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RY O ISTSSUE H K HI C A BL MONT

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History Maker

Super Bowl LIV

Remembering

Black-owned Businesses Making History in South Florida

NFL Exec Brings Super Experience to Local Youth

Meet Frank Borges The Knight Foundation’s First African-American Board Chairman

W. George Allen The University of Florida’s First Black Graduate

Frank Borges


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A BLACK MAN DID THIS

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Learn more at aarp.org/blackcommunity

This Black History Month, we celebrate unknown and unsung Black innovators, inventors and contributors who have helped shape, change and improve our world.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

4 CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT By Audrey M. Edmonson

MAYOR’S REPORT

By Oliver Gilbert

6 MONEY MATTERS BY JOANN MILORD MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor 8

PEARSON WANTS TO BRING REFORM TO STATE ATTORNEY’S OFFICE By Josie Gulliksen

10 BUSINESS REPORT By Beatrice Louissaint

SOCIAL MEDIA

By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

12 COVER STORY Borges Becomes First African

American to Lead Knight Foundation Board of Trustees

“Who Killed Malcolm X?” This gripping title intrigued me enough to recently commit a Friday evening to watch an advance screening of one episode of the docu-series at Fort Lauderdale’s African American Research Library and Cultural Center. Just in time for Black History Month, the six-part series debuts on Netflix Feb. 7, raising doubts about who actually assassinated the American Muslim minister nearly 55 years ago at Harlem’s Audubon Ballroom. As a scholar and history buff, I’m curious to learn what revelations could have now possibly surfaced and whether these “findings” will, ultimately, rewrite history. Tackling this subject is historian, activist and investigative journalist Abdur-Rahman

Muhammad of Washington, D.C., who appears in the series. (The project’s executive producer is Harvard’s Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr.) At the South Florida screening, Muhammad offered historical context for a subject matter that’s bound to raise eyebrows. “The issue of his assassination is something that always troubled me because I was disturbed by just the lack of academic interest in it,” Muhammad told Legacy. “Before Spike Lee’s movie (Malcolm X) in 1992, the subject of Malcolm’s assassination scholastically was a dead letter issue. Nobody was talking about it.” Nearly three decades after Spike’s 3-and-a-half-hour drama was released, Muhammad’s docu-series promises to ignite renewed interest in a case that convicted three members of the Nation of Islam for Malcolm X’s murder. In part, Muhammad suggests that two of the three convicted — Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson — did not commit the crime. In fact, he says the two men had the weakest case of the three. However, all three suspects were tried together. Thomas Hagan, the third man convicted for Malcolm’s murder, has maintained Butler and Johnson were innocent. Muhammad, 57, was almost 4 years old when Malcolm X was gunned down.

Muhammad credits Malcolm X for inspiring him to become a Muslim at the age of 24. He says it was his close association with three of Malcolm X’s close NOI brothers that prompted him to do some investigative reporting, which led him to draw new conclusions revealed in the series. “There are some explosive revelations in it,” claims Muhammad, who majored in philosophy and minored in history at Howard University. Muhammad stopped short of revealing too much about the docu-series, leaving dozens of curious attendees at the screening in suspense. “We believe this will be the definitive account of what happened to Brother Malcolm X — the forces that were involved in bringing about his demise,” said Muhammad. “We believe it will be definitive and close the book on the subject.” So will this account change history as we know it? Muhammad maintains, no, it won’t change history. Instead, he suggests it will “establish” history. Happy Black History Month.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

By Michelle Solomon

14 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP NFL Executive Works to Bring

Super Bowl Experiences to Local Residents

16 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids 18 W. GEORGE ALLEN’S SELFLESS LEGACY BLAZES TRAILS FOR OTHERS By Janiah Adams 20 ABOUT TOWN

The King’s Table presents a “Meal Fit For a King”

Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce 14th Annual Holiday Gala

MEDIA GROUP LLC

By Kallan Louis

22 LEGACY BRIEFS

LIFESTYLE

LU X U RY

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief

#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor

Shannel Escoffery Vice President

Sabrina Moss-Solomon

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

Designer

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Joe Wesley Cover Photo

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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CHAIRWOMAN’S REPORT

Miami Shares Strong Historical Bond with the Bahamas

Miami-Dade County Commission Chairwoman Audrey M. Edmonson

BY AUDREY M. EDMONSON

When Hurricane Dorian plowed through the Bahamas as a Category 5 storm last year, cutting a swath of destruction through Grand Bahamas Island and Abaco, there was an outpouring of support from our

