE

Chief of Staff to Mayor Mack Bernard Palm Beach County

Regional Compliance Director DB Schenker

MARCK K. JOSEPH, ESQ.

JARONICA BYNER, MHSA, MPH

MARLYNNDA L. CALIXTE

EDWIYGH FRANCK, PH.D.

BUERA GAMBLE

Financial Controller MIND & MOBILITY

Co-owner Delite Whitening

Attorney McDonald Hopkins

Talent Development Director NCCI Holdings, Inc. & Trin’s Sweet Treats

WILNAR JEANNE JULMISTE, ESQ.

LEON (MARTINI) MARTIN

JASON A. MCINTOSH, ESQ.

JAMIL NEWELL

AYANNA PROVIDENCE

CHRISTINA L. ROMELUS City Commissioner City of Boynton Beach

CLAUDEL J. SAMSON

Real Estate Broker/ Mortgage Broker Sole International Realty

Executive Chef/ CEO BDS Catering & Productions LLC

RICKY VIRTUOSO

TAKENYA WALKER

STORMY WELLINGTON

CHRISTOPHER “KALIB” WHITE

DR. CHANADRA YOUNG WHITING

Attorney at Law The Joseph Firm, P.A.

Co-Owner Engineered Design Services

Casting Director Ricky Virtuoso Inc.

Partner/Litigation Attorney AndersonGlenn LLP

Founder & CEO Perfectly Sculpted

Clinical Pharmacist Walgreens Centralized Services Site Operations

Co-Founder & Producer Vibe95

CEO Girl Hold My Hand

Attorney Lytal, Reiter, Smith, Ivey & Fronrath

Founder Seven Fx Graphics and Imagery

AJA CARTWRIGHT

Attorney Office of the State Attorney, Fifteenth Judicial Circuit of Florida

TIA L. GIBBS, ESQ.

MARILYN GUIRAND-MILHOMME

CEO/Designer Eminent by Buera

Assistant Professor of Academic Success, St. Thomas University School of Law

DR. PAUL L. MOORE, ESQ.

BREION MOSES, M.P.A.

Dean of Business & Attorney at Law Broward College

CHEF BORIS SEYMORE

Assistant Department Chairwoman and Professor Florida International University

ALEXCIA COX, ESQ.

Owner Billing 2Go

Co-Founder Seven Hillz Productions

MILTON C. SPENCE, III

ALICIA Y. DUNCAN

Owner/Designer Sassafras Custom LLC.

CHEF KIARA “KITCHEN KILLA” HARDY

Assistant Principal/Vice President of Literacy Connection Broward County Schools

Chef Kitchen Killa Culinary Solutions

STEVENIR “WEBA” MURPHY

SHENIQUE B. NAGELBUSH

Founder & CEO I Am Queen Clothing, Inc.

Small Business Relationship Manager TD Bank

Founder & CEO Well-Rounded Consulting, LLC

Legislative Assistant Office of Vice Mayor Alexandra P. Davis/City of Miramar

AURA. H. THOMAS

SCHNELLE TONGE, ESQ.

AYESHA WILLIAMS

DR. KYLA L. WILLIAMS

TERRANCE WILSON, SR.

CEO of Legacy of Change Legacy of Change, Inc.

Mathematics Professor Broward College

Attorney at Law 15th Judicial Circuit Public Defenders Office

Pastor, COOL Church


MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

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40 UNDER 40 Executive Board ALEXIA ROLLE - President

Dr. Alexia Q. Rolle, a graduate of UCF and NSU, is director of Career and Technical Education at Miami Dade College. Rolle also serves as president of the executive board for Legacy 40 Under 40, board chair of Black Professionals Network, and Director of Operations with DIBIA Dream. Rolle, a Miami-Dade (Homestead) naive, is committed to the enhancement of her community.

STEPHANE ELIAS - Vice President

Stephane Elias is a Haitian-American entrepreneur and philanthropist. He is the founder/CEO of E-nnovative Health; a digital health firm. Elias serves as a trusted adviser to leading healthcare organizations, health systems, medical group practices, community health centers and notfor-profits.

ZEDRICK BARBER - Parliamentarian

By Laws Committee Chairman Zedrick Barber II, Esq., is a leading attorney with great legal prowess and acumen dedicated to obtaining justice. As principal attorney of the Barber Firm, LLC., his practice expands throughout Florida. Best known for his advocacy on behalf of families killed by Brightline (Florida’s high speed train), his practice focuses on wrongful death law, personal injury law, criminal misconduct and contract litigation. Hailing from West Palm Beach, Zedrick is a double graduate of Florida A&M University and a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc.

ZACHARY RINKINS - Secretary Zach Rinkins is a lifelong South Floridian committed to economic empowerment and service. He wrote I Am College Material! Your Guide to Unlimited College,

OFFICERS

Career and Life Success (Australia Publishing) to close the achievement gap and give parents, teachers, and students a competitive advantage over the college experience. An Associated Press award-winning communicator, he is a graduate of Florida A&M University and a recipient of the prestigious Knight-Ridder Silver Knight Award in Speech. Fundraising/Special Events

KASSANDRA CENEAS - Chairwoman

Kassandra Ceneas is CEO of “ Convivial Link.” One of her greatest passions was to build a professional networking event to unite and develop professional relationships that boost an individual’s future business and connect them with the right prospects to find out about new trends in today’s competitive industry. She is the president of the “Haitian-American Historic Society,” designed to unite and promote historic awareness of the Haitian-American culture. She is a trained mediator for Florida Supreme Court in Circuit Civil cases. Ceneas’ educational background includes a bachelor’s in Communications from Nova Southeastern University in Davie. Ceneas is an adventurous mentor and entrepreneur at heart who believes that failure will never overtake if her determination to succeed is always stronger. Marketing/PR

CRYSTAL MATHIS - Chairwoman

Born and raised in Lauderhill, Crystal Chanel is the owner of Press Release Marketing, LLC, a full-service marketing company that offers event hosting, social media management, business development, community engagement, and influencer endorsement. When hosting, Chanel is known to have a dynamic presence. Whether hosting a gala, wine tasting, business conference, spiritual affair, or talk forum, Chanel is always ready to use her strategic event marketing skills to make any affair an unforgettable one. Membership

JERVONTE EDMONDS - Chair

Jervonte “Tae” Edmonds is the founder and CEO of Suits For Seniors Inc., a youth preparedness and exposure program. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in political science from Florida Atlantic University.

