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N I S DE SU R E 40

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South Florida

"Providing News/Information and Connecting Florida’s Black Affluencers and Influencers"


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EDITOR’S NOTE South Florida

4. Legacy South Florida’s 40 Under 40 Honorees 6. BROWARD SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT By Robert Runcie THE BAUGHTOM LINE REPORT By Germaine Smith-Baugh 7. ENTREPRENEUR Serial Entrepreneur Aims to Inspire Black Men to ‘Go Out and Get It’ By Zach Rinkins 8. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT By Gary Hartfield SPECIAL TO LEGACY Another Under-40 Milestone: Advance Planning for End-of-Life Care By Donna Borland 10. BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE By Shaheewa Jarrett POLITICS By Chris Norwood 12. COVER STORY Presenting South Florida’s Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow 14. MILLENNIAL By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw TECHNOLOGY By Kevin Michael 15. BROWARD CRA By Leslie Anne Frye-Thomas 16. SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor 18. PALM BEACH REPORT By Ann Marie Sorrell URBAN LEAGUE OF PALM BEACH COUNTY By Patrick J. Franklin 20. CAREER, LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary Davids 21. ABOUT TOWN Legacy’s “Top Black Educator” Reception Chef Creole’s MIA restaurant opening 22. ABOUT TOWN BOMA Awards 23. LEGACY BRIEFS On the cover: Photo shoot location is Art Africa Miami, 920 NW 2nd Ave., Historic Overtown. ArtAfricaMiamiFair.com

Andrew Gillum is not listed among the distinguished honorees in this issue of Legacy’s “40 Under 40.” But had he still resided in South Florida, where he was born and briefly raised, he most certainly would have made the cut. At 39, Gillum is one of Tallahassee’s youngest mayor. The Florida A&M University graduate has established a lengthy political career stretching back to his college days—first serving as president of FAMU’s Student Government

Association, then becoming Tallahassee’s youngest city councilman before garnering the trust of Tallahassee voters to lead City Hall. Now Gillum is revving up for the political fight of his life as Florida’s Democratic nominee for governor. And he doesn’t even turn 40 until next July. Gillum isn’t the only standout missing from the list. Broward College President Gregory Haile is 40. However, he was just featured on the cover of Legacy South Florida’s last issue honoring Top Black Educators. It’s worth noting that Haile graciously hosted Legacy’s awards reception for educators at Broward College’s main campus in Davie. For that, we thank him for his generosity (see photos on page 21). Another 40-year-old standout who could have made the list is the University of Miami’s Dr. Ryan Holmes. But UM’s dean of students just recently graced the cover of Legacy Miami’s “Education” issue, where he discussed his

unconventional rise from music artist to university administrator. Their absence makes room for 40 other young professionals who deserve to be recognized for their outstanding professional accomplishments and community involvement. This year’s honorees reflect the drive, commitment and passion that make South Florida great. Their creativity, vision, and passion enrich our region. We look forward to honoring them all at Legacy’s 40 Under 40 Awards event on Oct. 14 at the Miramar Cultural Center. For more than a decade, Legacy has awarded hundreds of young artists, entrepreneurs, doctors, educators, nonprofit executives, public figures, business leaders, behind-the-scenes contributors, to name few. It is my pleasure to honor the movers and shakers who help expand our view of what it means to shape our future.

Russell Motley

Editor-in-Chief, Legacy Magazine rm@miamediagrp.com

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine #BeInformed #BeInfluential #Legacy40under40 CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS "The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and na�onal antagonisms when it accords to every person, regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Ha�ng no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back."

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Zach Rinkins Editor-at-Large

Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor Shannel Escoffery Associate Editor Md Shahidullah Art Director


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Legacy Florida’s 40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow for 2018

Maurad Ali Chef Clas Lux Group

Desiree Banton Registered Nurse/Teacher Memorial Healthcare System/ Broward County School Board

Zedrick Barber, II A�orney The Barber Firm, LLC

Richard Belizaire Educator Dillard 6-12 / Broward County Schools

Carl Bri�on, Jr. Health and Fitness Coach BS, Diete�cs and Nutri�on Orange Theory Fitness

Yanique Bryan Educator Broward County Public Schools

Samantha Bryant News Reporter WPLG Local 10

Charlton Bu�s, O.D. Optometrist Eye Associates of Boca Raton

Brandon Campbell A�orney Schouest, Bamdas, Soshea & BenMaier, PLLC

Kweyah Cook Audit & Controls Manager United Technologies - O�s Elevator Company

Nicole Cummings Peterkin Engineering Program Manager Aerojet Rocketdyne

Lamara Davis CEO / Crea�ve Director Ainkas Jewels

Jervonte Edmonds

CEO Suits For Seniors

Beethovan Francois CEO & Founder Kafe Hub

Claims Specialist State Farm

Brandon Franklin

Tayson Gaines, Esq. A�orney at Law The Gaines Firm

Sayan Graham, ARNP Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner Body Details

Arri Henry Mon�gus Jackson Creative Director/ Founder CEO/ Licensed Mental Health The Westside Gazette Newspaper / Counselor @keepahappyhome Star�ng Pointe Counseling Services, LLC

Daneweise Jean-Joseph Execu�ve Director Dana Jay Professional Services

Grant Johnson Financial Advisor Merrill Lynch

Karla Mar�nez Admissions Manager Vitas Healthcare

Nike�e Neal, MD

Ebony Pardo District Senior Execu�ve Secretary State of Florida - House Of Representa�ves (District 94)

Wesley Po�s Owner From Green to Greener Inc

Manager, Digital Storytelling The Palm Beach Post

Samantha Ragland, M.A.

Chrissi-Lee Ramsey, M.S, EnvE Nuclear Chemistry Analyst Florida Power & Light

Bri�any C. Ross, M.Ed. Founder & CEO PriorityEd!, LLC

Daphnee Sainvil, J.D., LL.M. Legisla�ve Coordinator Broward County Board of County Commissioners

Quakish Williams Liner, M.S. District Director Broward College

Jessica Williams Publicist/Marke�ng Director /Blogger/Event Planner SouthPromo.com

Associate Mathema�cs Professor Broward College

Kyla Williams, PhD

Jeneca Willis, MBA Vice President - Dealer Finance Manager BB&T

Telena Paris, M.S. CEO Write Choice Consul�ng Firm

Jean Paul, Esq. CEO JP CONSULTING GROUP1

Ebony Daniels Sanon Director of Business Development BioTeknica, Inc.

Jessica Kelly Silverio CEO & Director Natú & SISTUHS, Incorporated

Jibrielle Polite

Execu�ve Director Women of Color Empowerment Ins�tute, Inc.

