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Welcome to

Mt. Hood Community College 26000 SE Stark Street Gresham, Oregon 97030

Table of Contents

Located in the shadow of majestic Mount Hood, MHCC enrolls nearly 25,000 people annually. Classes are offered on the 200-acre main campus in Gresham, Oregon, as well as satellite campuses throughout the district.

how to enroll................................................ 3-7

The MHCC district comprises an area of about 950 square miles with a population of more than 270,000.

Transfer Information................................... 79-81

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS..................................... 7-14 Educational Offerings Professional-Technical Programs.................... 16-75 Special Studies........................................... 75-78 Transfer Curricula.......................................82-118 Course Descriptions.................................119-212

GENERAL & STUDENT INFORMATION Academic Regulation................................214-222 Student Resources....................................222-226 Special Programs......................................226-227 Business and Community Resources............227-228 Student Rights.........................................229-231 College Mission & Facts............................231-233 Executive Staff...............................................234 Professional Staff...................................235-239 Index........................................................240-244 For a world of information about Mt. Hood Community College, visit us at

www.mhcc.edu 


Equal Opportunity Bienvenido!

It is the policy of MHCC to provide equal educational and employment opportunities and to provide service benefits to all students and employees without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or any other status or characteristic protected by applicable state or federal law. This policy is in accordance with the laws enforced by the Department of Education and Department of Labor, including Presidential Executive Order 11246, as amended, Title VI and Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act as amended by the Civil Rights Act of 1991, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Veteran’s Readjustment Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Acts of 1974-75, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Oregon Revised Statute 659.030. Inquiries regarding application of these and other regulations should be directed to either the college’s Human Resources Office 503-491-7200, the office of Student Development and Services 503-491-7317, or TDD 503-4917202; the Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education Office, Seattle, Washington; or to the office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, Department of Labor, San Francisco, CA.

Mt. Hood Community College se enorgullece de contra con la preferencia de la comunidad latina. MHCC ofrece los recursos necesarios para aquellos que quieran enriquecer su experiencia universitaria y provee los instrumentos para una educación y vida exitosa a los estudiantes latinos a través de su personal bilingüe, asesorías académicas, orientación vocacional y programas para el desarrollo de liderazgo.

Programa de Transiciones Respondiendo a las necesidades de la comunidad Latina, el Programa de Transiciones asiste a padres solteros y amas de casa a continuar su educación y explorar opciones de carrera. Para más información llama al 503-491-6972.

Asesoramiento Académico El collegion tiene personal bilingüe para asistir a los estudiantes a matricularse en clases y a desarrollar planes de estudios de acuerdo a sus intereses. Para más información comuniquese con Cecilia Sattergren at 503-491-7376 para asesoramiento académico.

Clases de Inglés como Segunda Lengua y GED. El colegio ofrece numerosas clases para el aprendizaje del inglés, clases en español para el GED y clases de civismo para prepararse para obtener la ciudadania en los Estados Unidos. Para más información comuniquese llama al 503-491-7675.

The information provided in this catalog is available in alternative format for persons with disabilities. For information call 503-491-6923 (503-491-7670 TDD).

MEChA Club

While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this catalog, Mt. Hood Community College has the right to make changes at any time without prior notice. This catalog is not a contract between Mt. Hood Community College and current or prospective students.

El Club MEChA es una de las organizaciones más activas en el colegio. El club toma parte en varias actividades, organiza la celebración anual del Cinco de Mayo, patrociana eventos para recaudar fondos y es un gran medio para que los estudiantes hagan nuevas amistades. Para más información comuniquese con Al Sigala, Consejero del Club al 503-491-7213.

Some policies and procedure are subject to change. See quarterly schedules for details.




How to Enroll Step 1. Apply for Admission

This information will be considered in the Executive Dean’s decisionmaking process. The Executive Dean’s decision as to whether the student will be allowed to enroll will be final. The Executive Dean will notify the instructor(s) in the division(s) in which the student is taking classes.

Admissions, Registration and Records Office/ Student Services Center Room AC 2253 503-491-7393 www.mhcc.edu/pages.1137.asp

Returning Enrollment Students will need to obtain an adviser’s signature on each registration form before they may register. These returning students do not have to see the Executive Dean unless the student is not making satisfactory academic progress as defined by the college.

Admission of all students is centralized in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. New students registering for credit bearing coursework must pay a one-time, nonrefundable admission fee. This fee will be added to the student’s first billing statement.

Students Age 16 and 17

General Admission

Initial Enrollment

Mt. Hood Community College has an open-entry general admission policy and welcomes all students who can benefit from instruction regardless of their educational background. Some programs have additional admission requirements. See Limited/Restricted-Entry Programs at the end of Step 1.

Students who have not graduated from high school, or have not been released from compulsory attendance, or have not obtained a GED must do the following: • Meet with an academic adviser in the Academic Advising and Transfer Center inside the Student Services Center prior to registration in any class

Initial Enrollment

• Take the College Placement Test if deemed necessary by the adviser

The first step to enroll at MHCC is to complete a Student Admission Form. The form is available:

• Complete the MHCC “High School Permission Form”. This form includes the “Release Agreement for Potential Injury and Liability” and is valid for 12 months.

• on the MHCC web site at www.mhcc.edu/admissions • in the printed schedule of classes each term • in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office inside the Student Services Center

Returning Enrollment These students follow the same guidelines for registration as students 18 years of age and older. See Step 5.

You may submit the form by: • fax 503-491-7388

Home-Schooled Students Under Age 18

• in person Admissions, Registration and Records Office

Home-schooled students will follow one of the specific procedures as outlined for ‘Students Age 15 and Under’ or for ‘Students Age 16 and 17’.

• mail Mt. Hood Community College Admissions, Registration and Records Office 26000 SE Stark St. Gresham, OR 97030

Students, who have been released from compulsory attendance, must:

See Step 5.

• Submit the “Release from Compulsory Attendance Form” to the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. This form is obtained from the student’s resident high school district.

Underage Students – credit coursework

Note: These students follow the same guidelines for ‘General’ admissions.

Returning Enrollment

Financial Aid Eligibility of Under-Age Students

Persons under 18 years of age who have not graduated from high school, have not been released from compulsory attendance, or have not obtained a GED, must follow special admissions procedures to enroll.

For the purposes of financial aid eligibility, “underage” students are not “regular” students and are therefore not aid eligible. Regular students are defined as degree seeking students. Students concurrently enrolled in high school and MHCC are by federal regulation ineligible for financial aid. If a student is age 16 or older, has been released from compulsory high school attendance, and has completed a GED and/or completes the College Placement Test to meet the “Ability to Benefit” requirements, they may be aid eligible. The Office of Financial Aid will make the final determination of aid eligibility status based on documentation provided by the student.

Students Age 15 and Under Initial Enrollment New students age 15 and under, must see the Executive Dean of Student Development and Services, prior to initial registration. To make an appointment and obtain the necessary forms, contact the Administrative Assistant at 503-491-7317. When meeting with the Executive Dean of Student Development and Services, students must bring the following:

Under-Age Students - non-credit coursework

• letter of request from student

Any student under the age of 18 may take “Community Education” classes, regardless of age, without special approval of MHCC staff. However, their parent or guardian must sign a MHCC “Release Agreement for Potential Injury or Liability Form”. This form is available in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office; the Academic Advising and Transfer Center; or the web site. This form will be kept on file in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office.

• letter of support from high school counselor (or ESD for home-schooled students) addressing the student’s maturity and readiness for college experiences • MHCC High School Permission Form • completed application for Underage Student Admission Checklist form, available through the administrative assistant. • College Placement Test (CPT) scores




International Students

minimum criteria. The Admissions, Registration and Records Office will notify applicants of their status within 30 days after the completion of the selection process.

To be considered for admission to Mt. Hood Community College, international students must submit the following to the Admissions, Registration and Records Office: • an International Student Application, MHCC Student Admission Form, and the non-refundable application fee

Limited-Entry Programs Limited-Entry Programs generally begin once a year in the fall term. Applicants are admitted on a space available basis after academic criteria has been met. Application packets for these programs are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

• Financial Statement, Affidavit of Support, and official supporting financial documents (such as a bank statement) See http://www.mhcc.edu/international

Restricted-Entry Programs

• documentation of Measles vaccination and Tuberculosis testing

Applicants for a restricted-entry program must complete the admissions application procedures and meet program criteria before being considered for acceptance into the program. In addition, each restricted-entry program has a non-refundable application fee due at time of application. Application packets for these programs are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

• photocopies of the passport ID page • proof of English proficiency in one of the following ways: - submit an official TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of at least 450 (paper-based test) or 133 (computer-based test) - attendance at an American high school for at least one year with a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) and placement into ENL courses or above on the Mt. Hood Community College Placement Test (CPT) - successful completion of an English Language Program with a minimum GPA of 2.00 - transfer students from an accredited United States college or university that have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 2.00

Further information regarding Limited or Restricted-Entry programs is available on page 214.

Adult High School Diploma Applicants for the Adult High School Diploma (AHSD) must be at least 18 years of age, unless they are referred by their district high school and are exempt from compulsory public/private attendance. If exempt from compulsory attendance, the student must present a release form from their high school.

• Students transferring from another US institution must submit a Transfer Clearance form from the current school, a copy of their I-20, and official transcripts.

The student must attend an orientation session at which time they will submit a registration form and high school transcript, learn more about the program, and meet their program adviser. It is advised to take the College Placement Test (CPT) prior to the orientation.

• All international students holding an F-1 visa must provide proof of health and accident insurance before being enrolled at Mt. Hood Community College.

The student must meet Mt. Hood Community College’s Reading, Mathematics and Writing competency requirements prior to receiving a diploma. Competency will be demonstrated by placement in RD115 or completion of RD90 with a passing grade; placement in MTH60 or completion of MTH20 with a passing grade; placement in WR115 or WR101 or completion of WR90 with a passing grade.

Co-Admission – Mt. Hood Community College/ Portland State University Through a special admission process, students can be admitted to both institutions as they pursue their freshman and sophomore years at MHCC. Co-admitted students enjoy:

To arrange an orientation, or for additional information, call 503491-7421.

• one application for co-admission • academic advising from both institutions

Step 2. Arrange for Financial Aid

• library privileges at both institutions

The Office of Student Financial Aid Room AC 2253 503-491-7262 www.mhcc.edu/financialaid

• coordinated financial aid and scholarships Applications and information are available at the Mt. Hood Community College web site, www.mhcc.edu/pages/1329.asp

The Office of Financial Aid at Mt. Hood Community College helps students apply for and receive all major types of Title IV federal and State of Oregon financial aid, including grants, work, loans and scholarships. Additional information regarding the specific types of grants, work, loans and scholarships are described on pages 223-224.

Other Programs Similar programs are available with Eastern Oregon University and Marylhurst University. The application materials are available on the MHCC web site, www.mhcc.edu/admissions.

The Office of Financial Aid provides materials, resources and helpful staff to guide students through the application process.

Limited or Restricted-Entry Programs

General Eligibility Requirements

Some of our programs have enrollment limits and/or other requirements before a student may register. The entry type of each program is listed at the top of each program description page. These programs require special application procedures.

To be eligible for aid, applicants must: • be at least 16 years old • be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen

Application packets for limited and restricted programs are available on the web site at www.mhcc.edu/pages/621.asp. Each packet includes the information and forms necessary for applicants to apply for the program in which they are interested. The packet must be completed accurately and returned by the application deadline. Only completed packets meeting minimum criteria will be considered. The deadline for submitting a completed packet varies for each program, so it is important to check the specified deadline date for each program. The return of an admission packet does not guarantee that the applicant has satisfied

• have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent or a GED • have ���adequate” placement test scores if they are without a high school diploma or a GED and are at least 18 years old • be in pursuit of a degree or certificate in an eligible program (at least 24 credits or six months in length) listed in this catalog • be registered with the Selective Service if they are male and at least 18 years old




How to Apply First time financial aid applicants:

• You have taken a college placement test at another college within the last 12 months. Bring a copy of your score report to Testing Services to have your scores evaluated. Students may be asked to take only the Math part of the CPT.

• On-line: on the internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov Personal Identification Numbers (PIN) must be requested and received before filing electronically. If the PIN is not supplied at the time of electronic filing, the information can be saved while waiting for the PIN or a physical signature page must be printed, signed and submitted by regular, surface mail.

• You are taking any course that carries a proficiency level of “Proficiency Required”. The proficiency levels can be found for each course at the end of individual course descriptions and under each course printed in the quarterly schedule of classes.

Step 4. Talk to an Adviser

or

• Paper: complete a paper FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Forms for this option are available in any financial aid office, in most high school counseling offices and some public libraries.

Academic Advising and Transfer Center 503- 491-7315

Previous financial aid recipients:

The next stop for most new students is the Academic Advising and Transfer Center (AATC). Prior to sitting down with an adviser, students should complete the on-line orientation, www.mhcc.edu/orientation. Students may complete the on-line orientation in the Testing Center, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center, or from their home computer. The orientation provides students with key information about the college, degree options, and the registration process.

Students will usually receive a “Renewal Application” by mail sometime before January 1 of each year. Online renewal forms are available by logging onto the fafsa.ed.gov web site and using your PIN number. To ensure that the FAFSA results are sent to all colleges desired, the applicant must enter school codes or complete addresses for prospective colleges. The Mt. Hood Community College school code is 003204.

Once orientation is completed, new students will work with an academic adviser to create a schedule of classes.

Conditions for Awards The following three items are the key conditions reviewed when awarding financial aid: 1. The size of the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) The FAFSA information is used to calculate this number. This number is used to determine eligibility for most types of financial aid; 2. The budget of the student while in college; 3. Availability of the types of aid

Beyond the first term, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center remains the place to come for advising for those students completing skill-building courses (e.g. RD90, WR90, MTH10, MTH20), those exploring program options, and those preparing to enter one of MHCC’s limited or restricted entry programs. Students may make an appointment with an adviser to develop an educational plan, review degree progress, or receive an unofficial evaluation of transfer credit. Students may also drop in and utilize a library of regional college catalogs, advising guides for popular college majors, and enjoy internet access to transfer school curriculums and programs nationwide.

Application Verification All schools and colleges must verify some of the data of FAFSA applications. Examples of verification materials required are: Student Status Letter (from the MHCC web site), signed tax returns for some FAFSA submitters, proof of untaxed agency income or benefits (Social Security, TANF, subsidized housing, etc.)

Continuing students who have declared a major should seek information and assistance primarily from their faculty adviser. Meet with your faculty adviser periodically to make sure you are on the right track to meet your goals. Contact information for faculty advisers is available at www.mhcc. edu/pages/162.asp and on specific program pages of this catalog.

Students who want to use credits from other colleges to satisfy requirements or pre-requisites for requirements for a Mt. Hood Community College degree will need to submit prior official transcripts to the College’s Admissions Office. At the time of evaluation, those credits will become part of the total credits used to determine further eligibility for financial aid under the Quantitative Measures Standards of Progress federal regulations.

Step 5. Register for Classes Admissions, Registration and Records Office/ Student Services Center Room AC 2253 503-491-7393 www.mhcc.edu/registration

Aid Disbursement

Registration is available for currently enrolled, returning and new students via Touch Tone, Web, and in person as explained in our quarterly schedule of classes. Mail in registration is accepted for Community Education courses only.

After the student is awarded financial aid, it is posted to their account (except bank loans) and will be used directly to pay their tuition and fees. Any remaining aid will be disbursed as a check that can be used to buy books, pay for room and board, transportation and miscellaneous supplies and personal items on or after the first day of classes. Proof of enrollment must be submitted to the MHCC Business Office any time aid is disbursed as a check or used to pay tuition without any remaining aid to physically disburse.

The quarterly schedule of classes is mailed to all in-district residents and is available on our campus and on the MHCC web site at www.mhcc.edu. Please use the following checklist to review required steps prior to registration: ❑ New students must complete the Student Admission Form and submit it to the Admissions, Registration and Records Office, see step 1.

Step 3. Visit Testing Services Testing Services 503-491-7678

Room AC 2253 www.mhcc.edu/advising

Room AC 2335 www.mhcc.edu/testing

❑ Take the College Placement Test (CPT) if you plan to take six or more credit hours of if you plan to take any course that carries a proficiency level of “Proficiency Required”. The proficiency levels can be found for each course at the end of individual course descriptions and under each course printed in the quarterly schedule of classes.

Testing Services is often one of the first stops for potential students. To be properly placed into courses, new students must take a College Placement Test (CPT). This test, which covers reading, writing and mathematics, helps to assess your academic readiness and will help you choose classes that fit your present skill level. You may not have to take the placement test if: • You have transcripted coursework in reading, writing, and/or mathematics. Bring a copy of your transcript to the Academic Advising and Transfer Center for assistance.

or ❑ Bring college transcripts if you have completed English composition and a mathematics course, both with a grade of “C” or higher to the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or fax to 503-491-7388 so that the CPT may be waived.




3. Financial Aid/Scholarship

❑ Update your student record with the Admissions, Registration and Records Office if changes have occurred to your name, address, phone number and/or major. You may change your address, phone number and email address via the web.

If a student’s financial aid is not available by the first day of the term or does not completely cover their tuition amount, they should select option 1 or 2 above. If a balance remains on their student account past the due date, the account is subject to late fees and collection costs.

❑ Complete an education plan by meeting with a staff member in the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or a faculty adviser.

4. Agency or Company

❑ Review a current schedule of classes to select courses and to learn policies, procedures and important dates, including registration dates and refund dates.

Arrangements for payment by an agency or company must be pre-approved by the college. The student is responsible to ensure that a payment authorization is on file in the College’s Accounts Receivable department by the first day of the term. Ultimately the student is responsible for payment of all unpaid charges, including late fees and third party service fees.

❑ Complete a registration form or Touch Tone or web worksheet with the courses you have selected. ❑ Register via Touch Tone, Web, or in person. Mail in registration is available for Community Education classes only.

Payment Types All payments must be made in US funds. Acceptable payment types include: • cash • money order • Visa • MasterCard • check College Services paid for by check will be provided 10 business days after payment occurs. An example of services include official transcript requests, awarding of degrees and certificates, catalog purchases, and GED testing; but does not apply to tuition payment.

❑ Make arrangements to pay tuition and fees with the Cashier’s Office, or pay online via the web. Registration assistance is available in the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office. Please see the Academic Regulations section of this catalog for important information regarding adding, dropping, withdrawal from school, waiting lists, attendance and no-show drop policy.

Student Financial Responsibility

Step 6. Pay for Classes

By enrolling or having enrolled as a student at Mt. Hood Community College, you agree to be responsible for all charges on your student account and abide by the student account practices and policies. Students will be held accountable for understanding the practices and policies of college billing and collections. Detailed descriptions are provided on pages 215-217 of this catalog. They include: • Types of Fees • Definition of Terms

Business Office – Student Billing Accounts Receivable Room AC 2253 503-491-6981 or 503-491-7276 www.mhcc.edu/pages/942.asp

College Tuition and Fees The MHCCD Board of Education sets tuition rates and reserves the right to make changes without notice. The amount of tuition you pay is determined by your residency and by the number of credit hours you are taking. Some classes require an additional course fee. There may be other types of fees assessed as well. A full description of tuition and fees are listed in the quarterly schedule of classes or on the web.

• Student Account Statements

• Past Due Accounts

• Collections

• Refunds

• Billing and Collection Rights and Responsibilities This information is also available: • in the applicable student handbook and brochures

Payment Due Date

• in the quarterly schedule of classes

Payment for all tuition and fees is due on or before the published due date, usually the first day of the term. All charges on your student account must be paid in full before you can register for another term.

• on the MHCC web site, www.mhcc.edu.

Step 7. Plan for Success

Payment Options

After you have taken care of all of the details needed to apply, enroll and register at Mt. Hood, you want to enjoy your time here, as well as maintain a good academic career. Certainly good study skills, adequate preparation, and attendance are important. Sometimes, though, other factors may affect how you persist at the school. We have many options that can assist you in this endeavor:

The college has four options available for payment. No other payment arrangements are available. 1. Pay all tuition and fees by the first day of the term. If a student registers after the term begins, payment is due the day of registration. This includes courses added from wait lists. 2. Student Installment Payment Note

Career Planning/Declaring a major

Student may opt to arrange for a deferred payment plan. Tuition/fees may be deferred if: • the student registers using an official social security number • tuition/fees total $100 or more • no other monies are owed to the college

The most successful students are those who have connected with a career focus and with faculty who share those career interests. Choosing a major is an important step in your academic life. Choosing a career and a major requires some introspection on your part. Our Career Planning and Counseling Center located in Room AC 1152 can help you discern your interests, skills, abilities and values, and tie those to majors and careers. You can declare your major at any time; just look for the major change forms in the academic and student services departments. For more information, call 503-491-7432.

Student Installment Payment Notes are not accepted after the second Friday of the term. Student Installment Payment Notes are not available to international students. If classes have been added after the Student Installment Payment Note has been signed, call Accounts Receivable immediately, 503-491-6981 or 503-491-7276. Additional charges to the student account may cause changes in the required minimum payment. Failure to pay the new minimum payment would drop the student from the Student Installment Payment Note plan.

Design an educational plan Once you have chosen a career path and major, MHCC recommends designing an educational plan that will lead you to fulfill degree and/or transfer requirements. The Academic Advising and Transfer Center (AATC) can assist you with this plan as well as with other advising needs. You will work with an assigned academic adviser in your major field of study (professional/




technical or transfer) or a generalist adviser to complete your plan. The AATC maintains an on-line and hard copy Transfer Center that can assist you in determining transfer requirements for your chosen major. Academic advisers are also available to answer questions regarding transfer procedures and process. For more information call (503)-491-7315.

the Mezzanine of the Library. For information, call 503-491-7108. Of course, you should always utilize the office hours of your instructors for assistance and questions about their courses. If you find that you have difficulties with finances, outside pressures or need a job or any other type of assistance, please contact any member of the Student Development and Services staff on campus or the Office of the Executive Dean of Student Development and Services (Room AC 2369) at 503-491-7317. They will be able to refer you to an appropriate resource.