Edmonds is the author of Adventures of the Rich and Famous, a book that teaches young children they were made to be great in life. Edmonds believes everyone should, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world”– Gandhi

NICOLE PETERKIN

Nicole Cummings Peterkin is an engineering program manager at Aerojet Rocketdyne. Peterkin has worked at Aerojet Rocketdyne for 13 years. She started as an intern when the company was known as Pratt & Whitney. In addition to her work at Aerojet, Peterkin works to promote STEM enrichment in schools and raise knowledge and awareness of engineering within the community. She regularly visits local schools to expose students to the excitement of being an engineer.

LATOYA STIRRUP

Entrepreneur, producer, strategist LaToya Stirrup gets things done. With more than 15 years of experience in advertising and marketing, Stirrup is able to bring a wealth of knowledge to any business challenge. She’s a speaker and co-founder of KAZMALEJE, founding member and president of Digital Grass Innovation & Technology, co-host of Tech, Beats & Bytes, and co-host of Stir it Up! Wednesdays during the “Midday Meditation” show on 92.7 FM WZOP.

RICHARD WAY

Richard Way III is a Merrill Financial Solutions adviser at Bank of America serving south Broward County. Way, native of Miami, earned his bachelor’s of science in finance at Florida Memorial University and his MBA at Florida A&M

University respectively. Outside of his financial services office, Way is a co-owner of Wisemen Music Group, an upcoming music production company, and owner of Urban Miami Inc., a south Florida media company. Way is involved in various professional organizations that continue to enhance the social and service culture is south Florida and will continue to support programs and initiatives directed towards positive growth in south Florida.

ASHLEE THOMAS

Ashlee Thomas is committed to building thriving arts communities and considers herself a cultural ambassador of South Florida. A graduate of Florida State University and Florida International University, she has a strong background in business, arts, and public administration. She has worked in management at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center & Adrienne Arsht Center. She is the co-founder and president of MUCE, an arts production company that brings brands and ideas to life with art. Follow her @muce305

DARRYL FORGES

Darryl Forges is a reporter for NBC 6 from Atlanta, Georgia. Besides reporting for NBC 6. Forges also co-founded, produces and hosts a weekly segment called “The NBC 6 Breakdown” that focuses on the biggest topics affecting Millennials. Before coming to South Florida Forges was a reporter for WAKA/WNCF in Montgomery, Alabama. While there, Forges won several awards from the Associated Press and the Alabama Broadcasters Association. Since Forges moved to South Florida he has covered several hurricanes, elections, other national stories, and interviewed politicians and celebrities including Oprah, John Legend, and Common. Forges has received an Emmy nomination for his hard work on breaking news coverage. When Forges is away from the demanding grind of South Florida news he enjoys emceeing and hosting events for the community, and also enjoying quality time with his dog Nola. Forges is also: treasurer of the NABJ South Florida Chapter, Legacy Magazine’s 40 Under 40 Future Black Leaders recipient, and 40 Under 40 executive board member.

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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

You Should Always Share What You Know

BY MARY DAVIDS

Whether you’re climbing the corporate ladder or trying to build your business, it is important that you resist the urge to be selfish with the things you know. Knowledge isn’t power unless it is shared. What you do with what you know secures the things you desire. Great leaders and entrepreneurs use what they

know to develop solutions to problems. Holding the answers to solutions only breeds frustration in others because it creates a negative feeling of dependency on one source for information. Certainly, you could say, “Well, Mary, it took me a very long time to accumulate this knowledge and I should be the only one with this information because I worked hard for it.” This way of thinking can prevent you from the very thing you’re trying to guarantee. You don’t need to keep everything inside to signify your worth. When you are selfish with what you know: You can’t build trust. People need to know you are someone who has a genuine desire to help them. When your network can rely on you for information, they are more likely to provide you with helpful information as well. On the other hand, if you refuse to share your knowledge with ease, you create a

perception that you have a self-serving motive, which limits your ability to build a trusted network. You limit your options. It is a crucial error in judgment to think that if you set yourself up to become the main source or the only source in your workplace that you are exempt from being fired. You’re wrong. If value were based solely on knowledge, everyone would be replaceable. Never get too comfortable storing your house with food that you forget how to hunt. When you become too comfortable holding information, you can lose sight of the importance in continuing to cultivate your craft. You forget your true value. Whether you’re working in an office or if you’re a business owner, there is value in the uniqueness of being you. The idea that someone will come along and take what is yours is a false notion that prevents you from seeing

the significance of learning how to use your unique value to your advantage. The difference between the information you have and the information they have is they are not equipped with the unique skill set, characteristics, mindset, or intellectual capacity to do the same things you can do with the same information. Never put more value on the process than you do in people. Being selfish with your knowledge makes sense when money is the motivating factor, but if your desire is to help others, what difference does it make if you share your recipe when your goal was to feed the needy?

Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.marydavids.com or follow @ MVDavids on Instagram or Twitter. n

MIRAMAR REPORT

Celebrate National Black Business Month by Supporting Black Chamber

The City of Miramar has implemented a new Business Inclusion & Diversity Program that offers innovative programs and services to help small businesses grow. The BID program is evidence of Miramar’s desire to implement measures to ensure more inclusion for all businesses, especially the small, minority, and disadvantaged trades that the diversity study has identified as underutilized. The City’s mission is to promote diversity in the procurement process in order to accurately reflect the demographics of its rather diverse business and residential community. As part of the BID’s effort to foster diversity and inclusion, training programs and services are offered to firms free of charge. The programs, trainings, services, and development support is being offered to pave the way and eliminate barriers for small businesses desiring to do business with the

City of Miramar Mayor Wayne Messam speaks to small business owners.

City of Miramar.

BID Programs and Services: • Monthly Business Development Trainings • Monthly Certification Workshops: CBE, SBE, DBE, Broward County • FDOT construction certifications: MOT, Safety Awareness, Structures and Bridges • BID Contractor’s List to Increase Diversity & Subcontractor Utilization

BID team attends TED Talk in Palm Beach County.