MAYOR’S REPORT

community. Miami-Dade residents opened their hearts and their wallets to provide muchneeded relief in the wake of the disaster. The strong display of compassion shown by our community for our neighbors in the Bahamas was the most recent chapter in a shared history that goes all the way back to Miami’s roots. That historical bond began in the mid-1800s, when Bahamians began to settle in the small village of Coconut Grove, which would eventually be annexed by the City of Miami. In 1889, Mariah Brown, a native of the Bahamian island of Eleuthera, became the village’s first black Bahamian resident. Many more black Bahamians soon followed, as they made their way from Key West (where a large Bahamian community had already settled) to the bustling mainland in search of employment. Miami’s early Bahamian community worked as carpenters, farmers, cooks and much more – helping

to build the now-sprawling metropolis we call home. Among them was Ebenezer Woodbury Franklin Stirrup Sr., who came to work as a chauffeur and farm worker for industrialist James Deering at the Vizcaya mansion. Through hard work and entrepreneurial pluck, Stirrup became Coconut Grove’s first black millionaire, serving as an inspiring example for future generations of black leaders in Miami. Besides Coconut Grove, Miami suburbs like Lemon City and Overtown also developed Bahamian enclaves – helping to give Miami the unique Caribbean flavor it is known for today. Many of Miami’s early Bahamian settlers were skilled stonemasons. Their fine craftsmanship can still be seen in the area’s coquina walls, houses, and churches. The majority of Bahamians in Florida continue to live in and around Miami, where they contribute daily to our economy and culture as elected officials,

entrepreneurs, teachers, construction workers, artists and much more. Bahamian culture is also put on spectacular display at the annual Coconut Grove Goombay Festival, where junkanoo bands, dancers, and stilt walkers delight crowds every year with their spirited music and dazzling costumes. Miami’s Bahamian heritage is one I proudly share. It’s gratifying to be part of a community that forms such a vital part of the rich multicultural tapestry that makes Miami such an amazing place to live. As we celebrate Black History Month this year, I ask you to remember Bahamians’ important contributions, and please don’t forget that the Bahamas still needs our help as they work to rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian.

Audrey M. Edmonson is chairwoman of the Miami-Dade County Commission. n

Miami Gardens Creates Black History Every Day

Mayor Oliver Gilbert, City of Miami Gardens

BY OLIVER GILBERT

We are the history that we make. Oftentimes, we reflect on Black history during the month of February but forget that history is being made year-round. It should be celebrated and remembered continuously. Contributions of Black Americans to what is an extraordinary American history is truly a testament to how the

country has matured and developed as a beacon of hope and opportunity for the world. In Miami Gardens, we have a full understanding that we are creating black history daily. As the largest AfricanAmerican city in the state of Florida, every day we strive to make history’s gaze proud of the lines that are written about us and read by our children. Whether transforming a parking lot into a world-class entertainment venue, Jazz in the Gardens, or transforming land use so that business development that was previously barren blossoms — that is black history. We know that we are writing the story that will be told about how we became Miami Gardens — a city of 113,000 working-class black people. We are a city that understands an investment today leads to producing self-sustaining, contributing members of our community in the future. Investment in Miami Gardens included $60 million

to overhaul parks that were closed and in disrepair for years before our incorporation. That investment looks like Buccaneer Park, Norwood Pool and Park, Bunche Pool, North Dade Optimist Park, and the creation of a state-of-the-art Real Time Crime Center. We have several more projects in progress including: Risco Park, Senior Family Center, A.J. King, and Bennett Lifter Park. This investment means places for families to enjoy recreation; children to learn how to produce music, operate TV cameras or create commercials; and those who want to learn ballet, martial arts, or culinary arts. Over the past six years, our development footprint has changed. In the last five months, we have broken ground on Gateway Commerce Park, the Center at Miami Gardens, and the Jessie Trice Community Health Systems as well as laid the groundwork for the development of a city center to include

a performing arts center. That is black history. Economic development and safety go hand-in-hand. Our police department is a reflection of the city. We recruit residents and send them to the police academy. The return on that investment is officers who love Miami Gardens; officers from Carol City, Norland, Bunche Park, and the Bahas; and officers who understand our youth, who want to make sure neighborhoods are safe, and who want our businesses to thrive. That is black history. As we look toward celebrating 17 years as a city, we do not take our place in history lightly. We stand squarely in the knowledge that what we are doing today is shaping a brighter future for generations to come. We are writing the book that our children’s children will read and be proud of the black history we have created.

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MONEY MATTERS

Preparing Your Business for Financing is Necessary for Growth

BY JOANN MILORD

Whether you are starting a business, expanding, or have been awarded a new contract, financing is necessary for growth at any stage of a business. While you may not need funding today, circumstances can change rapidly. Here are a few things to keep in mind to be prepared for financing your business.

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

1. Check your Credit: What is your credit score? Are there any inaccuracies or recent late payments? Are you maxed out on your credit cards? What steps can you take to improve your credit score before applying for a loan? A strong credit score shows financial responsibility and is a lower risk to lenders.

steps to achieve them.

2. Record Keeping: Have you been maintaining proper accounting and administrative records? Do you routinely review your bank account statements and monthly expense budget? Are your business licenses up to date? Accurate financial statements verify the value and growth potential of a business.

5. Financing Costs: What costs are related to the financing? What are the closing costs? Is there a prepayment penalty fee? What is a reasonable interest rate? Make sure you know all the costs associated with the financing to accurately compare options. Obtaining financing can be an involved process. If you do not prepare in advance, your business could find itself suddenly needing to secure funds with the only option available being a high-interest, short-term lender. Even if traditional bank financing is not available to you, that does not mean there are no viable options, such as the Miami Bayside Foundation.

