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E 202LECT 0 I ION SS UE

Miami

PERSPECTIVE

8

BUSINESS 13

Who should presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden select as his vice president? The answer may be right in Florida’s backyard. After months of seeing ‘temporarily closed’ signs in storefronts due to COVID-19, Miami-Dade County is back open for business.

VOTERS 14

POLITICAL 22 CAMPAIGNING

Could Black women voters hold the keys to the 2020 Election? South Florida influencers speak out. Campaigns are facing challenges in the COVID-19 era. Find out how opponents Sybrina Fulton and Oliver Gilbert are managing on the road to Miami-Dade’s County Commission.


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4

ON THE COVER  Leroy Campbell’s ‘Voting Together’ Signals Call for Action

By Christopher Norwood IMPORTANT 2020 ELECTION DATES 6 CANDIDATES FOR MAYOR OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CANDIDATES FOR MAYOR OF MIAMI GARDENS 7 CANDIDATES FOR MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 1 CANDIDATES FOR MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 3 8 POLITICS By Christopher Norwood 9 POLITICAL POINT OF VIEW By Dr. Olivia Jackson 10 CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT By Audrey M. Edmonson 12 CANDIDATES FOR MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 9 CANDIDATES FOR MIAMI-DADE STATE ATTORNEY CIRCUIT 11 13 BEACON REPORT By Michael A. Finney 14 BLACK WOMEN VOTERS MAY HOLD KEYS TO 2020 ELECTION By Marcus Bright 16 BUSINESS REPORT By Beatrice Louissaint MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor 18 CANDIDATES FOR FLORIDA STATE SENATE DISTRICT 35 CANDIDATES FOR FLORIDA STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 101 CANDIDATES FOR FLORIDA STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 108 20 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids TECHNOLOGY By Kevin V. Michael 22 POLITICAL CANDIDATES FACE CHALLENGES CAMPAIGNING IN COVID-19 ERA By Josie Gulliksen 24 FINANCE By Kevin Cadette BROWARD HEALTH By Joy Oglesby 26 LEGACY BRIEFS

sentenced, and executed all in the same day. So, yes, I’m disturbed. So disturbed that I have only glanced at the viral image of Floyd lying helplessly on the hard Minneapolis pavement with former officer Derek Chauvin’s knee squarely pressed against his neck for nearly nine minutes. 1 minute. 2 minutes. 3 minutes. 4 minutes. 5 minutes. George Floyd, an unarmed Black man 6 minutes. handcuffed and gasping for air in the 7 minutes. custody of a white cop, could have been 8 minutes. me. That’s not a dramatic exaggeration. 46 seconds. It’s a painful yet honest observation that, I am not ok with this, and neither sadly, no one who looks like me can deny. should anyone else with an ounce of It’s no coincidence that Black compassion for human life. I sincerely men — not to mention Black women want to thank all of my white friends — continue to be the target of merciless who’ve messaged me about how white law enforcement officers who display no regard for human life; African- concerned they’ve been about the latest unrest in our country. You’re right. This American life. madness must stop. It’s also no coincidence that But here’s how you can help make white suspects — many detained for it stop. Take your private messages to unthinkable violent crimes — somehow survive their arrest and live to see another me and your other Black friends and articulate them publicly — whether it’s day, which at least gives them the on social media or at Sunday dinner. opportunity to seek a fair trial. Let your family, friends, and Floyd, on the other hand, was coworkers know, in your own words, essentially arrested, charged, convicted, that the killing of Floyd was wrong and

that those who participated in it must be brought to justice. Stand up to that person in your close circle who you know is racist. Let them know you’re not on their team. Let them know you deplore their racist beliefs. Just know, your silence is deafening. In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies but the silence of our friends.” Now here’s how all of us can help: Go to the polls on Aug. 18 for the Primary Election and Nov. 3 for the General Election. This special Political issue of Legacy highlights a sample of the races you may see on the ballot. For some of the races, we’ve asked the candidates to respond to our questionnaire. Because of limited space, this is not a comprehensive list of all races and candidates. However, we hope it encourages you to vote for the candidates who, among other things, vow to change laws and policies to hold police officers accountable. Then George Floyd would not have died in vain.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

MEDIA GROUP LLC Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

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#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

ON THE COVER

Leroy Campbell’s ‘Voting Together’ Evokes Action

BY CHRISTOPHER NORWOOD

Leroy Campbell is an narrative painter who constructs stories on canvas. “Voting Together” evokes action. Campbell painted this piece on the porch of our gallery at the Historic Ward Rooming House in Historic Overtown. We listened to soul music and discussed ideas that eventually became a part of the painting. This work is personal to me. It depicts an inter-generational group of Black folks at the voting poll with a tapestry of newspaper clippings of critical political moments in Black history — all made possible by the act of voting. In blue, this artwork highlights the swing states of Florida, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and North Carolina, where African-American voters can determine who becomes the next president of the United States. One of the newspapers in the background is the front page of The Student Voice. Discouraged by the lack of press coverage of the Civil Rights Movement by the mainstream press, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee began its own independent

Artist Leroy Campbell paints “Voting Together” on the porch of the Historic Ward Rooming House in Historic Overtown.

newspaper. Published between 1960 and 1965 in Atlanta, The Student Voice covered news of student non-violent protests, voter registration, and efforts to cultivate local African-American political power. Campbell taps into this spirit as he painstakingly captures the

essence and emotion of God-fearing, self-reliant, proud, and intelligent subjects through acrylic mix-media collage-on-canvas artworks that display a deliberate choice of vintage quilted fabrics, news print clippings, burlap, threads, and elements of southern terrain.

The spirit of the ancestors reflects through the vivid colors. Their faces Black have very few features so that we don’t get lost in the peculiarity. This allows viewers to more fully engage with their spirit. This piece motivates our people to head to the polls. It’s important to have mass media visuals that can communicate that thought. As the saying goes, pictures say a thousand words, which is why veteran broadcaster and journalist Roland Martin is using “Voting Together” on the set of his daily digital news show “Unfiltered.” Campbell often says: “Art is supposed to educate, motivate, antagonize, bring thought, challenge ideas, be in opposition.” In the best traditions of our people, he marches that point home with “Voting Together.” Christopher Norwood, J.D. is founder of Hampton Art Lovers at the Historic Ward Rooming House Gallery in Historic Overtown. Limited edition prints of “Voting Together” are available at the gallery. www. hamptonartlovers.com. n

IMPORTANT 2020 ELECTION DATES MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PRIMARY ELECTION: AUG. 18 LAST DAY TO REGISTER: JULY 30 EARLY VOTING: AUG. 3-AUG. 16 GENERAL ELECTION: NOV. 3 LAST DAY TO REGISTER: OCT. 5 EARLY VOTING: TBA LAST DAY TO REQUEST VOTE-BY-MAIL BALLOT: AUG. 8 VOTE-BY-MAIL BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED — NOT POSTMARKED — BY THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTION’S OFFICE NO LATER THAN 7 P.M. ON ELECTION DAY. You can hand deliver Vote-by-Mail ballots to the Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections office: 2822 NW 87th Ave. Doral, FL 33172 or STEPHEN P. CLARK CENTER 111 NW 1st Street, Miami, FL 33128

For more information: Iamelectionready.org


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

MAYOR OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CANDIDATES Q: What primary issue affecting the Black community would you address as mayor? ESTEBAN L. BOVO JR.

DANIELLE LEVINE CAVA

As mayor, I’m committed to uniting Miami-Dade as we move forward on solutions that uphold the dignity of black lives. I’ll create public/private partnerships to attract businesses to create good paying jobs, make housing affordable and increase entrepreneurship. I will continue the work I started as chairman to address gun violence with community partners, and strengthen organizations like the Circle of Brotherhood for them to successfully fulfill their mission.