•E  ast Miramar Networking Events & Business Development Workshops •B  ID Academy – Partnering with Institutional Stakeholders: NSU, FIU, and Broward College • Apprenticeship Partnership – Partnering with local unions and trade organizations •C  ommunity “Think Tank” – Seeking to Advance Community Forum Initiatives to Foster Inclusion

● “Hack the Business” – Helping Firms Explore Technologically Advanced Ways to Grow Businesses For more information about the BID program, upcoming workshops, and training opportunities please call the City of Miramar’s Business Diversity Office at (954) 602-3136 or visit the BID’s webpage under the city’s website: www.MiramarFL.gov n


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Fertile Ground for Key Growth Sectors

W

hen Miramar-based cancer and infectious disease research company Altor BioScience Corp. was acquired in 2017 for $1 billion, it was more than Florida’s largest ever biotech acquisition. It was confirmation that Miramar is fertile ground for the state’s growing biotech and life science sector.

Altor founder Hing C. Wong is at it again. His latest start-up — HCW Biologics — is continuing Wong’s pursuit of immunotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer and age-related diseases. Today, HCW, an acronym for “Heaven Can Wait,” is thriving in the same Miramar corporate park where Wong founded Altor 17 years ago. “We’re taking bioscience innovation and research from the bench to the bedside,” said Wong. “It’s all done here in Miramar.” “Miramar is ripe for groundbreaking work across key business clusters,” said City Manager Vernon E. Hargray. Beyond biotech and life science, sectors include technology, aviation, logistics and education. In all, the city has more than a dozen corporate and office parks and hundreds of acres primed for further development.

“Attracting clean industries and reduced traffic delivers a higher quality of life with low impact on residents and businesses alike.” Vernon E. Hargray | Miramar City Manager

Altor Founder Hing C. Wong and Miramar City Manager Vernon E. Hargray

The city’s growth was spurred by some $600 million in infrastructure projects and partnerships with Broward County and the state, as well as area businesses, developers and universities. Together, they’re bringing to life novel development, innovation zones and a regional business park that will result in a 21st Century “smart city.” “A�racting clean industries and reduced traffic delivers a higher quality of life with low impact on residents and businesses alike,” Hargray said. Nestled along the county’s southern edge, the city of 140,000 is within easy reach of the region’s three international airports and three seaports. Interstate 75 and Florida’s Turnpike put Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties’ diverse population of six million just a drive away. For life science companies, as well as leading employers Spirit Airlines, Carnival Cruises, United Data Technologies, American Express and others, Miramar is ideal for a host of reasons. Wong’s rent is a third or less than

that found in other bioscience markets like California’s Bay Area. Housing costs are far more affordable, especially for new hires earning a median salary of $72,000. Executives fleeing high-income tax states will find “Life Less Taxing” in Florida, which has no state income tax and relatively low sales taxes. Those new hires are bountiful. Area schools include the University of Miami, Florida International University, Florida Atlantic University, Nova Southeastern University, Broward College and several others with robust STEM programs. Miramar’s educational offering, subtropical climate, diverse culture, including the city’s Caribbean community, and lively entertainment options, make the location an easy sell for executives and companies alike. “When you have a good name and reputation, and you’re in an a�ractive location, you can get anyone,” Wong said. “Miramar has a vision, and we are proud to be a part of it.”

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MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER

Including Young Professionals’ Insight Can Help Reduce Community Brain Drain

Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Esq. Chamber president

BY SHAHEEWA JARRETT GELIN, ESQ.

Many might assume that the sunny weather and sandy beaches are enough for young professionals to flock to the area or come back home after college. However, there are many factors that recent graduates and young professionals consider when they determine where to live. Job prospects, salary, cost of housing, quality public

education, and transportation are among the factors that can pull a young person to live in a certain region. South Florida has struggled in these critical areas. Florida consistently falls at the bottom of the list with regard to its K-12 public education, according to U.S. News and other reports. The cost of housing is steadily rising and South Florida is one of the most expensive places to live in the nation. Add the cost of transportation, because the public transit system is unreliable, and the area becomes less attractive than larger cities with well-organized mass transit systems that include buses and trains. It is difficult to attract companies that will create the jobs of the future. Without a solid public school system, affordable housing, and quality mass transit system that moves people easily around the region, companies know they will have a hard time recruiting talent to the area. In this context, it is imperative that we celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of our young professionals

who stay. It is our duty to mentor, train, and connect them to the resources and people that will allow them to blossom into the future leaders and business owners our region will need. Collectively, we have to include these young professionals in the conversation to help us come up with solutions to these problems. They can provide insight into attracting their peers. The Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce has created a welcoming space in this county to help black, young professionals develop, learn, and give back to the community. We understand that they will become the leaders of tomorrow and our current business leaders can play a vital role in their success. We welcome their innovative ideas and we will connect them with opportunities to change their communities for the better. We encourage members to serve on the advocacy committee to join the fight for equity in contracting and countywide small business-friendly policies. Join our community service committee to

mentor high school students at Dillard High and beyond. Get connected to seasoned business owners in the Chamber for mentorship opportunities. Be a part of a group that intends to make a positive impact for black businesses and professionals in the county. We congratulate the young professionals who were recognized by Legacy South Florida. While you should be honored for your achievements, the chamber issues a challenge for you to dig deep, show up, and get active to help us develop a county and a region that will make the brain drain conversation a thing of the past. Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Esq. is founder of the Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce: www. BrowardCountyBlackChamberOf Commerce.com info@BrowardCountyBlackChamberof Commerce.com n


MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

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Driving Broward’s Economy Forward: Growing Certified Small Businesses and Transportation Surtax Projects BY TATYANA R. MCCALL