3. Business Plan: Do you have a clear strategic plan to grow your business? Based on trends in your industry what does growth for your business look like? Is it adding an additional product or service? Is it increasing marketing or adding staff? It is important to outline your goals for the business and the action

4. Research Funding Options: Is a line of credit for short-term operational expenses or a term loan for equipment financing best for you and your business? Make sure to consider all available financing options.

MBF is a nonprofit organization with a mission to further economic development in Miami. MBF accomplishes this through loans and technical assistance to minority- and women-owned small businesses and through educational scholarships and grants. In 2018, MBF partnered with the State of Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity to become the administrator of the Black Business Loan Program for Miami-Dade County. Since 2011, and with amounts ranging from $2,500 to $150,000, MBF has awarded more than 100 low-interest loans totaling more than $5.3 million, helping create more than 450 jobs in Miami.

Joann Milord is manager of the Black Business Loan Program at the Miami Bayside Foundation. She can be reached at joann@mbf.miamior 786-703-5768. For more information, visit www. miamibaysidefoundation.org. n

Consider Applying Three Rarely Used Mediation Techniques that Work

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

As I gestured for everyone to take their seats, I began the mediation by saying, “Thank you for allowing me to be your mediator. In full disclosure, I have mediated with both attorneys (or their firms) in the past. So, they are familiar with my mediator’s orientation/ opening statement. The orientation statement is mandatory… it sets the

tone and explains the mediation process. But most importantly, it is for you, the decision-makers, to learn how beneficial this process can be, should you choose it to be… It is the decision-makers who are empowered and control if you choose to reach a resolution or not….” As I looked at both party-clients, I seemed to have grabbed their attention. The introduction contains excerpt of statements strategically used to impact the party-clients’ mediation awareness and set expectations. The following are three rarely used techniques that work after a complete orientation/opening statement: 1. Stay in joint session, for as long as possible – In various industries, the playing field is small. Controversy and discourse can damage reputations and the future business of both sides. So, an important regret I hear from the litigants (not their lawyers) is how they wish to regain a once profitable business relationship. With a mediator trained in conflict resolution skills, the mediation process often becomes an opportunity to

model better communication styles while in a joint session. Although there are instances where immediately separating the parties is wise, far too many mediators separate parties too fast as a control method. They are wrong, and lose a valuable opportunity while they lengthen the negotiation process and become a number-runner in between private rooms without reducing the barriers of communication. 2. Make your opponent smarter, SMILE at them. There is undeniable neuroscience evidence that people are smarter and make better decisions when they are in a better mood. Simply put, stare downs and scowls do not exhibit strength or intimidate anyone. Keeping the mood encouraging and constructive will yield more respectful dialogue and better communication efforts. 3. Stay Away from the “F” Bomb! The word “fair” is an overused idea that is simply not real in negotiations. Everyone is “being fair” when they negotiate for what they want, right? So “fair” is

relative to a perspective and context of how a position justifies someone’s wants and needs. Saying “you are being fair” implicitly forces your opponent to be defensive and challenge your idea of fair. Stay away from the term fair if you want to have better negotiations. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the ATD (Agree2Disagree) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. As an ADR consultant, he regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants. com www.effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


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Pearson Wants to Bring Reform to State Attorney’s Office

Melba Pearson

BY JOSIE GULLIKSEN

As a young girl watching “The People’s Court” on television, Melba Pearson was fascinated by the courtroom. That, and several other factors led her to pursue a law degree. The native New Yorker, who has called Miami home for the past two

decades, did just that and has led an illustrious career as an attorney, all leading up to her latest goal, becoming State Attorney in Miami-Dade County. She’ll have to unseat Katherine Fernandez Rundle who has held the post for nearly three decades. Pearson, nurtured by her father, said he reminded her that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had great attorneys around him to help keep the movement going. “It is that foundation, that desire to fight injustice, that led me to be an attorney and to now run for State Attorney,” she said. “Our county can be better, would have fewer racial disparities in the system, and can help more people become rehabilitated.” She said as attorney general, she will embrace reform and progress. This change will happen via a grassroots effort, engaging non-voters and those not traditionally interested in

prosecutorial elections. “When elected, I will release an annual report card to show the disparities in the system and how we are addressing them,” Pearson explained. “I will end the practice of sending non-violent youth offenders to adult court. I’ll engage the community more and bring back the ‘village’ approach to working with our youth and people returning from incarceration.” Pearson said she will also address what she feels are major deficiencies in the current State Attorney’s office. Those include: holding police officers accountable when rogue actors harm the community, an unwillingness to embrace bail reform, continually direct filing juveniles, and a lack of transparency about who is being impacted by policies. As a prosecutor in Miami, Pearson has first-hand knowledge of these

shortcomings. She was assistant state attorney in Miami-Dade County for 15 years, culminating as assistant chief in the Career Criminal/Robbery Unit where she supervised junior attorneys while prosecuting homicides. In addition to learning the value of hard work and perseverance from her immigrant parents from Jamaica and Trinidad, Pearson said she was also motivated by her friend and mentor Chadd Lackey from the State Attorney’s Office and Howard Simon, whose civil rights work inspired her to join the ACLU of Florida. “I learned about the intersectionality of policies to reform education, healthcare, voting, and the criminal justice system from Simon,” she said. “He helped shape my views on the need for bold policing and criminal justice reforms.”