Tutoring and assistance If you have difficulties with your academic work, don’t delay asking for help. The Learning Assistance Center (LAC) provides a wide array of services, including tutoring and learning strategies workshops to assist you. The LAC is located on

Degree Requirements All degrees and certificates issued by Mt. Hood Community College are for programs offered in the catalog year the student is qualified to follow.

Associate of Applied Science Degree

B. Communications Three quarter-credit hours at a level equivalent to WR101 or WR121. Other communication courses may satisfy the distribution requirements only.

(Professional-Technical Programs)

C. Mathematics

The Associate of Applied Science Degree will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours. (Some programs may require more than 90 credit hours.)

Three quarter-credit hours at a level equivalent to MTH65 or higher (except MTH211). D. Human Relations

Please refer to the Course Numbering System and Developmental Education courses on pages 217-218, with regard to courses not applicable toward a Mt. Hood Community College degree or certificate.

Three quarter-credit hours

2. Successfully complete all required courses in a professional-technical curriculum as listed in the catalog. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit.

Six additional quarter-credit hours from any of the following areas:

E. Distribution

1. Social Science/Humanities (Arts and Letters) Select from social science and/or humanities. (Maximum of three credit hours in skill-oriented classes within the humanities category.)

Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum. 3. Achieve a MHCC cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher.

2. Science/Mathematics/Computer Science

4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the candidate’s major classes (e.g., course prefixes such as DH, EET, NRS, etc.)

Select from science, mathematics, and/or computer science. (Mathematics must be MTH20 or higher.) 3. Communications

5. Successfully complete the required general education courses.

6. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 hours of applicable credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree/certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experienced-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.

Students who are pursuing an MHCC Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree at MHCC who have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from an accredited institution of higher education will have satisfied the general education requirements for the AAS degree if the AAS curricula identify general education categories, i.e. communications, math/science/computer science. If the general education requirements are listed specifically by course, i.e. SP111, PSY201, then those specific requirements must be listed on the incoming transcript in order for those courses to be satisfied. WR101, WR102, WR121, WR122, HPE295, PE185 and HE250 will automatically be satisfied by the baccalaureate degree.

If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university. This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the coursework.

General Education Courses must be selected from the approved list of General Education courses for the Associate of Applied Science Degree, (see page 9). A. Health/Physical Education A minimum of three credits in Physical Education (PE) and/or in Health Education (HE/HPE). Two (2) credit hours of PE185 credit may be granted toward an Associate degree at Mt. Hood for completion of military basic training. A copy of the DD214 form is required.

7. Complete the application process and pay a nonrefundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (e.g., spring term graduates must apply during fall term). Note: A maximum of 25 credits of ENL courses numbered 100 and above may be applied toward the AAS degree. (ENL94R, ENL94S, and ENL94W are not to be included. See Developmental Education Courses.)




Note: A maximum of 9 credits of PE185 may be applied to the AAS degree.

H. Complete the above requirements plus elective courses (no more than 25 credits of one discipline may apply as electives, with the exception of Special Studies curricula) to total 90 applicable credit hours. Elective courses may be any course number 10 or higher, not including those listed as Developmental Education courses, see page 218. A maximum of 9 credits of PE185 may be applied to the AGS degree. A maximum of 25 credits of ENL courses numbered 100 or higher may be applied toward the AGS degree. (ENL94R, ENL94S, and ENL94W are not to be included. See Developmental Education Courses.)

Note: Please refer to page 218 for a list of courses that are not applicable to this degree.

Associate of General Studies Degree The purpose of the degree in general studies is to provide the student an opportunity to pursue a broad general education during the two years at a community college. It is intended as a flexible program for the student who is not pursuing a specified curriculum in the lower division transfer or professional-technical area. The general studies degree may, in addition to including the number of hours in the divisional areas as listed below, include courses in lower division collegiate transfer, occupational education, and professional-technical education. Because of the flexibility and broad approach of this degree, a student may find that it may not fulfill all of the requirements of full junior standing when transferred to a four-year institution. The transferable credits generally include only those courses numbered 100 or above. Please refer to pages 217-218, “Courses Numbered 100-299,” for more information.

3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. 4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the core requirements (an average; not a “C” in every class). 5. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 hours of applicable credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree/certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experience-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.

The Associate of General Studies Degree will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours.

If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university.

2. Successfully complete all required courses in the general studies curriculum as follows. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit.

This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the coursework.

Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum.

6. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (i.e., spring term graduates must apply during fall term).

Courses (except for electives) must be selected from a list of approved general education courses (see page 9). A. Health and Physical Education A minimum of three credits which must include at least one class in Physical Education (PE) and one class in Health Education (HE). Other options: HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life or HPE285OL Wilderness Survival (3 credit) satisfies the total HPE requirement. PE285OL Wilderness Survival for two credits may satisfy the HPE requirement by completing one additional credit in either health or physical education. Two (2) credit hours of PE185 credit may be granted toward an Associate degree at Mt. Hood for completion of military basic training. A copy of the DD214 form is required. B. Communications Six quarter hours at a level equivalent to WR101 and WR102; or WR121 and WR122; or three credits in writing and three credits in speech; or three credits in writing and RD117; or three credits in writing and BA205.

Certificate Requirements The one-year certificate will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Successfully complete all required courses in a one-year certificate program as listed in the catalog. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit. 2. All programs of study of one academic year or more in length for which certificates are granted require a recognizable body of instruction in program-related areas of 1) communication, 2) computation (mathematics), and 3) human relations. Please refer to the individual program for specific courses. Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum.

C. Mathematics

Students who are pursuing an MHCC certificate at MHCC who have earned a baccalaureate degree or higher from an accredited institution of higher education will have satisfied the general education requirements for the certificate. However, students must complete or have completed the program specific general education course requirements within a certificate.

Three quarter-credit hours at a level equivalent to MTH65 or higher (except MTH211). D. Human Relations Three quarter-credit hours. E. Humanities (Arts and Letters) 12 credit hours in humanities (arts and letters) (maximum of six credit hours in skill oriented classes). F. Social Sciences 12 credit hours in social science. G. Science/Mathematics/Computer Science 9 credit hours in science or mathematics or computer science. (MTH20 and MTH40 are excluded and will not meet this requirement.)

3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. 4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the certificate and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the candidate’s major classes. 5. Satisfactorily earn 24 hours of credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experience-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.




6. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (e.g., spring term graduates must apply during fall term).

PHL201, PHL202, PHL203, PHL208 R210, R211, R212 RD117

The following is a list of general education courses, currently offered at Mt. Hood Community College, applicable to the Associate of Applied Science Degree, the Associate of General Studies Degree, and the Certificate of Completion. For additional approved general education courses no longer offered, please run a DARS audit to see if courses completed still apply. This list may be amended to include newly approved courses, again, please run a DARS audit for the most current information. Courses numbered 199 will qualify as elective credit only.

RUS101, RUS102, RUS103, RUS111, RUS112, RUS113, RUS201, RUS202, RUS203 SP100, SP111, SP112, SP114, SP115, SP130, SP218, SP229, SP262 SPAN101, SPAN102, SPAN103, SPAN111, SPAN112, SPAN113, SPAN150, SPAN151, SPAN201, SPAN202, SPAN203 TA101, TA106, TA107, TA109, TA141, TA142, TA143, TA144, TA148, TA241

Health and Physical Education

WR240, WR241, WR242, WR244, WR245, WR246, *WR247, WR248

HE202, HE204, HE205, HE207, HE208, HE213, HE240, HE250, HE252, HE253, HE255, HE261, HE265, HPE295, PE185, PE194, HPE285OL, PE285OH (may use only 1 credit toward a PE185 requirement), PE292SWT, PE294

*Skill-oriented class

Social Sciences ANTH101, ANTH102, ANTH103, ANTH180, ANTH211, ANTH212, ANTH213, ANTH215, ANTH231, ANTH232

Communications (distribution only for AAS) BA205, RD117, SP100, SP111, SP112, SP114, SP115, SP218, WR101, WR102, WR121, WR122, WR123

EC115, EC201, EC202, EC203 GEOG105, GEOG106, GEOG107, GEOG202, GEOG206, GEOG209, GEOG214, GEOG290

Mathematics

HST104, HST110, HST111, HST112, HST195, HST201, HST202, HST203, HST204, HST211, HST212, HST213, HST225, HST237, HST240, HST264, HST270, HST271, HST272, HST292, HST293, HST294

MTH65, MTH80, MTH85, MTH95, MTH105, MTH111, MTH112, MTH212, MTH213, MTH231, MTH241, MTH243, MTH244, MTH251, MTH252, MTH253, MTH254, MTH255, MTH256, MTH261

INTL101, INTL210

Human Relations

J211

ANTH101, EC115, GEOG106, GEOG107, HST110, HST111, HST112, HUM202, PHL201, PSY101, PSY201, PSY235, R210, SOC204, SOC205, SOC206.

PS200, PS201, PS203, PS204, PS205, PS209, PS215, PS217, PS220, PS225, PS241, PS242, PS297

Social Science/Humanities (Arts and Letters) Humanities (Arts and Letters)

PSY101, PSY151, PSY201, PSY202, PSY203, PSY214, PSY216, PSY231, PSY232, PSY235, PSY236, PSY237, PSY239

ART115, ART116, ART117, ART197, ART204, ART205, ART206, ART211, ART212, ART213, *ART214, *ART219, *ART225, *ART226, *ART227, ART231, ART232, ART233, *ART234, *ART240, *ART241, *ART254, *ART255, *ART256, *ART257, *ART258, *ART259, *ART257B, *ART258B, *ART259B, *ART261, *ART262, *ART263, *ART264, *ART265, *ART266, *ART271, *ART272, *ART273, ART281, *ART288, *ART289, *ART291, *ART292, *ART293, *ART294, *ART295, *ART296, *ART297

SOC204, SOC205, SOC206, SOC213, SOC214, SOC215, SOC216, SOC223, SOC225, SOC232, SOC291 WS101

Science/Mathematics/Computer Science BA231 BI100, BI101, BI102, BI103, BI110, BI112, BI121, BI122, BI132, BI145, BI211, BI212, BI213, BI231, BI232, BI233, BI234, BI235, BI240

ASL101, ASL102, ASL103, ASL201, ASL202, ASL203 ENG104, ENG105, ENG106, ENG107, ENG108, ENG109, ENG112, ENG113, ENG201, ENG202, ENG204, ENG205, ENG212, ENG214, ENG218, ENG221, ENG222, ENG250, ENG253, ENG254, ENG274, ENG275

BINF290 CH103, CH104, CH105, CH106, CH110, CH151, CH170, CH221, CH222, CH223, CH241, CH242, CH243

ENL201R, ENL201S, ENL201W

CIS120/L, CIS122, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS140, CIS144, CS133JA, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS160, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS244, CS260

FA257, FA258, FA264, FA266, FA268 FR101, FR102, FR103, FR111, FR112, FR113, FR201, FR202, FR203, FR211, FR212, FR213

ENGR201, ENGR202, ENGR211, ENGR212, ENGR213

GER101, GER102, GER103, GER111, GER112, GER113, GER201, GER202, GER203

F240 FN225

HUM100, HUM105, HUM106, HUM110, HUM111, HUM112, HUM202, HUM210

FW251, FW252, FW253, FW254

ITAL101, ITAL102, ITAL103, ITAL111, ITAL112, ITAL113

G148, G165, G201, G202, G203

JPN101, JPN102, JPN103, JPN111, JPN112, JPN113, JPN201, JPN202, JPN203, JPN211, JPN212, JPN213

GE101, GE102, GE115

*MUP101, *MUP105, *MUP114, *MUP115, *MUP121, *MUP123, *MUP125, *MUP131, *MUP146, *MUP171-192, *MUP201, *MUP205, *MUP214, *MUP215, *MUP221, *MUP225, *MUP231, *MUP246, *MUP271-292, MUS101, MUS104, MUS105, MUS111, MUS112, MUS113, *MUS114, *MUS115, *MUS116, *MUS117, *MUS118, *MUS119, *MUS124, *MUS125, *MUS126, *MUS131, *MUS132, *MUS133, *MUS137, *MUS138, *MUS139, *MUS147, *MUS148, *MUS149, *MUS161, *MUS162, *MUS163, *MUS191, MUS205, MUS208, MUS211, MUS212, MUS213, *MUS214, *MUS215, *MUS224, MUS261, MUS262, MUS263, *MUS265, *MUS292

MTH20, MTH60, MTH65, MTH80, MTH85, MTH95, MTH105, MTH111, MTH112, MTH211, MTH212, MTH213, MTH231, MTH241, MTH243, MTH244, MTH251, MTH252, MTH253, MTH254, MTH255, MTH256, MTH261

GS104, GS105, GS106

PH104, PH109C, PH121, PH122, PH123, PH127, PH201, PH202, PH203, PH211, PH212, PH213




Distribution (Associate of Applied Science only)

which will be accepted at any Oregon public college or university.

Six credits from any of the following areas: Communications

2

3

4

5

6

Social Science/Humanities Science/Mathematics/Computer Science

Oregon Transfer Module The Oregon Transfer Module (OTM) allows for institutional recognition of the completion of one-year (full-time equivalent) of General Education coursework. Once awarded, the OTM is recognized by all of the public institutions of post-secondary education in the state1. The Oregon Transfer Module may lead to an Associate of Arts / Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) degree or an Associate of Science / Oregon Transfer - Business (AS/OT-BUS) degree, from a community college, or to a baccalaureate degree from a university. The OTM is neither a certificate nor a degree. After completing the module, students are still obligated to take additional, institution-specific, General Education coursework if they pursue an AA/OT, an AS/OT-BUS, or a baccalaureate degree. Any student completing an Oregon Transfer Module that conforms to the guidelines below will have met the requirements for the Oregon Transfer Module at any Oregon community college or institution in the Oregon University System.1 Upon transfer, the receiving institution may specify additional course work that is required for a major, for degree requirements, or to make up the difference between the Oregon Transfer Module and the institution’s total General Education requirements.2

Oregon Transfer Module credits may not match program requirements in the receiving school. The OTM supplements, but does not supplant existing articulation agreements and does not replace effective advising. Courses that are designed to prepare students for college-level work are not applicable to the transfer module. In Arts and Letters, the second year of a foreign language may be included, but not the first year. American Sign Language (ASL) is considered a foreign language. When choosing courses in science and mathematics, students and advisers should check the specific requirements at receiving schools. Courses that include a laboratory component, or that deal with specific subjects, may be required for majors or degrees. Computer Science courses used in the Math/Science/Computer Science area must meet Oregon Council of Computer Chairs criteria for a science course. See list of courses at (http:// cs.bmcc.cc.or.us/occc/).

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer Degree The Oregon Transfer Degree (Associate of Arts) is a program of study that community college students can follow to fulfill all their lower division general education requirements for a bachelor’s degree at an Oregon University System institution. It is an agreement between the Oregon State System of Higher Education and Oregon’s community colleges to provide transfer of community college coursework to an Oregon university system institution.

GUIDELINES The OTM includes coursework chosen from the courses approved for the categories below by the institution issuing the credit. In the case of community colleges, these are courses approved for the AA/OT degree; in the case of universities and four-year colleges, they are courses approved for the General Education portion of a baccalaureate degree. All courses must have a grade of “C-” or better, and must be at least 3 credits (quarter system). Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the time the module is transcripted to their official academic record.

Completion of the Oregon Transfer Degree can lead to junior standing, for registration purposes, for any student admitted to a university in the Oregon university system: University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Western Oregon University, Southern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology and Eastern Oregon University. However, some school, department or major requirements with regard to courses or grade point average may not be fulfilled by this degree

Courses for an Oregon Transfer Module issued from Mt. Hood Community College must be selected from the list of approved courses on pages 13-14. The list is also available in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or from a program adviser.3

Students considering transfer to private and out-of-state institutions will find the Oregon Transfer Degree to be excellent preparation for upper division study. A similar transfer agreement also exists between Mt. Hood Community College and Concordia University, Pacific University, Warner Pacific College, George Fox University and Marylhurst University in the Portland area, as well as Western Baptist College, BYU-Hawaii, Hawaii Pacific University, Boise State University, Seattle Pacific University, and Washington State University.

Foundational Skills (Referred to as General Requirements in the current AA/OT degree) • Writing: Two courses of college-level composition. • Oral Communication: One course of fundamentals of speech or communication. • Mathematics: One course of college-level mathematics, for which at least Intermediate Algebra is a prerequisite

Upon enrolling at Mt. Hood Community College, students need to be ready for college-level mathematics, writing and science in order to complete the Associate of Arts Degree in two years. If students lack the necessary skills, MHCC offers excellent preparatory courses and tutorial assistance to help them get on track quickly.

Introduction to Disciplines (Referred to as Distribution Requirements in current AA/OT Degree) • Arts and Letters: Three courses4. • Social Sciences: Three courses. • Science/Math/Computer Science: Three courses, including at least one biological or physical science with a lab5,6.

Please refer to pages 217-218, “Courses Numbered 100-299,” for more information. The Associate of Arts Degree will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours. See #6 for an explanation (Some majors may require more than 90 credit hours.)

Electives

2. Successfully complete all required courses. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit.

As required to bring the total credits to 45. Courses must be from the Introduction to Disciplines areas (Arts & Letters, Social Science, or Science/Math/Computer Science). 1 Regionally accredited private colleges and universities within the state may offer and issue the Oregon Transfer Module,

Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum.

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3. Achieve a MHCC cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher.

7. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 hours of applicable credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree/certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experienced-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.

4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the core requirements. 5. Successfully complete the following: Courses (except for elective credits) must be selected from the list of approved courses for the Associate of Arts – Oregon Transfer Degree (see pages 13-14). The list is available on the following pages and in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or from the program adviser.

If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university.

General Requirements

This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the coursework.

A. Computer Literacy/Proficiency One quarter-credit hour of college level computer-based coursework. B. Health and Physical Education A minimum of three credits which must include at least one class in Physical Education (PE) and one class in Health Education (HE). Other options: HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life or HPE285OL (3 credit) satisfies the total HPE requirement. PE285OL Wilderness Survival for two credits may satisfy the HPE requirement by completing one additional credit in either health or physical education. Two (2) credit hours of PE185 credit may be granted toward an Associate degree at Mt. Hood for completion of military basic training. A copy of the DD214 form is required. C. Mathematics Four quarter-credit hours of college level mathematics with a grade of C or better (any mathematics course that has MTH95 or intermediate algebra or a higher course as a prerequisite, except MTH211). D. Oral Communication/Rhetoric Three quarter-credit hours of a speech course with a grade of C or better. E. Writing Nine quarter-credit hours at a level equivalent to WR121, 122, 123, or 227 with grades of C or better in each course. F. Distribution Requirements* 1. Humanities (Arts and Letters): A minimum of 12 credits chosen from at least two disciplines, with no more than nine credits from one discipline. Only six credits of skill-oriented classes can be used to meet humanities requirements. NOTE: In Arts and Letters, a second year of a foreign language may be included, but not the first year. American Sign Language is considered a foreign language. 2. Social Sciences: A minimum of 15 credits, chosen from at least two disciplines, with no more than nine credits from one discipline. 3. Science/Math/Computer Science: A minimum of 15 credits (including at least 12 credits in biological or physical sciences with laboratories) chosen from at least two disciplines.

8. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (i.e., spring term graduates should apply during fall term).

Associate of Science Degree The Associate of Science degree is designed for students who plan to transfer and complete a Bachelors of Science degree at a four-year institution. The degree requirements allow students more flexibility in course selection allowing them to focus on their discipline requirements. NOTE: Completion of this degree does not guarantee that all lower-division General Education requirements have been met for a baccalaureate degree (i.e., this is not a block transfer degree as is the AA/OT). In selecting courses for this degree, students are highly encouraged to consult the specific transfer curriculum pages in this catalog, the faculty adviser, and the institution to which they intend to transfer to determine if it is an appropriate choice. The Associate of Science degree will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours. See #5 for an explanation (Some majors may require more than 90 credit hours.) 2. Successfully complete all required courses. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit. Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum. 3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. 4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the core requirements. 5. Successfully complete the following: Courses (except for elective credits) must be selected from the list of approved courses for the Associate of Science (see pages 13-14). The list is available on the following pages and in the Admissions and Records Office, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or from the program adviser. A. Computer Literacy/Proficiency One quarter credit hour of college level computer-based coursework. B. Health and Physical Education A minimum of three credits which must include at least one class in Physical Education (PE) and one class in Health Education (HE). Other options: HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life or HPE285OL (3 credit) satisfies the total HPE requirement. PE285OL Wilderness Survival for two credits may satisfy the HPE requirement by completing one additional credit in either health or physical education. Two (2) credit hours of PE185 credit may be granted toward an Associate degree at Mt. Hood for completion of military basic training. A copy of the DD214 form is required.

* Each course must be at least three credits.

6. Complete elective courses to reach a total of 90 credits. The courses must be numbered 100 or above. However, only up to 12 credit hours of professional/technical courses numbered 100 or above may be applied as electives toward this degree. Professional/technical courses offered at community colleges in Oregon are identified by specific alpha prefixes. Please see pages 217-218 for a list of the professional-technical alpha prefixes offered at Mt. Hood Community College. A maximum of 15 credits of the highest level of ENL courses (ENL201R, ENL201S, ENL201W) may be applied as electives only toward the AA/OT Degree. A maximum of 9 credits of PE185 may be applied to the AA/OT degree.