The small business population in Broward plays an important role in the economic development of the county. There are more than 60,000 small businesses in Broward according to U.S. Census County Business Patterns, 2016. These businesses provide employment opportunities for residents and collectively support the vision of the Board of County Commissioners, which is to have “a vibrant economy with a diverse, skilled workforce…offering unique advantages that attract all types of businesses to create equitable, countywide prosperity.” The Broward County Business Opportunity Act of 2012, which was amended on May 9, 2018, establishes a minimum goal of at least 25 percent certified small business participation for all eligible County procurement contracts. The objective

of the ordinance is to ensure that small Broward County-based businesses are provided ample opportunities to meaningfully participate in the award of County-funded contracts. If you are a small business in Broward and you are not certified, now is the time to get certified! The Penny for Transportation Surtax that voters passed in November 2018 is estimated to generate $355 million per year for 30 years to be spent on projects related to transportation, infrastructure and the future of rail. Small businesses certified in Broward as a County Business Enterprise (CBE) are eligible to take advantage of a 30 percent certified small business participation goal that is set on eligible transportation surtax projects. It is conservatively estimated that half of the $355 million will be eligible contracts ($177.5M) that provides for $1.59B in

competitive procurement opportunities over 30 years for certified small business. This presents opportunities to grow small businesses with the transportation surtax projects and drive Broward’s economy forward. The Office of Economic and Small Business Development (OESBD) has been hosting Surtax Information Sessions for all small business owners, free of charge. The remaining Surtax Information Session dates, times and location are below. Come learn more about how to get certified, the 30% for 30 Years Surtax Campaign, and what it means for growing your small business with transportation surtax projects. Surtax Information Sessions September 5, 2019 - 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. City of Lauderdale Lakes Branch Library Educational and Cultural Center

3580 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33311 September 14, 2019 – 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. West Regional Library 8601 W. Broward Blvd. Plantation, FL 33324 For information about how to become certified, visit the OESBD website www.Broward.org/EconDev or call (954) 357-6400. Tatyana R. McCall is a Public Information Officer for Broward County Office of Economic and Small Business Development (OESBD) / August 2019 n

You’re invited to get the facts for your business!

Thursday, September 5th | 9 to 10:30 AM

Business

Information Sessions

Lauderdale Lakes Branch Library Educational and Cultural Center 3580 W Oakland Park Blvd., Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33311

Saturday, September 14th | 10:30 AM to 12 PM West Regional Library 8601 W Broward Blvd., Plantation, FL 33324

Driving Broward’s Economy Forward A 30-year, $16.5 Billion transportation initiative means opportunities to grow businesses in many sectors and trades! The County Commission adopted a 30% small business participation goal on all eligible projects. Come find out how you can be a part of transforming our community as a certified County Business Enterprise (CBE)! Join representatives from Broward County’s Office of Economic and Small Business Development and Transportation Department as they provide the inside scoop on upcoming projects and the short- and long-term projects available for small businesses. Light refreshments will be served. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged.

REGISTER NOW! Visit BCOESBD.Eventbrite.com OESBDPennySurtax Legacy HALF pg H Ad_08082019.indd 1

Brought to you by the Penny for Transportation and: Broward.org/EconDev | 954-357-6400 115 S Andrews Ave., Room A680 | Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 Get Social With Us!

@BCOESBD

Broward County OESBD

8/9/2019 9:35:28 AM


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COVER STORY

Millennials Lead the Way in Legacy South Florida’s 2019

Class of ‘40 Under 40’

BY ZACH RINKINS Amid regional discussions about the brain drain of young talent leaving South Florida, Legacy magazine presents its 2019 class of “40 Under 40 Leaders of Today and Tomorrow.” This year’s class showcases a broad swathe of honorees representing the academy, corporate America, as well as the private and public sectors. Their combination of achievement, service, and raw potential create an emphatic statement: Theses Millennials are the region’s succession plan and they are here to stay and serve. “I created the 40 Under 40 recognition to honor the contributions of Millennials in South Florida’s Black community,” said Dexter Bridgeman, CEO of MIA Media Group, LLC, publisher of Legacy South Florida. “We are excited to highlight their accomplishments professionally and civically. Our entire community needs to know who these achievers are.” Millennials Mean Business The Pew Research Center defines Legacy’s 2019 40 Under 40 honorees visit the oceanfront Acqualina Resort and Spa in Sunny Isles: (l to r) Alexcia Cox, Paul Moore, Buera Gamble, Jamil a Millennial as anyone born between Newell, Aura Thomas, Boris Seymore. Photo by Joe Wesley 1981 and 1996. This year’s 40 Under 40 class is dominated by Millennials being an entrepreneur is meeting lots professional services to low-income to help students overcome the fear (97.5 percent). The average awardee is of people,” she continued. “I serve so people and/or have memberships in of math that I experienced while in 34 years old. The oldest is 40 and the many people across my businesses. That school. Having a quality education helps service organizations. Honoree Alexcia youngest is 26. allows me to create business alliances.” Cox serves as an assistant state attorney students become successful in the world These honorees are not likely to for the State Attorney’s Office of Palm wait and ask permission for their chance. Millennials Value Education Beach County, where she prosecutes “The biggest advantage of being an They are either occupied preparing Roughly 35 percent of perpetrators of domestic violence. themselves for their next career move Broward and Palm Beach County entrepreneur is that I benefit from “Seeking justice on behalf of Palm or refining their inner capitalist as 47.5 residents have earned a bachelor’s all the work I put in versus someone Beach County residents is a tremendous percent of the recipients run part-time or degree or higher. Eighty-five responsibility and an honor that I take benefiting from my hard work...” full-time businesses. percent of the honorees received very seriously,” said Cox, chief of the Palm Beach-based serial - Aja Cartwright Domestic Violence Unit. “In this role, undergraduate degrees, 63 percent entrepreneur Aja Cartwright owns obtained graduate degrees, and 30 I am able to seek justice for victims several businesses that range from percent earned doctorate degrees. of crimes and sometimes deceased hookah events, notary, and billing Many of them have taken their academic outside of the classroom.” people who can no longer speak for services at the customer’s request. mastery back into the classroom to help themselves.” “The biggest advantage of being an Millennials Serve Their Communities develop a strong pipeline of educated Whether at work or in the entrepreneur is that I benefit from all the A significant segment of the and competent young people. community, these honorees are work I put in versus someone benefiting awardees (37.5 percent) work in “So many students drop out of committed to service and excellence. from my hard work,” said Cartwright, the public sector through churches, school because of math,” explained South Florida’s future is in very capable proprietor of Vyben Hookahs, government positions, schools, or honoree Kyla L. Williams, Ph.D., a and service-oriented hands. Billing2Go, Notary2Go, and the Nirvana mathematics professor at Broward n non-profit organizations. Additionally, Experience. College. “I came back into the classroom 100 percent of them provide pro-bono “The thing I like most about


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ENTREPRENEUR

West Palm Beach Designer Buera Gamble Makes Custom Apparel for ‘Boss’ Women BY CHRISTIAN PORTILLA