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A Salute to African-American Women Educators This Black History Month, United Teachers of Dade celebrates the incomparable legacy of African-American women in the field of education and their impact across the country. c From Susie Baker, the first black teacher for freed AfricanAmericans during the U.S. Civil War, to Mary McCleod Bethune the founder of Bethune Cookman Woman’s College in Melbourne, FL., to Lois Rice the “mother of the Pell Grant," black women educators have led the charge to ensure that children in the United States, regardless of race, creed or financial means, receive a top-notch education. United Teachers of Dade and its leadership thank you for your longstanding and unwavering commitment to our public schools.

We Educate Miami

President Karla Hernández-Mats First Vice-President Antonio White Secretary-Treasurer Mindy Grimes-Festge


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BUSINESS REPORT

Black-owned Businesses Making History in South Florida

BY BEATRICE LOUISSAINT

Small businesses, particularly minorityowned businesses, are fueling South Florida’s economy. As we celebrate Black History Month, let’s applaud the successes of these black-owned businesses making history, and support black-owned companies by doing business and partnering with them. 2Lyons Aerospace is a certified distributor of aviation parts domestically and internationally with customers in South

America, Indonesia, Thailand, Kenya, South Africa, Nigeria and other countries. Firm President Mike Cantave, a commercial pilot for a major airline, started the company in 2014. Cantave has more than 25 years of experience in the aviation industry, including managing the FedEx location in Fort Lauderdale. 2Lyons Aerospace ensures that customers receive the highest-quality aviation spare parts possible by utilizing only FAA certified repair stations that meet the most stringent quality standards and ISO/ASA certification requirements. www.2lyonsaero.com DeEtta Jones and Associates is a leading management consulting and training company that has been in business for more than 15 years. The firm specializes in equity, diversity and inclusion, leadership development, and individual and organizational transformation. The company’s founder and principal, DeEtta Jones has 25 years of experience guiding people and organizations through the process of fundamental change. Jones’ years of experience as a management consultant and trainer have turned her into one of the

most sought-after speakers and consultants in her field. Clients include higher education institutions, nonprofits, financial services firms, advertising companies and healthcare organizations. www.deettajones.com Dr. Angelo P. Thrower is a medical doctor specializing in ethnic skin and hair conditions. He opened his private practice more than 25 years ago. Thrower formulated the Dr. Thrower Skin Type Specific care products and authored three textbooks covering skin and hair care for ethnic skin. Since 1992, he has also served as one of the team physicians for the NBA’s Miami Heat. Thrower is a graduate of the University of Miami School of Medicine and George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. His over-thecounter products are sold in his practice, in beauty supply stores and online. Thrower also created the Thro-Grower Rx Hair Regrowth products, which are scalp-friendly for all hair types. www.drthrowerskincare. com Imaginart Media Productions, a marketing and production company, offers services in Caribbean communities

throughout the United States, Canada and the Caribbean Islands. The company is a one-stop shop for audio/video production services, including TV and radio commercials. Additionally, the firm helps its clients develop and expand their media presence by developing and executing promotional campaigns tailored to targeted customers through local or national print, online, television and radio outlets. Imaginart president, Elizabeth Guerin strives for the company to consistently exceed client expectations, using unparalleled creativity to help brands reach their target markets. www.imaginartmedia. com/about-us To meet these and many other minority entrepreneurs, attend the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s 35thAnnual Business Expo, April 16-17 at The Charles F. Dodge City Center in Pembroke Pines (greater Fort Lauderdale). Learn more about the Business Expo at www.fsmsdc.org, or call (305) 762-6151. Beatrice Louissaint is president and CEO of the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council. n

SOCIAL MEDIA

Work to Scale Your Small Business in 2020 one of which is the ability to scale.

Scaling vs. Growing: These two terms are often used interchangeably, but there is one major difference. Growth is simply an increase in revenue. Scaling implies the growth business revenue is happening without significantly needing to increase operating budget. As you consider the future of your small business, be focused more on scale, not necessarily growth. There are four strategies that will help you grow your business to new heights in 2020. Dr. Tracy Timberlake, award-winning business coach

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

The 2019 “Small Business Trends” reports that black business growth is at an all-time high, capping in at a 400 percent growth. Growth is always great news, but it does not exempt them from facing small business issues. Black-owned businesses are still plagued with all the things SBEs tend to struggle with in the early stages,

Play the Long Game: This is going to require the proverbial “go big, or go home” mentality. Maintaining a status quo in business should never be the goal, no matter how good the books look. The economy shifts quickly. Emerging technologies and resources can flip your industry on its head in a microsecond. If you want to grow and scale, part of your work is to stay ahead of the curve. Lets not forget the Blockbuster

fiasco. Not paying attention to what’s happening in your industry can leave you left behind and obsolete. Notice the trends and deploy internal strategies that keep you relevant.