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C. Mathematics Four quarter credit hours of college level mathematics with a grade of C or better (any mathematics course that has MTH95 or intermediate algebra or a higher course as a prerequisite, except MTH211). D. Oral Communication/Rhetoric Three quarter credit hours of a speech course with a grade of C or better. E. Writing Nine quarter credit hours at a level equivalent to WR121, 122, 123, or 227 with grades of C or better in each course. F. Distribution Requirements* Students must complete a minimum of nine credits in one of the three areas listed below, and a minimum of six credits in each of the remaining areas. 1. Humanities (Arts and Letters): Only six credits of skill-oriented classes can be used to meet humanities requirements. NOTE: In Arts and Letters, a second year of a foreign language may be included, but not the first year. American Sign Language is considered a foreign language. 2. Social Sciences 3. Science/Math/Computer Science

degree programs. Students transferring with this degree will have junior standing for registration purposes. For transfer students graduating from high school in 1997 and thereafter, the Oregon University System has a second language admission requirement: two terms of a college-level second language with an average grade of C- or above, OR two years of the same high school-level second language with an average grade of C- or above, or satisfactory performance on an approved second language assessment of proficiency. Demonstrated proficiency in American Sign Language meets this second language admission requirement.

Business School/Program Admission Admission to the business school/program of any Oregon University System (OUS) institution is not guaranteed upon completion of the Associate of Science/Oregon Transfer in Business (AS/OT-Bus) degree. It is strongly recommended that students contact the specific OUS campus’ business school/program early in the first year of their AS/OT-Bus program to be advised about additional requirements and procedures for admission consideration to the OUS institution and the business school/program.

Course and Elective Information Lower-division courses taken at the community college may not meet the requirements of an upper-division course with a similar title and content offered by an Oregon University System Business School/Program. In such cases, the courses in question will normally transfer as electives.

* Each course must be at least three credits.

6. Complete elective courses to reach a total of 90 credits. The courses must be numbered 100 or above. Professional-technical courses may be applied to the Associate of Science degree only if they are part of a current, formal transfer agreement with a four-year institution (see specific catalog transfer pages). Professional-technical courses offered at community colleges in Oregon are identified by specific alpha prefixes, see pages 217-218.

The AS/OT-Bus degree may include up to 12 approved professionaltechnical credits as electives.

A maximum of 15 credits of the highest level of ENL courses (ENL201R, ENL201S, ENL201W) may be applied as electives only toward the AS Degree. A maximum of 9 credits of PE185 may be applied to the AS degree.

2. Successfully complete all required courses. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit.

The Associate of Science - Oregon Transfer Degree in Business will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours. (Some majors may require more than 90 credit hours.)

Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum.

7. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 applicable hours of credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree/certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experience-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.

3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. 4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the core requirements. 5. Successfully complete the following: Courses (except for elective credits) must be selected from the list of approved courses for the Associate of Science – Oregon Transfer Degree in Business (see pages 13-14). The list is available on the following pages and in the Admissions, Registration and Records Office, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or from the program adviser. A. General Requirements: Note: Each course in this section must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. These requirements represent minimal skill competencies. As such, they may be open to demonstration of proficiency. 1. Writing: A minimum of eight credits of college-transfer writing courses. Designated courses are: WR121, WR122, WR227. 2. Oral Communications/Rhetoric: A minimum of three credits of a fundamentals of speech or communication course. 3. Mathematics: A minimum of 12 credits, MTH111 or above, four of which must be statistics. 4. Computer Applications: Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software as demonstrated by successful completion of three credits in applicable courses. B. Distribution Requirements* Note: In “Arts and Letters”, the second year of a foreign language may be included, but not the first year. ASL is considered a foreign language.

If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university. This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the coursework. 8. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (i.e., spring term graduates should apply during fall term).

Associate of Science - Oregon Transfer Degree in Business Any student who holds Associate of Science/Oregon Transfer in Business (AS/OT-Bus) degree that conforms to the following guidelines and who transfers to any institution in the Oregon University system, (University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Western Oregon University, Southern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology and Eastern Oregon University) will have met the lower-division general education requirements of that institution’s baccalaureate

12


1. Arts and Letters: A minimum of 12 credits, chosen from at least two disciplines. 2. Social Sciences: A minimum of 12 credits, with a minimum of eight credits of “principles of economics” (to include microeconomics and macroeconomics) at the 200 level. The courses in economics must be completed with a grade of “C” or better. 3. Science: A minimum of 12 credits of laboratory courses in the biological or physical sciences. *Each course must be at least three credits. C. Business-Specific Requirements: Note: Each course in this section must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university. This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the coursework. 8. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable graduation application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (i.e., spring term graduates should apply during fall term). The following is a list of approved courses, currently offered at Mt. Hood Community College, applicable to the Associate of Arts – Oregon Transfer Degree, the Associate of Science Degree, and the Associate of Science Oregon Transfer - Business. For additional approved general education courses no longer offered, please run a DARS audit to see if courses completed still apply. This list may be amended to include newly approved courses, again, please run a DARS audit for the most current information. Courses numbered 199 will qualify as elective credit only.

BA101 Introduction to Business BA211 Principles of Accounting I BA212 Principles of Accounting II BA213 Principles of Accounting III BA226 Introduction to Business Law (or other adviser-approved Business elective) D. Electives and/or University-Specific Prerequisites Note: This list of prerequisites and recommendations is subject to change without notice. 8 to 9 credits, depending on choice of transfer institution. Eastern Oregon University: WR227, Technical Report Writing; The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Oregon Institute of Technology: The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Recommendations: PSY201, General Psychology; BA206, Management and Supervisory Fundamentals (equivalent to BUS215 at OIT); WR227, Technical Writing Oregon State University: BA275, Business Quantitative Methods; MTH241 Calculus of Biological/Management/Social Sciences; MTH245, Math for Biological/Management/Social Sciences; The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Portland State University: CIS122 Computer Concepts III; BA205, Business Communications Using Technology; STAT244, Introduction to Probability and Statistics II; GPA: 2.75 overall and 2.75 in pre-business courses. Southern Oregon University: BA271 or BA282, Applied Business Statistics; GPA: 2.0 overall and 2.5 in all business courses. Students must apply for admission to the Business School/Program University of Oregon: DSC199 Special Studies: Business Applications Software; MTH241, MTH242, Calculus for Business and Social Science I, II; Multicultural requirement; GPA: 2.9 overall and 2.75 in pre-business core. Students must apply for admission to the Business School/Program Western Oregon University: The Business Law course for the AS/OTBus is required.

Computer Literacy (refer to specific transfer degree curricula for course selection) ART214, ART225, ART226, ART227 BA131, BA231 BT210 (summer 1999 or after) CIS120, CIS120L, CIS122, CIS125, CIS133JS, CS133JA, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS140, CIS144, CS125QRK, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS160, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS244, CS260 GE102

Health and Physical Education HE202, HE204, HE205, HE207, HE208, HE213, HE240, HE250, HE252, HE253, HE255, HE261, HE265, HPE285OL, HPE295 PE185, PE285OH (may use only 1 credit toward a PE185 requirement), PE292SWT

Mathematics (refer to specific transfer degree curricula for course selection) MTH105, MTH111, MTH112, MTH212, MTH213, MTH231, MTH241, MTH243, MTH244, MTH251, MTH252, MTH253, MTH254, MTH255, MTH256, MTH261

Oral Communication/Rhetoric SP100, SP111, SP112, SP114, SP115, SP218

Writing (refer to specific transfer degree curricula for course selection) WR121, WR122, WR123, WR227

6. Complete elective courses to reach a total of 90 credits. The courses must be numbered 100 or above. However, only up to 12 credit hours of professional/technical courses numbered 100 or above may be applied as electives toward this degree. Professional/technical courses offered at community colleges in Oregon are identified by specific alpha prefixes. Please see pages 217-218 for a list of the professional-technical alpha prefixes offered at Mt. Hood Community College. Courses that are developmental in nature, designed to prepare students for college transfer courses, are not applicable to this degree.

Distribution Requirements Humanities (Arts and Letters) ART115, ART116, ART117, ART197, ART204, ART205, ART206, ART211, ART212, ART213, *ART225, *ART226, *ART227, ART231, ART232, ART233, *ART234, *ART240, *ART241, *ART254, *ART255, *ART256, *ART257, *ART258, *ART259, *ART261, *ART262, *ART263, *ART264, *ART265, *ART266, *ART271, *ART272, *ART273, ART281, *ART288, *ART289, *ART291, *ART292, *ART293, *ART294, *ART296

A maximum of 15 credits of the highest level of ENL courses (ENL201R, ENL201S, ENL201W) may be applied as electives only toward the AS/OTBusiness Degree.

ASL201, ASL202, ASL203 ENG104, ENG105, ENG106, ENG107, ENG108, ENG109, ENG112, ENG113, ENG201, ENG202, ENG204, ENG205, ENG212, ENG214, ENG218, ENG221, ENG222, ENG250, ENG253, ENG254, ENG275

7. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 hours of applicable credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree/certificate is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement.

13


FA257, FA258, FA266

MTH105, MTH111, MTH112, MTH212, MTH213, MTH231, MTH241, MTH243, MTH244, MTH251, MTH252, MTH253, MTH254, MTH255, MTH256, MTH261

FR201, FR202, FR203 GER201, GER202, GER203

PH104L, PH109C, PH121, PH122, PH123, PH127, PH201L, PH202L, PH203L, PH211L, PH212L, PH213L

HUM100, HUM105, HUM106, HUM110, HUM111, HUM112, HUM202, HUM210

JPN201, JPN202, JPN203 MUS101, MUS105, MUS111, MUS112, MUS113, *MUS124, *MUS125, *MUS126, MUS205, MUS208, MUS211, MUS212, MUS213, MUS261, MUS262, MUS263 PHL201, PHL202, PHL203, PHL208 R210, R211, R212 RD117 RUS201, RUS202, RUS203 SP100, SP111, SP112, SP114, SP115, SP130, SP218, SP229, SP262 SPAN201, SPAN202, SPAN203 TA101, TA106, TA107, TA109, TA141, TA142, TA143, TA241 WR240, WR241, WR242, WR244, WR245, WR246, WR248 *Skill Oriented Class Social Sciences ANTH101, ANTH102, ANTH103, ANTH180, ANTH211, ANTH212, ANTH213, ANTH215, ANTH231, ANTH232 EC115, EC201, EC202, EC203 GEOG105, GEOG106, GEOG107, GEOG202, GEOG206, GEOG209, GEOG214, GEOG290 HST104, HST110, HST111, HST112, HST195, HST201, HST202, HST203, HST204, HST211, HST212, HST213, HST225, HST237, HST240, HST264, HST270, HST271, HST272, HST292, HST293, HST294 INTL101, INTL210 (3 - 4 credit versions only) J211 PS200, PS201, PS203, PS204, PS205, PS209, PS215, PS217, PS220, PS225, PS241, PS242, PS297 PSY101, PSY151, PSY201, PSY202, PSY203, PSY214, PSY216, PSY231, PSY232, PSY235, PSY236, PSY237, PSY239 SOC204, SOC205, SOC206, SOC213, SOC214, SOC215, SOC216, SOC223, SOC225, SOC232, SOC291 WS101 Science/Mathematics/Computer Science BI101L, BI102L, BI103L, BI110L, BI121L, BI122L, BI132L, BI145, BI211L, BI212L, BI213L, BI231L, BI232L, BI233L, BI234L, BI235L, BI240 BINF290 CH104L, CH105L, CH106L, CH110L, CH151L, CH170L, CH221L, CH222L, CH223L, CH241L, CH242L, CH243L CS160, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS260 ENGR201, ENGR202, ENGR211, ENGR212, ENGR213 F240L FN225 FW251, FW252L, FW253L, FW254L G148C, G165L, G201L, G202L, G203L GE101, GE102, GE115 GS104L, GS105L, GS106L

14

L

Lab Science Class


15


Quick Program Reference Guide SUMMER TERM 2007 - SPRING TERM 2008 Page

Program

PROFESSIONAL & TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS Phone

Degree/ Certification

Admission Category

Admission Requirement** Reading/Writing Math

Equivalent to completing: 19

Accounting Clerk

503-491-7196

Certificate

Open

*

*

Automotive Technology: 19

DaimlerChrysler CAP

503-491-7016

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

21

Ford ASSET

503-491-7016

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

22

Honda PACT

503-491-7016

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

23

IMPORT

503-491-7016

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

*

*

*

*

24

Business Management:

24

Accounting

503-491-7196

AAS

Open

25

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 503-491-7196

AAS

Open

26

Marketing, Management and eBusiness

503-491-7196

AAS

Open

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert.

Open

27/30 Computer Information Systems: Database Management

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert

Open

28/30 Computer Information Systems: Information Technology

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert

Open

29/31 Computer Information Systems: Networks and Operating Systems

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert

Open

29/31 Computer Information Systems: Web Management/Web Master

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert

Open

27

Computer Information Systems

32

Cosmetology: School of Hair Design

503-491-7196

AAS

Open

RD90/WR90

MTH10

33

Dental Hygiene

503-491-6070

AAS

Restricted

RD115/WR115

MTH65

34

Early Childhood Education

503-491-6070

AAS/Cert

Open

*

*

36

Engineering Technology:

36

Architectural

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert.

Open

*

*

37

Civil

503-491-7017

AAS

Open

*

*

38

- Environmental Option

503-491-7017

AAS Option

Open

*

*

38

Mechanical

503-491-7017

AAS/Cert.

Open

*

*

39

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 503-491-7196

Certificate

Open

*

*

40

Environmental Health and Safety

503-491-6081

AAS/Cert

Open

*

*

41

Fisheries Technology

503-491-6081

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20***

42

Funeral Service Education

503-491-6081

AAS

Restricted

RD90/WR90

MTH20

43

Hospitality and Tourism Management

503-491-7196

AAS/Cert

Open

*

*

16


Quick Program Reference Guide SUMMER TERM 2007 - SPRING TERM 2008 Page

Program

PROFESSIONAL & TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

Phone

Degree/ Certification

Admission Category

Admission Requirement** Reading/Writing Math

Equivalent to completing: 46

Integrated Media: Broadcasting

503-491-7410

AAS Option

Restricted

RD90/WR90

MTH10

47

Integrated Media: Digital Photography

503-491-7410

AAS Option

Restricted

RD90/WR90

MTH10

48

Integrated Media: Graphic Design

503-491-7410

AAS Option

Restricted

RD90/WR90

MTH10

49

Integrated Media: Video

503-491-7410

AAS Option

Restricted

RD90/WR90

MTH10

50

Machine Tool Technology

503-491-7016

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

51

Medical Assistant

503-491-6070

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH10

52

Medical Office Specialist

503-491-6070

AAS

Open

*

*

56

Medical Transcription

503-491-6070

AAS

Open

*

*

57

Mental Health/Human Service

503-491-6070

AAS

Restricted

RD90/WR115

MTH10

58

Mental Health/Human Service Youth Worker

503-491-6070

Certificate

Restricted

RD90/WR115

MTH10

59

Natural Resource Technology: Forest Resources

503-491-6081

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

60

Natural Resources Technology: Wildlife

503-491-6081

AAS

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

61

Natural Resources Technology

503-491-6081

Certificate

Limited

RD90/WR90

MTH20

61

Nursing

503-491-6070

AAS

Restricted

NA/WR121

MTH95

63

Office Assistant

503-491-7196

Certificate

Open

*

*

64

Office Management/Administrative Assistant

503-491-7196

AAS

Open

*

*

65

Office Management/Administrative Assistant: Human Resource Management

503-491-7196

AAS Option

Open

*

*

66

Office Management/Administrative Assistant: Web

503-491-7196

AAS Option

Open

*

*

66

Office Software Specialist

503-491-7196

Certificate

Open

*

*

67

Physical Therapist Assistant

503-491-6070

AAS

Restricted

RD115/WR115

MTH60

68

Practical Nursing

503-491-6070

Certificate

Restricted

RD115/WR115

MTH65

69

Professional Photography

503-491-7410

AAS

Restricted

RD90/WR115

MTH20

70

Respiratory Care

503-491-6070

AAS

Limited

RD115/WR115

MTH65

71

Retail Management

503-491-7196

Certificate

Open

72

Sheet Metal Technology

503-491-7401

AAS

Restricted

*

*

73

Surgical Technology

503-491-6070

AAS

Limited

RD115/WR115

MTH65

74

Welding Technology

503-491-7016

Certificate

Open

*

*

*While not required for admissions, please see curriculum page for writing and mathematics skill levels.

**Beginning the 2007-2008 school year, these are minimum requirements. *** Fisheries Students only - may be admitted with placement into MTH20, and then required to complete MTH20 by fall term

17


Professional-Technical Education Program Description

Occupational Extension Programs and Courses

Mt. Hood Community College offers selected professional-technical education curricula designed to prepare students for gainful employment. The professional-technical programs serve the community by providing business, industry and the trades with workers who have learned basic skills and competencies.

In addition to the regular professional and technical associate degree and certificate programs designed to prepare students for entry into occupational careers, Mt. Hood Community College offers occupational extension programs. The purpose of these programs is to develop the abilities, skills and attitudes needed to achieve employment stability or advancement.

The objectives of professional-technical education at Mt. Hood Community College are: • to provide pre-employment instruction in the development of manipulative skills and technical knowledge, including emphasis on health, safety, job orientation, business standards and ethics, customer relations, human relations in industry, and the responsibilities of citizenship. • to assist those in need of retraining and readjustment by providing professional-technical offerings to meet changing industrial conditions. • to provide apprenticeship and other skills, technical knowledge, safety and employer-employee relations for those already employed in industry. • to provide professional-technical education students with the opportunity to extend their educational achievements through participation in a program leading to an associate degree. • to contribute to the welfare of the community by providing conscientious, productive, intelligent workers. There are two basic types of professional-technical programs offered by MHCC:

Students enrolled in regular preparatory programs may apply occupational extension courses toward their major upon consent and approval of their program adviser. However, occupational extension programs are not financial aid eligible. The following occupational extension programs and courses are offered, depending upon the availability of fiscal resources: Central Service Technician……………………………Call 503-491-7459 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)…………………Call 503-491-7113 Nursing Assistant… …………………………………Call 503-491-7113 R.N. Surgical Orientation… …………………………Call 503-491-7179

Apprenticeship Mt. Hood Community College works in cooperation with the State Apprenticeship Council and the following Apprenticeship Training Committees: Brickmasons/Tilesetters………………………………… 503-234-3781 Carpenters …………………………………………… 503-287-3708 Cement Masons… ……………………………………… 503-408-8555 Central Electrical………………………………………… 541-917-6199 Crater Lake Electrical …………………………………… 541-773-5888 Glaziers, Architectural Metal and Glass Workers ……………………………………… 503-491-7359 Heat and Frost Insulators… …………………………… 503-255-5124 Ironworkers …………………………………………… 503-775-0877 NECA-IBEW Electrical Training… ……………………… 503-262-9991 Pacific Inside Electrical… ……………………………… 541-756-6997 Plasterers …………………………………………… 503-232-3257 Plumbers/Steamfitters and Marine Metal Trades… …… 503-691-1997 Roofers and Waterproofers…………… 503-546-4235 or 503-232-4807 Sheet Metal …………………………………………… 503-257-1022

The ASSOCIATE of APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE program provides two years of specialized education designed to prepare the student for career entry: The CERTIFICATE programs are occupation-oriented programs of shorter duration than the associate degree program. Transfer courses may be substituted for general education requirements in many professional-technical associate degree or certificate programs. All transfer course substitutions must be approved by the appropriate associate dean. Professional-technical programs that include related and/or approved electives as part of the curriculum may require approval from the adviser to take such courses PRIOR to registration.

For further information on apprenticeship programs, a web site is available, www.boli.state.or.us. If you prefer, you may call the State Apprenticeship Council at 503-731-4072, located at 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland, Oregon, or contact the Mt. Hood Community College Apprenticeship Coordinator, Melodie Barber at 503-491-7401.

Recognition of Completion Recognition of Completion is a non-transcripted award granted by Mt. Hood Community College to identify completion of a body of coursework in specific areas. see page CAM - CNC Milling… ……………………………………………… 51 CAM - CNC Turning… ……………………………………………… 51 Computer Numerical Control… …………………………………… 51 Journalism ……………………………………………………… 103 Medical Billing Specialist/Claims Analyst… ……………………… 55 Medical Office Coding……………………………………………… 55 Medical Receptionist… …………………………………………… 54 Outdoor Education……………………………………………… 109 Welding Technology… …………………………………………… 74

Alternative Credit College Now TECH PREP. Students from high schools that have College Now Tech Prep program articulation agreements with MHCC may earn credit as outlined in the program agreements. The procedure for earning credit may be through completion of course standards as approved by MHCC instructional staff or as detailed in the program agreements. Earned credit will be transcripted on the MHCC permanent record. Participation in College Now Tech Prep does not automatically enroll a person in an MHCC certificate or degree program. MHCC admissions procedures and requirements must still be met. Your local high school can provide interested students with procedures.

18


First Quarter (Fall)

Accounting Clerk Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Jerry Kohler: 503-491-7408 - Room AC 2682 Jim Arnold: 503-491-7468 - Room AC 2664

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing1; or CIS120 Computer Concepts I and CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I1. .................................. 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 BT11S Keyboarding/Formatting1........................................ 2

Jerry.Kohler@mhcc.edu Jim.Arnold@mhcc.edu

14 Second Quarter (Winter)

Do you want a career that will provide you continued opportunities for growth and recognize your achievements every step of the way? After completing the third quarter, you will receive the Accounting Clerk certificate recognizing the employable skills you have acquired and documenting your completion of the one-year program.

BA177 Payroll Accounting and Payroll Tax Filing Requirements............................................ 3 BA212 Principles of Accounting II...................................... 3 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT116 Communication Technologies................................... 3 BT210__ Excel - Level II1. .................................................... 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2. ........................... 3

Students with a limited amount of time or funds can get started in this practical, cost effective program. Recent high school graduates who need employable skills in a relatively short period of time, small business owners or prospective small business owners who need the accounting basics and business office skills, and returning students who want retraining into a career that provides continued opportunities for advancement all find this program attractive. Many accounting students work part or full time.