As mayor, I will lead boldly to lift up opportunities in underserved and left behind communities throughout the county. I will lead with a community agenda to ensure that new reforms and initiatives give Black residents a real voice in the mayor’s office. By taking on true police accountability and systematic underinvestment in Black communities, I am confident we will address key issues from housing, wealth gap, gun violence to transit investments and small-business growth.

WILLIAMS ALFRED ARMBRISTER SR.

CARLOS DE ARMAS

“Miami-Dade African-American median household income is $40,162, even lower than Florida’s ($43,268)”. An INEQUALITY issue that must be addressed IMMEDIATELY. For more than a year I’ve spoken with hundreds of African-Americans to nail down this main issue to these aspects: education, employment/entrepreneurship, housing, inclusion. Better quality education/ support will qualify African-Americans to access better paying jobs and achieve entrepreneurship opportunities. Home ownership programs will give them a sense of safety. Inclusion campaigns/education builds social tissue.

MONIQUE NICOLE BARLEY

ALEXANDER PENELAS

XAVIER L. SUAREZ

When I previously served as county mayor, I spent eight years fighting for greater equality and representation of the Black community in Miami-Dade. If I am able to return to public service, I will address issues in the Black community that have since been neglected. This means delivering justice to the families of gun violence victims, protecting historically Black neighborhoods from gentrification, building affordable housing, and creating economic opportunity founded on the principle of equity.

We need jobs and affordable housing. Fully 62 percent of the households in Miami-Dade spend more than half of their disposable income on housing and transportation. I have proposed having all public transportation be free, as has been done by the mayor of Kansas City. I have also instituted a summer jobs program for youth that now employs 2,700 youngsters. Plus 4 apprenticeship centers.

ROBERT INGRAM BURKE

LUDMILLA DOMOND

DID NOT RESPOND BY PRESS TIME

DID NOT RESPOND BY PRESS TIME

DID NOT RESPOND BY PRESS TIME

MAYOR OF MIAMI GARDENS CANDIDATES

Q: As mayor, how will you address the issue of public safety in your community? LISA DAVIS Public safety is an important concern. There are several areas that we will address. The hiring of more police officers will help our city stay safe. Resources to make sure officers have the equipment they need to successfully do their job: police cars, shotspotters, body cameras, diversity and mental health training. There should be citizen/officer relationships to have a level of trust in the community. Town Hall meetings to regain the trust of our citizens.

LAVERN DEER

Public safety depends on effective crimecontrol and well-communicated social programs to increase safety and civic pride. As mayor, I commit to optimizing resources to ensure safety in Miami Gardens. I plan to solidify a working relationship with our police chief and community and other leaders to review current policies, and quickly implement effective strategies. These include encouraging neighborhood watches, addressing environmental disasters and relief, improving emergency response, and increasing occupation opportunities, especially for youths.

RODNEY HARRIS As mayor of Miami Gardens, I will continue to support the hiring of quality officers who understands our community. In addition, I will continue to support our Police Citizen’s Academy that allows residents to learn about the policies, procedures and challenges of local law enforcement. Lastly, business development and its sustainability in the city will continue to be essential. Jobs for our youth and young adults provide employability and career pathway to becoming productive.

SHARON PRITCHETT

DID NOT RESPOND BY PRESS TIME


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MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 1 Q: What key issues affecting the Black community would you address as county commissioner?

SYBRINA FULTON

Before my son Trayvon Martin was killed, I was a dedicated county professional for 24 years. What I learned during that time is that too many people in Miami-Dade County are struggling simply because they never had a fair shot. I look forward to bringing new ideas to the county commission aimed at improving work, wages, and wealth for everyone and addressing the root causes of generational poverty in Black and Brown communities.

OLIVER GILBERT III Far too often, politicians want you to believe there’s one easy answer. Everything relates and connects to everything else. Economic development impacts jobs. Jobs impact housing affordability. Transportation impacts economic development. Public health impacts public safety. Public safety impacts development. Development impacts quality-of-life. We need an agenda for the community that’s holistic and recognizes that needs are not singular. As a community, we have the bandwidth to change our situation and I’ll lead the charge.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 3

Q: What key issues affecting the Black community would you address as county commissioner? BRIAN DENNIS

KEON HARDEMON

MONESTER D. LEE-KINSLER

One key issue affecting the Black community that I will address as county commissioner is poverty. I will address this issue by ensuring proper funding and accountability for community-based organizations. I will also forge equitable economic development strategies coupled with community-led benefits agreement, job creation, workforce training, homeownership, affordable housing and transit mobility options for all.

The Black community suffers most from Miami-Dade County’s dramatic income and wealth disparity. The county uses income to determine one’s economic status and encourage policy decisions. However, wealth variability is a better tool to measure the condition of Black communities because it considers assets that are owned by Blacks instead of simply the flow of money into their household. Using strategies like my Anti-Poverty Initiative, I would foster greater wealth generation for the Black community.

The Black community has an issue of homelessness; a place to “live” with no sense of home. The school system doesn’t teach our children about economic freedom, crippling them mentally in the future. There are thousands of people being displaced and are now physically homeless. Systematic oppression is emotionally keeping the people stagnant. I will change the mindset and instill programs to help the PEOPLE in the community, not just the city, move forward.

EDDIE LEWIS

TISA M. MCGHEE

GEPSIE MORISSET METELLUS

I played a pivotal role in this county that ensured we elected good responsible office holders that would focus on our community needs. I truly understand the role of being responsible, honest and having integrity. The citizens living in our community who are affected by the Miami Dade Board of Commissioner’s Office require quality service, and that is where I pledge my leadership of Eddie Lewis.

While COVID-19 significantly impacted our community and could be considered a key issue, I would argue that the social inequality it highlighted is a far more pressing issue. Data clearly exposed economic and health disparities, and when you add in education, transportation, and public safety, the Black community is at an overall disadvantage. As a commissioner, I will work to address social inequality, to make sure we have more access to needed resources and opportunities.

The issues that affect the Black community are intersectional and must be addressed through their unique intersectionality. Hence, I would prioritize restoring hope in the promise of a better future rooted in safe and secure neighborhoods through reforms in policing and corrections, while also working with community stakeholders to lift up strategies to expand economic opportunities that enable small business owners to prosper while also enabling hardworking households to thrive.


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POLITICS

Biden Should Choose Rep. Demings as Vice Presidential Candidate

BY CHRISTOPHER M. NORWOOD, J.D.

“Enter the Dragon” is the greatest martial arts film ever made and the first film to combine martial arts action (Bruce Lee) with the emerging “so-called” Blaxploitation genre (Jim Kelly). That’s the genius of its success, the coalition of culture. The same holds true in American politics. Today, we are at a critical juncture in presidential electoral politics. Presidential nominees’ first real decision in the spotlight is the selection of a running mate. But in my opinion, one stands out from the rest and. Valdez Venita Demings of Florida. She has everything former Vice President Joe Biden needs in a running mate and can help get him elected in ways that others simply can’t. Every four years potential Democratic presidential candidates make their proverbial visits to the Hamburg Inn No. 2 (restaurant) in Iowa City, Iowa and Red Arrow Diner in Manchester, New Hampshire to grab some fried French toast and pie shakes. All the while, I’m thinking why is the success of campaigns determined by their performance in these early states where demographically they look nothing like the rest of America or the Democratic Party? Not to mention, why would you eat fried French toast or pie shakes.