Focus on Personal Branding:

This is a critical strategy that often goes neglected in today’s marketplace. We are no longer a strictly B2B/B2C economy. Now, it’s all about the P2P (people-topeople). Your target customers want to get to know the leader behind the brand. The reputation of the company’s leadership can significantly contribute to the business’ bottom line. Staying in touch with your consumers through social media platforms is an easy way to do this and is 100 percent free. This keeps your expenses low, but visibility high.

Network and Collaborate: There is so much truth to the saying “it’s who you know,” especially in today’s business environment. Be excellent at what you do. Deliver the best product to your audience.

Show up and be seen, but your network matters a great deal. These connections can be a gateway to your next contract. Expansion requires resources. You have the option of choosing time or money. Looking under the hood of some of the small businesses that seemed to have skyrocketed overnight (think Uber and the like), very few of them are selffunded. You’re going to need capital to hire more, build more, make more. You have several options, from small business loans, angel investors, access to government contracts or even business grants. Don’t be afraid to explore them. There is a lot of money out there for the taking. As minority-owned business, you have more available to you than you think. Take action on these steps in 2020 and use them to scale your business to new horizons. Dr. Tracy Timberlake www.tracytimberlake.com/freeresources Instagram.com/tracytimberlake Facebook.com/drtracytimberlake n


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COVER STORY

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

Frank Borges Becomes First African American to Lead Knight Foundation Board of Trustees

BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

Francisco “Frank” Borges doesn’t believe life happens to you. Instead, you make life happen. His motto is to live every day with “intentionality.” The newly named chairman of the board of trustees of the more than $2.3 billion John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Borges believes that “John and Jim” were the models of intentionality. The first African-American chairman of the Knight Foundation’s board of trustees, Borges said, “Clearly they had extraordinary vision and foresight in running their business, but equally exceptional in terms of how they would like to be remembered, how they would like to continue to affect the communities that were important to them.” The Knight brothers, according to the foundation, believed that a well-informed community could best determine its own true interests and was essential to a well-functioning, representative democracy. They built and ran one of America’s largest and most successful 20th century newspaper companies. In 1937, John Knight bought The Miami Herald and became its president and publisher. His brother, James, became operations manager. They continued to scoop up papers, eventually creating the Knight Newspapers chain. The Knight Foundation invests in journalism, in the arts, and in the success of the cities where John and James Knight once published newspapers. “I wish there were more people like them,” Borges reflected. Humble in his conversation, Borges said he appreciates the honor of being a history maker as the first African American to serve as head of the foundation’s board of trustees. However, there is a bit of a double-edged sword to the designation. “It’s interesting,” he shared. “When you are at a point in our nation’s and

Frank Borges

both were intellectually and spiritually gifted.” He said it was his mother who instilled in him the importance of service. “One should always share one’s blessings,” he remembers his mother Maria, now 93, telling him as a youngster. “When you are at a point in our nation’s “She would say, ‘if and world’s history where you are the first, you can help someone, well, I’ve never liked being the first (African do so. And don’t do it American). I kind of wish there were so many with an expectation that you wouldn’t know them all. Now that would there is something to be reciprocated.” be progress...” For Borges, sharing his blessings has been principally focused on public service. He was result, I’ve never looked at being first as twice elected Connecticut state treasurer and served as deputy mayor of the city progress.” of Hartford, Conn. Borges arrived in the United States “The local government experience at the age of 8 from the Cape Verde really provided me with an appreciation Islands. He spoke no English, only and an understanding of the challenges Criuolo, the island’s language. “I had that exist within our cities,” he said. a mother and father that did not have “Whether those challenges are around the benefits of formal education, but world’s history where you are the first, well, I’ve never liked being the first (African American). I kind of wish there were so many you wouldn’t know them all. Now that would be progress. As a

education, opportunity, quality of life, for me service is my way of contributing.” Currently, he is chairman of Landmark Partners, an institutional alternative investment firm, specializing in private equity and real estate secondary market acquisitions. Borges splits his time between New York and Massachusetts, but said he enjoys his home in Palm Beach Gardens the most. “When you can get on a plane and be in warm weather in three hours and get out of the cold Northeast, that’s where I want to be.” As a member of the Knight board’s audit and investment committees, Borges was instrumental in adding women and minority-owned companies to manage the Knight’s investment portfolio. Diverse owned firms currently manage more than onethird of Knight’s endowment. “We were intentional about that and that’s what’s resulted in us having a significant amount of the endowment being managed by women and minority firms. We could have very simply continued to go on a normal course.” Commenting on Borges’ unanimous election as chairman of the board of trustees, Alberto Ibargüen, Knight Foundation president, said, “He understands how cities and publicprivate partnerships work, and has an unwavering belief that people in communities can best determine their own futures.” Borges added: “Change happens only when people choose to be intentionally in charge of their futures.”