Daphne Snell, BAS, CPT Owner Trinity Eleva�on, LLC

Andrea Thompson

Instructor and Program Coordinator for the Office of Undergraduate Research and Inquiry at Florida Atlantic University, Founder and CEO of Brown Skin Lovin LLC Florida Atlantic University and Brown Skin Lovin LLC

Pediatrician, Course Director, Physician Educator, and Director of Interprofessional Collabora�on Pediatric Associates and Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Allopathic Medicine


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Great leaders inspire us In every community, there are people who can inspire others to work for positive change. Legacy 40 under 40 recipients, it’s an honor to recognize you. wellsfargo.com

© 2018 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. IHA-23318_A2

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EDUCATION

Student Safety Top Priority for Broward County Public Schools

By Ann Marie Sorrell

Our district and our entire community are forever changed by the tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. As we approach the start of the 2018/2019 school year, we remain focused on building strength as a community and finding ways to heal together. Over the past few months, the district has worked with employees, parents and community partners to reinforce and enhance safety practices across all school campuses. The safety and security of our students and employees is paramount and we are leveraging a variety of resources to support our efforts in this area. This critical work is ongoing. Across Broward County Public Schools, our teachers, administrators and staff work hard every day to provide all

students with safe, secure, and innovative educational environments. We encourage parents and families to remind their children – if you see something, say something. Information and tips can be shared anonymously in the following ways: • Call 754-321-0911 • Email school911@browardschools.com • Text CRIMES or 274637 – the message must begin with SBBC • Submit online via broward.k12.fl.us /siu/siunew/tipsemail.asp I am extremely proud of the work we are doing in our schools to support our students and help them reach their highest potential. We are engaging young minds to master logical thinking, preparing students for college and careers, closing achievement gaps and collaborating with the community about educational priorities. BCPS provides a wide variety of programs to meet students’ interests and help them develop a lifelong love of learning. We are motivating them to learn and excel with award-winning

magnet and innovative programs, dual language programs to promote biliteracy, computer science opportunities at every school, and chess for second grade students to develop their critical thinking skills. In addition, BCPS offers the largest debate and JROTC programs in the country, opportunities for students to earn industry certifications, advanced academic programs allowing students to earn college credits, virtual education options, award-winning music and arts programs, and outstanding athletic programs. Our district’s commitment to excellence in education establishes an infrastructure that supports family, student and community engagement efforts. Parent and family engagement plays a crucial role in a student’s academic success. Through the BCPS Office of Family and Community Engagement, the district works to strengthen the home-family-school connection by supporting and assisting parents with ways they can help their

children achieve academic success. FACE implements innovative practices for parents and families at the school level and across Broward County through initiatives such as Community Connections, collaboration between BCPS and local organizations that provides workshops, training courses, and other learning opportunities for families. These learning experiences are designed to promote academic achievement, enhance parenting and advocacy skills, and provide families with the tools they need to grow. I encourage you to explore all that Broward County Public Schools has to offer, and to get involved in the many school and district programs that take place throughout the year. You can also learn more by visiting our website, browardschools.com. Thank you for partnering with us in your child’s education. Every child has a gift for the world. Let’s continue working together to help them unwrap it.

THE BAUGHTOM LINE By Germaine Smith-Baugh, Ed.D. Look around. Our world is changing, and changing fast due to technology advances in education, medicine, transportation, communication, and so much else. Yet change isn’t always making us better. We need healthy, effective leaders to provide direction. It’s an issue the World Economic Forum has noted many times in recent years, finding a global crisis of confidence in leadership. Our society isn’t moving fast enough away from leadership based on command and control, short-term thinking and aggression to one that is in tune with relating and empowering, sustainable thinking, and collaboration.

Young Professionals Needed to Lead Change More young professionals are needed to speed up this transformation. Almost one half of the world’s population is 21 years old or younger. This means that three to four billion young people are in need of being developed. Ready or not, they will lead our world into the future. So companies, organizations, and governments have to encourage more young professionals to step up and take initiative to lead. And we need a diversity of young professionals that represent the makeup of our communities. Thankfully, this is already happening across the nation and in Broward County. There are many talented, young professionals who have achieved extraordinary things in their careers, while also making tremendous impact in our region. Some of them are connected to the Urban League of Broward County Young Professionals Network, which cultivates young professionals to take an

active role in serving and empowering Broward County's urban communities. One of these local professionals is attorney Gregory Adam Haile who has become the seventh president of Broward College. The Urban League of Broward County, along with Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity and Broward Black Elected Officials, recently held a reception for him. Haile, who is 40 and AfricanAmerican, was chosen from a field of more than 50 applicants because of his knowledge of the community, successful work with the college, and passion for education. He’s been Broward College’s general counsel and vice president for public policy and government affairs for the past seven years. In thanking the college for appointing him, Haile said in the Sun-Sentinel: “I know the passion that each of you has for Broward College, and

with that in mind, it means everything to me to know that you decided that I could be the person to help lead this institution and to continue the great things that have been done.” Our world needs a new batch of problem solvers like Mr. Haile. In the next 15 years or so, close to 45 percent of the workforce in the U.S. will be departing mostly due to Baby Boomers retiring. These vacancies must be filled by young professionals who can harness the power of technology to create culture-shaping changes that will make our world a better place for all. The Baughtom Line is this: Youth leadership is no longer nice to have – it’s an imperative. Today’s young professionals need to get involved. They need to take charge.


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ENTREPRENEUR

Serial Entrepreneur Aims to Inspire Black Men to ‘Go Out and Get It’ By Zach Rinkins Upon meeting serial entrepreneur Beethovens Francois, you might ascertain he’s not your run-of-the-mill capitalist. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor suggests the average business fails within two years, this 38 year old’s four successful enterprises, based in Palm Beach and Broward counties, are proof that he’s not your average business owner. The proud Haiti-native says his community motivates him. “I am inspired by turning nothing into something,” he asserted. “Growing up in a hard-working Haitian family, I knew I wanted more for myself, my family and my community,” said Francois, who grew up in Connecticut. "My parents worked hard to put us through Catholic schools. But I am hungry and I am never comfortable with the status quo. I love the grind and the hustle." Not satisfied with solely cultivating his own business success, Francois launched Kafe Hub, a 4,800-square-foot coffee bar and co-working space, to serve java and provide growing firms with office and support services. Additionally, he operates Sterling Event Hall, Crisp Eatery and Bar, as well as two publications. He is most proud of creating jobs for nearly 30 employees. "Black-owned businesses are very important to the Black community,” said Francois. “I put my money where my mouth is. We cannot talk about it. We must invest in it.” Whether it’s his coffee shop, entertainment, or dining enterprises, Francois subscribes to a customeroriented philosophy. “My brand equity is always making the customer feel like family and like they are walking into their home,” he shared. “It’s all about creating an experience. We don't give food. We serve food. It is all about the feeling you get when you walk in the door. " Francois concedes that managing his business, personal, and family obligations are very challenging. “I never know what my day-to-day is going to look like,” he admitted. “The

Beethoven Francois, standing in his restaurant Kafe Hub, is a serial entrepreneur committed to economically empowering is the community. other day, I was implementing a new system to make the company better, and today I was working on a gas line. But consistency plus commitment equals success.” Francois maintains that faith and purpose are the competitive advantages of all successful business owners. “Faith and purpose are the most qualities an entrepreneur can have,” he revealed. “Once you are connected with your purpose and controlled by your faith, nothing is impossible and you are unstoppable because your faith will keep you going.” Francois said the one thing he looks for before starting a venture is his ability to contribute to its growth. “A business is only attractive to me if I can add something to it,” he said. “I

don’t want to be involved with any business where I bring nothing to the table.” For people thinking about going into business for themselves, he encouraged them to look to their community for inspiration. “I am all about the development of my community,” shared Francois, who also launched Good News Riviera Beach and The Taste of Singer Island magazines. “I decided to create businesses that promote our development and the great things people are doing in our community.” Francois concluded, “I just want to inspire more Black men to go out and get it.” Log on to kafehub.com for more information about Francois’ restaurant.