16 Third Quarter (Spring) BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 BA228 Computer Accounting Applications........................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management ..................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

Completion of the first quarter prepares you for an entry level office job requiring word processing and data entry skills, use and understanding of a basic accounting system, manual and/or electronic organization and maintenance of office records, as well as a general understanding of business terminology and business math including the use of an electronic calculator.

16

Completion of the second quarter qualifies you to be among the few job applicants who are prepared to process payroll, meeting all the needs of the employer and the legal reporting requirements. In addition to learning the basic principles and applications of computer technology you will be proficient in using computer spreadsheets, the accountant’s most important computer tool. Business communication skills and the ability to use office computer programs will further strengthen your ability to make a contribution in any business environment.

Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1 2

Note: Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all Accounting classes in order to be awarded an Accounting Clerk certificate. Students interested in pursuing an AAS may select the Business Management - Accounting option, see pages 24 - 25.

Completion of the one-year program will enable you to help managers use accounting information when making decisions. You will also gain experience in recording accounting transactions which are encountered less frequently and make recommendations when there are reporting options. Your ability to use a commercial accounting software package and apply electronic spreadsheets to various accounting situations will enable you to be efficient as well as knowledgeable.

DaimlerChrysler CAP – Automotive Technology

The longer you are able to stay in the program the more qualified you will be to assume additional job responsibilities. Many students start the Accounting Clerk program and then decide they want to expand their knowledge and skills and be rewarded for performing even more challenging job responsibilities by earning a two-year degree. Students wanting to pursue a two-year degree must talk to a faculty adviser.

MHCC Faculty Advisers Steve Michener: 503-491-7148 - Room IT 52 Steve.Michener@mhcc.edu Mark Lambrecht: 503-491-7111 - Room IT 51 Mark.Lambrecht@mhcc.edu

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

The DaimlerChrysler College Automotive Program (CAP) provides students with a unique opportunity to earn income while being trained as service technicians for DaimlerChrysler Corporation dealerships (Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep). The program is designed as a two-year automotive curriculum to develop the technical competency and professionalism of the incoming dealership technician. The CAP program is a two-part experience with training taking place at both Mt. Hood Community College and at the sponsoring DaimlerChrysler dealership. The curriculum leads to an associate degree in Automotive Technology and a certificate of completion from DaimlerChrysler CAP program.

If you plan to transfer to a four-year school you can enroll in the accounting specialty of the Business Administration transfer degree program. You will also have the opportunity to take additional advanced accounting courses to strengthen your preparation for upper-division course work at a university. Consult a faculty adviser for assistance in identifying and selecting courses which may be of most benefit to you. A career in accounting is for people with above-average mathematical and analytical skills who have good communication skills and want to work in a business environment. Today, more than ever, the accountant/bookkeeper must be a team player. Interacting and working in small groups is encouraged and developed in many of the courses in the accounting programs. Computer skills are also developed throughout the programs and incorporated into courses whenever appropriate.

Aimed at men and women who have a career interest in the automotive industry, this program demands a commitment to both work and study for a two-year period including fall, winter, spring and summer terms both years.

19


The CAP Student

Second Quarter

DaimlerChrysler dealerships see the students in this program as its “service technicians of the future”. The instructional facilities are equipped with some of the finest and up-to-date equipment available. CAP students have the assurance of industry support and certain employment options for the future. Being accepted in the CAP program means learning the latest automotive technology and being paid for on-the-job experience.

Third Quarter

6

AM132 Automotive Electronics I Theory ............................. 2 AM133 Automotive Electronics I Lab ................................. 1 AM136 Brake Systems Theory............................................. 2 AM137 Brake Systems Lab.................................................. 1 AM170 Automotive Project I.............................................. 1 AM216 Engine Performance I Theory .................................. 3 AM217 Engine Performance I Lab ...................................... 2 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1,2. .......................................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safe shop practices and hazardous material handling • diagnose and repair automotive electrical systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive engine performance systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive emission systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive internal combustion engine systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive automatic transmission and transaxles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive manual drive train and axles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive brakes systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive steering and suspension systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive heating and air conditioning systems as to NATEF Standard • perform minor vehicle services.

18 Fourth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Fifth Quarter

6

AM251 Engine Performance II Theory ................................ 3 AM252 Engine Performance II Lab ..................................... 3 AM253 Steering and Suspension Theory............................... 2 AM254 Steering and Suspension Lab................................... 1 AM256 Heating and Air Conditioning Theory........................ 2 AM257 Heating and Air Conditioning Lab............................ 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3

15 Sixth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Seventh Quarter

6

AM152 Automatic Transmission Theory................................ 3 AM153 Automatic Transmission Lab.................................... 3 AM156 Power Train Theory................................................. 2 AM157 Power Train Lab...................................................... 1 AM258 Automotive Electronics II Theory . .......................... 2 AM259 Automotive Electronics II Lab ................................ 1 AM270 Automotive Project II............................................. 1 General Education Distribution requirement‡............ 3

The Sponsoring Dealer DaimlerChrysler dealerships will screen qualified applications and select those they wish to sponsor. Once a student has been selected, he or she will begin working at the dealership alternate terms during the two-year training process. Dealers will provide an experienced technician to monitor student work, service uniforms and an hourly wage. Applicants to the program are accepted on a limited entry basis after meeting the selection criteria for the program. Applications are available on our web site, www.mhcc.edu. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165, 503-491-7111, or 503-491-7148.

16 Eighth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Registration in program classes after the start of the first term may be possible with instructor permission. For interested students, AM100, Automotive Skill Building (1 credit) provides individuals with the fundamental information and skills required to enroll in other CAP program courses before the first day of the 3rd term. For further information, contact a program adviser. To be fully admitted into the program, students must apply for and be accepted into the program for the following academic year.

First Quarter

Cr

AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Cr

AM110 Internal Combustion Engine Theory.......................... 3 AM111 Internal Combustion Engine Lab.............................. 2 AM118 Electrical Systems Theory........................................ 4 AM119 Electrical Systems Lab............................................ 2 AM120 Minor Vehicle Services............................................ 2 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I1 ............................................. 3 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

19

20

6 Students placing directly into MTH65 without taking MTH60 will need to complete a three-credit distribution requirement‡ 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‡ See pages 7-10.


process. Dealers will provide an experienced technician to monitor student work, service uniforms, and an hourly wage.

FORD ASSET – Automotive Technology

Admission is based on meeting application deadlines and satisfactory completion of criteria. All criteria is described in the application packet. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc. edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165, 491-7203 or 491-7130.

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Jerry Lyons: 503-491-7203 - Room IT 35 Bob McDonald: 503-491-7130 - Room IT 53

Registration in program classes after the start of the first term may be possible with instructor permission. For interested students, AMF100, Automotive Skill Building (1 credit) provides individuals with the fundamental information and skills required to enroll in other ASSET program courses before the first day of the 3rd term. For further information, contact a program adviser. To be fully admitted into the program, students must apply for and be accepted into the program for the following academic year.

Jerry.Lyons@mhcc.edu Bob.McDonald@mhcc.edu

The Automotive Student Service Educational Training program (ASSET) provides students with a unique opportunity to earn income while being trained as service technicians for Ford Motor Company’s current and future vehicles. Designed as a two-year automotive curriculum to upgrade the technical competency and professional level of the incoming dealership technician, ASSET is a two-part experience with training taking place at both Mt. Hood Community College and at sponsoring Ford and Lincoln/Mercury dealerships. The curriculum was developed by MHCC in conjunction with Ford Motor Company, and leads to an associate degree in Ford ASSET automotive technology.

First Quarter

Cr

AMF110 Internal Combustion Engine Theory.......................... 3 AMF111 Internal Combustion Engine Lab.............................. 2 AMF118 Electrical Systems Theory........................................ 4 AMF119 Electrical Systems Lab............................................ 2 AMF120 Minor Vehicle Services............................................ 2 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I1 ............................................. 3 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

Aimed at men and women who have a career interest in the automotive industry, ASSET demands a commitment to both work and study for a twoyear period, including fall, winter, spring and summer terms both years.

The FORD ASSET Student Ford Motor Company sees the students in ASSET programs across the nation as its “service technicians of the future.” The finest technical schools have been selected as program sites, and all instructional facilities are equipped with the most up-to-date and professional equipment available. ASSET students have not only the reassurance that a major corporation is placing stock in them by their selection for training, but they also have relatively certain employment options for the future. Being chosen for the ASSET program means learning from Ford‑certified instructors and being paid for on-the-job experience.

19 Second Quarter AMF280 Ford Dealership Experience...................................... 6

Third Quarter

6

AMF132 Automotive Electronics I Theory ............................. 2 AMF133 Automotive Electronics I Lab ................................. 1 AMF136 Brake Systems Theory............................................. 2 AMF137 Brake Systems Lab.................................................. 1 AMF170 Automotive Project I.............................................. 1 AMF216 Engine Performance I Theory .................................. 3 AMF217 Engine Performance I Lab ...................................... 2 HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies or HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life or Health and Physical Education requirement‡......... 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1,2. .......................................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safe shop practices and hazardous material handling • diagnose and repair automotive electrical systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive engine performance systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive emission systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive internal combustion engine systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive automatic transmission and transaxles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive manual drive train and axles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive brakes systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive steering and suspension systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive heating and air conditioning systems as to NATEF Standard • perform minor vehicle services.

18 Fourth Quarter AMF280 Ford Dealership Experience...................................... 6

Fifth Quarter

6

AMF251 Engine Performance II Theory ................................ 3 AMF252 Engine Performance II Lab ..................................... 3 AMF253 Steering and Suspension Theory............................... 2 AMF254 Steering and Suspension Lab................................... 1 AMF256 Heating and Air Conditioning Theory........................ 2 AMF257 Heating and Air Conditioning Lab............................ 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3

15 Sixth Quarter AMF280 Ford Dealership Experience...................................... 6

The Sponsoring FORD ASSET Dealer Ford and Lincoln/Mercury dealerships in the Portland metropolitan area will screen qualified ASSET applicants and select those they wish to sponsor. Once a student has been selected, he or she will begin working at the dealership alternate terms during the two- year training

21

6


Seventh Quarter

Cr

• diagnose and repair automotive emission systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive internal combustion engine systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive automatic transmission and transaxles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive manual drive train and axles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive brakes systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive steering and suspension systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive heating and air conditioning systems as to NATEF Standard • perform minor vehicle services.

AMF152 Automatic Transmission Theory................................ 3 AMF153 Automatic Transmission Lab.................................... 3 AMF156 Power Train Theory................................................. 2 AMF157 Power Train Lab...................................................... 1 AMF258 Automotive Electronics II Theory . .......................... 2 AMF259 Automotive Electronics II Lab ................................ 1 AMF270 Automotive Project II............................................. 1 General Education Distribution requirement‡............ 3

16 Eighth Quarter AMF280 Ford Dealership Experience...................................... 6

6 Students placing directly into MTH65 without taking MTH60 will need to complete a three-credit distribution requirement‡ 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

The Sponsoring Dealer Honda/Acura dealerships will screen qualified applications and select those they wish to sponsor. Once a student has been selected, he or she will begin working at the dealership alternate terms during the twoyear training process. Dealers will provide an experienced technician to monitor student work, service uniforms and an hourly wage.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Honda PACT – Automotive Technology

Applicants to the program are accepted on a limited entry basis after meeting the selection criteria for the program. Applications are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165, 503-491-7111, or 503-491-7148.

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Registration in program classes after the start of the first term may be possible with instructor permission. For interested students, AM100, Automotive Skill Building (1 credit) provides individuals with the fundamental information and skills required to enroll in other PACT program courses before the first day of the 3rd term. For further information, contact a program adviser. To be fully admitted into the program, students must apply for and be accepted into the program for the following academic year.

MHCC Faculty Advisers Steve Michener: 503-491-7148 - Room IT 52 Steve.Michener@mhcc.edu Mark Lambrecht: 503-491-7111 - Room IT 51 Mark.Lambrecht@mhcc.edu

The Honda Professional Automotive Career Training (PACT) provides students with a unique opportunity to earn income while being trained as service technicians for American Honda Motor’s Acura and Honda dealerships. The program is designed as a two-year automotive curriculum to develop the technical competency and professionalism of the incoming dealership technician. The PACT program is a two-part experience with training taking place at both Mt. Hood Community College and at the sponsoring Honda dealership. The curriculum leads to an associate degree in Automotive Technology and a certificate of completion from Honda PACT program.

First Quarter

Cr

AM110 Internal Combustion Engine Theory.......................... 3 AM111 Internal Combustion Engine Lab.............................. 2 AM118 Electrical Systems Theory........................................ 4 AM119 Electrical Systems Lab............................................ 2 AM120 Minor Vehicle Services............................................ 2 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I1 ............................................. 3 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

Aimed at men and women who have a career interest in the automotive industry, this program demands a commitment to both work and study for a two-year period including fall, winter, spring and summer terms both years.

19 Second Quarter

The PACT Student

AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Honda dealerships see the students in this program as its “service technicians of the future”. The instructional facilities are equipped with some of the finest and up-to-date equipment available. PACT students have the assurance of industry support and certain employment options for the future. Being accepted in the PACT program means learning the latest automotive technology and being paid for on-the-job experience.

Third Quarter

6

AM132 Automotive Electronics I Theory.............................. 2 AM133 Automotive Electronics I Lab................................... 1 AM136 Brake Systems Theory............................................. 2 AM137 Brake Systems Lab.................................................. 1 AM170 Automotive Project I.............................................. 1 AM216 Engine Performance I Theory .................................. 3 AM217 Engine Performance I Lab ...................................... 2 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1,2. .......................................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safe shop practices and hazardous material handling • diagnose and repair automotive electrical systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive engine performance systems as to NATEF Standard

18 Fourth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

22

6


Fifth Quarter

Cr

students have the assurance of industry support and certain employment options for the future. Being accepted in the IMPORT program means learning the latest automotive technology and being paid for on-the-job experience.

AM251 Engine Performance II Theory ................................ 3 AM252 Engine Performance II Lab ..................................... 3 AM253 Steering and Suspension Theory............................... 2 AM254 Steering and Suspension Lab................................... 1 AM256 Heating and Air Conditioning Theory........................ 2 AM257 Heating and Air Conditioning Lab............................ 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safe shop practices and hazardous material handling • diagnose and repair automotive electrical systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive engine performance systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive emission systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive internal combustion engine systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive automatic transmission and transaxles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive manual drive train and axles systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive brakes systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive steering and suspension systems as to NATEF Standard • diagnose and repair automotive heating and air conditioning systems as to NATEF Standard • perform minor vehicle services.

15 Sixth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Seventh Quarter

6

AM152 Automatic Transmission Theory................................ 3 AM153 Automatic Transmission Lab.................................... 3 AM156 Power Train Theory................................................. 2 AM157 Power Train Lab...................................................... 1 AM258 Automotive Electronics II Theory . .......................... 2 AM259 Automotive Electronics II Lab ................................ 1 AM270 Automotive Project II............................................. 1 General Education Distribution requirement‡............ 3

16 Eighth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

6 Students placing directly into MTH65 without taking MTH60 will need to complete a three-credit distribution requirement‡ 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

The Sponsoring Dealer Independent and Import dealerships will screen qualified applications and select those they wish to sponsor. Once a student has been selected, he or she will begin working at the dealership alternate terms during the two-year training process. Dealers will provide an experienced technician to monitor student work, service uniforms and an hourly wage.

‡ See pages 7-10.

IMPORT – Automotive Technology

Applicants to the program are accepted on a limited entry basis after meeting the selection criteria for the program. Applications are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165, 503-491-7111, or 503-491-7148.

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Steve Michener: 503-491-7148 - Room IT 52 Steve.Michener@mhcc.edu Mark Lambrecht: 503-491-7111 - Room IT 51 Mark.Lambrecht@mhcc.edu

Registration in program classes after the start of the first term may be possible with instructor permission. For interested students, AM100, Automotive Skill Building (1 credit) provides individuals with the fundamental information and skills required to enroll in other IMPORT program courses before the first day of the 3rd term. For further information, contact a program adviser. To be fully admitted into the program, students must apply for and be accepted into the program for the following academic year.

The Individualized Mechanical Program of Repair Technicians (IMPORT) provides students with a unique opportunity to earn income while being trained as service technicians for independent and import manufacturers (Mazda, Nissan, BMW, VW, etc.). The program is designed as a two-year automotive curriculum to develop the technical competency and professionalism of the incoming dealership technician. The IMPORT program is a two-part experience with training taking place at both Mt. Hood Community College and the sponsoring import dealership. The curriculum leads to an associate degree in automotive technology and a certificate of completion in IMPORT auto repair.

First Quarter

Cr

AM110 Internal Combustion Engine Theory.......................... 3 AM111 Internal Combustion Engine Lab.............................. 2 AM118 Electrical Systems Theory........................................ 4 AM119 Electrical Systems Lab............................................ 2 AM120 Minor Vehicle Services............................................ 2 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I1 ............................................. 3 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

Aimed at men and women who have a career interest in the automotive industry, this program demands a commitment to both work and study for a two-year period including fall, winter, spring, and summer terms both years.

19 Second Quarter

The IMPORT Student

AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Import dealerships see the students in this program as its “Service technicians of the future.” The instructional facilities are equipped with some of the finest and up-to-date equipment available. IMPORT

23

6


Third Quarter

Cr

Students in the Business Management AAS degree will develop the business skills and managerial “know how” to become valuable assets to any company. The degree offers a core set of courses in accounting, finance, business law, economics, management, marketing, and human resources that will prepare students to enter and succeed in today’s companies. The degree offers options in Accounting; eBusiness Management and Marketing; and Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management, where students can focus on specific areas of concentration.

AM132 Automotive Electronics I Theory ............................. 2 AM133 Automotive Electronics I Lab ................................. 1 AM136 Brake Systems Theory............................................. 2 AM137 Brake Systems Lab.................................................. 1 AM170 Automotive Project I.............................................. 1 AM216 Engine Performance I Theory .................................. 3 AM217 Engine Performance I Lab ...................................... 2 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1,2. .......................................... 3 Health/Physical Education requirement‡.................. 3

Students will receive a “leading edge” education with practical application. This program is for you if: • You are already in business seeking to upgrade your skills. • You are a new entrant to the business world. • You want to become an effective business leader.

18 Fourth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Fifth Quarter

6

Primary Occupations are Business Management, Administrative/Office Management, Financial Management, Marketing Management, and many, many more.

AM251 Engine Performance II Theory ................................ 3 AM252 Engine Performance II Lab ..................................... 3 AM253 Steering and Suspension Theory............................... 2 AM254 Steering and Suspension Lab................................... 1 AM256 Heating and Air Conditioning Theory........................ 2 AM257 Heating and Air Conditioning Lab............................ 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3

Potential Employers are too many to name! From wholesale to retail, from service businesses to financial agencies, from large businesses to your own business, from government agencies to educational systems, the world of exciting career choices are open to you. For employment information, salary information and career choices, please contact the faculty advisers, MHCC’s Career Planning and Counseling Center, or www.qualityinfo.org.

15 Sixth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Seventh Quarter

Program Outcomes

6

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate an understanding of critical thinking in business • describe basic business functions • apply basic accounting principles to analyze and classify transactions • explain the role of marketing • prepare basic financial statements • explain the legal concepts related to business.

AM152 Automatic Transmission Theory................................ 3 AM153 Automatic Transmission Lab.................................... 3 AM156 Power Train Theory................................................. 2 AM157 Power Train Lab...................................................... 1 AM258 Automotive Electronics II Theory . .......................... 2 AM259 Automotive Electronics II Lab ................................ 1 AM270 Automotive Project II............................................. 1 General Education Distribution requirement‡............ 3

Curricula follows for each of the three Business Management options.

16 Eighth Quarter AM280 Automotive Dealership Experience........................... 6

Business Management Accounting

6 Students placing directly into MTH65 without taking MTH60 will need to complete a three-credit distribution requirement‡ 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Jim Arnold: 503-491-7468 - Room AC 2664 Jerry Kohler: 503-491-7408 - Room AC 2682

‡ See pages 7-10.

Jim.Arnold@mhcc.edu Jerry.Kohler@mhcc.edu

Do you want an accounting career but don’t have the time and/or money to get a four-year business degree? Graduates of MHCC’s Business Management - Accounting AAS Degree Program are well prepared for accounting placement exams. Graduates complete for positions as: • accounting manager • full-charge bookkeeper • staff accountant • accounts payable manager, etc.

Business Management Associate of Applied Science Degree Program with options in: • Accounting • Marketing, Management and eBusiness • Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Today’s business environment is changing more rapidly and is more competitive than ever. In this environment, it is the business leaders’ skills, attitudes, and leadership abilities that will determine which companies succeed and which fail.

24


Upon successful completion you will: • have a solid foundation of accounting concepts • have hands-on experience using a computerized commercial accounting package and electronic spreadsheets • be able to process payroll, meeting all the needs of the employer and the legal reporting requirements • be able to analyze financial statements and use accounting information to assist management in becoming more profitable and efficient

For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree or Eastern Oregon University’s four-year degree in Business, please consult faculty advisers for information. Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu

Cr

Business Management Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing; or CIS120 Computer Concepts I and CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I..................................... 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 BA218 Personal Finance ................................................... 3

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

MHCC Faculty Adviser Rodney Barker: 503-491-6971 - Room AC 2688 Rodney.Barker@mhcc.edu

BA212 Principles of Accounting II...................................... 3 BA223 Principles of Marketing........................................... 4 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡.......................... 3 WR121 English Composition .............................................. 3

Have you ever thought of owning your own business or working for a small business? The Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management program will prepare you for self-employment and careers in small business. The program includes instruction and training in evaluating small business ideas and opportunities, developing skills, and understanding the resources necessary to go into business.