Buera Gamble is the fashion designer and seamstress of Eminent By Buera, a West Palm Beach boutique at the Northwood Arts Village that features custom designs and on-thespot alterations. The entrepreneur says her 5-foot-11 frame left her with few selections in clothing stores. “My mother purchased me a machine and told me not to waste her money,” said Gable, 38, who started sewing at the age of 30. “I watched a few videos in my laundry room and taught myself to sew.” To be eminent is to be high in station, rank, or reputation. Gamble aims to make sure all of her designs make her customers feel distinguished. Her designs include bodycon, glam, and tribal print pieces, among others. Measurements and alterations are also done on-site at the time of purchase in her store. Customers can email requests

Buera Gamble, 38, is the fashion designer and seamstress of Eminent By Buera, a West Palm Beach boutique. Photo courtesy of Mimi Vincent of I’m Focused Photography.

for a custom fit. Gamble’s pieces are bright, bold, and hug the curves of the wearer. She says different materials inspire her to create, but she wasn’t always into fashion. She had a different path in mind than the one she is on. “My inspiration was probably just

the fabric store itself and seeing how the dresses would fit me exactly once I made them,” Gamble said. “My mother and grandmother knew how to sew, but I would never pay attention to them. I was more into computers and technology.”

Since then Gamble has embraced her talent and knack for designing. She has leveraged her social media following to expand her business. She has established a “text club” allowing only her faithful clientele to receive updates and discounts as well as exclusive details about new Eminent By Buera designs as soon as they’re available. In addition to clothing, the Palm Beach County businesswoman sells accessories including belts and jewelry in her store and on her website, but she says her custom designer pieces are what have created and built her reputation. “My designs are one of a kind,” Gamble said. “They’re affordable for custom clothing. Once measured and design is discussed, I start to create.” Eminent By Buera is located on 1804 North Dixie Highway, Suite C, West Palm Beach. Gamble’s fashions are also available at www.eminentb.com. n

THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT

We Must Advance the Vote to Advance Our Future

Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh, president and CEO, Urban League of Broward County

BY DR. GERMAINE SMITH-BAUGH

Right now, the voting rights of African Americans are under attack at levels not seen since the Civil Rights era. These are the unsettling findings of the recently completed 2019 National Urban League’s State of Black America report. The report found a host of instruments currently at work to suppress AfricanAmerican votes across our nation and

locally, from state-sponsored Russian trolling via social media to institutional barriers erected by the individual state Legislature. This means our hard-earned right to vote is yet again threatened as political forces and those with hateful agendas are keeping many of us from participating in civic processes that are at the core of our democracy. The report makes close to a dozen policy recommendations, among them: • Elimination of the Electoral College, a proposal widely discussed by many candidates running for president. • Removal of strict voter identification requirements. • Allowing online, same-day and automatic voter registration. • Granting statehood to the District of Columbia. • Abolishing purges of voter rolls. • Prohibiting distribution of false information intended to dissuade people from voting. Broward County has many bright young activists who are working to build a

better future for us all. We saw what young leaders did in the aftermath of last year’s Parkland school shooting tragedy: pushing to pass legislation and starting a nationwide political movement. We need the same fever and urgency to focus on the AfricanAmerican vote. On a local level, there are several things that young leaders can do to educate others about voter suppression and to encourage friends and family to exercise their right to vote: • Volunteer with an organization such as the Urban League, to canvas and register people to vote in the community • Volunteer to work the polls around election time, especially if you speak more than one language • Attend community forums to learn about local elected officials who are up for election and the issues that will be on the ballot • Encourage youth as young as 16 to register to vote • Have conversations with friends and family about voter suppression and the importance of voting in local, state, and

federal elections Our young people are an untapped resource when it comes to solving problems and creating better communities. I believe the vast majority of youth want to make a difference. I’ve seen it first-hand at the Urban League of Broward County, where we equip our young people with skills and determination to solve their own challenges and lead others to overcome theirs. Through our youth education programs, our youth are preparing themselves for the world of tomorrow — where we encourage them to be contributors to positive social change. The Baughtom Line is this: The battle for our right to vote must be fought and won at every level and by every generation. We will need radical and revolutionary solutions from our youth to advance the vote in the new era of voter suppression.

Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh is president and CEO of the Urban League of Broward County. n


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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Alexcia Cox Seeks Justice for Victims of Domestic Abuse

BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

Alexcia L. Cox has a career that challenges her every day, but as chief of the Domestic Violence Unit for the Palm Beach County State Attorney’s office, 15th Judicial Circuit, she said she finds herself “blessed to be a beacon of light for people who have found themselves in a dark place.” The 39-year-old said she grew up in awe of her uncle, Miami criminal defense attorney Larry Handfield. Now, the prosecutor supervises seven to eight attorneys and a group of 20 support staff who are part of the Palm Beach County State Attorney’s DOVE. unit. Its three main goals are to: assist police in investigating domestic violence crimes; hold offenders accountable by prosecuting the crime, and collaborate with various social services and government agencies to get victims the services they need. In 2005, when Cox first began with the State Attorney’s Office, immediately after graduating from Florida State

resources to create a domestic violence unit. She was asked if she was interested. She soon became the first attorney to start the felony Domestic Violence Unit. Because of working in such a diverse county, Cox said her office sees it all: “We have defendants who are super wealthy and then we have victims who are living in tents with their abusers on the street, and Alexcia Cox, chief of the Domestic Violent Unit for the Palm Beach everyone in between.” County State Attorney’s Office, sees herself as a counselor and Cox said over the years big sister. she has noticed that dating University College of Law, she was abuse has been on the rise. “Domestic assigned misdemeanor domestic violence violence doesn’t always mean husbands cases. and wives, but intimate partner violence,” “It was challenging, but I enjoyed she said. “I’m seeing young girls barely the work,” she shared. “Then it was on to out of high school getting caught up in other stints in the office — juvenile and cycles of violent relationships.” felony cases.” Her style is not to “sugar coat” One day she received a call saying anything for the victims. She has a drawer the office was considering dedicating

in her office that contains files from domestic violence homicide cases. “I tell them that the reality is, ‘you can continue in this relationship, and it is very possible that you could end up as one of the files in that drawer.’” She said many cases affect her emotionally regardless of the victim’s race, but she explained that when she sees young, black women in abusive and violent situations, it strikes a deep chord. “These are young girls that remind me of my nieces.” One of the rewarding aspects of her job, she shared, was receiving the occasional call or email thanking her for her service. “Sometimes it is the victims who hated me for prosecuting their significant other but are now telling me how grateful they are that I held that person accountable. It is the most rewarding part of my job – getting justice for people who don’t know how to speak up for themselves and helping them get their life on the right track.” n


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SOCIAL MEDIA

Focusing on Four Priorities Will Strengthen Your Online Presence

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

For entrepreneurs and small businesses that want to stay ahead of the curve, there are four things you should be doing right now to keep your on-line presence strong and competitive. Social Media. Having a social media presence is non-negotiable. Making sure you acquire the major social media real estate is key, but it’s not enough.