Kafe Hubs' waffle ice cream sandwich.

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BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Collaboration and Mentorship Can Strengthen Small Firms By Gary Hartfield MiamiDade County aims to provide its local businesses with access to various avenues of opportunity for growth. It is well known that small businesses sometimes face challenges with accessing resources, managing financial risks when embarking on new endeavors, and maintaining sufficient cash flow. Being able to partner with other companies can reduce and even eliminate some of these obstacles. In addition to its Small Business Enterprise Certification Programs, the County permits collaborations that allow companies to join together to share insight, pool resources, and increase capacity. These collaborations include joint venture agreements and participation in the Mentor-Protégé

Program. A joint venture is a business arrangement of two or more parties, in which at least one is a certified SBE that agrees to pool its resources for the purpose of accomplishing a specific task and is registered with Small Business Development. Companies that create a lawfully established joint venture can combine their property, finances, and expertise under a separate legal entity and compete for opportunities that may have been less obtainable for their independent businesses. Joint ventures can participate under the SBE program on contracts with set-asides, subcontractor goals, bid preferences, and selection factors. Qualification as a joint venture requires a written joint venture agreement that must be completed by all parties, executed before a notary public, and which clearly delineates the rights and responsibilities of each member or partner with a time commitment

that lasts, at a minimum, for the duration of the project. Joint ventures also receive bid preferences or selection factors depending on the percentage of ownership that is allocated to the certified SBE. This option is just one way smaller firms can team up with other businesses to gain a competitive edge. Similarly, the county seeks to foster relationships between established companies and local developing small businesses through its Mentor-Protégé Program. In this program, experienced mentor companies can share insights and knowledge with smaller protégés while improving the county’s overall business and economic climate. Mentor companies will assist with the development of these smaller firms’ business plans by targeting their most critical needs and implementing plans of action for achievement of identified goals. In addition to major companies and small business enterprises, the program

will involve financial and bonding institutions, contracting associations, and support service organizations in the effort to mitigate the obstacles that limit the success of small businesses. The goal is to promote growth, profitability, and long-range stability for the protégé companies, but mentoring firms will also benefit. Mentors who complete the commitment period of one year will be eligible for an incentive on bidding on Miami-Dade County contracts for one year after completion of the commitment period. Overall, these initiatives are designed to develop and strengthen smaller businesses through partnership, optimize opportunities for these companies, and improve the economic landscape for all businesses. Leveraging experience, sharing resources, and having greater access to needed information is sure to bolster our small businesses and our local economy.

SPECIAL TO LEGACY

Another Under-40 Milestone: Advance Planning for Your End-of-Life Care By Donna Borland This issue of Legacy showcases South Florida individuals who have made their mark and achieved success before the age of 40. Not only is middle adulthood the perfect juncture to focus on your life and career accomplishments, it is also the ideal time to have serious conversations with family members, doctors, faith leaders and others about your plans for the remaining decades of life. In the hospice and palliative care professions, those conversations are called Advance Care Planning, marked by honest and goal-oriented discussions about the care you want – and do not want – if you are ever diagnosed with a

life-limiting illness, seriously injured, or unable to speak for yourself. Make Decisions Now About The Next Critical Decades Even for people in their 30s, 40s and 50s, these ACP discussions are never too early, given the real-world implications of injury or illness from chronic diseases, motor vehicle accidents, even gun-related violence and the stresses of the “sandwich generation.” According to the Pew Research Center, nearly half (47 percent) of U.S. adults are responsible for multiple generations – sandwiched between raising their own families and caring for aging parents, while pursuing their own careers. VITAS® Healthcare, the nation’s leading provider of end-of-life care and the first licensed hospice provider in Florida, is uniquely positioned to offer ACP guidance, expertise, and the

necessary documents (e.g., a living will) for families and individuals to put into writing their preferences for care at the end of life. ACP addresses such questions as: • Do you (or your aging parents) want doctors to exhaust all efforts to prolong life, even when curative treatments are no longer effective? Or is the quality of life at the end a better option? • Do you (or your loved ones) want to be kept alive by artificial means (e.g., respirator, feeding tubes), or is dying in the comfort of home, supported by family, friends and an expert hospice team a more suitable alternative? • VITAS professionals can also reassure individuals and families about what compassionate hospice care involves: a focus on comfort, calm, symptom management, pain relief and quality of life at the end of life.

Having the conversation while you are able is a far better alternative than leaving difficult decisions to family members, caregivers or medical teams who do not know your values and preferences or who must make choices under distress or in an emergency. Indeed, one of life’s most difficult conversations might also be the most rewarding, especially if it is initiated now, during a stage in life that is marked by the milestones of success, not crisis. For more information about hospice care or end-of-life care options, call VITAS Healthcare at 866.759.6695 or visit VITAS.com. Donna Borland is general manager of VITAS Healthcare in Broward County.


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Nurse. Manager. Hospice Advocate. Problem-Solver. Volunteer. Mom.

40 Under 40 Winner. For all you do. For all you inspire. For all you stand for.

Karla Martinez, from all 11,913 of your VITAS colleagues.

SINCE 1980

YEARS OF CA RIN G

800.723.3233 • VITAS.com

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

BROWARD BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Celebrating Young Professionals’ Accomplishments Reduces Community Brain Drain By Shaheewa Jarrett, Esq.

For several years, the brain drain has been a hot topic in South Florida. Many might assume that the sunny weather and sandy beaches are enough for young professionals to flock to the area or come back home after college. However, there are many factors that recent graduates and young professionals consider when they determine where to live. Job prospects, salary, cost of housing, quality public education, and transportation are among the factors that can pull a young person to live in a certain region. In truth, South Florida has struggled in these critical areas. Florida consistently falls at the bottom of the list with regard

to its K-12 public education, according to U.S. News and other reports. The cost of housing is steadily rising and South Florida is one of the most expensive places to live in the nation. Add the cost of transportation, because the public transit system is unreliable, and the area becomes less attractive than larger cities with well-organized mass transit systems that include buses and trains. It then becomes clear why it is difficult to attract companies that will create the jobs of the future, because without a solid public school system, affordable housing, and quality mass transit system that moves people easily around the region, companies know they will have a hard time recruiting talent to the area. In this context, it is imperative that we celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of our young professionals who stay. It is our duty to mentor, train,

and connect them to the resources and people that will allow them to blossom into the future leaders and business owners our region will need. Collectively, we have to invite them in and include these young professionals in the conversation to help us come up with solutions to these problems. They can provide insight into attracting their peers. We have to engage them in the political process so they understand the system and then work to make it better. Once we launch on August 13, 2018, the Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce will create a space in this county to help our young professionals grow, learn, and give back to the community. We will welcome their innovative ideas and we will connect them with opportunities to change their communities for the better. So, we congratulate all of the young professionals who were recognized by

Legacy South Florida. You should be honored for your achievements, but at the same time, the chamber issues a challenge for you to dig deep, show up, and get active to help us develop a county and a region that will make the brain drain conversation a thing of the past. Visit www.browardcountyblackchamberofcommerce.comfor information about the Chamber’s Candidate Meet & Greet, the Chamber Launch, and other upcoming events. You can also keep up with the Chamber through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Shaheewa Jarrett Gelin, Esq. is founder of the Broward County Black Chamber of Commerce: www.BrowardCountyBlackChamberOfCommerce.com info@BrowardCountyBlackChamberofCommerce.com