16 Third Quarter (Spring) BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 BA228 Computer Accounting Applications........................... 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3

As you know, anyone can start a business. The problem, however, is that many people don’t know what’s involved, don’t know the risks and don’t have the skills to start and successfully operate a business or work for an already existing business. At the completion of this program, you will not only have a degree, but you also will have newly developed, practical skills to feel confident that you can start and successfully run a small business.

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) AC261 Intermediate Accounting I...................................... 3 BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 BA220 Tax Accounting...................................................... 3 BA222 Finance................................................................. 3 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4

This program is directly focuses on the practical, hands-on aspects of small business. Your success starts here at MHCC.

First Quarter (Fall)

AC262 Intermediate Accounting II..................................... 3 BA177 Payroll Accounting and Payroll Tax Filing Requirements........................................... 3 BA226 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 BA231 Information Technology in Business......................... 4

15 Second Quarter (Winter) BA223 Principles of Marketing........................................... 4 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡ ........................ 3 WR121 English Composition .............................................. 3 Adviser approved electives3..................................... 3

14 Sixth Quarter (Spring) BA215 Cost Accounting..................................................... 3 BA250 Small Business Management.................................... 4 BA271 Financial Statement Analysis................................... 3 Adviser approved electives3 or WE280BU_ Cooperative Education Internship........ 6

16 Third Quarter (Spring)

16

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing; or CIS120 Computer Concepts I and CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I..................................... 4 BA150 Developing a Small Business.................................... 3 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4

17 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Electives to be approved by faculty adviser on Catalog Exception Form.

‡ See pages 7-10. For students interested in the Accounting Clerk program (Certificate), please refer to page 19 in the catalog.

Although some companies still require a four-year degree, more and more employers are recognizing that MHCC’s Accounting students have the knowledge and skills to handle their accounting needs.

First Quarter (Fall)

3

BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 BA249 Retail Management................................................. 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. MTH111 credits can be used as approved related electives. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

17

25


Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Cr

First Quarter (Fall)

BA202 Customer Service and Employee Relations................. 3 BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 BA222 Finance................................................................. 3 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Adviser approved electives3 .................................... 3

17 Fifth Quarter (Winter) BA226 BA231 BA238 EC202

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing; or CIS120 Computer Concepts I and CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I..................................... 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 BA218 Personal Finance ................................................... 3

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 Information Technology in Business......................... 4 Sales..................................................................... 3 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4

BA223 Principles of Marketing........................................... 4 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡ ........................ 3 WR121 English Composition .............................................. 3 Adviser approved electives3..................................... 3

15 Sixth Quarter (Spring) BA224 BA250

16 Third Quarter (Spring)

12

BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 BA239 Advertising in Business........................................... 3 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

Human Resource Management.................................. 3 Small Business Management.................................... 4 Adviser approved elective3 or WE280BU_ Cooperative Education Internship ....... 5

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. MTH111 credits can be used as approved related electives. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Electives to be approved by faculty adviser on Catalog Exception Form. 1

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 BA222 Finance................................................................. 3 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Adviser approved electives3 or WE280BU_ Cooperative Education Internship ....... 5

‡ See pages 7-10.

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

For students interested in the Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Certificate, please refer to pages 39-40 in this catalog.

BA226 BA231 BA238 BA265

For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree or Eastern Oregon University’s four-year degree in Business, please consult faculty advisers for information.

Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 Information Technology in Business......................... 4 Sales..................................................................... 3 eManagement......................................................... 3

14 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu

BA224 BA250 BA267 EC202

Business Management Marketing, Management and eBusiness

Human Resources Management................................ 3 Small Business Management.................................... 4 eBusiness Project Management................................ 3 Principles of Economics II....................................... 4

14

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

MHCC Faculty Adviser David Garlington: 503-491-7467 - Room AC 2687 Dave.Garlington@mhcc.edu Study.Business@mhcc.edu

Preparing students to be tomorrow’s business leaders is the goal of this Marketing, Management and eBusiness option. Critical skills in sales and advertising, human resource management and eBusiness will provide career opportunities in this diverse business climate. Thriving in change, flexibility and adaptability are keys to success. This program meets the challenge by offering current content and skills for preparation in careers in

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. MTH111 credits can be used as approved related electives. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Suggested adviser approved electives include: BA212, BA215, BA249, EHS230, MTH243, MTH244, BT210__ Excel- Level II and Access - Level II 1

‡ See pages 7-10.

For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree or Eastern Oregon University’s four-year degree in Business, please consult faculty advisers for information. Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu

• sales management • project management • eBusiness • human resources • accounts management

26


• demonstrate knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and certification requirements in the use of computer hardware and operating systems technology • prepare a comprehensive plan for implementing a LAN (local area network) in a small business environment • identify career and transfer options early in students’ academic careers • demonstrate competency in information literacy, quantitative reasoning and critical thinking • demonstrate the ability to translate oral and wr itten specifications into an effective solution using established problem-solving techniques • explain and discuss ethical, legal, and societal implications inherent in the information technology field and an understanding of the historical context of modern computing.

Computer Information Systems Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Robert Buroker: 503-491-6019 - Room AC 2779 Robert.Buroker@mhcc.edu Jack Fassel: 503-491-7672 - Room 1274 Jack.Fassel@mhcc.edu Gary DeRoest: 503-491-7339 - Room AC 2781 Gary.DeRoest@mhcc.edu Dr. Wayne Machuca: 503-491-7631 - Room AC 2783 Wayne.Machuca@mhcc.edu Paul Morris: 503-491-7303 - Room AC 2778 Paul.Morris@mhcc.edu Begin your pathway to a successful career in Computer Information Systems at Mt. Hood Community College. This program will not only train people who are beginning their information systems career, but will also assist people to become more productive in their existing jobs or professions. You can earn an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree, a specialized Certificate, or train in one of the following areas:

• • • •

Specific program and class information can be obtained by calling the Computer Information Systems Department at 503-491-7515, or visit our web site at www.mhcc.edu/programs.

Computer Information Systems: Database Management

database management information technology network and operating systems management web management/webmaster

We offer instruction in HTML, wireless and network security, computer programming languages such as Java, C++, Perl, and Visual Basic.Net, computer operating systems such as Microsoft Windows, Novell Netware, Macintosh and Linux, hardware installation, information system management, as well as foundation-building, general computer skills, and courses that lead to industry certification such as CISCO and Oracle. According to the Oregon Employment Department’s statewide employment analysis, “The 2002-2012 growth rate for this occupation is projected to be much faster than average. Total job openings are projected to be much higher than average.?

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Jack Fassel: 503-491-7672 - Room 1274

First Quarter (Fall)

Jack.Fassel@mhcc.edu

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 BA101 Introduction to Business or any business management course......................................... 3-4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra I (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate appropriate knowledge of computer equipment and peripherals characteristically used in a business environment • describe and demonstrate the functions and features of the Windows operating system • demonstrate proficiency in common industry software applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access) to effectively communicate in a professional setting • demonstrate ability to research business and employment information using published materials, electronic media, databases, and the Internet • demonstrate the ability to communicate orally and in writing at a level necessary for successful employment in business • perform business-related mathematical operations using database and spreadsheet applications • demonstrate the ability to research employment opportunities and prepare an effective e-portfolio • use effective written and oral communication skills techniques • use critical thinking skills during the problem solving process • work cooperatively to share information, resolve conflict and make decisions • demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot and solve technical problems • apply technology in using available resources to identify and describe viable solutions

15-16 Second Quarter (Winter) CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WP Word Processing..................................................... 3 CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

17 Third Quarter (Spring) CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125SS Spreadsheets......................................................... 3 CIS151 Network Fundamentals............................................ 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or BA205 Business Communications...................... 3-4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

17-18 Fourth Quarter (Fall) CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 CS244 Introduction to Systems Analysis............................. 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

12-13

27


Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Cr

Second Quarter (Winter)

CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4 CIS133SQL Introduction to SQL................................................ 3 CIS240WS Web Servers........................................................... 3 WE280CAD Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

17-18 Sixth Quarter (Spring) CIS133JS CIS133XML CIS135DBM CIS297

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

JavaScript I........................................................... 3 Introduction to XML............................................... 3 Database Modeling and Design................................. 3 Capstone Project Development................................. 5

CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125SS Spreadsheets......................................................... 3 CIS151 Network Fundamentals............................................ 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or BA205 Business Communications...................... 3-4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

14

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Electives include any CIS/CS courses other than those required in the core program and/or those in the specific curriculum track. You can select from the following; any others must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form: CIS125GA, CIS125GB, CIS125GC, CIS125WGA, CIS125WSC, CIS133JS, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS140U, CIS145, CIS152, CIS154, CIS188, CIS225, CIS227, CIS240WS, CIS279A, CIS279S, CIS284, CS133JA, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS260.

1

17-18 Fourth Quarter (Fall) CIS145 Hardware Installation Support and System Maintenance........................................... 4 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 CS244 Introduction to Systems Analysis............................. 3 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

13-14 Fifth Quarter (Winter) CIS225 Computer End-User Support I................................... 4 CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

‡ See pages 7-10.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year school must consult with the institution they will be attending as well as work with a CIS faculty adviser. In all schedule planning, it is important for the student to check the course description for prerequisite information.

14-15 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree, please consult faculty advisers for information.

CIS227 System Support I.................................................... 4 CIS297 Capstone Project Development................................. 5 WE280CAD Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

Transfer School Web Link:

13

Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Electives include any CIS/CS courses other than those required in the core program and/or those in the specific curriculum track. You can select from the following; any others must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form: CIS125GA, CIS125GB, CIS125GC, CIS125WGA, CIS125WSC, CIS133JS, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS135DBM, CIS140U, CIS145, CIS152, CIS154, CIS188, CIS225, CIS227, CIS240WS, CIS279A, CIS279S, CIS284, CS133JA, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS260.

Computer Information Systems: Information Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Robert Buroker: 503-491-6019 - Room AC 2779 Robert.Buroker@mhcc.edu

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WP Word Processing..................................................... 3 CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 BA101 Introduction to Business or any business management course......................................... 3-4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra I (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year school must consult with the institution they will be attending as well as work with a CIS faculty adviser. In all schedule planning, it is important for the student to check the course description for prerequisite information. For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree, please consult faculty advisers for information.

15-16

Transfer School Web Link: Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu

28


Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Electives include any CIS/CS courses other than those required in the core program and/or those in the specific curriculum track. You can select from the following; any others must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form: CIS125GA, CIS125GB, CIS125GC, CIS125WGA, CIS125WSC, CIS133JS, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS135DBM, CIS140U, CIS145, CIS152, CIS154, CIS188, CIS225, CIS227, CIS240WS, CIS279A, CIS279S, CIS284, CS133JA, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS260.

Computer Information Systems: Networks and Operating Systems Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Gary DeRoest: 503-491-7339 - Room AC 2781 Gary.DeRoest@mhcc.edu Paul Morris: 503-491-7303 - Room AC 2778 Paul.Morris@mhcc.edu

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 BA101 Introduction to Business or any business management course......................................... 3-4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra I (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

1

‡ See pages 7-10. Students planning to transfer to a four-year school must consult with the institution they will be attending as well as work with a CIS faculty adviser. In all schedule planning, it is important for the student to check the course description for prerequisite information. For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree, please consult faculty advisers for information.

15-16 Second Quarter (Winter) CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WP Word Processing..................................................... 3 CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Transfer School Web Link: Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu

Computer Information Systems: Web Management/ WebMaster

17 Third Quarter (Spring) CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125SS Spreadsheets......................................................... 3 CIS151 Network Fundamentals............................................ 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or BA205 Business Communications...................... 3-4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Wayne Machuca: 503-491-7631 - Room AC 2783 Wayne.Machuca@mhcc.edu

17-18 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 BA101 Introduction to Business or any business management course......................................... 3-4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra I (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

CIS140U Unix/Linux Management......................................... 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 CS244 Introduction to Systems Analysis............................. 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

15-16 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

15-16 Second Quarter (Winter)

CIS152 Fundamentals of Routing Theory and Technology....... 4 CIS188 Wireless Network Concepts and Design..................... 3 CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4 CIS279A Novell Systems Management.................................... 3 WE280CAD Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WP Word Processing..................................................... 3 CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

18 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

CIS154 Intermediate Routing Switching - WAN Theory and Technologies................................................ 4 CIS279S Windows Server Operating System............................ 4 CIS284 Network Security Fundamentals .............................. 4 CIS297 Capstone Project Development................................. 5

CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125SS Spreadsheets......................................................... 3 CIS151 Network Fundamentals............................................ 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or BA205 Business Communications...................... 3-4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

17

17-18

29


Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Cr

classes instruct students in up-to-date theoretical basics to assist them in getting off to a solid start.

CIS125WSC Website Creation Using Dreamweaver........................ 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 CS244 Introduction to Systems Analysis............................. 3 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

First Quarter (Fall) CIS100 CIS120 CIS120L CIS140 CS244 MTH65

12-13 Fifth Quarter (Winter) CIS125WGA Web Graphics Animation I....................................... 3 CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4 WE280CAD Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 Electives in CIS2. ................................................ 3-4

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

14-15 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS133SQL Introduction to SQL................................................ 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

CIS133JS JavaScript............................................................. 3 CIS133XML Introduction to XML............................................... 3 CIS297 Capstone Project Development................................. 5 CS133PRL CGI Programming with PERL..................................... 4 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

15 Third Quarter (Spring)

18

CIS133JS JavaScript I........................................................... 3 CIS133XML Introduction to XML............................................... 3 CIS135DBM Database Modeling and Design................................. 3 CIS297 Capstone Project Development................................. 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Electives include any CIS/CS courses other than those required in the core program and/or those in the specific curriculum track. You can select from the following; any others must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form: CIS125GA, CIS125GB, CIS125GC, CIS125WGA, CIS125WSC, CIS133JS, CIS133SQL, CIS133XML, CIS135DBM, CIS140U, CIS145, CIS152, CIS154, CIS188, CIS225, CIS227, CIS240WS, CIS279A, CIS279S, CIS284, CS133JA, CS133PRL, CS133VB, CS161, CS162, CS233JA, CS233VB, CS234JA, CS234VB, CS260.

Cr

Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 Introduction to Systems Analysis............................. 3 Beginning Algebra II (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

1

17

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

This Certificate program easily transfers into the Computer Information Systems AAS Degree.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Students planning to transfer to a four-year school must consult with the institution they will be attending as well as work with a CIS faculty adviser.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Computer Information Systems - Information Technology

In all schedule planning, it is important for the student to check the course description for prerequisite information. For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree, please consult faculty advisers for information.

Certificate

Transfer School Web Link: Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu

MHCC Faculty Adviser Robert Buroker: 503-491-6019 - Room AC 2779 Robert.Buroker@mhcc.edu

Computer Information Systems - Database Management

The Information Technology Certificate program prepares students for work in Information Systems (IS) and Information Technology (IT) industries. Career positions information and system management are waiting for motivated, talented, and qualified people trained in system troubleshooting, maintenance, and analysis. This certificate program will teach you how to plan and assist in determining what the next computer system, software application, or network would best meet corporate requirements.

Certificate MHCC Faculty Adviser Jack Fassel: 503-491-7672 - Room AC 1271

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS125WP Word Processing..................................................... 3 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 CIS145 Hardware Installation Support and System Maintenance...................................................... 4

Jack.Fassel@mhcc.edu

The Database Management Certificate program prepares individuals to design and manage the construction of databases and related software programs and applications using the Oracle Tools as a baseline. In today’s corporate climate, data needs to be processed and stored in databases. Relatively few people know how to effectively create and maintain these databases. This area is a highly skilled occupation. Our

16

30


Second Quarter (Winter)

Cr

Third Quarter (Spring)

CIS125DB Desktop Database................................................... 3 CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 CIS225 Computer End-User Support I................................... 4 CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4

16 Third Quarter (Spring)

15

CIS125SS Spreadsheets......................................................... 3 CIS297 Capstone Project Development................................. 5 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology ................................ 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

This Certificate program easily transfers into the Computer Information Systems AAS Degree.

17

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Certificate

‡ See pages 7-10.

MHCC Faculty Adviser Wayne Machuca: 503-491-7631 - Room AC 2783 Wayne.Machuca@mhcc.edu

Computer Information Systems - Networks and Operating Systems

The WebMaster Certificate Program provides students with a foundation that will help them be successful in creating dynamic web sites for a variety of companies. The program prepares individuals to design and publish images, graphics, sound and other multimedia products on the World Wide Web. Tools such as HTML, XML, and JavaScript, along with other graphics applications are incorporated into the program. Designing, developing, and maintaining web sites are central components of this program as well as emerging web technologies and e-commerce tools.

Certificate MHCC Faculty Advisers Gary DeRoest: 503-491-7339 - Room AC 2781 Gary.DeRoest@mhcc.edu Paul Morris: 503-491-7303 - Room AC 2778 Paul.Morris@mhcc.edu

First Quarter (Fall)

MHCC’s Network Systems Management certificate program prepares students for work in the Information Technology (IT) industry. Jobs in computer networking and system administration are waiting for qualified and motivated individuals. This program will teach you the underlying networking concepts and theory, how to administer and troubleshoot the network infrastructure, how to set up and manage network operating systems such as Microsoft Windows Server, Novell NetWare, and Linux, and how to control network security. One-year certificate and two-year degree options are available.

First Quarter (Fall)

Students intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

Computer Information Systems - Web Management/ WebMaster

This Certificate program easily transfers into the Computer Information Systems AAS Degree.

Cr

CIS154 Intermediate Routing Switching - WAN Theory and Technologies................................................ 4 CIS279S Windows Server Operating Systems........................... 4 CIS284 Network Security Fundamentals............................... 4 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology ................................ 3

Cr

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology ................................ 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Cr

18 Second Quarter (Winter)

CIS100 Computer Careers Exploration.................................. 1 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 CIS151 Network Fundamentals............................................ 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher, excluding MTH211)1‡............................................................. 3

CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WGA Web Graphics Animation I....................................... 3 CIS125WSC Web Site Creation Using Dreamweaver....................... 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3

16 Third Quarter (Spring)

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

CIS133JS CIS133XML CS133PRL CIS297

CIS140U Linux/Unix System Management.............................. 3 CIS140W Windows Operating systems..................................... 2 CIS152 Fundamentals of Routing Theory and Technology....... 4 CIS188 Wireless Network Concepts and Design or CIS279A Novell Systems Management................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

JavaScript I........................................................... 3 Introduction to XML............................................... 3 CGI Programming with PERL..................................... 4 Capstone Project Development................................. 5

15 This Certificate program easily transfers into the Computer Information Systems AAS Degree.

15

31


• demonstrate client services correctly using a variety of salon products in accordance with the manufacturers’ directions • demonstrate services in a safe environment taking measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases • illustrate the proper use of implements, materials and tools used in hair design/esthetics/nail technology services • practice marketing of professional salon retail products • demonstrate mastery of the basic application techniques of all hair design/esthetics/nail technology services within the time frames required by the Oregon State Board of Cosmetology for certification • evaluate the structure and composition of the skin, hair, and nails • evaluate disorders and diseases of the skin, hair, and nails • evaluate which diseases should be referred to a physician and should not be treated in the salon • evaluate the conditions that counter-indicate any salon service • apply the basic business applications of Cosmetology.

S tudents intending to transfer must take MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or above, excluding MTH211. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Cosmetology – School of Hair Design Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Lynn D’Angelo: 503-491-7194 - Room AC 2686 Lynn.D’Angelo@mhcc.edu Juanita Loveland: 503-491-7499 - Room AC 1168 Juanita.Loveland@mhcc.edu

The cosmetology industry is an exciting, adventurous and creative field full of color, fashion, and diversity. The instructors in the MHCC cosmetology program pride themselves in helping students acquire the knowledge and necessary skills to enter the field of hair design, nail technology and esthetics.

What are the requirements of the job? The cosmetologist should possess a pleasing personality, be a good listener and enjoy working in a service industry. Coordination and finger dexterity as well as the ability to stand for long periods of time are necessary. The cosmetologist must be able to learn new techniques quickly and apply these in his/her own work.

Cosmetology is an open enrollment program with admission being based on space available each term. New students are accepted into the program each term with an add slip signed by a cosmetology adviser on a first-come, first-served basis. If you have questions regarding enrollment or the dates of information sessions, please call 503-4917499 or 503-491-7194 to speak with a cosmetology adviser, or e-mail either Juanita.Loveland@mhcc.edu or Lynn.DAngelo@mhcc.edu

What are the requirements of the program? The program consists of seven consecutive terms , including summer term, with an attendance of 30 clock hours each week.

The Cosmetology program at Mt. Hood Community College offers indepth instruction and hands-on training in hair design, esthetics (skin care) and nail technology (manicuring and sculptured nails.) Upon completion of the 2300-hour course consisting of lecture, lab, clinic time and general education, the student will be prepared to take the state board examination. After passing this examination, the student will receive a certificate to practice in his/her new career.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

COS__ Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 COS__ Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 WR121 English Composition or WR101 Workplace Communications I..................... 3

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

The opportunities in the field of cosmetology are limitless. Depending upon the individual’s skills, self-confidence, attitude, knowledge and creativity, certified cosmetologists can utilize their new skills in a variety of settings.

COS__ COS__ MTH65

Program Outcomes

Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‡........................... 3

15 Third Quarter (Spring)

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • complete all COS courses with a minimum of 2.0 grade average • demonstrate a basic understanding of the tax laws and guidelines that govern federal income tax of small businesses and the self employed • demonstrate how to keep accurate business records • articulate a complete understanding of the Oregon Administrative Rules chapter 817 Cosmetology • demonstrate the sanitary and safety precautions that should be observed when performing a hair design/esthetics/nail technology service • employ all safety and sanitation procedures in the lab/clinic area • articulate a complete understanding of the Oregon Revised Statutes chapter 690 Cosmetology • analyze clients to determine their needs and preferences • demonstrate the pre-service and post-service steps of all chemical services • apply all hair design/esthetic/nail technology services in accordance with a clients needs or expectations

COS__ COS__

Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 Speech elective3.................................................... 3

15 Fourth Quarter (Summer) COS__ COS__

Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8

12 Fifth Quarter (Fall) COS__ Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 COS__ Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 PSY201 General Psychology or PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations................ 3

15 Sixth Quarter (Winter) COS__ COS__

Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 Health and Physical Education requirement 3‡............ 3

15

32


Seventh Quarter (Spring)

Cr

Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/ LRadmissions. Information sessions are also offered on a regular basis. The information sessions are listed in the application packets. Once you have read the application materials and attended an information session, you may call 503-491-7341 if you have questions about the admission process.