Participation is key. Choose two to three platforms, and be consistent. Pro Tip: For Instagram and Facebook, posting 5-7 times a week is optimal. For Twitter, tweet 5-7 times a day. It’s important to know what your platform of choice prefers, then adjust your strategy accordingly. Website. Your website needs to be home base. This will be the hub for all detailed information about your business and brand. What products you offer? What services are available? What does the calendar of events look like, and what are the contact details of all your organization’s major players? When someone searches for your business on Google, your website should be one of the first things to pop up. Pro Tip: Focus on visitors’ experience. Make sure the site loads quickly for them. Optimize the site for mobile devices. Keep all links active and up to date. Blogs. Blogging isn’t as popular as it once was, but when it comes to keeping

your Google ranking high, it is one of the best tools. A blog is the place where your company or your brand establishes a voice. When you do it correctly, your SEO skyrockets! Google ranks sites that are regularly updated and sites that get a lot of visitors. Pro Tip: Blog regularly (once a week should be enough) and then use social media to let your community know about your new posts. Give them the link and lead them directly to the blog. Bonus: Install Facebook and Google Pixels on your blog pages and create retargeting ads to the people who visit. That kind of visibility creates a super strong digital strategy. YouTube Channel. While being the No. 2 search engine in the world, YouTube is still the most underused digital strategy. For my clients, it’s often overwhelming. YouTube requires a curated strategy. You need high quality videos that get right to the point and are the best representation of your brand. When done properly, it

becomes a very valuable social proofing technique and boosts your first page rankings on Google. Pro Tip: Create videos that solve people’s problems. What are they Googling right now? Whatever the answer is, that is the video you should create. Remember, Google owns YouTube, so they will always prioritize content on their own platform before any other social media. Having a strategy is one thing. Having an effective one is another. It doesn’t come together in one day. There is a lot to navigate, but as you create regular rhythms in your online strategy, it gets easier. Dr. Tracy Timberlake is an awardwinning digital strategist and business coach. Instagram.com/tracytimberlake entrepreneurs and influencers. n

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Beware of Who You Bring When Negotiating or Mediating

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

I was recently called by a mediator colleague who seemed hushed, rushed and speaking in a whispering tone. He was at the commencement of mediation and excused himself to secretly call me in private. He nervously explained that as he was about to start a commercial mediation conference, and while ushering the plaintiff and his attorney into the conference room, they abruptly

stopped, turned around and refused to enter after seeing that the defendant and the defendant’s attorney were sitting with a third person unrelated to the lawsuit. The plaintiff was highly upset and marched into a smaller conference room stating that he refused to mediate if the other person stayed in the mediation. The plaintiff felt that the third person was largely responsible for most of the dispute. The defendants insisted the third person stay. The defendants being sued is a small family business and its principal individually. The third person identified himself as an attorney and a Certified Public Accountant, but wanted to participate in support of his cousin (the business owner) and as a friend of the business. He initially assisted with the company’s accounting, vendor accounts, and setup. My colleague stated that he knew the intricacies of the Florida Mediation rules/statutes procedures but was stuck. He did not know quite what to do since both sides appeared so rigid and this mediation took months to set up. What

to do? Insight, Party Self-Determination Mediation is a consensual process whereby parties have the unique opportunity to be in control of their own destiny. Unlike being in court or arbitration, parties can determine how they negotiate and with who. Often, one side may bring someone to the mediation that the other side feels disrupts negotiations. A skilled mediator will know the difference and will encourage a constructive process and dialogue. My Suggestion, How to Discuss Participation With the defendant, discuss that only named parties and parties of interest participate in mediation. However, if the plaintiff agrees, there will be restrictions that must be adhered to. The mediator will ask the third party to leave if his behavior is less than constructive. With the plaintiff, discuss how a third party may have a value and influence on how the defendant negotiates by setting them at ease. People usually negotiate better when they feel

supported and less stressed, and when anxiety doesn’t cloud their judgment. Outcome I was later told that the third-party participated in the mediation conference and offered several strategies regarding how to resolve the matter while maintaining vital portions of the business relationship. They settled in four hours. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court Certified circuit, family, county mediator; primary trainer; and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation and arbitration rosters and mediates with the Agree2Disagree Mediation Group. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediation consultants.com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


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PALM BEACH URBAN LEAGUE

What African Americans Need to Know to Reach CEO Status

BY SOULAN JOHNSON

There is no single, guaranteed, clearly defined path to becoming the chief executive officer of a large organization, but if your ambition is to become a CEO or other C-Suite position, there are a handful of key areas you, especially African Americans, should focus on to prepare for the role. According to Fortune Magazine, Black CEOs account for less than 1 percent of Fortune 500 companies, but