POLITICS

The ‘Anonymous Nobodies’ Appear as Gillum Campaigns for Florida Governor By Chris Norwood

I've known Andrew Gillum professionally for over 15 years. We worked together when I served as the Florida Deputy Director for People for the American Way Foundation (PFAW), a national civil rights organization founded in 1980 by Norman Lear and Barbara Jordan to fight the Christian Right agenda of the Moral Majority. Andrew was running the National Youth Engagement Programs for PFAW from our Tallahassee office when we met and, at the time, he had been recently elected to the city council while still a FAMU student. For the past year, people have wondered whether a small city mayor from a college town could win the Democratic nomination for governor. The questions were all the same: can he

raise the money necessary? Is he too left of center? Would Florida Democrats vote for an African American? Those questions loomed large for traditional Democratic donors, politicos and others. Luckily these folks don't move votes. “Florida Insider Poll” is produced by the Tampa Bay Times and includes more than 220 campaign operatives, lobbyists, money-raisers and assorted other veterans of Florida politics. It predicted Gwen Graham to win (80 percent), and only 5 percent of them predicted Andrew Gillum to win. Meanwhile, in the real world, those who knew Andrew knew better. We knew those 517,863 “Anonymous Nobodies” who voted for Gillum and shocked the pollsters and the politicos. My response to those who wondered about his viability was simple: “Under what scenario do nearly 30 percent of the Florida Democratic Voters who are African-American not vote for the most qualified candidate in the Democratic primary, who has more public service

than the other candidates combined twice over? Who happens to be African American himself (with a beautiful family), in a crowded primary where someone with less than 35 percent of the vote can win the primary?” Gillum won the Florida Democratic Primary with 34 percent of the vote. As the Gillum campaign tent widens, my hope is that Andrew never forgets the Anonymous Nobody. He should never forget that when the Sun Sentinel endorsed Jeff Greene, the Anonymous Nobodies didn't know and didn't care and gave him victory in Broward (40 percent). When the Miami Herald endorsed Philip Levine, the Anonymous Nobodies gave him victory in Dade County (40 percent). When the Tampa Bay Tribune and Palm Beach Post endorsed Gwen Graham, the anonymous nobodies gave you victory in Hillsborough (40 percent) and Palm Beach (30 percent). When the Florida Education Association endorsed Gwen Graham and called her “the public

education dream candidate...an easy choice for anyone concerned about Florida's schools,” despite Gillum's call for $50,000 starting salary for teachers (and a mechanism to pay for it), the Anonymous Nobodies didn't know who the FEA was and didn't care. Gillum's campaign brought many of my friends together organically to volunteer, a selfless group of all backgrounds and shades. They came together and asked “why not stand on our values and get behind a Democratic candidate for governor that isn't shy about being a Democrat?” They bucked the prevailing ethos of middle of the road Democratic nominees. The great philosopher Dave Jolicoeur (aka Trugoy the Dove) once said “the anonymous nobody is the person who doesn't need to say 'I was part of it' just an everyday person who just wants to contribute.” Andrew Gillum will #BringItHome in November by standing with and fighting for the Anonymous Nobodies that are showing the nation what People for the American Way truly means.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

COVER STORY By Zach Rinkins

Presenting South Florida’s Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow

Whether they are informing viewers about the small screen or mixing it up in a gourmet kitchen, the members of Legacy South Florida’s 2018 class of “40 Under 40 Black Leaders of Today and Tomorrow,” have one thing in common – they are gaining ground in their vocations and contributing to their communities. Legacy received recommendations for young people age 40 and younger who have established themselves as leaders or who have the potential to create an impact in the region. After assessing hundreds of candidates, a steering committee of area leaders and former honorees selected the crème de la crème. Among them are health care providers, attorneys, various professionals, entrepreneurs and even rocket scientists. You may have seen our youngest honoree Samantha Bryant reporting breaking-news stories for Local 10 News. The 21-year-old television reporter

studies neuroscience and metaphysics, and trades foreign currency in her spare time. “My job as a journalist allows me to contribute to the expansion and evolution of my hometown by digging for the facts and bringing them to television every day,” said Bryant, a Miami Gardens native. Conversely, four honorees made the listing during their last eligible year. Forty-year-old chef Maurad Ali of Class Lux Group is a father of six children and favors bologna sandwiches. His granddaughter, however, frequently asks him to cook black beans and rice. Outside of his family, Ali takes pride in, “Serving tonight’s clients.” The equally impressive Nicole Cummings Peterkin is an engineering program manager for Aerojet Rocketdyne. The 40-year-old engineer’s team designs rocket engines for clients such as United Launch

Alliance, U.S. Air Force, and NASA. “My career started in ninth grade as a member of the STEM-oriented SECME program,” said Peterkin, who holds a private pilot’s license. “My high school teacher put me in the engineering club and I started winning contests. Florida Atlantic University saw my work and offered me a scholarship.” Peterkin, who also hosts Sophisticated Out Loud, a Palm Beach

WHEN I GROW UP, I WANT TO BE A PHILANTHROPIST AND DONATE AS MUCH MONEY AS POSSIBLE TO PROMOTE THE WELFARE OF OTHERS. - Ebony Daniels Sanon

County-based showcase for minority-owned businesses, said the key to success is, “Sticking it out and having tough skin.” While Black women make up less than 4 percent of the county’s rocket scientists, Legacy’s current class boasts two (5 percent) female rocket scientists. Quadragenarian Ebony Daniels Sanon, a former NASA engineer, launched her own luxury purse line and set her sights towards charity. “When I grow up, I want to be a philanthropist and donate as much money as possible to promote the welfare of others,” said Sanon, who serves as director of Business Development for BioTeknica, Inc. While their interests and professions differ, these honorees all have proven their dedication to excellence and philanthropy. These recipients are a snapshot of the leadership that will take us into the next decades.


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

MILLENNIAL

Electing Gillum as Florida Governor Will Create More Equity for More People

By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw

Across this country, with midterm elections looming dangerously near, we are at pivotal political crossroads. For the past 20 years in Florida, we have been living under a Republican governor, and Republican majorities in the House of Representatives and Senate. This has meant: constant attacks on reproductive rights, bigoted legislation against undocumented immigrants, draining affordable housing trust funds, refusing to prioritize education, and a failing criminal “justice” system, all enacted by a government that is in no way representative of the demographics of this state. Simply put, there is too much at stake.