COS__ Beauty Culture Theory1........................................... 4 COS__ Beauty Culture Lab and Clinic1................................. 8 Distribution requirement3‡ (chosen from ART, PSY, SOC, or foreign language).. 3

15

COS10 and COS11 are offered only Fall and Spring terms at the MHCC site. COS12 - COS19 are offered all terms. COS10 - COS19 must be taken in sequence. COS20 and COS21 are offered Summer term at the MHCC site; COS22 and COS23 are offered Winter term at the MHCC site. COS20 - COS23 are not sequential and are taken in the term they are offered. Course placement is based on the term in which a student begins and the student must see the program adviser for placement. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 In selecting Speech, or Health and Physical Education, or distribution requirement, the student may consult with the program adviser. Selections not from the following list must be pre-approved by a faculty adviser and submitted on a Catalog Exception Form. Examples of courses to be selected are: Health and Physical Education: HE252, HE253 Distribution: ART115, ART116, ART117, PSY‡, and SOC‡, or foreign language. Speech: SP100, SP111, SP112, SP114, SP115, SP218 ‡ See pages 7-10. 1

Employment Opportunities/Personal Aptitude Areas of employment open to dental hygienists include private dental offices or clinics, industrial dental programs, public health, etc. Salaries vary and are commensurate with experience and scope of responsibilities. Opportunities for dental hygienists are excellent. The personal requirements necessary to succeed as a dental hygienist begin with a strong belief in the importance of good oral health and include an aptitude for the biological sciences. Of prime importance are manual dexterity, high ethical standards, a genuine interest in science and an ability to work with people. NOTE: Prior to entry into the Dental Hygiene program, students must satisfactorily complete CH104, CH105 and CH106, or the equivalent, as well as selected high school level coursework. CH104 must be completed prior to the application deadline. During the program students must maintain a C grade or better in all dental hygiene courses to progress and to be recommended for dental hygiene licensure examinations. Although BI121 and BI122 is the anatomy and physiology sequence currently required, students are encouraged to enroll in BI231, BI232 and BI233. This more advanced series fulfills the anatomy and physiology requirement and may transfer more readily for advanced degrees.

Dental Hygiene

All classes outside the core curriculum (those not preceded by DH) except general pathology may be taken prior to admission to the Dental Hygiene program.

Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Teresa H. Tong: 503-491-7691 - Room AC 2726

Students who used the College Placement Test (CPT) to demonstrate mathematics proficiency for program admission as of 2004 – 2005 will not meet the general education requirement for the Associate of Applied Science Degree. Three credits of a mathematics course (MTH65 or higher, excluding MTH211) must be transcripted before graduation. Please see pages 7-10 for more details about the general education requirements of the Applied Associate of Science Degree. To receive points on your application a 100-level or higher mathematics course must be completed (excluding MTH211).

Teri.Tong@mhcc.edu

The Dental Hygiene program at Mt. Hood Community College is six quarters in length, leading to an associate degree. Academic instruction in basic and dental sciences is integrated with instruction in dental hygiene therapy, dental procedures, and work in clinical settings to provide a total learning experience for the dental hygiene student. Having completed the program and passed National and Regional Board examinations for dental hygienists, the graduate can be licensed to practice. Some institutions and agencies require a baccalaureate degree for employment. To this end, many courses in the Mt. Hood Community College dental hygiene curriculum are transferable to fouryear colleges and can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter

Cr

DH111 Introduction to Dental Hygiene............................... 2 DH112 Principles of Clinical Dental Hygiene........................ 3 DH113 Dental/Oral Anatomy.............................................. 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I......... 4 BI234 Microbiology.......................................................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • prepare dental hygienists who will be able to effectively assess, plan, implement and evaluate current dental hygiene services • develop appropriate decision making skills and the utilization of professional judgment, conduct and ethics to provide optimum patient care • promote innovative approaches to problem solving and critical thinking that stimulate independence and responsibility • enhance communication skills that enable students to work effectively with diverse populations as members of the health care team • promote active participation and leadership in community activities and professional associations • instill a commitment to continued education and skill development.

18 Second Quarter DH121 Dental Hygiene Clinical Theory I.............................. 2 DH122 Dental Hygiene Clinic I1.......................................... 3 DH123 Oral Histology/Embryology...................................... 2 DH124 Oral Radiology I..................................................... 3 DH125 General Pathology.................................................. 3 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 1

18

33


Third Quarter

Cr

Program Outcomes

DH131 Dental Hygiene Clinical Theory II............................. 1 DH132 Dental Hygiene Clinic II.......................................... 3 DH134 Oral Radiology II.................................................... 2 DH135 Oral Pathology....................................................... 2 DH136 Pharmacology........................................................ 3 DH137 Head and Neck Anatomy.......................................... 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or SP100 Basic Speech Communication..................... 3

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate an exemplary work ethic and uphold the standards of the profession • use positive guidance strategies to promote children’s development • manage a classroom using Developmentally Appropriate Practices and all relevant guidelines • provide a learning environment designed to promote children’s optimal development in all domains with emphasis on secure relations, self-efficacy and flexible thinking • develop positive relationships with families and community to best support each child’s optimal development

18 Fourth Quarter DH211 Dental Hygiene Clinical Theory III........................... 1 DH212 Dental Hygiene Clinic III......................................... 5 DH213 Expanded Functions................................................ 2 DH214 Periodontology for Dental Hygienists I..................... 2 DH215 Dental Materials..................................................... 2 DH216 Community Dental Health........................................ 2 DH217 Local Anesthesia.................................................... 2 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 1

Enrollment in the early childhood classes is open to all interested students, whether attending school full- or part-time. However, only a limited number of practicum opportunities is available and enrollment in this aspect of the program is available only with consent of the program faculty. Many of the courses are also excellent for parents and others who work with young children.

17 Fifth Quarter

With or without accommodation, students must fulfill the program competencies for practicum experiences with young children. The safety and well-being of children is always of primary importance. Certificate and degree candidates should anticipate practicum settings with physical, emotional and mental challenges. Students with questions about the nature of the program should arrange for an individual appointment with a program adviser.

DH221 Dental Hygiene Clinical Theory IV............................ 1 DH222 Dental Hygiene Clinic IV......................................... 5 DH223 Public Health and Dental Research........................... 2 DH224 Periodontology for Dental Hygienists II.................... 2 FN225 Nutrition............................................................... 4 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3

Early Childhood Education options include certificate and AAS programs. Consult ECE program advisers regarding your individual needs.

17 Sixth Quarter

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

DH231 Dental Hygiene Clinical Theory V.............................. 1 DH232 Dental Hygiene Clinic V........................................... 5 DH233 Ethics and Jurisprudence......................................... 2 DH234 Practice Management and Dental Hygiene Issues....... 2 SOC204 General Sociology................................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 1

First Quarter

17

1

All students are required to participate in a background check and drug testing prior to attending clinical rotations.

16 Second Quarter

‡ See pages 7-10.

ECE131 ECE145 ECE150 ECE156 WE280CDC

Early Childhood Education Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Ellen White: 503-491-6985 - Room EC 22

Cr

ECE123 Early Childhood Literature and Language.................. 2 ECE140 Introduction to Early Childhood Education1. ............. 2 ECE146 Curriculum: Foundations......................................... 3 ECE156 Cooperative Planning Seminar I2.............................. 1 ECE170 Health, Safety, and Nutrition.................................. 2 WE280CDC Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3 WR101 Workplace Communications or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

Ellen.White@mhcc.edu

Child Development.................................................. 3 Techniques of Positive Guidance.............................. 3 Curriculum: Play1. .................................................. 3 Cooperative Planning Seminar II2. ........................... 1 Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3

13 Third Quarter

The Early Childhood Education program prepares students to work with children from birth through school age in both public and private school settings. This program is designed for persons of all ages and backgrounds, with special attention given to individual student needs and abilities. A two-year program leading to an associate degree is available. Graduates are trained to work in a variety of educational and child-care settings, including nursery school, pre-school, day care, private kindergarten, and as para-professionals in the public schools. Course work and practical work experience emphasize knowledge of normal growth and development, guidance skills with young children, and the planning and directing of activities for children which foster positive intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth and development.

ECE147 ECE152 ECE157 ECE160 MTH65

Infant/Toddler Caregiving....................................... 3 Creative Explorations.............................................. 3 Sensory Motor........................................................ 3 Interpersonal Skills................................................ 2 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)3‡........................ 3-4

14-15 Fourth Quarter ECE156 ECE231 ECE236 ECE244 WE280CDC

Cooperative Planning Seminar III2........................... 1 Child Development: Theory to Practice..................... 3 Curriculum: Social-Emotional................................... 3 Observation for Curriculum Development.................. 3 Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3 Distribution requirement‡ . .................................... 3

16

34


Fifth Quarter

Cr

Second Quarter

Cr

ECE156 Cooperative Planning Seminar IV2............................ 1 ECE224 Early Childhood Math and Science............................ 3 ECE237 Curriculum: Physical/Motor..................................... 3 ECE245 Guidance Challenges............................................... 3 WE280CDC Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

ECE131 ECE145 ECE150 ECE156 WE280CDC

16 Sixth Quarter

16 Third Quarter

ECE156 Cooperative Planning Seminar V2. ............................ 1 ECE238 Curriculum: Cognition............................................. 3 ECE246 Parent/Family Relations.......................................... 2 ECE260 Values and Issues in Early Childhood Education......... 2 PSY235 Human Development: I: Infancy-Adolescence............ 3 WE280CDC Cooperative Education Internship2 .......................... 3 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

ECE147 ECE152 ECE157 ECE160 MTH65

ECE140 may be taken Fall or Winter; ECE150 may be taken Winter or Spring 2 ECE156 and WE280CDC must be taken concurrently. Level I seminar and co-op may be taken Fall or Winter term. Level II seminar and co-op may be taken Winter or Spring term. 3 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Your prior training and current job experience may provide the knowledge needed to successfully challenge a course. An ECE faculty adviser will work individually with you to outline a degree path using a combination of traditional classes, on-site evaluation of your teaching and caregiving experience and non-traditional credit for prior learning. • Get credit for what you know. • Cut the time required to earn your college degree. • Maintain your employment.

Early Childhood Education Certificate Program Ellen.White@mhcc.edu

Successful completion of the curriculum for a one-year certificate allows a student to move into the second year of the Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS). (Students must complete with a C grade average.) A one-year certificate prepares a student to enter the field of early childhood education as a teacher, or assistant teacher in child care centers and private preschools or as a nanny.

Non-traditional credit can provide the flexibility you need to make your dream of a college degree a reality! (All students must successfully complete coursework and practicum competencies required for graduation. College and program requirements apply.)

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter

‡ See pages 7-10.

Non-traditional credit can help you earn a degree or certificate while you’re working in early childhood education. You must have completed 12 credits at MHCC to be eligible.

‡ See pages 7-10.

MHCC Faculty Advisers Ellen White: 503-491-6985 - Room EC 22

ECE156 and WE280CDC must be taken concurrently. Level I seminar and co-op may be taken Fall or Winter term. Level II seminar and co-op may be taken Winter or Spring term. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Special opportunities for teachers and caregivers - Learn while you earn!

Students must successfully complete 1st year classes/certificate coursework prior to admission to 2nd year classes. Program advisers will determine individual eligibility

Infant/Toddler Caregiving....................................... 3 Creative Explorations.............................................. 3 Sensory Motor........................................................ 3 Interpersonal Skills................................................ 2 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‡........................ 3-4

14-15

17

Child Development.................................................. 3 Techniques of Positive Guidance.............................. 3 Curriculum: Play..................................................... 3 Cooperative Planning Seminar II1............................. 1 Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

Employment Skills Training

Cr

Certificate (less than one-year)

ECE123 Early Childhood Literature and Language.................. 2 ECE140 Introduction to Early Childhood Education................ 2 ECE146 Curriculum: Foundations......................................... 3 ECE156 Cooperative Planning Seminar I1.............................. 1 ECE170 Health, Safety, and Nutrition.................................. 2 WE280CDC Cooperative Education Internship1 .......................... 3 WR101 Workplace Communications or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

MHCC Adviser: Students must contact MHCC Worksource Oregon staff, faculty adviser, or academic adviser for assistance in developing the EST.

The Employment Skills Training (EST) Certificate provides flexibility for students who are seeking specific training for an occupational goal and job-entry preparation. EST certificates have the following components: • 12-44 credits • Minimum college and/or industry proficiencies (see section minimum proficiencies) • Each pre-approved plan will target a specific occupational goal and job entry point in existing degree and certificate professional/technical programs. • Students can enroll at the beginning of any term during the year.

16

35


Program Outcomes

Minimum Proficiencies Students must demonstrate minimum proficiencies defined by college and/or industry standards, whichever is most applicable, beneficial to the student and academically sound. Industry standards are understood through consultation with employers, market information, professional/technical advisory committee members, and other data sources. Division deans will have final authority over setting said minimum proficiencies.

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • master the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their disciplines • apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of mathematics, science, engineering and technology • conduct, analyze and interpret experiments and apply experimental results to improve processes • apply creativity in the design of systems, components or processes appropriate to program objectives • function effectively on teams • identify, analyze and solve technical problems • communicate effectively • engage in lifelong learning • describe professional, ethical and social responsibilities • respect diversity and knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and global issues • commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Students must meet college proficiency and prerequisite requirements for all courses included in the approved plan. Occupational proficiency is defined specific to chosen occupations and industry standards. Planning a Curriculum - Creating a Certificate: Before beginning a curriculum, students are required to have a preapproved plan in place. An interview with an adviser or a faculty member with the professionaltechnical department is required to determine the student’s career goals as they relate to employability and program content. All MHCC college-level courses are eligible to be included in the certificate. Developmental or basic education courses may not be included as part of the certificate.

Additional outcomes are further identified for each specific Engineering Technology program.

The curriculum plan is initiated when the student meets with an adviser and completes the form “Individual Student Plan”. The adviser then meets with the applicable Division Dean to review the plan. Minimum proficiencies and plan contents are reviewed, amended and approved by the Division Dean. A copy of the approved plan is provided to the student, the adviser and the Admissions, Registration and Records Office.

Listed below are the requirements for all three degrees offered. Questions may be directed to the program adviser as listed for each engineering degree.

Architectural Engineering Technology

Students who have an approved EST plan on file with the Admissions, Registration and Records Office must petition for certificate completion six months before they have completed all the required course work. It is the responsibility of the student to petition for the certificate. If the student does not complete the course of study after one year, the plan will be purged and the student will need to reinstate another plan.

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program (One-year certificate also available) MHCC Faculty Adviser Mike Brayson: 503-491-7118 - Room AC 2572 Mike.Brayson@mhcc.edu

Engineering Technology Architectural, Civil, or Mechanical…

This degree focuses on engineering technology as it relates to the design and construction of buildings. Many opportunities exist in the construction industry which include; building design, construction management, inspection, quality control, materials sales, and technical support. Architectural engineering technicians could find employment with structural design firms, general and specialty contractors, and engineered component manufacturers. Job opportunities also exist in various parts of federal, state and local government. The AET program also offers a one-year certificate for those successfully completing the first three terms of the two-year AAS degree. Contact the AET adviser for more information.

Engineering Technology is a professional technical career that involves the practical application of science and mathematics along with engineering knowledge, methods, and skills to support activities in design, manufacturing and construction. Engineering technicians provide a critical link between design professionals and craftspeople doing the work. Employment opportunities exist for men and women in this growing, fast-paced, and ever-evolving occupation. Mt. Hood Community College offers Associate in Applied Science degrees in three areas of specialization which are Architectural, Civil, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

Additional Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • employ concepts of architectural theory and design in a design environment • utilize modern instruments, methods and techniques to produce A/E documents and presentations • conduct standardized field and laboratory testing on construction materials • utilize modern instruments and research techniques for site development and building layout • determine forces and stresses in elementary structural systems • estimate material quantities for technical projects

Emphasis is “hands on” experience with much of the coursework focusing on common tasks that technicians actually will do in industry on a day-to-day basis. Skills and abilities expected of a technician participating in engineering related fields include: computer literacy, problem solving, critical thinking, communication, flexibility, and the ability to work in teams. With the tremendous range of jobs related to engineering technology, some employers may require only a few of these skills where others may need all of them and more.

36


• calculate basic loads and demands in mechanical and electrical systems • utilize codes, contracts and specifications in design, construction and inspection activities • employ productivity software to solve technical problems.

First Quarter (Fall)

Civil Engineering Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Thomas McCormack: 503-491-7001 - Room AC 2391 Thomas.McCormack@mhcc.edu

Cr

ET120 Architectural Drawing............................................. 3 ET123 Introduction to Engineering Technology .................. 3 ART115 Basic Design I or Related Elective1........................ 3-4 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right Triangle Trigonometry2.................................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

The field of civil engineering is the most visible of the engineering disciplines. The highways and streets we drive on; the airports, harbors, and railroads that connect our country; the water and sewer systems that protect our health; and the dikes and dams that protect our property are all the product of the civil engineering team. The civil engineering team also supports the work of architects by designing building sites, foundations and the structural framework on which the actual building is constructed. Typical job titles for this degree include civil engineering technician, survey technician, design drafter, construction inspector and materials technician.

17-18 Second Quarter (Winter) ET135 Practical Descriptive Geometry................................ 3 ET144 Computer Applications in Engineering Technology..... 3 ET154 Computer Aided Design I3. ...................................... 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions2...................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Additional Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • utilize graphic techniques to produce engineering documents • conduct standardized field and laboratory testing on civil engineering materials • utilize modern surveying methods for land measurement and/or construction layout • determine forces and stresses in elementary structural systems • estimate material quantities for technical projects • employ productivity software to solve technical problems.

17 Third Quarter (Spring) ET130 Architectural CAD Drawing...................................... 3 ET150 Plane Surveying or Related Elective...................... 3-4 MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry/Geometry2. ................ 5 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

17-18 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

First Quarter (Fall)

ET204 Computer Aided Design II3...................................... 3 ET221 Statics.................................................................. 4 PH201 General Physics I or CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I or G201 Principles of Geology.............................. 4-5 Social Sciences/Humanities distribution requirement‡................................... 3

14-15 Fifth Quarter (Winter) ET231 ET240 ET261 HPE295

Cr

ET120 Architectural Drawing ............................................ 3 ET123 Introduction to Engineering Technology .................. 3 CIS120 Computer Concepts I ............................................. 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right Triangle Trigonometry..................................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

18 Second Quarter (Winter)

Basic Strengths of Materials.................................... 4 Project Design I..................................................... 3 Concrete Construction Design.................................. 3 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

ET154 Computer Aided Design I1........................................ 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

13 Sixth Quarter (Spring) ET250 Project Design II.................................................... 3 ET262 Mechanics of Soils.................................................. 3 ET263 Structures............................................................. 4 ET265 Site Development................................................... 3 WE280ET_ Cooperative Education Internship or Related elective......................................... 3-4

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

16-17

15 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

ET142 ET150 MTH112 WR227

If a related elective is to be taken instead of ART115, it is suggested that HPE295 be taken in the first quarter and the related elective be taken in the fifth quarter. Related electives listed on page 39. 2 MTH60, 80, 85 may be substituted for MTH95, 111, 112 for Certificate only. 3 ET161 and ET162 may be substituted for ET154. ET163 and ET164; or ET175, ET176, ET177, and ET179 may be substituted for ET204. 1

Civil CAD............................................................... 3 Plane Surveying..................................................... 4 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry/Geometry................... 5 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

ET200 Route Surveying..................................................... 4 ET204 Computer Aided Design II1 ..................................... 3 ET221 Statics.................................................................. 4 PH201 General Physics I or CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I . ................... 5

16

‡ See pages 7-10.

37


Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Cr

Fourth Quarter (Fall)

ET222 Fluid Mechanics..................................................... 3 ET231 Basic Strengths of Materials.................................... 4 FT228 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems............................................................. 3 MTH241 Elementary Calculus or MTH243 Probability and Statistics I or MTH251 Calculus I.......................... 4 Related elective..................................................... 3

18 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring) ET232 ET262 ET263 ET265

ET222 Fluid Mechanics..................................................... 3 ET231 Basic Strengths of Materials.................................... 4 FT228 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems....... 3 EHS201 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations II........ 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

Sanitary and Storm Sewer Design............................. 3 Mechanics of Soils.................................................. 3 Structures or Related elective.................................. 4 Site Development................................................... 3 Social Sciences/Humanities distribution requirement‡........3

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

16

ET161 and ET162 may be substituted for ET154. ET163 and ET164 may be substituted for ET204.

1

ET262 ET265 EHS230 HPE295

‡ See pages 7-10.

Civil Engineering Technology: Environmental

Mechanics of Soils.................................................. 3 Site Development................................................... 3 Sustainable Business Practice.................................. 3 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

15

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Thomas McCormack: 503-491-7001 - Room AC 2391 Thomas.McCormack@mhcc.edu

ET154 may be substituted for ET161 and ET162. ET163 and ET164 may be substituted for ET204.

1 2

‡ See pages 7-10.