So, when Biden lost in these states, I didn’t think much of it. South Carolina was the “safety valve” where the “other America” would emerge/ African-American voters comprise up to 60 percent of South Carolina’s Democratic electorate. Biden made his move. He declared he would name an African-American woman to the U.S. Supreme Court. It didn’t resonate with most of America, but I saw clearly his political skill resurfacing from his old Senate days. It was a landslide for him in South Carolina and Super Tuesday. Biden re-affirmed his declaration to appoint an African-American woman to the U.S. Supreme Court on March 15 at the CNN debate, but audiences understandably seized on his new declaration to choose a woman as his vice president. So back to Demings. Three states matter in 2020 that Trump barely won in 2016: Florida, Michigan, and Pennsylvania, totaling 55 electoral votes. Trump won Florida by 1.2 percent, where African-Americans make up 13 percent of the vote. Trump won Michigan by 0.3 percent in a state where 13 percent of the voters are African-American. Pennsylvania by 0.7 percent, where 11 percent of the voters are African American. African-Americans tip the scale in all of these races for Democrats, especially when nine out of 10 vote Democrat. Biden’s vice presidential selection is easy to me. All roads lead to Congresswoman Val Demings of Central Florida — the swing region of a swing state, the former police chief of Orlando who is married to the mayor of Orange County. She has the authority to arrest any Black man seen not voting on election day (I wish). But seriously, her credentials as an impeachment manager in President Trump’s impeachment trial just seals it for me. n

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020


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POLITICAL POINT OF VIEW

Trump Administration’s ‘Weaponization’ of COVID-19

BY DR. OLIVIA A. JACKSON

By now we all have had to quickly adjust to the challenges resulting from COVID-19, a viral pandemic that has brought about health and economic crises of grave proportions, particularly impacting our elderly and Black and Brown lives. While doing so, unfortunately, President Donald Trump has managed to turn this viral threat into

a weapon of opportunity to push forth broader political agendas while dividing the nation along partisan lines. Take President Trump’s race-baiting rhetoric from the outset in January, referring to the virus as the “China Virus,” leading some of his supporters to viciously seek out and target people who appeared of Asian descent. Instead of focusing on preparedness, such senseless rhetoric simply reflects his ability to spur divisiveness. Remember, this is the same president who declared in early February that because only 15 reported cases of infections had been reported at that time, this virus was akin to just another flu-like virus. By late February he continued to minimize the impact of this virus, predicting that by April the number of cases would be near “zero” and would “miraculously” go away. Unfortunately, as the number of cases continued to climb, the obvious blowback from his delayed response began to emerge: the country was not prepared to deal with the exponential rise in cases and deaths, although the Obama administration actually provided the

Trump administration with a Pandemic game plan for addressing pandemics. So, Mr. Trump, you are wrong when you say Obama left you with “…empty shelves, empty cupboards” to address pandemics. Nevertheless, after two months of dismissing this virus, he eventually acquiesced to the public health officials’ insistence to issue a national stay-athome directive, despite several brave state and local leaders taking matters into their own hands by declaring “shelter-in” policies for their own residents. Let’s get real. Our president’s delay to issue this directive and now his rush to “re-open America” is driven by one motive—an opportunity to win a second term in office. From the outset he weaponized this pandemic to gin up his base by blaming this virus on the “liberal media,” “the radical left,” and of course, Obama. Given the subsequent economic decline, Trump immediately began to weaponize this same virus to push forward an economic stabilization policy in an effort of ensuring re-election with the hopes of people forgetting his failed response to

this pandemic. Unfortunately, because of our president’s petulant behavior and lack of leadership, the rise in infections, deaths, and economic fallout that could have been avoided actually occurred. By May 29, the number of reported infections skyrocketed from 15 in midFebruary to over 1.7 million, and 101,635 reported deaths. Indeed, reviving the economy and getting folks back to work is crucial for a nation to thrive, but as health experts insist, doing so without carefully balancing public health policy could lead to greater spikes in infections and deaths. So I implore you to remember that as we approach the November 2020 election, let this pandemic—and how it has exposed the failed leadership of our president—serve as a reminder to vote as if your life depends on it…because it does. Dr. Olivia A. Jackson is associate professor of Law and Government at Florida Memorial University. n

Protect Older Adults Now. Coronavirus has hit older Floridians hard, especially those in nursing homes. We’re pushing for widespread testing of residents and care staff, adequate protective gear and virtual visitation for families.

Join us in fighting for what’s right for all 50-plus Floridians. Learn more at aarp.org/fl


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CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT

Let’s Exercise Our Sacred Franchise this August

Miami-Dade County Commission Chairwoman Audrey M. Edmonson

BY AUDREY M. EDMONSON

From the passage of the 15th Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and beyond, African Americans have fought long and hard for the right to be fully represented members of this nation’s democracy. Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King Jr. and so many others throughout the generations struggled and died so black people could vote without impediment or harassment. When we exercise that sacred franchise at the polls, we honor their legacy while making our voices heard in the halls of power. Despite all the hard-won victories, minority voter turnout remains troublingly low, especially in off-year and local elections, although recent advances like expanded early voting and unrestricted mail-in balloting have made voting easier. This year, the Coronavirus pandemic could exacerbate the problem of low minority voting at a time when an anemic turnout could have particularly significant consequences for our community. On Aug. 18, primary elections for the Miami-Dade County Commission and School Board, as well as other important contests, will be held. Given the current pandemic, many are predicting that fears over COVID-19 could keep significant numbers of voters away from the polls. That’s why I recently sponsored legislation to have

mail-in ballot request applications sent to all Miami-Dade households with voters who haven’t requested one yet. I encourage you to request a mail-in ballot as soon as possible so you can vote from the comfort and safety of your home. One reason this August’s elections are so critical is that the term limits charter amendment that voters approved in 2012 is set to go into effect, resulting in the loss of more than 80 years of combined experience on the Board of County Commissioners this year, as nearly half the commissioners, including myself, term out. This will be followed by the loss of an additional century of experience in 2022 when term limits kick in for another five commissioners. The resulting seismic shift will completely reshape the commission in a short period of time. With so many seats up for grabs, there has never been a more important time to vote to ensure you have a say in what the new commission looks like. I am one of three black members of the commission who will be stepping down this fall due to term limits. The other two are my dear friends and colleagues Dennis Moss and Barbara Jordan. I want to take this opportunity to say what a privilege it’s been to serve with them over the years. Their accomplishments are far too numerous to list here, but they will long be remembered for their principled, outspoken leadership, their passion for public service, and the indelible mark they have left on this county. While we can never truly replace them, as citizens you can help ensure their successors are worthy of the honor of sitting in their chairs by learning about all the candidates and then exercising your right to vote. Audrey M. Edmonson is chairwoman of the Miami-Dade County Commission. n

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

MIAMI-DADE STATE ATTORNEY CIRCUIT 11 Q: What key issues affecting the Black community would you address as county commissioner?

MARK COATS

JOHNNY G. FARIAS

MARLON A. HILL

I’m a homegrown boy with deep roots in our district. I know firsthand the social and economic issues that have been impacting our community for decades. I am aware that the COVID-19 pandemic has been intensifying and multiplying inequalities. As an experienced community leader/builder, I have what it takes to lift our community from economic depression, while creating/supporting the innovative educational and economic programs our community needs for our youths and families.

In my purview as a Miami-Dade commissioner, I will tackle racial disparities in jobs, housing, healthcare outcomes and policing. These disparities destroy the trust between friends, neighbors, families and government. I will move towards the end of residential segregation and invest in education outcomes in partnership with the Miami-Dade Public School System.

I firmly believe that one of the most critical issues and existential threats facing the Black community in South Miami-Dade County is the scourge of violence, especially between young Black males in their teens and twenties. This issue impacts communities across District 9 in disrupting quality of life of residents, threatening public safety, and impeding economic mobility in those neighborhoods. We must engage and confront this challenge without delay.