African Americans make up more than 13 percent of the U.S. population. According to research from UCLA, there have been just 16 black CEOs at the helm of Fortune 500 companies since 1999. Currently, Roger Ferguson Jr., CEO of TIAA, has the longest tenure of the three black CEOs on the 2012 list. Only four black CEOs head up Fortune 500 companies, down from six on the list. With the December 2016 departure of Xerox’s Ursula Burns, the first and only black woman to run a company on the Fortune 500 list, that number now includes only black men. The sitting chief executives are Ferguson, Kenneth Frazier at Merck, Arnold Donald of Carnival Corp, and Marvin Ellison of J.C. Penney. Former American Express CEO Ken Chenault said it’s “embarrassing” for corporate America. Chenault insisted that it’s because of management, not lack of talent among minority candidates. According to William Pasmore, an international authority on organizational leadership, top young professionals should make experience, personal qualities,

network depth, and quality relationships priorities when preparing for C-Suite positions. Personal readiness are the characteristics that help determine whether someone is a “good fit” for a position, including: beliefs and values, personal skills, and personality characteristics. Boards often consider integrity, high selfregulation, openness to new ideas, and other attributes. CEOs and other C-Suite level candidates are expected to use their influence outside the organization they lead by interacting with key individuals. That may include the media, government officials, bankers, and other leaders in the industry. Effective chief executives also bring a network with them that can help them assess critical market conditions, influence regulatory actions, and connect the company with helpful resources. Aspiring young CEOs need to develop strong networks with their current boss, direct reports, and peers inside the company. Candidates should keep in mind

that professional networking relationships are formed when people can provide value to each other. Boards will often consider how a prospective CEO has handled personal relationships. Has the candidate, for example, been able to sustain appropriate work and family balance? Insights from a candidate’s personal relationships can tell a board a lot about how someone might handle work relationships. Minorities cannot allow barriers to dictate the outcome of their personal and professional goals. It is just a matter of time before the dynamics of the corporate environment change to allow the best and brightest young minds to run these top companies based on their qualifications alone. Soulan Johnson is vice president of Development and Marketing for the Urban League of Palm Beach County Inc. n

AFRICAN AMERICAN RESEARCH LIBRARY

New Speaker Series Aims to Elevate Black History and Culture

Makiba J. Foster, manager of the AfricanAmerican Research Library and Cultural Center

BY MAKIBA J. FOSTER

As the new leader of the African-American Research Library and Cultural Center of Broward County Libraries, it is my pleasure to share with you a new vision for our evolving and maturing organization. Throughout my career, I believe that my success was brought about because of my commitment to working towards

a greater level of engagement with the communities that I serve. Although I am a recent transplant to South Florida, I am quickly learning about the issues and concerns that deeply impact the community and how AARLCC is not only a source of local pride but also a physical manifestation of the blood, sweat, and tears of generations of Black people who sought out spaces and opportunities to safely educate, celebrate, and congregate. Within our community, those same needs are still true today. Under my leadership, my goal is to become a more agile institution responsive to the interests of the community. Our willingness for reinvention and the ability to consistently demonstrate our value will allow us to maintain and enhance existing partnerships, but also produce new synergies with organizations whose missions align with ours. As AARLCC readies to celebrate its 17th anniversary, the team at AARLCC has recommitted ourselves to the goal of addressing some of the needs of the

community by providing access to premier research and circulating collections, producing engaging and enjoyable programs, and sharing innovative and relevant services. One such program I am excited to introduce to the community is our new speaker series called “Cultural Conversations at the Center,” designed to move the Black experience and culture from the margins of history to center. As an anchor institution and cultural center within the heart of a historic Black community, AARLCC is committed to creating experiences that broaden minds and impact lives for the better. This new program provides a platform where we will host intellectually stimulating programs featuring guests whose research and scholarship celebrates and illuminates the known and unknown parts of Black history and culture. Invited speakers represent renowned thought and industry leaders, scholars, educators, filmmakers, artists and many more. Mark your calendars for the first

Thursday of every month from 6 p.m.8:30 p.m. The debut of this series will be September 5, where we are excited to host Dr. Stefan M. Bradley, professor and chairman of the African-American Studies Department at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Calif. Bradley will lead a lively lecture and conversation about “Black Student Activism: From Black Greek Letter Organizations to Black Lives Matter,” sharing the history of Black student activism, which changed higher education relative to social justice and racial equality. As the inaugural speaker, Bradley’s lecture is a special educational companion to our popular social event #DestinationFriday, with the month of September celebrating the Black Greek Letter Organizations that make up the “Divine 9.” I look forward to your support to make this new series a success! Makiba J. Foster is manager of the African-American Research Library and Cultural Center. n


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ABOUT TOWN The South Florida Chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists hosted Scholarships on the Seas to fund raise for scholarships for aspiring journalists, Aug. 7, 2019, at the Bill Bird Marina at Haulover Park, Miami.

Donovan Campbell, Sheryl Underwood, Jawan Strader, Russell Motley, Calvin Hughes

DJ Irie, Roberta Shields (Ludacris’ mother), Kevin Asbell

Lorenzo “Ice-Tea” Thomas, Jawan Strader, DJ Irie, Jim Berry

WOMEN’S POWER LUNCHEON

Fox Sports Radio’s Chris Broussard and Rob Parker

The Broward Education Foundation kicked off its Backto-School Drive to support students and teachers in Broward County Public Schools, July 8-Aug. 12, 2019.

Florida Representative Patricia H. Williams; Shea Ciriago, Broward Education Foundation Woodie Lesesne, Women’s Power Caucus (WPC) WPC Quiet Storm Award reception with 2019 nominees, past honorees, attendees, and supporters. founder executive producer

Business leaders, donors and Broward Education Foundation board members gathered at the School Supply Center in Pompano Beach to kick start the 2019 Back to School Supply Drive.

Jeannie Wong, 2018 Quiet Storm honoree Winnie Tang, 2019 honoree Marie Woodson, Woodie Lesesne, 2019 honoree Raisa Segueira, 2012 honoree Maria Hidalgo Diaz

WPC panelists Barbara Lamb, Alexandra Bassil, Maiya Gitryte, and Blake Cole

The Gamma Zeta Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. hosted approximately 200 women at its 7th annual Frederica S. Wilson’s Pumps, Pearls and Politics event, July 20, 2019, at Florida Memorial University.