After an historic midterm election, we have an opportunity to turn the tides for our state this November. In an interview with gubernatorial candidate, Andrew Gillum, the current mayor of Tallahassee said he hopes to change history as the first Black governor of Florida, proving that money doesn’t vote, the people do. Every year, Legacy Magazine honors the top 40 South Florida leaders under 40 years old. Mayor Gillum just recently celebrated his 39th birthday while on the campaign trail, and earns an honorable mention for “40 Under 40.” Gillum has a long career of political engagement that began with his election to the Tallahassee city commission at just 23. Since then, he has been working to build equity for the residents of Tallahassee through early childhood education programs, building more opportunities for minority owned business, and ensuring businesses create

family-friendly workplaces. And when elected in November, he plans to bring that equity to the governor’s mansion. Gillum has chosen radical progressivism, calling for: the abolition of Immigration and Custom Enforcement, and a repeal of Stand Your Ground. He has also made it clear that he is not ignorant about the lack of equity that blankets this state, which for him makes the experiences of women of color a priority. He acknowledged that while this state possesses many women with brilliant ideas, “There are systems that suppress the potential of women, specifically women of color.” As mayor, he said he has been working to “pursue public policy that expands and creates greater opportunity for women and girls.” He expressed being emotionally close to his praying Black grandmother; being the child of a hardworking Black mother; being married to an “extremely

capable, individually brilliant” Black women; and being father to a beautiful Black daughter. “If we don’t have a governor that understands the plight of women, the future will not be bright for them,” he shared. “Women ought to make their own reproductive decisions,” and work at businesses that honor the labor of parenting. Gillum has the personal experiences to lead this state in a progressive direction that will guarantee more equity for more people. On Nov. 6, make civic engagement a community affair, and vote for equity and progress. Make sure to complete the entire ballot to the end. Jasmen Rogers-Shaw is a community organizer in South Florida, focusing on issues of racial and gender justice. Email: jasmen.m.rogers@gmail.com IG: @thebeautyofthesoul Twitter: @beautyofthesoul

TECHNOLOGY

Protecting Your Email Account Safeguards Your Identity and Livelihood By Kevin Michael

Lately, the word ‘cybersecurity’ has been swept into the national conversation. While cybersecurity is a vast and technical topic, it consists of all the practices and tools that allow us to keep data safeguarded from third parties that are not authorized to access it. Imagine if someone had access to the private records of your clients, knew every chat conversation you had online, or knew your banking information without your knowledge. The use or disclosure of this information could be devastating to you or your business. There are a host of good security practices such as using complex passwords, utilizing a password manager, and having antivirus software, but one of the most overlooked ways to keep your digital assets safe is to protect your email

account. For most of us, our email account represents the single largest goldmine of information about our lives. Bank accounts, social security numbers, where we shop, what online systems we use, and our next airline flight are all pieces of information found in the average person’s email account. This is why today’s biggest online threat comes from hackers who are desperate to gain access to your inbox. It might be easy to think that hackers have magical methods that allow them to gain access to your account, but the overwhelming majority of successful email account breaches are done through phishing. In simple terms, phishing is a tactic used by hackers to coerce you into voluntarily disclosing your account username and password. The process of phishing starts with you receiving a seemingly legitimate email from a company or person you know that invites you access some information that has been shared with

you. After clicking on a link from this email you are then prompted to sign into a system that you’re familiar with (i.e. Gmail, Online Banking, etc). Everything appears normal so you proceed. Unknowingly, you’ve just signed into a fake website and given your password over to the hackers. Within minutes, your email account is breached and the hackers begin to dig through your inbox

IT MIGHT BE EASY TO THINK THAT HACKERS HAVE MAGICAL METHODS THAT ALLOW THEM TO GAIN ACCESS TO YOUR ACCOUNT, BUT THE OVERWHELMING MAJORITY OF SUCCESSFUL EMAIL ACCOUNT BREACHES ARE DONE THROUGH PHISHING.

for information that can be used to steal your identity, initiate financial transactions or dupe your contacts into also being phished. To guard against this type of attack, there is a simple and effective strategy to protect your inbox from the persistence of hackers; Multi-Factor Authentication. MFA is a way for you to safely sign in to online systems while keeping the hackers out. The most familiar version of MFA is after entering a valid password you are then prompted to enter a code that has been texted to your phone. This requirement significantly drops the risk that your account can be compromised by a hacker. Even though they may have your password they certainly don’t have your phone. My suggestion: enable MFA on every online system you use. Trust me, it’s worth the hassle. Kevin V. Michael is the co-founder & Managing Partner of Invizio, a South Florida IT support and management firm.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

BROWARD CRA By Leslie Anne Frye-Thomas

Clarence Woods is Fort Lauderdale’s newest manager for Northwest Progresso Flagler Heights Community Redevelopment Agency. “What I do is serve the community,” said Woods. “I love South Florida and I can’t tell you how fulfilling it is to put my imprint on the way it grows.” As Fort Lauderdale’s newest CRA manager, it is Woods’ responsibility to ensure that the Community Redevelopment Agencies he manages use strategic community development efforts

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New Leadership at Broward CRA

Clarence Woods Talks Passion, Purpose, and Public Service to not only “eliminate slum and blighted conditions,” but to drastically improve them. Barely at the helm for a week, Woods was already gearing up for his first advisory board meeting. Although he’s new to Fort Lauderdale, Woods is a native Miamian with a long track record of success as well as an arsenal of fresh ideas aimed at transforming the community. Prior to his current managerial role, Woods worked as Senior Advisor of Economic Development and Housing under Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones. Woods was then promoted to Assistant Director of all three Miami CRA’s, which covered Overtown, Park West, Midtown and Omni Community Redevelopment. That was followed by a

five-year stint as its executive director. In total, the public servant has nearly 19 years working on behalf of the city of Miami and admits, “I felt like it was my calling to work in a city where I was born and raised.” During his tenure, Woods welcomed job training programs, more affordable housing, new businesses and improved parks and recreational facilities in Overtown. Woods envisions a community where he said “public services exceed the needs of its residents.” This includes the creation of vibrant, state of the art spaces for people of all ages to enjoy. According to Woods, his “passion and purpose is to benefit the people who are here long term.” Safe, clean, affordable housing and proper office

spaces is a great start, but Woods said he believes that welcoming new businesses will help stimulate job growth and enable neighborhoods to thrive. While Woods respects legacy organizations, he is a proponent of “socially conscious community partnering” and insists that it is possible for businesses to do right by their bottom line while benefiting the community at large. Woods said he believes it’s critically important that Fort Lauderdale residents help determine the future of their communities, which is why he invites citizens to become civically engaged by attending CRA meetings, visiting his office or contacting him at 954-828-4548.

Legacy Magazine's 25 Most Influential and

Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry

NOMINATE SOMEONE TODAY Click on link to Nominate Deadline: October 12th https://bit.ly/2hOrn2w


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SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

I got my start in the online world as a YouTube Beauty Blogger. My first video was of me on my bathroom floor, talking about a flat iron. Humble beginnings, I know. More than 400 videos and 3 million video views later, I proudly say that one video changed the course of my whole life. Each year YouTube holds a Next Up Contest where the company spends five days mentoring contest winners. I received an email directly from YouTube encouraging me to apply because, this year, they are specifically looking for Black and Latino content creators. One of the questions I was asked was: “Do you think Black voices matter on YouTube?” In short, yes.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