ELVIS MALDONADO

DID NOT RESPOND BY PRESS TIME

KIONNE MCGHEE

The key issue is the lack of affordability. Our community has struggled due to rising costs of housing and transportation. As we recover from this pandemic, we need to ensure our residents have affordable or workforce housing, reliable transportation options that include rail, and viable businesses that pay decent wages. District 9 will need an experienced public servant to address these issues. As your House Minority Leader, I am ready to lead on day one.

MIAMI-DADE STATE ATTORNEY DISTRICT 11 Q: In this era of heightened racial issues, how do you see the state attorney position helping to address serious concerns that continue to plague the Black community?

KATHERINE RUNDLE (DEM) Incumbent As the State Attorney’s Office, we will continue our Smart justice initiatives of pre-and post-arrest diversions within the criminal justice system to our therapeutic and rehabilitative pathways. I support greater police accountability and urge that the county reinstate and fully fund a Citizen review panel. As a community leader, we will continue to look for reforms that will eliminate existing social injustices.

MELBA PEARSON (DEM) My platform prioritizes rehabilitative programs that would help reduce crime, reduce the number of people incarcerated, and reduce racial disparities in Miami-Dade. For 27 years, Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle has refused to hold bad cops accountable while fueling mass incarceration with a 1990’s “tough on crime” mentality. It’s time for a state attorney who prioritizes the most serious offenses such as gun violence, and is committed to equal justice for all.


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BEACON REPORT

BY MICHAEL A. FINNEY

Miami is known for many things — its energy and creativity, rich cultural diversity and entrepreneurial spirit. That sense of community and commitment to shared success are what make MiamiDade so resilient, but it is our ability to mobilize in an innovative, inclusive way that will ultimately drive our recovery. In only a matter of weeks COVID-19 has upended families, businesses and economies. Government, anchor institutions, foundations and

Miami-Dade is Open for Business

organizations like ours mobilized quickly, working together to not only try to slow the pandemic but mitigate its impact. Information and its timely dissemination was vital. The Beacon Council worked with Miami-Dade County and numerous partners to quickly launch an online portal streamlining the loan application process for our small businesses. Available in English, Spanish and Kreyol, BizHelp.Miami began as a portal to SBA-approved lenders working with Miami companies. The site has evolved to include dozens of private and public sector partners delivering much-needed assistance to our small businesses. The One Community One Goal platform also allows us to convene leadership across sectors and deploy much-needed resources to support the recovery and long-term economic health of Miami-Dade. At the County level, the top three priorities we are working to help address are access to capital, talent and workforce development, and marketing. Billions of dollars in forgivable federal

loans are still available via the Paycheck Protection Program, and we encourage every small business to reach out to their bank, the SBDC, Overtown CRA, Liberty City Trust, NANA, or one of the vetted organizations on BizHelp.Miami to understand if they qualify. Miami-Dade has also launched a forgivable small business loan program managed by Tools for Change and Partners for Self-Employment. Another revolving small business loan fund, RISE Miami-Dade, was unanimously approved by the Board of County Commissioners on June 2 and will roll out soon. With unemployment rising to 12 percent in April, Miami-Dade not only needs to retain displaced workers but help reposition them for success in an evolving economy. We are connecting local talent to companies with open positions, and working with organizations like CareerSource South Florida, General Assembly, WeWork Labs and others to facilitate reskilling and upskilling opportunities at little or no cost to the individual. Talent is the

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No. 1 issue as companies reopen and revisit their existing processes; having access to qualified people is essential. Our third priority is to market that Miami-Dade is again “open for business.” Individuals and companies are both encouraged to buy goods that are Made in Miami, driving a stronger culture of “Localism.” Championed by the Health Foundation of South Florida and a dozen other organizations, the Anchor Alliance encourages large anchor institutions to source more products and services locally, increasing jobs and investment in Miami-Dade. This is a mindset that we can all adopt, stimulating our local economy. Collaboration and innovation have never been more important for our community. Connect with us and each other to ensure that we lead with our strengths as we build the best version of Miami-Dade … together. Michael A. Finney is president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council. n


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

BLACK WOMEN VOTERS MAY HOLD KEYS TO 2020 ELECTION BY MARCUS BRIGHT

African Americans are reminded every day about the importance of the upcoming 2020 elections as protests continue to erupt across the country demanding justice and a more equitable nation. One of the most pivotal and deciding voting blocs will undoubtedly be Black women. Their potential reach is also very potent as they are often not alone at the polls. “Black women also bring their families along when they are voting,” said Jasmen Rogers-Shaw, a political strategist and candidate for Florida State House District 95. “They are voting for the interests of hundreds of people.” Criminal justice and policing reform, affordable healthcare, racism, and equal rights — they’re all at the top of the list of issues facing AfricanAmerican women voters, according to the “Power of the Sister Vote” survey published by Essence magazine. Experts say this demographic could be a secret weapon at the polls. “One way to address current challenges is to vote,” said Dr. Valerie Patterson, a public administration professor at Florida International University. “You want to vote for the candidate, but you also want to send a message about the importance of inclusion and the importance of representation. I vote in the spirit of Fannie Lou Hamer and Shirley Chisholm.” The level at which Black women will turnout is still very much in question. Dr. Olivia Jackson, a political science professor at Florida Memorial University, points to the decline in the voter turnout among Black women between the 2012 and 2016 Presidential elections as a big game changer in those tight races. The turnout for Black women dropped from 70.7 percent in 2012 to 64.1 percent while the turnout for White women stayed about the same from 65.6 percent in 2012 to 66.8 percent in 2016.

Generations of Black women voters Generational differences are a factor in the motivation of why Black women will vote. Different generations have dealt with varying sets of challenges. Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security are more pressing for older voters. Meanwhile, younger generations are facing burdens that older generations didn’t face at nearly the same level. For example, student loan debt. Younger college-educated Black women are faced with an enormous amount of student

loan debt. They’re potentially faced with a lifelong financially-crippling economic albatross if student-loan debt cancellation is not voted a legislative reality. Unfortunately, this is one of the primary reasons why some highly-educated Black

women from younger generations are in a worse financial position than their grandmothers were under the oppressive Jim Crow laws. According to the 2017 study “Women, Race, and Wealth,” Black women show negative median wealth at different ages regardless of marital status. Single black women in their 20s without a degree have zero wealth. The study also showed that the typical single black women with a college degree is $11,000 in debt. Married, college-educated black women in their 30s are $20,000 in debt. Millennial Ann Marie Sorrell, president and CEO of the Mosaic Group, thinks there are not only generational differences, but differences based on people’s backgrounds and upbringings. “Some issues are going to speak to some of us more than other, she said. “For example, I am an immigrant that spent most of my life growing up in the small town of Pahokee, so I look at things through a different window than others.” Patterson, a member of the Baby Boomer generation, remembers learning freedom songs from the Civil Rights Movement as a student in a segregated school where voting was stressed. “The idea that we are shaped by the major historical events of our respective generations applies,” Patterson recalled. Florida State Rep. Anika Omphroy, D-Lauderdale Lakes, is a Xennial (born between 1977-1983). She believes the primary

concerns among three generations of Black women in her family are the same. “We work at it differently, but it motivates us the same to vote and be actively involved in our community,” Omphroy said. Anna Stewart, a senior at FIU, is a member of the Black Student Union on campus and has been encouraging her fellow students to vote in the upcoming election. She believes her generation prioritizes healthcare, among other issues. “I think Black women voters are looking to be seen entirely by our elected candidate,” Stewart said. “Not only as Black individuals. Not only as women. We are looking to be seen as Black women.” There are several different factors at play. One is whether presumptive Democratic Presidential nominee Joe Biden will choose a Black woman as his vice presidential running mate. Sorrell said that would be a game changer, especially with the current climate of Black Lives Matter at the forefront. “There are a lot of deeprooted issues in our communities like gaps in wealth, homeownership, education, and health that a strong Black woman vice-presidential candidate would be able to bring to the forefront,” Sorrell said.