Mechanical Engineering Technology

The field of civil engineering is the most visible of the engineering disciplines. The highways and streets we drive on; the airports, harbors, and railroads that connect our country; the water and sewer systems that protect our health; and the dikes and dams that protect our property are all the product of the civil engineering team. The environmental option will provide preparation that allows the civil engineering technician to support civil engineers in the environmental issues related to all areas of city, county and state infrastructure.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

ET204 Computer Aided Design II2...................................... 3 ET221 Statics.................................................................. 4 EHS101 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations I......... 3 ESR271 Environmental Science II: Introduction to Environmental Engineering.............................. 4 MTH251 Calculus I.............................................................. 4

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program (One-year certificate also available) MHCC Faculty Adviser Troy Donaldson: 503-491-7681 - Room AC 2579 Troy.Donaldson@mhcc.edu

This degree focuses on technicians for entry in various engineering support activities required by industry. These courses give students experience in mechanical design at a technician level. Included in the scope of many courses is the use of state of the art computeraided design equipment (CAD). MET students could find employment in any type of manufacturing thus creating a wide variety of job possibilities such as an engineering technician, drafter, and CAD technician in light to heavy product design industries. Typical employers would be manufacturers of material handling equipment, transportation equipment, medical equipment, recreation equipment and materials testing. The MET program also offers a one-year certificate for those successfully completing the first three terms of the two-year AAS degree. Contact the MET adviser for more information.

Cr

ET123 Introduction to Engineering Technology .................. 3 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 CH104 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I.............. 5 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right Triangle Trigonometry..................................................... 5

17 Second Quarter (Winter) ET161 Beginning 2-D Autocad1.......................................... 2 ET162 Intermediate 2-D Autocad1...................................... 2 CH105 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II............. 5 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Additional Program Outcomes

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate technical expertise in a minimum of three subject areas chosen from - engineering materials, applied mechanics, applied fluid sciences, applied thermal sciences, and fundamentals of electricity • demonstrate technical expertise in manufacturing processes, mechanical design, and computer-aided engineering graphics with added technical depth in at least one of these areas • discuss applied physics with an emphasis in applied mechanics plus inorganic chemistry

ET142 Civil CAD .............................................................. 3 ET150 Plane Surveying..................................................... 4 CH170 Environmental Chemistry........................................ 4 MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry/Geometry................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

19

38


• determine forces and stresses in elementary mechanical systems • utilize graphic techniques to produce engineering document • calculate basic loads and demands in systems.

First Quarter (Fall)

CIS125DB Desktop Database (CET) CIS133SQL Introduction to SQL (CET) EHS171 Envr. Sci I: Chemistry of Hazardous Materials (CET) ESR271 Envr. Sci II: Intro to Envir. Engineering (CET) ET134 Remodeling and Addition Design (AET) ET161 Beginning 2-D AutoCAD (AET, MET) ET162 Intermediate 2-D AutoCAD (AET, MET) ET163 3-D AutoCAD (AET, MET) ET164 Menus and Lisp AutoCAD (AET, MET) ET170 AutoCAD 2000 Layouts, Features and Tools (AET, MET) ET175 AutoCAD 3-D Views & Coordinate Systems (AET, MET) ET176 AutoCAD 3-D Modeling I - Surfaces (AET, MET) ET177 AutoCAD 3-D Modeling II - Solids (AET, MET) ET178 AutoCAD Rendering (AET, MET) ET179 AutoCAD Customization (AET, MET) ET222 Fluid Mechanics (AET, MET) ET232 Sanitary and Storm Sewer Design (AET) ET234 Engineering Economics (AET, CET) ET261 Concrete Construction Design (CET) F200 Introduction to Forest Surveying (AET) FT228 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (AET) G201 Principles of Geology (AET, CET, MET) GE101 Engineering Orientation (CET) GE102 Engineering Computations (CET) MFG134/MFG135 Metallurgy Theory and Lab (MET) MTH241 Elementary Calculus (AET, MET) WE280CE Cooperative Education Internship (CET) For other approved Engineering transfer, Computer Science or Physical Science courses, see program adviser

Cr

ET122 Engineering Drawing............................................... 3 ET123 Introduction to Engineering Technology .................. 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right Triangle Trigonometry1.................................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

17 Second Quarter (Winter) ET135 Practical Descriptive Geometry................................ 3 ET144 Computer Applications in Engineering Technology..... 3 ET154 Computer Aided Design I2. ...................................... 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions1...................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

17 Third Quarter (Spring) ET132 Engineering CAD Drawing........................................ 3 MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry/Geometry1. ................ 5 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

14 Fourth Quarter (Fall) ET204 Computer Aided Design II........................................ 3 ET221 Statics.................................................................. 4 ET234 Engineering Economics........................................... 3 PH201 General Physics I.................................................... 5

15 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

ET222 Fluid Mechanics or PH202 General Physics II................................. 3-5 ET231 Basic Strengths of Materials.................................... 4 ET240 Project Design 1..................................................... 3 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 MFG212 CAM Concepts I...................................................... 4

Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Rodney Barker: 503-491-6971 - Room AC 2688 Rodney.Barker@mhcc. edu

17-19 Sixth Quarter (Spring) ET250 Project Design II.................................................... 3 WE280ET_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking.......................................3 Related elective..................................................... 6

Preparing you to start and successfully operate your own small business is the emphasis of the Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Program. This program encompasses all aspects of starting a business from initial evaluation of an opportunity and forming the structure of the business to operational management. Essential elements covered in this course include: • Risks involved in starting a business • Valuing an existing business • Fundamentals of franchising • Effective small business operating methods • Cash flow analysis

16

‡ See pages 7-10.

MTH60, 80, 85 may be substituted for MTH95, 111, 112 for Certificate only. 2 ET161 and ET162 may be substituted for ET154. 1

Engineering Technology Related Electives The following is a list of pre-approved related electives for the programs indicated. The program adviser for the degree being sought must approve other related electives on a Catalog Exception Form.

Ready and anxious to launch your business? A one-year certificate program is available for students who already have a marketable skill or product ready for market. All of the courses in the one-year certificate program are required in the two-year degree program. Therefore, it is easy for a student who gets a one-year certificate to decide to go on for a two-year degree. Please refer to Business Management: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management.

ART115 Basic Design I (MET) ART117 Basic Design III (AET) ART291 Sculpture I (AET) CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I (AET, MET) CH151 Basic Chemistry (MET) CH170 Environmental Chemistry (CET)

39


First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

Program Outcomes

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing; or CIS120 Computer Concepts I and CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I..................................... 4 BA150 Developing a Small Business.................................... 3 BA202 Customer Service and Employee Relations................. 3 WR121 English Composition or WR101 Workplace Communications I..................... 3

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • evaluate hazardous materials and hazardous waste sample data • safely handle hazardous materials and hazardous wastes • respond to hazardous materials and hazardous waste emergency situations in accordance with regulatory requirements in 29CFR • identify and label hazardous materials and hazardous wastes in accordance with regulatory requirements in 40CFR and 49CFR • calibrate, operate and maintain instrumentation and equipment related to hazardous materials and hazardous wastes operations • collect, prepare, document, and ship samples for analysis • compile, record, and maintain documents for hazardous materials and hazardous wastes management activities • select and use appropriate personal protective equipment in accordance with regulatory requirements in 29CFR • operate hazardous materials and hazardous wastes treatment and disposal systems • transport and store hazardous materials and hazardous wastes in accordance with regulatory requirements in 40CFR and 49CFR • implement applicable safety regulations and procedures in accordance with regulatory requirements in 29CFR • demonstrate the use of Ecological Footprint and other sustainability indicators • describe the relationship between ecological, economic and social sustainability • relate land use planning, health, population and institutional issues to social sustainability • investigate the appropriate level of analysis ranging from the personal to the global • demonstrate systems for stakeholder management and engagement • implement applicable environmental regulations and procedures in accordance with the regulatory requirements in 40CFR • implement applicable environmental auditing requirements based on the requirements in the ASTM-1527 • demonstrate “best practices” in conducting and implementing environmental audits.

17 Second Quarter (Winter) BA205 BA206 BA211 BA226

Business Communications....................................... 4 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4

16 Third Quarter (spring) BA238 Sales..................................................................... 3 BA249 Retail Management................................................. 3 BA250 Small Business Management.................................... 4 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1‡........................... 3

16

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Environmental Health and Safety Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Javid Mohtasham: 503-491-7440 - Room AC 2571 Javid.Mohtasham@mhcc.edu

The Environmental Health and Safety program provides students a basic understanding of the environmental health and safety issues. The technical nature of this field requires basic courses in math and chemistry in order to understand and work more effectively in this field. The program includes lectures, class projects, and an internship. The curriculum would be suitable for high school graduates, people now working in industry in the areas of occupational safety and health, or environmental management, and those with no related job experience wanting to change careers. Persons assigned new duties in this area may find individual courses will fulfill their needs for continuing professional education. Students completing an Associate’s Degree in the EHS program may transfer to several different four-year schools for the Bachelor of Science degree in different environmental fields. Interested students should contact the program adviser for additional information.

First Quarter

Cr

EHS100 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety......................................................... 2 EHS101 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations I......... 3 CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I1............ 5 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right-Triangle Trigonometry or MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions2........................................ 5 Health and Physical Education requirement‡ ............ 3

18 Second Quarter

What are the Possibilities for Employment? The Environmental Health and Safety program prepares students for well paid jobs in the growing fields of environmental health and safety. Small to large companies have the need for at least one person responsible for environmental health and/or safety issues. Employment in the environmental field include such jobs as program managers, regulatory officers, auditors, field and lab technicians, scientists, researchers, educators, and trainers. Employment in the health and safety field include such jobs as safety technicians, safety officers, accident investigators, industrial hygienists, risk managers, program developers, and program managers.

EHS143 Environmental Science Lab I: EPA Methodology Labs and Sampling.......................... 3 ESR281 Elements of Industrial Hygiene................................ 3 BI101 General Biology I3.................................................. 4 CH105 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II1. ......... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

18

40


Third Quarter

Cr

Basic Course Requirements

EHS171 Environmental Science I: Chemistry of Hazardous Materials........................................ 3 ESR285 Safety and Health Standards and Laws...................... 3 BI102 General Biology II3................................................. 4 CH170 Environmental Chemistry........................................ 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

17 Fourth Quarter EHS221 Environmental Safety I: Emergency Response Planning.............................................. 4 EHS225 Human and Environmental Toxicology....................... 3 ESR271 Environmental Science II: Introduction to Environmental Engineering.................................. 4 CIS120 Computer Concepts I4............................................. 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I4....................................... 1 Approved electives5............................................. 2-3

17-18 Fifth Quarter

In addition to basic course requirements above, add:

Safety and Regulations Electives (3 courses required)

EHS201 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations II................................................... 3 EHS222 Environmental Safety II: Environmental Auditing............................................................ 4 WE280EV_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 Human Relations requirement‥................................ 3 Approved electives5............................................. 2-3

EHS221 Environmental Safety I: Emergency Response Planning.............................................. 4 EHS222 Environmental Safety II: Environmental Auditing........................................................... 4 EHS225 Human and Environmental Toxicology....................... 3 ESR285 Safety and Health Standards and Laws...................... 3

16-17 Sixth Quarter

Science and Technology Electives (3 courses required)

EHS230 Sustainable Business Practice . ............................... 3 EHS243 Environmental Science Lab II: Introduction to Instrumental Analysis ........................................ 4 WE280EV_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 Approved electives5............................................. 2-3

EHS143 Environmental Science Lab I: EPA Methodology Labs and Sampling.......................... 3 EHS230 Sustainable Business Practice . ............................... 3 EHS243 Environmental Science Lab II: Introduction to Instrumental Analysis ........................................ 4 ESR271 Environmental Science II: Introduction to Environmental Engineering.................................. 4

13-14

Cr

EHS100 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety......................................................... 2 EHS101 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations I......... 3 EHS171 Environmental Science I: Chemistry of Hazardous Materials........................................ 3 EHS201 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations II........ 3 ESR281 Elements of Industrial Hygiene................................ 3 CIS120 Computer Concepts I1. ............................................ 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I1. ...................................... 1 CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I............. 5 CH170 Environmental Chemistry........................................ 4 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right-Triangle Trigonometry or MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions2........................................... 5 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Any two 200 or higher level chemistry courses may be substituted for CH104 and CH105. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Any two 200 level biology courses may be substituted for BI101 and BI102. 4 Higher level Math or Computer Science course may be substituted. 5 EHS154, EHS155, and EHS156; student must have adviser approval on a Catalog Exception Form to select other options. 1

Higher level Math or Computer Science course may be substituted. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Fisheries Technology

‥ See pages 7-10.

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Environmental Health and Safety

MHCC Faculty Advisers Tom Worcester: 503-491-7330 - Room AC 2570 Tom.Worcester@mhcc.edu Todd Hanna: 503-491-7163 - Room HF 13 Todd.Hanna@mhcc.edu

Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Javid Mohtasham: 503-491-7440 - Room AC 2571 Javid.Mohtasham@mhcc.edu

The purpose of the two-year Fisheries Technology AAS degree curriculum is to prepare students for successful careers with private, federal or state agencies as a fish culturist and/or a fishery technician. Over and above such required work as fish biology, fish husbandry and fishery techniques, a significant portion of the program will provide hands-on experience through field and propagation projects, including operations in the campus fish hatchery.

Students may earn a certificate in Environmental Health and Safety. The curriculum would be suitable for people now working in industry in the areas of environmental management or occupational safety and health, or anyone interested in entering this field. Students may find this option a beginning point for the associate degree program.

41


Program Outcomes

Fifth Quarter

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • develop and apply a variety of techniques commonly used to evaluate and manage fisheries in the Pacific Northwest • develop and apply basic fish husbandry principles employed in Pacific Northwest fish culture facilities to successfully raise a variety of aquatic species • design, conduct and present (written and oral) a fisheries-related research project • apply a variety of building and equipment maintenance techniques commonly employed at fish culture facilities • demonstrate and apply basic biological principles to the study of fish • demonstrate and apply basic statistical processes to the analysis of fisheries data • discuss current issues impacting the field of natural resources • conduct and record a stream survey in accordance with a standardized procedure.

FI202 Fish Husbandry II................................................... 6 FI212 Field Projects II..................................................... 2 FI222 Equipment Maintenance and Repair.......................... 4 FI231 Current Issues in Natural Resources.......................... 1 HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies....................... 3

16 Sixth Quarter FI203 Fish Husbandry III................................................. 3 FI213 Field Projects III.................................................... 2 FI241 Stream Habitat Assessment and Improvement..................................................... 2 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 WE280FIA Cooperative Education Internship4........................... 1 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

14

Chest waders and rain gear are required and must be purchased by the student. Students completing the program will usually assist in propagation and rearing of game and food fish. Because of the rigorous activity demanded by the work, good physical condition is a necessity.

Those students desiring entry into the Fisheries program are advised that admission will be on a first-come, first-served basis. Admission is based on date of application and satisfactory completion of placement criteria. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions about the admission process, please call 503-491-7256.

First Quarter

Cr

Students placing in WR121 should begin their writing sequence in the fall. 2 Students who place into WR121 and MTH65 may need electives to satisfy degree requirement of 90 credits. 3 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 4 WE280FIA may be taken any quarter, including the summer. 1

Funeral Service Education Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Cr

MHCC Faculty Advisers Doug Ferrin: 503-491-6940 - Room AC 1555

FI101 Fishery Techniques I............................................... 4 FI111 Fish Biology I........................................................ 4 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3 WR115 Introduction to College Writing1,2............................ 3

Doug.Ferrin@mhcc.edu

The Funeral Service Education program at Mt. Hood Community College is a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree program. This program is accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE), 3423 Ashland Ave., Suite U, St. Joseph, MO, 64506. Transfer credit from an accredited college or university may apply against comparable courses offered in the curriculum.

14 Second Quarter FI102 Fishery Techniques II.............................................. 4 FI112 Fish Biology II....................................................... 4 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II2,3........................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • educate students for positions and career as embalmer • educate students for positions and career as funeral director • increase the background knowledge of students about the funeral services profession • educate students in every phase of funeral service, and to help enable them to develop the proficiency and skills necessary of the profession • educate students concerning the responsibilities of the funeral service profession and the community at large • emphasize high standards of moral conduct • provide curriculum at the post-secondary level of instruction • encourage research in the field of funeral service • encourage advanced education among funeral service professionals.

15 Third Quarter FI103 Fishery Techniques III............................................ 4 FI113 Fish Biology III...................................................... 4 FI205 Fisheries Lab Techniques......................................... 2 PE185FSW Swimming and Basic Water Safety............................ 1 SP100 Basic Speech Communication or SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking................ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

17 Fourth Quarter FI201 Fish Husbandry I.................................................... 6 FI207 Data Collection Techniques...................................... 3 FI211 Field Projects I...................................................... 2 FI221 Building Maintenance and Repair............................. 4

The degree offered by Mt. Hood Community College can be earned by following a prescribed course of instruction which requires six quarters in residence. Transferring all non-FSE classes from accredited institutions may allow a student to complete his/her professional course work in a three-quarter sequence, beginning each fall quarter. According to accreditation standards of the American Board of Funeral Service Education, an individual must take the National Board

15

42


Fifth Quarter

Examination as written by the International Conference of Funeral Service Examining Boards, in order to complete the Funeral Service degree from any accredited program. Therefore, in addition to successfully passing required FSE courses, students must take the National Board Exam to graduate from the Funeral Service Education program at MHCC. The annual passage rate of first-time takers on the National Board Examination for the most recent three-year period for this institution and all ABSFE accredited funeral service education programs is posted on the ABFSE website: www.abfse.org. 2004 National Board; 22 students took the exam Number passing Science: 20/22%; Pass: 91% Number passing Arts: 21/22%; Pass: 95% Number passing both sections 20/22%; Pass: 91%

16-17 Sixth Quarter FSE213 Embalming III........................................................ 3 FSE217 Funeral Service Pathology....................................... 3 FSE240 Funeral Service Internship4..................................... 6 FSE245 Funeral Service Issues............................................. 3

15

2005 National board; 23 students took the exam Number passing Science: 17/23%; Pass: 74% Number passing Arts: 20/23%; Pass: 87% Number passing both sections: 16/23%: Pass: 69.5%

2006 National board; 27 students took the exam Number passing Science: 24/27%; Pass: 89% Number passing Arts: 23/27%; Pass: 85% Number passing both sections: 21/27%: Pass: 78% Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/ LRadmissions. Once you have read the application materials, if you have questions about the admission process, you can call 503-4917346. Application deadline is the end of February.

First Quarter

Cr

FSE212 Embalming II......................................................... 4 FSE214 Restorative Art...................................................... 3 FSE216 Funeral Service Microbiology or BI234 Microbiology......................................... 3-4 FSE222 Funeral Home Management II.................................. 3 FSE227 Funeral Service Counseling...................................... 3

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. MTH65 must be taken prior to or concurrently with CH103. 2 For students attempting to substitute a like course for SP100, please note that SP100 is not a public speaking course. Refer to course information in the back of this catalog for a description. 3 Students must achieve a 2.0 or better grade point average for acceptance into fourth quarter. 4 Students may elect to take the internship for 3 credits (FSE240A) in any two terms, fall, winter or spring. 1

Note: While graduation from high school is not required for admission to the college, national accreditation standards require that a high school diploma or the equivalent be on file before the student can be admitted to the Funeral Service Education program. These same standards also require that a recent health certificate be submitted to the college prior to acceptance in the program.

Cr

FSE121 Funeral Service Orientation..................................... 3 AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings or MO114 Medical Terminology I............................ 2-3 CIS120/L Computer Concepts I (w/Lab) or BA231 Information Technology in Business.......... 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness For Life or HE250 Personal Health or HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies....................................................... 3 WR121 English Composition.............................................. 3

The criteria for selecting students gives priority to those applicants who have apprentice experience. Somewhat less priority is given to those with related work experience. Another criteria, gives priority to applicants from Oregon, then slightly less priority for Washington, Idaho, and Montana applicants. All other states are treated equally. Students from California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada and Washington automatically pay in-state tuition.

15-16 Second Quarter

More information is available at www.mhcc.edu/programs

FSE122 Funeral Service Sociology........................................ 3 BA226 Introduction to Business Law ................................. 4 BI100 Survey of Body Systems.......................................... 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1............................................. 3 PSY201 General Psychology ............................................... 3

Graphic Design Limited Entry Associate of Applied Science Degree Program (See Integrated Media: Graphic Design)

17 Third Quarter FSE124 Funeral Service Law................................................ 3 AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I......................... 4 CH103 Chemistry for Allied Health or CH104 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I 5 SP100 Basic Speech Communication2 or PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............ 3

Hospitality and Tourism Management Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Court Carrier: 503-491-7486 - Room AC 2661 For program information, dial 503-491-7515 www.mhcc.edu/hospitality

15 Fourth Quarter3 COS28 Mortuary Cosmetology............................................ 1 FSE211 Embalming I.......................................................... 4 FSE219 Funeral Services Chemistry...................................... 3 FSE221 Funeral Home Management I.................................... 3 FSE225 Funeral Directing.................................................... 3

Court.Carrier@mhcc.edu

Hospitality and Tourism Management is an associate degree program designed to prepare students for careers in the hospitality and tourism industry. The curriculum includes instruction and training in hotel, travel, recreation, tourism, food service, convention and meeting

14

43


Sixth Quarter (Winter)

planning, culinary, and related service industries. In addition to formal instruction, cooperative education internships are an integral part of the program and allow for on-the-job experiences in a wide variety of settings and occupations directly related to each student’s career objectives.

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • identify and interpret laws specific to our industry • demonstrate physical, cultural, and destination geographic knowledge. For alternative degree opportunities, please refer to Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism, Associate of Science degree, pages 107-109 or Hospitality and Tourism Management, Associate of Science degree, page 101.