Black Voices Matter on YouTube Historically, black voices have been underrepresented in virtually every industry in America. In most sectors from education, enterprise, to entertainment, the black community's contribution has been significantly marginalized. But platforms like YouTube, that are cost effective with a low barrier to entry, allow for anyone to participate and be successful at it. More than 5 billion videos are being watched every single day. Thusly, I highly encourage all black leaders with power and influence to use the platform as a means to share their message to the masses. Secondly, young African-American children need to see this successful representation sooner rather than later. In May, I spoke at career day at a local South Florida elementary school. None of them knew what I did for a living. Before I started my talk, I made each one stand up, say their name, and state what

they wanted to be when they grew up. There were the traditional responses of NFL player, fireman, and the like. But something unexpected was brought to my attention. Out of more than 130 fifth graders, 35 percent wanted to be YouTubers. That percentage was higher than any other "industry" or career choice in the room. It even outweighed the conventional doctor-lawyer type responses. More importantly, this school was roughly 85 percent Black. Statistics show that kids don’t watch TV as much anymore. Instead they are watching YouTube where children’s channels are quite successful. So, these fifth graders, and millions of other children across the country are seeing their peers’ success and naturally want to imitate it. While I don’t necessarily recommend every child be given free reign of the Internet, it would be irresponsible not to

take note of society’s trajectory. The youth of today are seeing YouTube as a viable career option, and with good reason. Studies show that traditional job markets will cease to exist in the next 20-30 years. Therefore, they will need to have other choices. They also need to see those choices exemplified in a successful manner. The more positive black voices on YouTube, the better for the community, our enterprises, and our future. Dr. Tracy Timberlake is a coach, speaker, and digital strategist. Her area of expertise is in digital leadership and online entrepreneurship. Email: tracy@tracytimberlakeonline.com Instagram: @tracytimberlake YouTube: youtube.com/tracytimberlake Facebook: facebook.com/drtracytimberlake

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

The 6 Principles of Influence: The Psychology of Negotiation & Persuasion By Stanley Zamor

“…For over 60 years researchers have been studying the factors that influence us to say “yes”…. It is undeniable and surprising that there is a science behind decision-making and what persuades and influences people…There are six universal principles that are shortcuts that can guide how we influence others and make decisions…” — Dr. Robert Cialdini Real-Life and True Negotiation: David vs. Goliath It was the classic David versus Goliath mediation. Big Company X (Goliath) entered the room with its litigation and negotiation team and boxes of demonstrative aids. While the plaintiff walked in with her lawyer and an associate. There was an obvious power imbalance in the room.

As the six-hour mediation unfolded, the balance throughout the negotiations were ebbed and flowed. The intimidation tactics and the strategic negotiating of Big Company X didn’t seem to work. A mutually acceptable agreement was eventually executed, and all the parties seemed satisfied. Question: How did David maintain balance and ultimately negotiate better than anticipated? As I casually spoke with the plaintiff’s attorney said to him, “I found it interesting how you negotiated throughout the mediation.” He smiled then stated, “I attribute how I negotiate to certain principles of influence that I learned from reading Dr. Robert Cialdini’s book, ‘Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.’” Dr. Cialdini’s Six Principles Include: 1. Reciprocity Think of this as the principle of “you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” If

you make someone feel you’ve done something nice for them, they in turn should do something nice (a favor) for you. 2. Scarcity Simply put, people want more of the things that they can have less of. Or people who negotiate from a position of “plenty” negotiate differently from a position of having “less-than” (i.e. scarcity). 3. Authority This is the idea that people follow the lead of credible, knowledgeable experts. 4. Consistency People like to be consistent with the things they have previously said or done. When negotiating and offering small concessions people have a self-image, that once presented with an idea or appeal that fits their own self-image they are likely to convert and agree. 5. Liking People prefer to say “Yes” to people they like. We like people who are like us, we like people who pay us compliments, and

we like people who cooperate with us towards mutual goals. 6. Consensus People who are uncertain will look at the behaviors of others to determine, “legitimize,” their own behavior. So, there you are – six scientifically based principles of persuasion that often require small, costless approaches yet often yield big decision-making results. Stanley Zamoris a Florida Supreme Court Certified circuit/family/county mediator, primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/arbitration rosters and has a private mediation and ADR consulting company. He regularly lectures about a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, bullying, and family/business relationships. szamor@effectivemediationconsultants.com www. effectivemediationconsultants.com www.LinkedIn.com/in/stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600


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ENTREPRENEUR

Failure Is Not An Option For Burgeoning Jewelry Entrepreneur By Michelle F. Solomon Lamara Davis loves that her online jewelry business has grown so much in the past five years that she has been able to quit her full-time corporate America job and devote her skills and passion to Ainkas Jewels. But the road wasn't always paved with diamonds. Davis said it was when she was pregnant with her son that she realized that dreaming about being an entrepreneur was no longer an option. And, so Ainkas Jewels was born, along with Kyan, who is now 5. "The money was good at my job, but I was starved for time. I realized then that I couldn't live my life like this, and if I wanted to be the mom I wanted to be, I had to pursue my own business." Through some trial and error – Davis confides that when she stopped trying to be "on trend" and create a line that was authentic to what she would wear – things began to take shape. "I was a single mom living at home with my parents. I was trying to make ends meet, but it wasn't until last year when I changed my model that things started to shift. Initially I was caught up in what was trending and things like that, but then I decided I was just going to do 100 percent me."

Lamara Davis is founder and CEO of Ainkas Jewels, an online jewelry company based in West Palm Beach, dedicated to women of color.

Her pieces, she says, are meant to be classic, yet contemporary, simple yet edgy. "As women of color, we have that edge to us. We'll take a basic polo shirt and, well, it won't end up being just a polo shirt. We tuck it in, we add something to it, we flair it up." She describes the collection as, "Chic styling with a hint of fabulosity." While 93 percent of her business comes through Instagram, Davis, whose business is based in West Palm Beach, is quick to say that although customers of Ainkas Jewels may shop online, it is as

personal as any in-store experience. Each purchase is accompanied by a handwritten, thank you note from Davis. She knows her customers’ by names, and can easily recall what they ordered. "I try to implement a clientele approach to the online experience." She admits to being a bit old school, remembering, when high-end boutiques would call customers to notify them that their items were in or to see how they liked purchase. “I think if we can mix in some of these old habits with the new way of

shopping, well, these are the things I am constantly thinking about to bring full throttle to my business." For Davis, the secret to success is a combination of faith and confidence. "I have no choice but to make it, so failure isn't an option for me." The inspiration for the name of her brand is rooted in that mindset as well. She explained, "In Swahili, Ainkas means a woman that is powerful and complete. One that stands out among the rest."


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PALM BEACH REPORT

Palm Beach County Becomes National Leader in Reducing Rate of Black Infant Mortality By Ann Marie Sorrell

Palm Beach County’s Black infant mortality rate hits 20-year low, according to the Children’s Services Council.

With September being Infant Mortality Awareness Month, Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County shared new data that recognizes Palm Beach County as a national leader in reducing the rate of Black infant deaths to a 20-year low. The Black infant mortality rate for Palm Beach County dropped in 2017 to the lowest point in 20 years with 6.0 infant deaths per 1,000 births, which is well below the statewide rate of 10.8. Black infant mortality, for this

calculation, combines Black non-Hispanic and Haitian. The racial disparity gap narrowed from 2.37 in 2016 to 1.58 in 2017, the smallest gap in the past five years. Infant mortality is the death of a child before his or her first birthday. The infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths for every 1,000 live births. In addition to giving key information about maternal and infant health, the infant mortality rate is an important marker of the overall health of a community’s well being. While the drop is noteworthy, racial disparities persist. The infant mortality rate for Black non-Hispanics in 2017 is more than double the rate for White non-Hispanics, and the rates for both Hispanics and Haitians also remain higher than the White non-Hispanic rate. For too long, racial disparities have existed in infant mortality rates. Black babies have a higher mortality rate than non-Hispanic whites and are more likely

to die from complications related to low birth weight and premature birth. Black mothers are more likely to receive late or no prenatal care. CSC developed a comprehensive system of programs to help reduce infant mortality and address racial disparities. These include the Women’s Health Initiative Nurses program that addresses the health and wellness needs of Black women who are either pregnant or have a baby, and the Community Voice program that supports behaviors that promote healthy pregnancies through education and encouraging healthy lifestyles. In addition, CSC has resumed funding of the Fetal Infant Mortality Review through the Florida Institute of Health Innovation. FIMR works to understand how a wide array of social, economic, health, educational, environmental, and safety issues relate to infant deaths, and presents that information to improve community resources.