Black woman as next U.S. vice president? Patterson suggests that a Black woman vice-presidential candidate would galvanize people similar to the excitement and enthusiasm around Barack Obama’s presidency. So would a significant number of Black women stay home if Biden decides to select someone other than who he promised? “Do Black women want to see a Black woman on the ticket? Yes, but will they stay home if it is not a Black woman? I don’t think so,” Jackson said. Still, there is no doubt that the selection of a Black woman as the vice presidential nominee would create an enormous momentum and galvanize a large portion of the Democratic party’s base. It is clear, however, that Black women want much more than just a Black female figure in high political office. They want more than symbolism. They want substantive policy advancements that will create a better

way of life. “We must stop looking at personalities and start looking at people’s policies,” Omphroy said. Sybrina Fulton, a candidate for MiamiDade County Commission District 1, suggests that policing and gun reform legislation are among the issues that will motivate Black women to participate in the electoral process. “Black women will influence this year’s election cycle, not only locally but nationally as well,” Fulton said. “With the current climate of the country, local level voting will be instrumental as it relates to police and gun reform legislation.”

Black and white women voters There is a clear delineation between the voting patterns of Black women and white women. Dr. Marcia Parker, a recent doctoral graduate from the College of Education at Loyola Marymount University, hypothesized that the economic factor was the main one that separated the perspective of Black women and many white women. Parker wrote: “Much of the differences in interpretations of the movement (feminist) were due to economic conditions facing Black families that were different from those facing white families.” Most of the racial wealth gaps that exist are a result of the lack of intergenerational wealth transfers available for Black families. That’s based on an array of reasons ranging from Federal Housing Administration policy, slavery, Jim Crow laws, employment discrimination, and denial of access to capital, to name a few. Ultimately, the priorities of Black women are the priorities of the nation. “There are so many things that are pressing down on Black people that should be in the top of everyone’s priority list,” Rogers-Shaw said. “Everyone should be centering Black women in their policy conversations. If we can address these concerns, we can drastically improve conditions for our country, state, and everyone.” With so much at stake, there is a level of intensity entering the 2020 election. People need a tangible change to their day to day life, not just flowery rhetoric. Voting is just the first step, but it is a very pivotal and essential step for substantial and sustained change to occur. “We have to have a multi-layered plan,” Sorrell said. “There is a place for everyone.” Marcus Bright, Ph.D., is a scholar and educational administrator. n


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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With the Reopening of Miami-Dade County. Please support Black owned restaurants and hotels located in Overtown. BLACK OWNED RESTAURANTS

Two Guys Restaurant

Lyric Live Presented by Black Archives

305-374-1141

Historic Lyric Theater

Groovin Bean Coffee Bar & Lounge

1490 NW 3rd Avenue #108, Miami, FL 33136

786-353-2566 www.groovinbean.com

World Famous House of Mac

Amateur night monthly showcase. Every first Friday of the month. 819 NW 2nd Avenue Miami, Fl 33136

House of Wings Miami

786 636-6967 www.houseofmac.com

305-371-6556 www.houseofwingsmiami.com

Craft | Culinary | Culture

BLACK OWNED HOTEL

J9 Smoothie Bar and Grill

1028 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

801 NW 3rd Ave Suite #104, Miami, FL 33136

1039 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

801 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

(786) 899-0615 www.restaurantji.com

Jackson Soul Food

950 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

305-374-7661 www.jacksonsoulfood.com

Lil Greenhouse Grill

1300 NW 3rd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

(786) 277-3582 www.lilgreenhousegrill.com

2055 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami, FL 33127

Dunns-Josephine Hotel

877-571-9311 www.dunns-josephinehotel.com

EVENTS Purvis Comes Home: Manchild in the Promise Land

Presented by Hampton Art Lovers at the Historic Ward Rooming House

249 NW 9th Street, Miami, FL 33136 Opening Reception: July 3, 2020 | 6pm-9pm Exhibition Dates: July 3, 2020-October 3, 2020

RSVP @ www.HamptonArtLovers.com

Red Rooster Overtown

Folklife Friday’s

(305) 640-9880 www.redroosterovertown.com

Every first Friday of the month: 11am-8pm 9th Street Pedestrian Mall (Adjacent to Lyric Theater) Vendor Info: 786-488-4972

920 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami FL 33136

Open-Air Market

www.bahlt.org

The Urban

Friday, July 3, 2020 Happy Hour: 11am • Day Party: 1pm-6pm Night Party: 9pm-Until Saturday, July 4, 2020, Happy Hour: 11am Night Party: 9pm-Until 1000 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami, FL 33136

www.theurban.miami


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

BUSINESS REPORT

Black-Owned Businesses Need Extra Help to Recover

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT Since the COVID-19 pandemic began affecting the U.S. economy, the number of working black business owners in this country has fallen by more than 40 percent, according to the Washington Post. That is around 450,000 active black business owners who have either permanently shut down their companies or are currently not conducting business. Other minority groups have also seen drops: working Hispanic business

owners fell by 32 percent; working Asian business owners fell by around 25 percent and working immigrant business owners fell by 36 percent. African-Americans already have the lowest business-ownership rate of any U.S. racial group, which means fewer black families benefit from the long-term wealth that research shows is linked to owning a business. In addition, minorityowned companies can be a catalyst for economic growth throughout their communities – they consistently employ other minorities and make purchases from other community businesses. Falling numbers of black business owners mean there will be more families in precarious financial situations. Black-owned businesses are also less likely to recover from this pandemic disruption. A recent McKinsey & Company study shows that around 40 percent of black-owned companies’ revenues are in leisure, hospitality, transportation and retail. Only 25 percent of U.S. companies’ overall revenues are in these sectors, which are experiencing the worst effects of COVID-19

shutdowns and slowdowns. There are other reasons minorityowned businesses are more at risk of failing during this crisis. McKinsey found that, historically, those that continue operating during and after a recession are about 60 percent less likely than peer businesses to receive all of the financing they require. In addition, research shows that black business owners are less likely to seek advice from professionals. The Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council has initiated several new programs and expanded others to help minority-owned businesses through this crisis (fsmsdc.org/covid19). These include consulting and technical assistance to help businesses pivot to take advantage of opportunities related to COVID-19. We are also packaging loans for minority-owned businesses and helping them apply for grants. Minority-owned businesses can also sign up for video conference sessions with the FSMSDC team and free webinars. Our SBA 7(j) Management and Technical Assistance program gives minority-owned businesses access to

in-person and online training, one-on-one consulting, and meetings with federal agency representatives. Also, we launched a PPE Portal (fsmsdc.org/ppe) connecting Minority Business Enterprises that sell Personal Protective Equipment with corporations, health care organizations and individuals looking to purchase equipment. Our goal is to help as many companies as possible to not just survive but thrive during this crisis. Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council), one of 23 regional councils affiliated with the National Minority Supplier Development Council. The FSMSDC acts as a liaison between corporate America and government agencies and Minority Business Enterprises in Florida and operates U.S. Department of Commerce Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers serving southern and central Florida. Learn more about the FSMSDC’s programs and services at fsmsdc.org, or call (305) 762-6151. n

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

The Basics of Online Negotiation/Mediation: Creating Value Through COVID-19

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

(Editor’s Note: The following is Part 2 of a three-part series) “Thank you for allowing me to be your mediator. If you can clearly see/hear me, please give the thumbs up signal… Thank you. You are all not muted and I will do my best to make this feel comfortable and familiar. Thumbs up if you have participated in mediation and/ or negotiations using an online platform.