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LEGACY BRIEFS SFCDC’s board chairwoman. “Ranata brings incredible expertise in combining community development policy and training, The Florida which will benefit our membership and the Memorial greater Miami community.” Reeder brings University Board an exciting vision, a comprehensive grasp of Trustees has of community development policy, and named William a commitment to SFCDC’s mission. She McCormick as comes to SFCDC with a strong background its new chairman. in community development. Reeder has led The board voted successful initiatives for Transportation for unanimously America, Smart Growth America, and the City on his selection of Greensboro. “I am honored to join South during its annual Florida Community Development Coalition meeting on May 10. as its executive director,” Reeder said. “I look McCormick is an forward to continuing the incredible work set FMU alumnus who McCormick has served as a member of the board of trustees forth by SFCDC in the areas of affordable housing and community development in since May 10, 2013. Miami-Dade County.” “It’s rewarding to serve my alma mater, For more information, log on to www. Florida Memorial University, and an honor to https://southfloridacdc.org. be selected by my fellow trustees to assume the chairman’s position,” McCormick said.” I BLACK ARCHIVES EXECUTIVE am humbled to be following Attorney Jolinda TIMOTHY BARBER APPOINTED TO Herring’s tenure of exemplary leadership. AAAM BOARD I look forward to working with my fellow board members and the university’s leadership The board to ensure continued growth and student of directors for success.” McCormick is founder and CEO of the Association of Tamarac-based Americlaims Billing, Inc., a African-American national healthcare and medical billing service Museums appointed firm that provides end-to-end revenue cycle Timothy A. Barber management services for healthcare providers to its governing across the country. McCormick brings a level body. AAAM was of energy, expectations and excellence similar established to to when he was a standout student-athlete provide professional at FMU from 1983 to 1987. “As one of the development most popular and outstanding students to ever and networking attend Florida Memorial University, I am not opportunities to its Barber surprised by his long standing professional membership base success, community leadership and his and to African American and African Diaspora committed service to his alma mater,” said audiences. Barber is the longtime executive Erma Williams, former dean of Student Affairs director of the Black Archives, History and during McCormick’s time on campus. He was Research Foundation of South Florida, Inc. destined for such a time as this.” “It is an honor and a privilege to be selected to serve on the board of directors for the AAAM,” Barber said. “The work that I am SOUTH FLORIDA CDC HIRES REEDER AS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR doing here locally and on a national level with AAAM is more than just a job to me. This is The South a large part of my life’s purpose, and I find Florida Community great satisfaction in knowing that the work I’m Development doing today will help to ensure that our stories Coalition board of live beyond my time on this earth.” AAAM directors recently has membership of more than 500 national hired Ranata Reeder and international institutions that include as its executive cultural organizations, historical societies, and director. Reeder museums, which not only collect, preserve, succeeds Shekeria and exhibit objects valuable to art, history Brown who served and science, but also educational institutions, at the helm for research agencies, and cultural centers. more than four AAAM and its board of directors support years. SFCDC the goals of African-American museums and expands affordable Reeder museum professionals through professional housing and economic opportunities for low and moderate- development, member services, and annual national conferences. income individuals throughout Miami-Dade Explore AAAM and its member County. “We are very excited to welcome institutions at www.blackmuseums.org Ranata to SFCDC,” said Gretchen Beesing,

McCORMICK NAMED CHAIRMAN OF FMU BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CHRISTINE JOHNSON JOINS MIAMI-DADE BEACON COUNCIL LEADERSHIP TEAM

Miami-Dade County Beacon Council leaders hired Christine Johnson as vice president of Innovation and Economic Development. The council is a publicprivate partnership that serves as the official economic development Johnson organization for Miami-Dade County. Johnson is charged with leading recruitment, retention, and expansion efforts for the technology and innovation sectors. She brings to the role more than 10 years of experience developing entrepreneurial ecosystems. A graduate of Notre Dame of Maryland University, Johnson understands the importance of leveraging resources and brokering strategic relationships to foster a community’s growth. Her impact on MiamiDade’s innovation ecosystem is palpable, driving inclusion and thought-leadership not only through The Beacon Council but also via participation in, among others, the Miami DDA’s Technology Advisory Group and the Vizcaya Museum’s Technology Advisory Committee. Find out more information at www. beaconcouncil.com

MAYOR JAMES TAPS FRANK ADDERLEY AS WEST PALM BEACH’S TOP COP

The City of West Palm Beach Commission recently ratified Mayor Keith James’ selection of Frank Adderley as the city’s police chief. The commissioners voted 4-1 to elevate Adderley, who previously served as police chief for Adderley the City of Fort Lauderdale and second-in-command in the Broward County Sheriff’s Office. Former chief Sarah Mooney will serve as assistant chief in charge of emergency management. The police department is the city’s largest, with a $60 million budget. “I’m excited to announce the nomination of Chief Frank Adderley as West Palm Beach police chief and believe our shared vision for WPBPD’s future community policing, customer service, culture of responsiveness — coupled with his strong relationships with neighboring agencies and the local community — will make a positive difference for the

department and our residents,” James said. “I am confident he will take the West Palm Beach Police Department to the next level.” The change, along with the creation of a new deputy chief slot for Adderley’s choice Richard Morris, was among several staff shifts as James put his imprint on the city’s executive ranks. According to media reports, commissioners said they were swayed by Adderley’s credentials in a larger city with similar challenges of violent crime and homelessness. His nomination was bolstered by endorsements from a former Fort Lauderdale mayor, the Police Benevolent Association, Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches, and the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority. Log on to www.wpb.org.

MEDIA MOGUL JAMARLIN MARTIN KEYNOTES BOMA SYMPOSIUM

Jamarlin Martin, founder of Bossip and Madame Noire, delivered an insightful keynote address during the Black-Owned Media Alliance’s fourth annual symposium showcasing matters that impact the Black community Martin and media outlets that serve the Diaspora. The symposium is an annual opportunity to get to know Black media in South Florida. Sponsors included Florida Power & Light, The Knight Foundation, WOW Marketing, Miami-Dade County Commissioners Barbara Jordan, Dennis Moss, and Jean Monestime. “When you are building a business in a rapidly changing industry you are going to have to be ahead of the game,” Martin said. “You are going to have to tap into the people who are going to be the leaders a year from now, two years from now, three years from now, five years from now.” Martin’s foresight in the digital stratosphere for the culture of Black people guided him in the right direction of creating an online portal for Black people looking for their news. DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? LET US KNOW BY SHARING YOUR GOOD NEWS IN LEGACY BRIEFS. SEND A PRESS RELEASE AND YOUR PROFESSIONAL HEADSHOT TO rm@miamediagrp.com.


MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

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19BB


20BB

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

MONDAY, AUGUST 19, 2019

Introducing the new FPL

The new FPL Energy Analyzer, powered by America’s most intelligent g rid, gives you a complete breakdown of your energy use so you can see what’s driving your bill. Lear n how your home uses energy and how you can save. FPL.com/TakeControl

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2019 - 40 Under 40 Issue - Legacy South Florida  

2019 - 40 Under 40 Issue - Legacy South Florida  

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