“Infant mortality is always tragic, both for the family and the community,” said Lisa Williams-Taylor, CEO of Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County. “We hope that the work being done here to emphasize the importance of prenatal care, early doctor visits, reducing stress, and focusing on healthy behaviors will continue to reduce the rates overall and lower the racial disparities.” While we celebrate the rate reduction in Palm Beach County, infant mortality continues to be a major social crisis and health care concern in our state and county. CSC recognizes the importance of designating a month devoted to increasing the public’s awareness that all new parents deserve a healthy, safe, and strong future for their baby. For more information, visit www.cscpbc.org. For more information about racial disparities in birth outcomes, visit CSC’s E-Learning site: http://learning.cscpbc.org/train519/story_html5.html

URBAN LEAGUE OF PALM BEACH COUNTY

Urban League Program Working to Meet Demand for STEM Professionals By Patrick J. Franklin

The data is clear and irrefutable. Underrepresented minorities currently make up 30 percent of our nation’s population (a number projected to reach more than 40 percent by 2050), but in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics field, they are poorly represented with only 12.5 percent earning STEM degrees in 2011. The demand for qualified STEM professionals is high, but the supply is low. Therefore, it is critical that more people from marginalized communities pursue careers in these fields, but that is easier said than done.

Underrepresented minorities traditionally complete high school at lower rates than their peers and tend to score lower on standardized tests, creating real barriers to college admission. For those who gain college admission and major in undergraduate STEM studies, retention-to-graduation rates are comparatively low as well. As a result, STEM employers are faced with a growing shortage of skilled STEM candidates and the STEM workforce does not reflect the diversity of America. The Urban League of Palm Beach County has an active Project Ready STEM program that prepares middle through high school students for college, work, and life with an emphasis on STEM learning and career readiness. Funding was secured to ensure that our kids, who attend underperforming schools in high poverty communities,

receive the best education. The target population for Project Ready STEM is low-income, minority, urban or rural youth enrolled in Title I schools in West Palm Beach, Riviera Beach, and the Glades. Our program is currently working with 50 rising freshmen through their junior year in high school. Project Ready STEM is designed to train a qualified workforce of color to meet the growing needs of the STEM sector labor market. This is especially important for Palm Beach County as the tech corridor continues to grow in Boca Raton and biotech companies at the north end of our county continue to flourish. In order to prepare a diverse population of future workers, we aim to ignite an interest in STEM careers through experiential-learning and career

exploration. Project Ready STEM helps us achieve this goal, and goes a step further by preparing participants for success in post-secondary education. By providing ongoing discussions and workshops, more students can develop at grade level with the skills they need to be successful and graduate, and pursue a STEM education in college. We will continue to build the next generation of young scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians of color who can change the world and change the numbers of underrepresented minorities thriving in STEM. Patrick J. Franklin is president and CEO of the Urban League of Palm Beach County: 1700 N. Australian Avenue, West Palm Beach, FL 33407; Office: 561-833-1461 - WWW.ULPBC.ORG


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

CAREER, LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

How To Know When You’ve Outgrown Your Workplace By Mary V. Davids

When you started, it was exciting, then challenging, then too easy, sometimes frustrating, and now you’re over it. Here are some reasons why you may need to rethink your career strategy: 1. No leadership opportunities available to you. It’s a small department /company and you’re either waiting for someone to retire, move, or (worse) die. There is nowhere to go, which means there are no opportunities for you to grow your skills and knowledge. 2. Proactive ideas are discouraged by decision makers. Where you work just

isn’t open to new ideas or pro-active problem solving strategies. They are stuck in their ways and they want all employees to be silent and tow the line. You can’t grow there, and they don’t want you to. 3. The flame you once had withered away. Simply put: you just don’t love it anymore. Before you walk through those doors or log onto that computer, you suddenly feel annoyed and bored. There is no excitement, no challenges and no motivation to do your best. According Gallup’s 2017 “State of the Global Workplace”report, 85 percent of U.S. employees are not engaged or are actively disengaged at work. You are not alone. 4. Though you always give advice, there is no one at work you can go to for advice. When you’re pouring out and there’s no one to pour back into you, you become empty and frustrated with

problem solving. An industry mentor is a great way to stay progressive in your career. They don’t always have to work in the same building as you do. Networking helps. 5. You’ve become a robot. This one is the most subtle, yet damaging, to your career. Routine is difficult to break because once we adapt we convince ourselves the routine is better for us. Before you know it, your routine (as comfortable as it may be) has stolen time you can never get back. Sure, there are times when you need things to be basic, but don’t get stuck riding the “basic” wave for too long. 6. You’re not learning anything. The one thing that is consistent in business and life is change. Business practices, policies, and procedures are ever evolving. If organizations aren’t conscious they can

easily become left behind. If you feel you know everything there is to know about your job area or industry, then you aren’t growing. If you’re not growing you are not progressing, and that is when you know it’s time to make a change. Do a career check-in at least once every six months. Asking yourself a few simple questions twice a year about where you are in your career and how you can improve will help you stay focused and on track with achieving your career goals. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For career tips and advice visit www.marydavids.com, on Facebook/CoachMaryD, or email info@marydavids.com.

DRIVE-BY THERAPY

Don’t Just Be a Boss; Be a Leader By Dr. Tasha

As a 24-year-old elementary school principal, I had to learn how to lead very quickly. My first lesson was to refrain from being too bossy. I needed to influence my staff members, which were much older than me, without being a dictator. Something I’ve learned in my 37 years is that everyone is not ambitious or energetic about making change and few like taking risks. Natural born leaders, however, are all three. Being a young leader can have its peaks and valleys. Many people want to be the boss or to be an entrepreneur, but it is not always pretty at the top. Think about it. As a leader, when things go wrong on the job (and, yes, things will go wrong) guess who is to blame? You. To be a good leader, you have to take full responsibility for possibly not setting your staff up for success when problems arise or not being the type of leader they turn to for help. It is a sexy

EVEN WITH THE HIGH EXPECTATIONS THAT YOU PLACE ON YOURSELF AS A LEADER, YOU MAY WANT TO LEARN TO GIVE YOURSELF SOME GRACE. balance of knowing when to delegate and when to demonstrate the expectation. What sets a leader apart from a boss is that a great leader shows how it’s done versus a boss who tells someone what to do. Even with the high expectations that you place on yourself as a leader, you may want to learn to give yourself some grace. Yes, we have to always think outside of the box and try to be as resourceful and as diligent as can be. However, don’t forget to give yourself a break. Not a long break, but remember to stop and “smell the growth” that you have made because a

stressed out, critical boss, cannot lead effectively. Check your emotions at the door. A great leader always has to manage his or her reactions because they are always watching you. Coach them. Serve them. Give them credit for their efforts and stop taking credit for everything. Think about it. Even

TO BE A GOOD LEADER, YOU HAVE TO TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR POSSIBLY NOT SETTING YOUR STAFF UP FOR SUCCESS WHEN PROBLEMS ARISE OR NOT BEING THE TYPE OF LEADER THEY TURN TO FOR HELP.