Good. Well mediation is a process and technology allows for more flexibility… I am a third party impartial neutral without the authority to impose a decision/ solution… All of the rules of confidentiality apply, and all named parties are present correct? … Now, there may come a time where I may need to meet with the parties and their attorneys privately, or the attorneys privately, or even in rare circumstances just both parties together… You are encouraged and empowered to create your own solution that best satisfies your needs today and craft a Mutual Acceptable Agreement… Are there any questions? Let’s begin.” Creating Mutual Gains and Value Recently, I facilitated an online mediation where both attorneys expressed a frustration with the case and how the matter was being litigated during COVID-19. Everything was an issue, from document production requests/responses, to communicating with multiple revolving attorneys on the case. Nothing was consistent. The above are excerpts from my Mediator’s Orientation Statement (opening

statement) where I addressed the attorneys’ frustrations. It worked! During the process, I used the online platform functions to meet separately during various times with the attorneys alone and with their clients. I was able to create trust in the process between the attorneys/parties and build perspectives that led to shared mutual goals and a willingness to create a mutually satisfied agreement. Not enough value is placed on the opening statement (and using an online platform makes it more difficult). Depending on the case and participant specifics, negotiators need to be flexible in their approaches and be prepared to reserve the “harsh-tactics” for face-to-face interactions or court. So, as you negotiate through online platforms think about the following: 1. What do you want out of the process and how will you approach it differently than the usual face-to-face interactions? 2. How have you responded to conflict or the adverse opinions/positions of the other side?

3. How will you participate differently when online? 4. Prepare a brief and concise opening statement that also captures your expectation with online negotiation, and your limitations. 5. Be honest about what you want and where you are willing to go. Save ego for court. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the ATD (Agree2Disagree) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.LinkedIn.com/in/ stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Mayor Gimenez Parent Waiver for Head Start Programs

Head Start and Early Head Start programs primarily serve low income families in Miami-Dade, many of whom are considered essential workers and who have no other options for child care or access to health insurance. Despite a rising number of COVID-19 cases in Florida, Mayor Carlos Gimenez has opted to increasingly put these already COVID-ravaged communities in danger by reopening programs and establishments that have not been secured to prevent spread of the virus. Last week, UTD launched a public petition asking Mayor Gimenez to stop the opening of these programs in the midst of increasing COVID-19 cases in Miami-Dade County. To date, over 3,500 people have signed. Despite issuing a response

that labeled UTD’s concerns as “insidious race-baiting for negative political purposes” and ensuring the public that the county is following “CDC social distancing and sanitation requirements,” Mayor Gimenez is asking parents to sign a waiver clearly stating that providing CDC measures in these settings is “impossible.” Furthermore, parents are being asked to sign off on their child’s welfare while admitting that participation runs a high risk of COVID-19 illness or even death to the child, themselves or other family members who may become exposed. “After having five family members test positive for COVID-19 and witnessing firsthand the inadequacies of testing, I have a unique perspective of the dysfunctionalities that have

existed during this pandemic. My perspective is further amplified by my one-of-a-kind view into the educational inequities that children are experiencing through no fault of their own, but simply because of societal afflictions that continue to persist. With the continued rise of COVID-19 cases in Florida, and Miami-Dade being the epicenter, I find it unbelievable that these babies and their families are being put at higher risk in these already vulnerable communities.This waiver should not exist, and our community should be outraged.” n

United Teachers of Dade President Karla Hernandez-Mats

Miami Beach Monorail Consortium Led by Global Infrastructure Firm Meridiam

The Miami Beach Monorail Consortium is announcing the addition of a reputable, internationally-recognized company as project lead and partner: global infrastructure investment firm Meridiam. The company has over $8 billion in assets under management across the globe, and in Miami successfully completed the Port of Miami Tunnel on time and under budget, after taking over the project in the midst of the recession. This landmark sustainable and resilient infrastructure was delivered by a workforce of 7,000 people, 83% of which came from the local community. Operation 305 2020 marks ten years since Meridiam broke ground on the PortMiami Tunnel. In preparation for the project, the firm launched Operation 305, an initiative to hire local and maximize its impact on Miami’s community. The team

Port of Miami Tunnel. “Meridiam can now utilize the expertise gained through the Tunnel project to once again hire local workers and companies who will help deliver the monorail safely and efficiently.”

partnered with several organizations to onboard Miami-Dade workers, including the Overtown CRA, New Birth Enterprises, Laborers International Employees Union (LiUNA), and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). “The success of the PortMiami Tunnel would not have been possible without a strong partnership with hundreds of Miami companies with local knowledge,” said Christopher Hodgkins, Chief Executive Officer for

Next Project in the Pipeline As workers from all industries are feeling the impacts of the coronavirus, African American communities have been among the hardest hit. In fact, a recent Pew Research Center Study found that Hispanic and black Americans have suffered the most severe economic impacts from the COVID-19 crisis, with an estimated 61% of Hispanics and 44% of African Americans surveyed saying they or someone in their household was laid off or had their wages cut. The Miami Beach Monorail

Consortium is proposing a monorail to connect Downtown Miami and Miami Beach, which would create an estimated 3,000 jobs and fulfill a public transit need that commuters and visitors have been demanding for three decades. “We are excited with the possibility of delivering another cutting-edge infrastructure project in Miami that will serve the community for decades to come,” said Jamie Rubin, CEO of Meridiam Infrastructure North America Corp. The monorail will run on an elevated track for 3.45 miles on the South side of the MacArthur Causeway, offering passengers a 5 to 6-minute ride. There will be two trains constantly operating, each holding up to 300 riders and serving up to 12 trips per hour. The monorail’s mainland transit hub will serve as a stop for the Miami-Dade County Bus and People Mover. Meridiam expects to deliver the project by 2025. n


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

FLORIDA STATE SENATE DISTRICT 35

DAPHNE CAMPBELL (DEM)

WILBUR HARBIN (DEM)

ERHABOR IGODARO (DEM)

SHEVRIN JONES (DEM)

JOSUE LAROSE (REP)

FLORIDA STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 101

BRIAN C. JOHNSON (DEM)

ASHIRA MOHAMMED (DEM)

VINCENT PARLATORE (REP)

MARIE P. WOODSON (DEM)

FLORIDA STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 108

GEORGES BOSSOUS JR. (DEM)

ROY HARDEMON (DEM)

DOTIE JOSEPH (DEM) *Incumbent


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

#BLM

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

Career Pivot: How to Make Your Next Big Move you’re thinking about changing your career, there are a few things you need to do before taking the leap.

Mary V. Davids, MS-HRM, career strategist

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

Are you not really feeling your current job or are you worried your current job is not feeling you? Selfemployed, but thinking of shifting gears into a new industry or going back into the workforce? Willfully or not, many people are taking a closer look at their career choices these days. If

1. Know what you don’t know. The best way to see what your chances are to get into a new industry or role is to find out what they need vs. what you have. You’ll need to compare the required skills to the skills you already possess. Knowing this can help you strategically prepare and possibly increase your knowledge base before applying for a new role or launching a new business. 2. What is working for you? I often tell my clients to use an “eat the meat and spit out the bone” method when struggling with big decisions. Consider what is really working for you such as your strengths, things you enjoy, or things you’ve always wanted to try, and discard the rest. It’s easy to point out what you don’t like, but if you don’t

take time to sort out the things you do like, you could find yourself in a different place facing the same problem from which you tried to get away. 3. Know your level of risk. Fear is the No. 1 reason many people end up spending their lives working in jobs they hate. While moving into something new is scary, it can also be an exciting new challenge. You’ll need to educate yourself on as much as you can about your next move to help increase your level of confidence and to see how far you’re willing to stretch yourself before making your next move. 4. Ditch the résumé; Go straight to the source. Don’t get too wrapped up in what to put on your résumé more than you are about being intentional, direct, and creative about getting the role you want. Because you are stepping into something you’ve never done, it will

require you to do something you’ve never done. Going the basic route of submitting your résumé online won’t work for pivoting. Try reaching out directly to a hiring manager, writing a letter, and mailing it directly instead of waiting for an applicant tracking system (not) to select your resume. LinkedIn is a great way to use your current network to help you connect with people you may not have access to directly. Tap into your online and offline network to see if they can aid you in reaching out to someone they know to make an introduction. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n