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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

NFL Executive Works to Bring Super Bowl Experiences to Local Residents BY KALLAN LOUIS

The economic impact a city earns from hosting a Super Bowl is significant. The Atlanta Metro Chamber estimated a nearly $400 million impact on the region last year from hosting the big game. This year, Miami will host the signature event for the 11th time, more than any other city. The NFL knows local businesses immediately benefit from its presence, but the league is working to bring Super Bowl experiences to residents of the host city as well. “In many cases, the Super Bowl or other large events will dominate a downtown and all the branding, and it may or may not positively affect people in the community unless you patronize some of the things going on downtown, said Roman Oben,” NFL vice president of Youth & High School Football Strategy. Starting with Super Bowl LI in Houston, the NFL began celebrating youth and high school football participants, coaches, programs and partners the week of the game. This season, the 2020 Play Football Family Festival takes place February 1, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the North Miami Athletic Stadium. The free event will feature appearances from NFL players, football clinics, a parents’ forum and breakout panel sessions, food, music, giveaways and more. “It really creates a fun atmosphere for families that may not want to drive down to South Beach or downtown and deal with the traffic,” Oben said. “The event is growing substantially every year.” Oben said his team uses the NFL calendar and league activations to determine when to roll out programming. For example, the NFL Pro Bowl takes place in Orlando this year, and Oben says the event is youth focused and will celebrate all levels of the game. His team will also have some programming around the NFL Combine

Washington D.C. as a child. He reflected on one of his favorite NFL memories as a youth. “The first Super Bowl I watched was Super Bowl XVII, when the Washington Redskins played the Miami Dolphins,” he recalled. “It made me fall in love with the game. Imagine first starting to watch football and your team wins the championship.” Oben didn’t play organized football until high school. He later played for the University of Louisville where he earned a bachelor’s in economics before he was drafted by the New York Giants in 1996. While playing professionally, he earned a master’s in public health from Fairleigh Dickinson University. He went on to intern for Congressional leaders, work as a sports broadcast analyst, and joined the NFL league offices in 2015. He is involved in various charitable work through the Roman Roman Oben, NFL vice president of Youth & High School Football Strategy. Photo credit: National Football League Oben Foundation. Oben has served as a spokesperson for Big Brothers Big Sisters and was named 2007 Big Brothers Big Sisters San Diego Man of the Year. As a youth sports advocate and philanthropist, Oben uses that passion when speaking with parents about the importance of protecting the future of football. He says NFL youth programming helps to push the narrative. “The game equips young people for success in the classroom by inspiring character, leadership, resilience and teamwork. I can never Roman Oben (left), NFL vice president of Youth & High School Football Strategy, speaks with young football players give back what football during NFL Play Football panel - Photo credit: Associated Press has done for me and my family. It’s a game I love XXXVII as a member of the Tampa and Draft. dearly and I want future generations to Bay Buccaneers, Oben was born in Before playing 12 seasons in feel the same way.” n Cameroon, Africa He migrated to the NFL and winning Super Bowl


Ailey II’s Kyle H. Martin. Photo by Nir Arieli.

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MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 8

Motivated by You • Delivering for You • Committed to You

Toge Together we celebrate Black History Month recognizing the significant contributions African-American men and women have made to our country and especially to Miami-Dade County. As we celebrate our sha shared history, we must recommit ourselves to uplifting the Black community in Miami-Dade County through inclusive and innovative policies and programs that strengthen Black businesses, protect families and improve our quality of life. /CommissionerCava

@dlcava

@dlcava

10710 SW 211 Street, Miami, FL 33189, Suite 103 • 305-378-6677 • District8@miamidade.gov 1071


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CAREER & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

Three Reasons Why You Have Not Been Promoted at Work Florida Department of Economic Opportunity

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BY MARY V. DAVIDS

My newly acquired business ǁĂƐƐƚƵƩĞƌŝŶŐĂƐĂƌĞƐƵůƚŽĨƐůŽǁ ĐĂƐŚŇŽǁƐŽ/ƌĞĂĐŚĞĚŽƵƚƚŽD& ĨŽƌŚĞůƉĂŶĚƚŚĞLJŚĂƐƐůĞͲĨƌĞĞ ĂĐĐŽŵŵŽĚĂƚĞĚŵLJƌĞƋƵĞƐƚĨŽƌ ĐĂƐŚŇŽǁĨƵŶĚŝŶŐ͘

As a career coach, I get tons of requests from professionals looking to get to the next level within their careers. While many of these professionals are very good at what they do, they are often overlooked for promotions for reasons that rarely have anything to do with their actual work product. Here are just a few areas I’ve found most impactful:

dŚĞƉƌŽĐĞƐƐǁĂƐĞdžƚƌĞŵĞůLJĞĂƐLJ͕ ƚŚĞŽĸĐĞƌƐŬŶŽǁůĞĚŐĞĂďůĞ͕ǁĂƌŵ͕ ĂŶĚĂĐĐŽŵŵŽĚĂƟŶŐ͕ĂŶĚƚŚĞƌĂƚĞ ďĞLJŽŶĚƌĞĂƐŽŶĂďůĞ͊ 'ŝǀĞƚŚĞŵĂĐĂůů͕ƚŚĞLJĂƌĞǁĂŝƟŶŐ ĂŶĚǁŝůůŝŶŐƚŽĂƐƐŝƐƚLJŽƵƌĐŽŵƉĂŶLJ ƚŽŶĂǀŝŐĂƚĞĮŶĂŶĐŝĂůŚƵƌĚůĞƐǁŚĞƚŚĞƌ LJŽƵĂƌĞũƵƐƚƐƚĂƌƟŶŐŽƵƚŽƌŚĂǀĞ ďĞĞŶŝŶďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĨŽƌĂǁŚŝůĞ͘