Jesus was “meek,” a trait most of us do not strive hard enough to be. However, I have learned that I have been way more productive as a humble leader versus an arrogant one. There are a few tricks to becoming an effective leader: Use “We” and not “I.” Set realistic goals. Provide incentives. And remember to praise and acknowledge your employees when the goal is met. Dr. Tasha received her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in Berkeley, twelve years after graduating from Spelman College. Today, she is the President-Elect of The Association of Black Psychologists, South Florida Chapter and an Adjunct Professor at South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary. Dr. Tasha has a Live Talk Show every first Thursday and a monthly Speed Dating event for progressive singles. As seen on CBS4 Miami and heard on Hot 105FM, Dr. Tasha specializes in getting to the core of an issue, which she calls “Drive-By Therapy.” Follow her on Social Media @doctoratasha.


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ABOUT TOWN

Legacy’s 2018 “Top Black Educator” reception, Aug. 30, Broward College – A. Hugh Adams Center Campus, Davie.

ANDREW GILLUM

Chef “Ken” Sejour, owner of Chef Creole, celebrated its 26th anniversary by opening his sixth location at the Miami International Airport, Sept. 21, 2018.

1

FOR GOVERNOR

2

3

Let’s Make History! WE HAVE THE CANDIDATE

WE HAVE THE POWER

WE HAVE OUR FUTURE AT STAKE

Andrew Gillum is from our community and for our community.

Black, Latino, and White progressive voters are the new majority in this state. Together, we can win.

Andrew Gillum isn’t just our best defense against Trump and his party, he’s got the best plan for a better future.

Tell Your Friends & Family

Early Voting Starts October 22nd – Election Day is November 6th 1. Chef Sejour, Congresswoman Frederica Wilson 2. Miami-Dade Commissioner Barbara Jordan, Chef Sejour 3. Chef Sejour surrounded by supporters at his restaurant’s ribbon cutting ceremony

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Early, By Mail, or on November 6th

Text Gillum to 90975 to find your polling place or how to get involved. Paid political advertisement paid for by New Florida Vision PAC (10800 Biscayne Blvd., Ste 1050, Miami, FL. 33138) independently of any candidate. Not approved by any candidate.


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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

ABOUT TOWN

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

The Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA) holds the 2nd Annual BOMA Awards, honoring South Florida media professionals, at Miami’s Hilton Airport Hotel, Sept. 21, 2018.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

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LEGACY BRIEFS for GLBTQ Youth, Boys & Girls Club of Broward County, youth from the Israeli Consulate in Miami, North Miami PAL, North Miami Beach PAL and the Greater Miami Pop Warner Tamiami Colts Jr. Varsity football program.

Cisely Scott Promoted to Principal Cisely Scott was promoted to principal of Agenoria S. Paschal/Olinda Elementary School in Miami-Dade County Public Schools. She was previously assistant principal. Scott is an FIU alumna who last year was named Miami-Dade Assistant Principal of the Year while working at Miami’s Lenora B. Smith Elementary

Courtney Newell, a branding and marketing strategist who owns Crowned Marketing & Communications, has won the prestigious Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s (FSMSDC) MBE Supplier of the Year Class 1 award at the FSMSDC’s 43rd Annual Awards Gala. Her company was selected from a large group of thriving businesses throughout the state. Newell started Crowned Marketing & Communications in 2011 with a $500 Scholarship from winning a local Miss America Pageant. Since then, she has grown the business and now works with Fortune 1000 companies, government agencies and small to mid-sized businesses, providing web design, digital marketing, PR and signature events. Courtney is a graduate of Florida International University and holds a Business Certificate from Dartmouth College

Domini Gibbs Receives NBA Honor City of Miami Attorney Domini Gibbs received the National Bar Association’s Best Advocate Top 40 Under 40 honor. The National Bar Association is the Nation’s largest Bar Association of African American Attorney’s. Gibbs received her MBA and bachelor’s degree from Lynn University and her law degree from Florida A & M University.

Miami Dolphins Announce Football Unites Captains Program The Miami Dolphins announced the creation of the Football Unites Captains Program, a diversity and inclusion initiative that will bring 80 to 100 middle school students from various backgrounds together once a month for a day of learning about tolerance, acceptance and leadership. Dolphins players and alumni will join these students to share their stories, perspectives and experiences. The Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality (RISE) will assist with programming and program evaluation. “We are excited to launch the Football Unites Captains Program with the goal of stimulating conversations, encouraging inclusivity and uniting our South Florida youth,” said Miami Dolphins Senior Vice President of Communications & Community Affairs Jason Jenkins. Participating students will come from the following organizations: The Alliance

The remaining categories for the 2018 BOMA Awards include: • Marketing Firm of the Year Award Hip Rock Star Advertising ONEUNITED AND BB&T EXECS GARNER TOP HONORS AT BOMA AWARDS The Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA) awarded Teri Williams, president of OneUnited Bank, and Tony Coley, regional president of BB&T Bank the BOMA Champion of the Year Award. They were both honored for their commitment to support and advocate for equality in the media as well as their efforts to support South Florida’s Black community. This year’s ceremony was held on Sept. 20 at the Hilton Miami Airport. The BOMA awards was established to recognize outstanding media-related agencies, businesses, and individuals who make a positive impact in the South Florida Black community. Other top honorees include: • Icon of the Year Award - Bernadette Morris, founder and chairman of Sonshine Communications • Advocate of the Year Award - Publix • Legend of the Year Award - Tamara Phillippeaux, president of Island TV • Vanguard of the Year Award - Sandy Walker, publisher of The Gospel Truth • Visionary of the Year Award - Peter Webley, publisher of Caribbean Today • Luminary of the Year Award - John Yearwood, Yearwood Media Group

• PR Firm of the Year Award – S.A. Nelson & Associates • Advertising Agency of the Year Award – WOW Factor • Black Advertisement Agency of the Year Award – The Mosaic Group • Best Communicator of the Year TV Award – Calibe Thompson (Blondie Ras Productions, Inc.) • Best Communicator of the Year Radio Award - Lynda Harris (Financial) • Best Communicator of the Year Print Award – Russell Motley (MIA Media Group) • Best Communicator of the Year Digital Award – Tracy Timberlake (Timberlake Ventures) • Best Social Media Communicator of the Year Award – LaShannon Petit (PRPL • Photo/Video Journalist of the Year Award – David Muir • BOMA Rising Star Award – Arriale Henry (The Westside Gazette) Did you recently get a promotion? Are you a new hire at a South Florida company? Does your firm have a major announcement to make? Let us know by sharing your announcement for possible inclusion in Legacy Briefs. Send your press release and professional photo to rm@miamediagrp.com and include Legacy Briefs in the subject line.


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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE SUN SENTINEL

South Florida’s

only p lac e to

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018

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Legacy South Florida - 40 Under 40 of 2018  
Legacy South Florida - 40 Under 40 of 2018