TECHNOLOGY

Educators Should Prepare for Even More Online Instruction

Kevin V. Michael, managing partner, Invizio

BY KEVIN V. MICHAEL

As we navigate our way through this pandemic, one of the many facets of life that has been upended has been our educational system. Almost overnight, students and teachers from Pre-K through higher education found themselves thrust into online learning environments in an attempt to maintain some semblance of normalcy and finish the school year. Many school districts, administrators,

and teachers were forced to quickly devise strategies to shift schools to virtual learning and oftentimes without the necessary planning or tools to overhaul the entire system of instruction and assessment. I will not even begin to comment on what the parents endured. As a technology consultant to private and charter K-12 schools, I have had an opportunity to observe firsthand some of the challenges faced by administrators, teachers and students since COVID-19 struck. For the upcoming school year, here are a few ideas that can help make things easier for educators:

Proactively Address Digital Divide Issues Disparities created by the digital divide were further laid bare because of the pandemic. Some districts experienced low student attendance rates to online education and inconsistent student engagement because of inequitable access to computers and Internet broadband in homes. Proactively identifying vulnerable students within your school community provides an opportunity to individually assess virtual learning readiness and remove obstacles that may prevent students from connecting to class.

Have a Virtual Operations Plan Consider what the upcoming school year may look like if your school is forced to suspend classroom learning or be required to operate at less than full capacity. Define the objectives, goals and measures to provide effective learning outcomes for students and assess teacher effectiveness. Think about the technology platforms and tools that align with these goals and consider how prepared your school is to leverage them.

Expand Professional Development for Teachers Many teachers were forced to quickly build familiarity with a range of technology tools and applications needed to provide online instruction. Some were successful at climbing the learning curve, while others struggled with the new demands. Teachers should be offered additional learning opportunities to build competence with the technology tools they are using and the best practices to succeed

in online classrooms.

Prepare Students for Online Learning Online learning also requires a variety of competencies on the student side of the equation. Knowledge and understanding of the specific software applications that are to be used in the digital environment is a big factor in student success. Core skills such as typing, document creation, using email, or accessing and submitting homework assignments are all expected, but now students must also navigate video-conferencing and a variety of other online applications. Offering preparedness and training in these skills will help build student confidence and reduce the friction of the online learning experience. Kevin V. Michael is CEO and co-founder of Invizio, a leading South Florida Managed IT Services Provider that provides outsourced IT management services to companies and schools, helping them operate more efficiently and reduce costs. n


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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Knowledge. Growth. Unlimited Possibilities. It takes 21 days to change a habit. Join us for a unique opportunity to explore issues of race, power, privilege and leadership. Daily emails invite you to read an article, listen to a podcast, watch a video or reflect on a personal experience -- all with the goal of inspiring our community to action.

Will You Accept The Challenge? Dates: June 29 - July 27

Register as an individual or recruit a team at your organization! Visit www.ywcasouthflorida.org

      



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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

POLITICAL CANDIDATES FACE CHALLENGES CAMPAIGNING IN COVID-19 ERA

County Commission District 1 Candidates Gilbert and Fulton Take to the Internet BY JOSIE GULLIKSEN

Miami-Dade County Commission District I candidates Oliver Gilbert and Sybrina Fulton are facing one major hurdle: How to effectively campaign during the Coronavirus pandemic at a time when shaking hands, visiting residents door-to-door, and hosting large rallies are out of the question due to social distancing. “I have gone mainly digital via social media,” said Gilbert, in a phone interview with Legacy. “[I’ve] placed lawn signs and distributed door hangers and done many radio interviews because we have to get our message out to voters.” In his second and final term as mayor of Miami Gardens, Gilbert said his primary obligation right now is reopening the third largest city in Miami-Dade County, which has been largely shut down since March because of the pandemic. Like Gilbert, COVID-19 temporarily suspended Fulton’s campaign activities. The lifelong Miami Gardens resident was even forced to temporarily close the office of the Trayvon Martin Foundation, which she operates on the campus of Florida Memorial University. “We wanted people to focus on their health, families, career and just making sure they were safe,” said Fulton, who responded to Legacy via email for her interview. By mid-May, parts of MiamiDade slowly started re-opening in Phase 1 of the county’s New Normal Guidelines. Most retailers were given the green light to open with restrictions, eventually followed by restaurants. Fulton said once things started opening up “we began checking on people and their welfare, picking up with the campaign functions once again and I began to have a larger media presence.” On May 29, Fulton kicked off her return to campaigning with an

online fundraiser featuring her friend, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who encouraged

latex gloves and a face mask bearing the Miami Gardens city logo. He said he hopes to reach voters in the district

“We also need to talk about the affordability of housing, not just affordable housing,” said Gilbert, who has been endorsed by the Transport Workers Union, Local 291, AFL-CIO, among others. “There are young teachers, government workers, and many other hard-working people who cannot afford to live here, and that’s basic supply and demand. We have to drive down the price. We can’t price our professionals out of the county.” One of Fulton’s top priorities for Miami-Dade County, if elected commissioner, includes public safety. “People need to feel safe in their own communities and this can be facilitated by building stronger relationships between residents and law enforcement,” stated Fulton, whose latest endorsement includes Ruth’s List Wearing a mask and gloves, Mayor Oliver Gilbert practices social distancing and safety while distributing Florida, the largest organization food in Miami Gardens. in Florida that helps progressive proFulton to run for her first choice women get political office. Supporters elected to office. joining the event via “I also aim to Zoom were asked to increase affordable donate up to $1,000 for housing and the chance to virtually rub homeownership, shoulders with Clinton. as well as “We discussed build stronger Mothers of the Movement, homeowners campaigning for her in associations 2016, how we were fairing and community through the Coronavirus, oversight and police violence and committees.” how those living with bias Fulton and have to recognize it within Gilbert hope to themselves,” said Fulton, succeed four-term who added she worked incumbent Barbara in government services Jordan, who is for more than 20 years being termed out. Sybrina Fulton takes a selfie with Hillary Rodham Clinton who supported her campaign with an appearance during a virtual fundraiser on Zoom on May 29. and was inspired to run Voters in District for office because of her 1, which largely passion to help others. to discuss everything from improving includes Miami Gardens and Opa Whether it’s interacting with public transportation to reduce traffic, locka, will select a new commissioner the public or his staff in the office, to increasing access to housing for in the Primary Election on Aug. 18. n Gilbert is cautious, often wearing average working-class residents.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

Legacy Magazine’s 40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today & Tomorrow

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‘40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow.’

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If you are interested in nominating someone as one of ‘South Florida’s 40 Under 40 Leaders of Today and Tomorrow’, please go to http://www.123formbuilder.com/form-4511855/form and fill out form. You may nominate up to 3 individuals.