Percy Newland General Manager Genisis Global LLC

Call MBF now! (786) 703-5768 Apply online: ŵŝĂŵŝďĂLJƐŝĚĞĨŽƵŶĚĂƟŽŶ͘ŽƌŐͬďůĂĐŬͲďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐͲůŽĂŶͲƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ ŽŶƚĂĐƚƵƐĨŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͗ ŝŶĨŽΛŵŝĂŵŝďĂLJƐŝĚĞĨŽƵŶĚĂƟŽŶ͘ŽƌŐ D&ŝƐĂŶŽŶƉƌŽĮƚŽƌŐĂŶŝnjĂƟŽŶĐƌĞĂƚĞĚƚŽĂĚǀĂŶĐĞĞĐŽŶŽŵŝĐĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ŝŶD/D/ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚƚŚĞƐƵƉƉŽƌƚŽĨŵŝŶŽƌŝƚLJďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐĞƐĂŶĚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͘

1. Not Being Approachable. Your facial expressions and engagement with staff can greatly impact your influence and the way colleagues feel about your ability to lead. When I work with corporate clients having challenges with employee engagement, one of the most common things I see is employees wearing earphones while they work. While it is understandable that music or podcasts may help you to focus or relax more at work, it doesn’t increase your chances of engaging with others and building valuable relationships. Wearing earphones is signaling to those around you that you don’t want to be bothered. Approaching you will feel like an interruption and a deterrent to those who may already be intimidated to approach you. Being mindful of non-verbal cues like these will help you build authentic relationships with your colleagues.

2. Doing the Minimum. Doing what’s required is expected, but it is not something that can be viewed as remarkable or outstanding. What you do beyond your required role is what will get you noticed. Problem solving often requires us to go beyond our safe zone and access resources and information that others were unable to find. So instead of thinking, “I don’t get paid enough for doing this extra work,” try to think about what you’d like your employees to do if you were the owner of the business. Everything you do at work impacts your work environment and your specific role. Become the person that makes the job easier, and one who makes their workplace better. 3. Not speaking up. You may have tons of solutions and great ideas, but no one will ever know if you continue to sit in that dreadful meeting without sharing them. Just because you may not have a leadership title doesn’t mean you don’t have the right to say what you know. The only way people recognize your value is when you open your mouth and share your thoughts. The best environment to show others your ability to lead is when you’re in a room with your co-workers and management. The environment you’re in doesn’t change what you know, it just changes the audience you share it with. Don’t bother getting caught up in whether people agree or not. That is a distraction. What matters is that you contribute to the conversation, add your perspective, and let your voice be heard. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.comor follow @ MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n


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W. George Allen’s Selfless Legacy Blazes Trails for Others

be felt in Broward County for years to come and his contributions ingrained in history.” When you have a trailblazer for a Eugene Pettis, the former president father, it’s hard not to speak about him of the Florida Bar, with pride in your told the Allen family voice. That’s exactly that W. George how Jonathan Allen Allen was “a true speaks about his legal giant, who father, the late W. had the courage George Allen. and conviction “He’s always to confront evil, been the one who bigotry and injustice would pave a wherever they path for others to existed. Because of follow,” Allen said George’s unselfish of his father who service to society, died on November 7 he left us a better at age 83. world.” “He always He’s been had the ability to honored at the look forward to say University of Florida, how can I impact with the school’s others through my Black Law Students service and my Association naming sacrifice.” their chapter after Jonathan Allen with father George Allen attending the OIC George Allen Pavillion established at Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park W. George Annual Gala. him. Allen was the “So many first Black man to people have just said great graduate from the University things about him and of Florida Law School during recognized his work and a period of bigotry and blatant recognized his contribution racism. He was admitted to the state of Florida, to Harvard University and to the county as a legal the University of California trailblazer, and I am at Berkeley, but he opted forever grateful for those to attend the University of recognitions,” Jonathan Florida instead. Allen said. He told the Florida Trend A scholarship fund in a 2013 interview he “felt is being established that somebody had to integrate in his name, and will the University of Florida. The provide opportunities to racists told me I didn’t belong two African-American there and I’d never graduate.” high school graduates But he would defy the in Broward County, and odds and become the first George Allen addresses an audience at the 50th anniversary of the Seminole County, from Fort Lauderdale Wade-In Demonstrations. Black man to graduate from which W. George Allen UF’s law school in 1962. graduated. W. George Allen will be and hard working,” he said. “For as long as I can remembered for his selfless legacy Numerous lives have been touched remember, he’s been that Jonathan Allen and George Allen attending the recognition of that paved the way for many African by the work of W. George Allen. Florida selfless and he’s been a the Broward Bar Association. Americans. Congressman Alcee Hastings released trailblazer,” Jonathan Allen “He not only paved a path for those a statement, saying, “George leaves said. who look like him,” Jonathan Allen said, behind a principled legacy of service to and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. W. George Allen’s beginnings “he had a mindset to look forward, and our country, the Civil Rights Movement, Jonathan Allen says his father’s originated from Sanford in 1936. He and South Florida. I know his loss will example became a motivator for him.“I that is what he did.” n received his undergraduate degree from BY JANIAH ADAMS