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FINANCE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

Investment Diversity: We Are Leaving Money on The Table

BY KEVIN CADETTE

Even the wealthiest people in the Black community are leaving significant amounts of money on the table. Black Americans, as a group, continue to fall far behind our white counterparts on the measure of expanding our wealth and successfully transferring it to future generations. Amazingly, the biggest deterrence to our growth in this arena is

not a blatant barrier — rather, it is our collective lack of understanding and active use of the wealth creation tools that define capitalism. Angel Investing, for example, is one of several methods that can help us increase wealth across Black America. So what is Angel Investing? It is the act of investing money in early-stage businesses, in exchange for a share of the profits. Angel Investors typically invest in young companies that are not established enough to attract investments from venture capital firms and investors. Sometimes, they also lend their relationship and professional experience to the companies. Shark Tank is a good example of Angel Investing. Annually, Angel Investors provide more than $25 billion to 70,000 plus companies in the U.S. A Kauffman Foundation study showed that Angel Investor groups are generating roughly 2.6 times return on their investments in 3.5 years. Black investors amount to less than 1.5 percent of the Angel Investors in the U.S. Also, the absence

of Black Angels contributes to Blackled start-up companies receiving a negligible percentage of this financial and professional support. We are missing out on significant wealth creation opportunities by not being in the game. Black Angels Miami was launched in 2019 to solve this problem. BAM is an angel investment club with a core mission to increase angel investment knowledge and activity among the Black community. Our members get exposed to exciting companies that need investments and then we help them to make investment “magic” happen. BAM uses our broad and international network of relationships to identify attractive early-stage companies and high-quality sources of information. Our network includes fellow angel investment clubs, top-notch investment firms, incubators, accelerators, universities and commercialization programs. Through the power of BAM’s network, our members get better access to attractive companies seeking investments. Consider us an onramp for

Black investors seeking to get on the super highway that is Angel Investing. BAM believes diverse perspectives improve investment outcomes and strengthens capitalism as a whole. It is time to put more Black capital to work and to start closing the wealth gap­. To learn more about Angel Investing, stay-tuned for our upcoming contributions to Legacy magazine that will continue to explain the what, how, and why of Angel Investing. Or check out #BlackAngelsU, a digital broadcast that introduces Angel Investing to a broader audience through interviews with top professional investors, business and thought leaders. Kevin Cadette is executive director of Black Angels Miami. Black Angels Miami: Changing the landscape of Angel Investing. Enabling investing for a higher reward. Website: www. blackangels.miami Twitter: @ blackangelsmia n

HEALTH

Broward Health’s Nurse Connect Provides Vital Service for Community

Kedline Maxime, RN, helps guide patients with general health concerns as part of Broward Health’s free Nurse Connect service.

BY JOY OGLESBY

Most days, the calls come in nearly unending waves. Patients have concerns about symptoms they find troubling – ranging from minor to more urgent conditions. On the other end is a Broward Health registered nurse ready to make a swift and sound assessment and provide medical guidance. This is Broward Health’s free Nurse Connect service, which expanded in March to a 24/7 operation.

“When people call and are worried, I try to take the fear away,” said Shannon Heiss, RN, TCRN, lead nurse for Nurse Connect. “I take advantage of the time that I have on the phone with the patient to educate them.” Before the call is over, Heiss said, patients often share their appreciation. “They tell us all the time ‘you really made me feel better today.’” Nurses work in 12-hour shifts answering hundreds of health questions each day. Many of them have experience caring for patients in the fast-paced and unpredictable world of Emergency Departments. The core group of nurses receives invaluable support from Aldo Calvo, D.O., medical director of ambulatory care for Broward Health, and Gavin Malcolm, MSW, LCSW, population health director. The team is also supported by about 15 population health nurses who primarily care for patients in ambulatory settings. The nurses expertly “help manage patients’ anxiety, answer questions and triage,” Malcolm said. “It’s been awesome to see the population health nurses flourish in this expanded system.” Through Nurse Connect, patients can obtain guidance on whether to seek

immediate care. The registered nurses also share information about how to manage symptoms, help schedule appointments, connect patients with a primary care provider when needed, and educate about proper medication protocol. When Broward Health expanded its services to accommodate the needs associated with the pandemic, the Nurse Connect team morphed into an important conduit for patients who do not have doctors and suspect they have Coronavirus symptoms. “I’m particularly proud – but far from surprised – about how our nurses have delivered incredibly passionate care in these very challenging times,” Calvo said. Nurses also represent the community’s diversity, as some of the nurses are fluent in Spanish, French, Creole, and Portuguese. The healthcare system also has access to translation services for other languages. The team also makes hundreds of follow-up calls to patients, including sharing negative COVID-19 test results. The Nurse Connect program has been beneficial to the nurses, too.

Additionally, it is a tremendous help when patients share their complete medical history with the nurses, said Joe DiGiorgio, RN, who works overnight. Especially those patients who don’t have a primary care provider. “Number one, we can educate the patient when we have all the facts,” DiGiorgio said, “and number two, we can facilitate care on a diagnostic level assuming they meet criteria.” Broward Health has two mobile COVID-19 testing sites for the South Florida community. Patients can call Nurse Connect for an appointment and should have a written script from a physician. Nurse Connect steps in to fill the access-to-care gap for patients who don’t have a primary care provider. Patients are asked to bring a photo ID and the written COVID-19 testing prescription to the mobile testing sites in Lauderhill and Pompano Beach. To speak to a registered nurse at Nurse Connect, call (954) 320-5730. Nurses will not diagnose conditions, but are available to provide valuable information on a range of health-related topics. In an emergency, call 911. n


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

LEGACY BRIEFS due to COVID-19. Geathers campaigned online and through social media from her Miami home. Students elected her by voting online.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSIONER DENNIS MOSS ANNOUNCES CANDIDACY FOR SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 9 Miami-Dade County Commissioner Dennis Moss announced his candidacy for MiamiDade School Board District 9. The seat will be vacated by Dr. Lawrence Feldman Moss who announced last July that he would not run for reelection. “My passion for District 9, its schools, students, and residents have led me to announce my candidacy,” said Moss. The residents of District 9 need a leader who can build upon the work of Dr. Feldman and continue to guide the district in this evolving educational environment.” Moss said as a school board member, he will work to ensure the physical

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let’s talk REAL ESTATE.

SOUTH FLORIDA NATIVE MAKES HISTORY AS MIT’S FIRST BLACK STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT Danielle Geathers of Miami has been elected the first black student body president at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Geathers just completed her sophomore year at Geathers MIT and is majoring in mechanical engineering. She served as the diversity officer last year. Geathers said she plans to use her platform to make MIT as inclusive as possible. “Although some people think it is just a figurehead role, figureheads can matter in terms of people seeing themselves in terms of representation,” she said. “Seeing yourself at a college is kind of an important part of the admissions process.” About six percent of undergraduates at MIT are black and 47 percent are women, according to MIT. MIT students left campus in March

safety of schools, ensure that students are safe from the COVID-19 virus, save traditional and challenged neighborhood schools, refine online distance learning, and implement life preparation skills in school curricula such as employability, entrepreneurship and coding skills. Commissioner Moss is a lifelong resident of District 9 and has served MiamiDade County’s Commission since 1993.

GALLON TO SERVE SECOND TERM ON MIAMI-DADE SCHOOL BOARD Dr. Steve Gallon III has been re-elected to the Miami-Dade School Board District 1 without opposition. No other candidate entered the race in time for the June 12 qualifying deadline. Gallon’s district includes Miami Gallon Gardens, Opa-locka, and North Miami. He will now serve a second 4-year term on the board. Recently, Gallon was unanimously also re-elected as the vice-chair of the Council of Urban Boards of Education National Steering Committee at its virtual meeting held on

April 3. Gallon was re-elected by school board members representing regions from around the country.

YOUNG LEADS TOWER CLUB Dan Young has been named Chairman of the Board of the Tower Club Fort Lauderdale. Young will provide strategic leadership for the Board of Directors and Club to ensure the growth Young and long term prosperity of the organization. n DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2020

“Change starts from the ground up, and I hope you will join our movement focused on enacting meaningful positive changes that make Miami-Dade County a better place for all to raise a family, work, and call home.” —Sybrina Fulton, Candidate for County Commissioner, District 1

SybrinaFulton.com /SybrinadFulton @SybrinaFulton

VOTE SYBRINA FULTON BY AUGUST 18, 2020 Paid for by Sybrina Fulton for Miami-Dade County Commissioner, District 1, Nonpartisan

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