Florida A&M University in 1958, then served in the army before attending law school. He served in numerous organizations, including the NAACP, the Florida Bar Association,

think it was very motivational for me because he was always a firm believer that hard work beats talent. So it allowed me to at least remain humble and hungry


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ABOUT TOWN

The King’s Table presented “A Meal Fit for a King” featuring keynote speaker Pastor Jamal Bryant, Jan. 16, 2020, Florida Memorial University, Miami Gardens 1

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1. Event participant, Dr. Jaffus

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Hardrick, Florida Memorial University president; Dr. Adrienne Cooper, FMU provost Delrish Moss Santonio “Blaze” Cooper Pastor Jamal Bryant Terry Wright, Eric Knowles, Rep. Kionne McGee, Santonio “Blaze” Cooper, Pastor Jamal Bryant, Larry Handfield Pastor Jamal Bryant leads participants in prayer

- Photos by AJ Shorter

Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce hosted 14th Annual Holiday Gala, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, Hilton Miami Downtown.

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1. G. Eric Knowles, president & CEO, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce; H.T. Smith, Al Dotson Jr.; Alvin West, Gala committee chairman 2. G. Eric Knowles, State Representative Kionne McGhee, Alvin West 3. G. Eric Knowles; Jeff Lozama, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce Board vice-chairman; Gepsie Metellus, Alvin West. 4. G. Eric Knowles, Alvin West, Kenasha Paul, CEO of the Black Professionals Network; Kevin Smith, chairman of Young Professional Network. Photo Credit: Ryan Nelson, Hip Rock Star Media 5. Joy Vickers, Alvin West, Beverly James, G. Eric Knowles, Timothy Parker during the reception. 6. NBC 6 Anchor Jawan Strader and his wife Yolanda Strader. Photo Credit: TK 7. Quincy Cohen, Sr., State Rep. Kionne McGhee, Bill Diggs, Rick Beasley, Henry Crespo, Sr. 8. The Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce presented a $5,000 check to Florida Memorial University for students effected by Hurricane Dorian. Cory Witherspoon, FMU vice president of University Advancement; Shelia Cohen, FMU director of Alumni Affairs. Eric Knowles


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LEGACY BRIEFS LOCAL 10 NAMES ALEX FINNIE WEEKEND EVENING CO-ANCHOR

WPLG, Miami/ Fort Lauderdale’s ABC affiliate, has promoted Alex Finnie to coanchor of the station’s weekend evening newscasts. Finnie joins Andrew Perez on the anchor desk for the Saturday and Sunday Finnie 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 11 p.m. newscasts. Finnie, who grew up in Miami Shores, joined the station in May 2018. She’s a graduate of St. John’s University in New York. CHANEL ROWE JOINS SEC MIAMI

MCGARRELL LEADS NAHSE FLORIDA

Rowe

Natoia Adella McGarrell serves as the first president of the National Association of Health Services Executives’ Florida chapter, formerly

LUCIDO GLOBAL KELLER WILLIAMS PARTNERS REALTY

NAHSE South Florida. The non-profit association of minority health care executives was founded 25 years ago for the purpose of promoting the advancement and development of minority health care leaders and elevating the quality of health care services rendered to minority communities. McGarrell is currently an account manager with Masimo Corporation. SAUN LIGHTBOURNE LEADS EDEN ROC AS DIRECTOR OF SALES

Saun Lightbourne has been hired as director of sales at Nobu Eden Roc Miami Beach. Lightbourne has extensive experience in hotel sales and marketing. Lightbourne He is responsible for the most demanding clientele in the hospitality industry at four Forbes travel-rated 5-star resorts and one AAA-rated 4-Diamond Hotel & Casino in North America and the Caribbean.

JONES PROMOTED AT FIRE DEPARTMENT

McGarrell

let’s talk REAL ESTATE.

Chanel Rowe recently joined the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Miami Regional Office as an enforcement attorney. As an enforcement attorney, she is responsible for conducting

investigations into possible violations of federal securities laws, recommending the Commission bring civil actions in federal district courts or in administrative proceedings before an administrative law judge, and litigating those cases once they are filed. Additionally, she works closely with law enforcement agencies to bring criminal cases where appropriate. Before joining the SEC, Rowe clerked for two years with Senior Judge Donald L. Graham, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Prior to that, she practiced at two AmLaw 100 firms, Akerman LLP and Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP. Rowe earned a bachelor’s of business administration from Florida Atlantic University where she majored in Economics. She was valedictorian of FIU Law Class of 2014.

Xavier Jones, 32, has been promoted

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020

to division chief of Professional Standards at the Coral Gables Fire Department. Since beginning his career with the department in 2006 at age 19, Jones has climbed the ranks and served the Department in many roles, including Jones firefighter, assigned paramedic, lieutenant, recruit academy lead instructor, accreditation manager, and captain of Emergency Medical Services. n

DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.


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Legacy Miami Black History Month 2020  

Legacy Miami Black History Month 2020  

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