First Quarter (Fall) HT104 HT106 HT140 MTH65

15-18 Seventh Quarter (Spring) HT215 Managerial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry or HT245 EcoTourism and Adventure Travel................ 3 HT230 Hotel, Restaurant, Travel Law.................................. 3 HT237 Culinary Arts - Food Prep III or Related elective5 ............................................ 3-4 HT249 Hospitality Issues and Trends.................................. 3 WE280HT_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

Cr

Introduction to Travel and Tourism........................... 3 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry.................. 3 Travel and Tourism Geography.................................. 3 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1‡........................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

16-17 Related Electives

HT107 Introduction to Leisure/Recreation Management....... 3 HT133 Convention and Meetings Management..................... 3 HT141 Customer Service Management................................. 3 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 WR121 English Composition or WR101 Workplace Communications I..................... 3

Students are advised to consider additional hospitality or tourism courses. In selecting related courses, the student must consult with an adviser to determine which courses are most appropriate to the student’s goals and area of interest. HT226/227/228 Beverage Management: Wines of the World HT229 Beverage Management: Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic Beverages

16 Third Quarter (Spring)

Note: Please check the course description section of the catalog for those courses which require a prerequisite.

HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customers or HT142 Travel and Tourism Agency Operations.................................. 3 HT181 Computer Applications in the Hospitality Industry or HT180W Airline Computer Reservations System Training............................... 3 HT234 Sanitation and Safety or HT144 Destination Specialist............................... 2 PSY201 General Psychology or PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations................ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking or WR102 Workplace Communications II or SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking or SP112 Persuasive Speech or SP115 Intro to Intercultural Communication or BA205 Business Communications...................... 3-4

14-15 Fourth Quarter (Summer) WE280HT_

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Students taking HT235, HT236 and HT237 must also take HT234. 3 BT210 Software Applications are 1-credit courses. The Computer Information Systems program offers 3-credit courses. Please refer to the Software Training or Computer Information Systems section of the schedule. Selection must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form. 4 Students in the Hospitality track take HT229 and HT229A if applicable; students in the Travel and Tourism track take an approved related elective. 5 Instructor approved elective. Students in the Hospitality track take related elective if applicable. All approved electives must be submitted on a Catalog Exception Form. 1

‡ See pages 7-10. Mt. Hood Community College is an officially licensed school with The Travel Institute (TTI) and offers the Certified Travel Counselor and Destination Specialists Certifications.

Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

Fifth Quarter (Fall)

Cr

AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I; or HT144 Destination Specialist............................ 2-4 HT206 Hotel/Resort Operations Management or HT246 Travel Transportation: Air, Rail, and Auto.... 3 HT236 Culinary Arts - Food Prep II or Related elective4............................................. 3-4 HT270 Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Control or HT247 Cruises and Tours...................................... 3 BA238 Sales..................................................................... 3 BT210__ Software Applications3 (requires adviser approval)..... 1

4

HT241 International Hospitality and Tourism...................... 3 HT242 Supervisory Management in the Hospitality Industry........................................... 3 HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing or HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing..................... 3 HT235 Culinary Arts - Food Prep I2 or WE280HT_ Cooperative Work Experience............... 4 BT210_ Software Applications3 (requires adviser approval)..... 1

14

44


Hospitality and Tourism Management

Food Service Management Concentration

Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Court Carrier: 503-491-7486 - Room AC 2661 Court.Carrier@mhcc.edu For program information, dial 503-491-7515 www.mhcc.edu/hospitality

Students may earn a certificate in Hospitality and Tourism Management and specialize in one of the following areas: Travel and Tourism, Hotel and Resort, Convention and Meetings, Food Service Management, Recreation and Leisure Management or Culinary Arts. Students completing the certificate program may apply these credits toward an associate degree in Hospitality and Tourism Management.

Core Requirements:

Cr

In addition to basic course requirements, add: HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customers (Spring)............................. 3 HT270 Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Control (Winter).......................................... 3 HT181 Computer Applications in the Hospitality Industry (Spring)............................... 3 HT215 Managerial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry (Spring)............................... 3 HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing (Fall)........................ 3 AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I.................................................. 4

Convention and Meetings Management Concentration

Cr

In addition to the basic course requirements, add: HT233 Special Events and Attraction Mgmt (Wi -alt yr)........ 3 HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customers (Spring)............................. 3 HT181 Computer Applications in the Hospitality Industry (Spring)............................... 3 HT133 Convention and Meetings Management (Winter)......................................... 3 HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing (Fall)........................ 3 AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I.................................................. 4

HT104 Introduction to Travel and Tourism........................... 3 HT106 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry.................. 3 HT141 Customer Service Management................................. 3 HT230 Hotel, Restaurant, Travel Law.................................. 3 WE280HT_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 BA238 Sales..................................................................... 3 BT210_ Software Applications1 (requires adviser approval)..... 2 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‥........................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology or PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations................ 3 WR121 English Composition or WR101 Workplace Communications I..................... 3 Program Specialties (See Below)........................18-24

Recreation and Leisure Management Concentration

In addition to the basic course requirements, add: HT107 Introduction to Leisure and Recreation Management (Winter)......................................... 3 HT207 Managing and Programming of Recreation and Sport Facilities (Sp - alternate yrs)................ 3 AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I or HT245 Ecotourism and Adventure .......................................................................... Travel 3-4 HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies....................... 3 Outdoor/Recreation Related Electives...................... 6

In addition to core requirements, students must select one track from below to complete the certificate requirements.

Certificate Program Concentrations

Travel and Tourism Management Concentration In addition to the basic course requirements above, add: HT140 Travel and Tourism Geography (Fall)......................... 3 HT142 Travel and Tourism Agency Operations (Sp) .............. 3 HT180W Airline Computer Reservation System Training (Worldspan - Spring) . ........................................ 3 HT241 International Hospitality and Tourism (Fall)................................................................. 3 HT247 Cruises and Tours (Winter)....................................... 3 HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing (Fall).......................... 3

Culinary Arts Concentration In addition to the basic course requirements, add: HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customers (Spring)............................. 3 HT234 Sanitation and Safety (Spring)................................ 2 HT235 Culinary Arts - Food Prep I (Fall).............................. 4 HT236 Culinary Arts - Food Prep II (Winter)........................ 4 HT237 Culinary Arts - Food Prep III (Spring)....................... 4 HT238 Culinary Arts - Food Prep IV - Baking (Fall)............... 4 HT270 Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Control (Winter) ....... 3

Hotel and Resort Operations Concentration In addition to the basic course requirements above, add: HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customers (Spring)............................. 3 HT206 Hotel/Resort Operations Management (Winter).......... 3 HT181 Computer Applications in the Hospitality Industry (Spring)............................... 3 HT215 Managerial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry (Spring)............................... 3 HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing (Fall)........................ 3 AC110 General Accounting I or BA211 Principles of Accounting I.................................................. 4

45

BT210 Software Applications are 1-credit courses. The Computer Information Systems program offers 3-credit courses. Please refer to the Software Training or Computer Information Systems section of the schedule. Selection must be approved on a Catalog Exception Form. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‥ See pages 7-10.


For employment information, please contact an Integrated Media faculty adviser, MHCC’s Career Planning and Placement Center or visit www.mhccim.com.

Integrated Media Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program with options in: • Broadcasting • Graphic Design • Digital Photography • Video

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • prepare documentation showing the analysis, research and information gathering, prototyping and evaluation methods used to solve a communication problem • create a communication solution that addresses the physical, cognitive and social factors of a particular audience • create and develop audio/visual form in response to communication problems, including an understanding of the principles of visual organization/composition, information hierarchy, symbolic representation, aesthetics, and the construction of meaningful messages • understand tools and technology, including their roles in the creation, reproduction, and distribution of audio/visual messages. Relevant tools and technologies including time-based and interactive media • understand history, theory, and criticism from a variety of perspectives including those of art history, language, communication and information theory, technology, and the social and cultural use of media • identify and adhere to professional practices • behave appropriately in both self-directed and shared learning environments • demonstrate sufficient dexterity to perform work and function safely in a production environment and/or computer lab.

MHCC Faculty Advisers JD Kiggins: 503-491-7632 - Room AC 1385 JD.Kiggins@mhcc.edu Christina Maier: 503-491-6992 - Room AC 1375 Chris.Maier@mhcc.edu Jack Schommer: 503-491-7611 - Room AC 1372 Jack.Schommer@mhcc.edu

MHCC’s INTEGRATED MEDIA program is an exciting new approach to training students for employment in the thriving Creative Services industry. It represents the first of its kind in Oregon and leverages decades of faculty experience, state of the art facilities, and the rapidly emerging emphasis on digital media. This new format has emerged from our historically strong individual professional technical programs in Photography, Television, Radio Broadcasting and Graphic Design and features interdisciplinary instruction from faculty with deep professional experience. The Integrated Media Program is a unique opportunity for you to explore a broad-based digital media education. The creative industry is being pressed to do more, do it faster — and more effectively. There is high demand for employees with digital skills. Powerful personal computers and access to high-speed Internet has changed the way we create and consume media. The Integrated Media Program emphasizes a shared core of digital skills across the disciplines of photography, design, audio and video. Classes are small, focused and rigorous. After selecting an option, you’ll receive specialized instruction in that area while gaining exposure to the wider field of Integrated Media.

The Integrated Media Programs are Restricted entry programs. Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Further information and application packets are available on the MHCC website at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

Because businesses increasingly require content creators from each discipline to work in collaboration, Integrated Media developed courses in which students from different options can work in teams on projects requiring varying areas of specialization. By working across traditional boundaries, students achieve fluency in multiple design settings and applications. They learn to conceptualize, plan, build and promote products/projects in a variety of digital media. Students involved in Integrated Media projects create solutions that incorporate sound, video, photography, lighting, acting, script writing, animation and design.

Integrated Media: Broadcasting Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser JD Kiggins: 503-491-7632 - Room AC 1385

Computers are the primary tool for the planning and presentation of work created with digital tools. Examples include using software to design a print ad or magazine spread, record a podcast, manipulate photographic images for a montage or produce a video. Students use digital media to put their ideas into motion, creating animations, sound tracks, titles and an array of special effects. In many instances, the final presentation is viewed only on a computer or via the Internet or on a portable media player.

JD.Kiggins@mhcc.edu

As technology evolves, the role of the broadcaster has evolved along with it. As a student in the Broadcasting option you will acquire technical proficiency with digital audio tools, understand the theoretical concepts behind a variety of digital media, and develop the skills you’ll need to work in the industry as a production and promotions director, operations manager, and program director. If you’re interested in music production, sound design for film, video games and the Internet, the Broadcasting option offers a broad range of multimedia skill development emphasizing professional audio skills. Instruction includes an even balance between theory classes and practical, hands-on production laboratories.

Employers favor those who have excellent technical skills as well as the behavior to work effectively in teams and independently. Today’s creative professional needs to be able to function beyond the boundaries of a single discipline and is often called upon to contribute in a variety of media. Portland’s demand for creative talent is supported by well-known international firms such as Nike, Adidas, Wieden+Kennedy, Laika, and Columbia Sportswear.

Our facilities include a Digidesign Pro Tools lab, and include instruction in Adobe Audition, Apple’s GarageBand, and Soundtrack Pro. Two television studios allow for experience in both sound and picture based productions. The Broadcasting option also shares an electronic music lab with MHCC’s renowned music program, giving students access to both analog and digital synthesizers, samplers and MIDI controllers. Students learn fundamental concepts and procedures in recording and broadcasting and explore emerging industry technologies that prepare them for jobs such as:

Many graduates find that freelancing (contract work) offers higher pay and more flexibility than being a full time employee, so we’ll teach you the business skills to succeed as a creative contractor.

46


Sixth Quarter

• Broadcast Presenter • Program Director • Operations Manager • Recording Engineer • Producer • DJ • Advertising Copywriter • Sound Designer for Film and Multimedia • Location Recordist for Film and Television

15

Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

You’ll have many opportunities to collaborate as you work in the college’s radio stations or serve on creative teams with other students in the Integrated Media program. In addition, there are many outside internship opportunities at commercial radio stations in the Portland market. You will earn credit while serving on the staff as an intern. These internships are an opportunity to develop networking skills and learn, first hand, about the broadcasting industry. IM179 IM178 RB150

‡ See pages 7-10.

Integrated Media: Digital Photography

You will become proficient with industry standard tools and practice in the fields of broadcasting and audio production. You’ll develop an understanding of the concepts behind the production of audio for other disciplines such as film and video production, animation, music, and web based multimedia.

First Quarter

Cr

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280RB_ Cooperative Education Internship............ 4 IM290 Integrated Media Portfolio...................................... 4 RB252 Sound Design and Post Production........................... 4 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

MHCC Faculty Advisers (503) 491-7410 JD Kiggins: 503-491-7632 - Room AC JD.Kiggins@mhcc.edu Christina Maier: 503-491-6992 - Room AC 1375 Chris.Maier@mhcc.edu Jack Schommer: 503-491-7611 - Room AC 1372 Jack.Schommer@mhcc.edu

Digital imaging has opened a world of creativity and self-expression to everyone who has the desire to experiment. Choosing the Digital Photography option within the Integrated Media degree program means you’ll be broadly trained for the Creative Services industry to capture both still and moving images, incorporate sound to enhance a presentation, and have the ability to work with both words and images in a digital or printed form. This curriculum covers the basics of digital photography with special focus on web media and emerging formats. Our program is particularly well positioned to adapt to technologies as they emerge. Instructors are energetic, working professionals in the creative services field.

Cr

Digital Tools and Workflow...................................... 4 Sound, Frame, Light................................................ 4 Broadcasting I....................................................... 5 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

16 Second Quarter IM180 Digital Acquisition and Editing................................ 4 IM181 Web Design I......................................................... 4 RB151 Audio Production................................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Upon completion of this two-year program, you’ll know how to take engaging photographs, use Photoshop to manipulate and enhance images as you create content that works in both a print and webbased environment. With your camera’s ability to show you instant results, you’ll be able to adjust light and the shadows exactly the way you’ve only dreamed you could. Just as important, you’ll have the vocabulary, technical and people skills to work in creative design teams. You’ll become very comfortable with the give-and-take of close collaboration.

16 Third Quarter ART279 Integrated Media Survey......................................... 3 IM191 Web Design II........................................................ 4 RB152 Broadcast Programming.......................................... 5 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II.............................................. 3

15 Fourth Quarter

If you want to know more about the entire process of imagemaking within the creative services industry, this is the program for you. Job titles for graduates of this program include: • Digital Imaging Specialist • Photo Editor • Digital Producer • Photo Assistant • Web Production Artist • Multimedia Designer • Freelance Photographer

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280RB_ Cooperative Education Internship........ 4 IM260 Professional Practice for Integrated Media................ 3 RB250 Digital Systems...................................................... 5 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

15 Fifth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280RB_ Cooperative Education Internship............ 4 IM282 Integrated Media Focus: Motion or DP282 IM Focus: Digital Photography or GD282 IM Focus: Graphic Design or TV282 IM Focus: Video........................................ 4 RB251 Broadcasting II...................................................... 4 SP262 Voice and Articulation............................................ 3

From thumbnail-sized images to large format print applications, viewing on a portable media player or on a web log, you’ll be prepared to repurpose your photographic work for any medium. Color theory, lighting, exposure, digital workflow, and media management practices will insure that the thousands of images produced are captured, stored and accessible for future use.

15

47


Integrated Media: Graphic Design

Courses include opportunities to collaborate with other students in the Integrated Media Department (Broadcasting, Video and Graphic Design), and projects for real clients. Many internships are available in the Portland market, preparing students for immediate employment upon graduation. Students create several portfolios of their photographs and projects by the conclusion of the program: a traditional printed portfolio, a web-based portfolio site and a PDF portfolio suitable for sending to clients and prospective employers.

Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Christina Maier: 503-491-6992 - Room AC 1375 Chris.Maier@mhcc.edu

You’ll learn how to succeed in business as a freelancer or subcontractor, a common goal for creative people interested in more flexibility, control over your hours or location, or the kind of work you produce.

First Quarter

Students looking for an outlet for their creative ideas will find that the Graphic Design option includes new opportunities to gain broad digital media expertise. Video, audio and photography content have been added to the print and web design training we’re well known for offering. We’re confident that employers will value a true digital media creator.

Cr

IM179 Digital Tools and Workflow...................................... 4 IM178 Sound, Frame, Light................................................ 4 DP150 Integrated Media Photography I.............................. 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

This new program will be every bit as rigorous a course of study as the previous AAS degree in Graphic Design. The 12 Integrated Media core courses are complemented by six Graphic Design option courses that will prepare student for career paths within the creative services field including but not limited to art direction, project management, interactive media, digital production art, graphic design and publishing. Graduates of this program will be qualified to work as: • Interactive Web Designer • Publication Designer • Graphic Design Assistant • Digital Pre-press Technician • Web Graphics Producer • Junior Art Director • Marketing Assistant • Multimedia Designer

16 Second Quarter IM180 Digital Acquisition and Editing................................ 4 IM181 Web Design I......................................................... 4 DP151 Digital Media Applications ..................................... 5 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II.............................................. 3

16 Third Quarter ART279 Integrated Media Survey......................................... 3 IM191 Web Design II........................................................ 4 DP152 Photoshop for Multimedia....................................... 5 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

15 Fourth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280DP_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM260 Professional Practice for Integrated Media................ 3 DP250 Integrated Media Photography II............................. 5 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

Graphic designers solve business and communication problems by providing expert advice and strategic creative services to clients to help them succeed in a competitive environment. The impact and results of the work will be measured by multiple sets of criteria—both yours and the client’s. Each project must meet high aesthetic standards, but it must also meet specific business objectives. Most professional design assignments span several different media such as print, online or broadcast. This means that most assignments require a multi-disciplinary team. Projects evolve through a process of multiple design directions and refinements, so you need to be very comfortable with the give-and-take of close collaboration. Unlike fine art, the focus of graphic design is not self-expression or the exploration of personal issues.

15 Fifth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280DP_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM282 Integrated Media Focus: Motion or GD282 IM Focus: Graphic Design or RB282 IM Focus: Audio or TV282 IM Focus: Video........................................ 4 DP251 Digital Retouching and Output................................. 4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

This curriculum covers the basics of graphic design with an equal focus on printed solutions and web site design. We incorporate many approaches to instruction including: individual and group critiques, collaborations with other students in Integrated Media (Broadcasting, Video and Digital Photography) and over a dozen sponsored design projects for real clients in the second year. Internships are strongly recommended and often prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Students will create several portfolios of their design work: a traditional print portfolio, a web-based portfolio and a PDF portfolio to send clients and prospective employers via e-mail.

15 Sixth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280DP_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM290 Integrated Media Portfolio...................................... 4 DP252 Digital Media Studio............................................... 4 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

Students’ portfolio projects include typography, editorial design, corporate identity programs, packaging design, multimedia presentations, web site designs, illustrations, posters, brochures and magazines. You’ll understand how design processes and skills are applied to printing, online media and other distribution methods found in the creative services industry.

15

‡ See pages 7-10

48


First Quarter

Cr

• Multimedia Designer • Assistant Editor • Freelance Producer • Multimedia Designer • Grip • Camera Assistant

IM179 Digital Tools and Workflow...................................... 4 IM178 Sound, Frame, Light................................................ 4 GD150 Principles of Graphic Design ................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16 Second Quarter IM180 Digital Acquisition and Editing................................ 4 IM181 Web Design I......................................................... 4 GD151 Color, Composition and Typography.......................... 5 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II.............................................. 3

The motion picture and creative services industries continue to grow in the Pacific Northwest presenting a variety of rewarding work in an exciting and dynamic field. Production companies, mobile production units, and independent producers are drawn to the vibrant creative services industry in our area and present entry-level opportunities for graduates. Digital video advances continue to create self-employment opportunities for people with visual production skills. The new Integrated Media degree will prepare you with freelance and small business skills necessary to work as a freelancer. You’ll learn the collaboration skills necessary to thrive as a member of a virtual creative team, an increasingly common format.

16 Third Quarter ART279 Integrated Media Survey......................................... 3 IM191 Web Design II........................................................ 4 GD152 Concept, Creativity and Unity.................................. 5 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

15 Fourth Quarter

MHCC’s Integrated Media department features professional production studios and the most current NLE (non-linear editing) tools. Electronic field production equipment includes professional level camcorders, grip and audio. The facility supports MiniDV, DVcam and Beta SP formats. Sound, lighting and camera equipment is available for checkout to Integrated Media students. As part of the Integrated Media program, you will be learning and working with photographers, sound and graphic designers on projects that reflect the best practices of this industry.

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280GD_ Cooperative Education Internship........ 4 IM260 Professional Practice for Integrated Media................ 3 GD250 Corporate Identity Systems .................................... 5 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

15 Fifth Quarter

First Quarter

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280GD_ Cooperative Education Internship........ 4 IM282 Integrated Media Focus: Motion or DP282 IM Focus: Digital Photography or RB282 IM Focus: Audio or TV282 IM Focus: Video ....................................... 4 GD251 Digital Publication Design....................................... 4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

16 Second Quarter IM180 Digital Acquisition and Editing................................ 4 IM181 Web I.................................................................... 4 TV151 Introduction to Digital Filmmaking.......................... 5 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II.............................................. 3

15 Sixth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280GD_ Cooperative Education Internship........ 4 IM290 Integrated Media Portfolio...................................... 4 GD252 Digital Media Studio............................................... 4 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

16 Third Quarter ART279 Integrated Media Survey......................................... 3 IM191 Web II................................................................... 4 TV152 Film and Video Production Management.................... 5 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

15

Cr

IM179 Digital Tools and Workflow...................................... 4 IM178 Sound, Frame, Light................................................ 4 TV150 Fundamentals of Digital Video................................. 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

‡ See pages 7-10.

15 Fourth Quarter

Integrated Media: Video

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280TV_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM260 Professional Practice for Integrated Media................ 3 TV250 Advanced Digital Filmmaking................................... 5 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Jack Schommer: 503-491-7611 - Room AC 1372 Jack.Schommer@mhcc.edu

15 Fifth Quarter IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280TV_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM282 Integrated Media Focus: Motion or DP282 IM Focus: Digital Photography or GD282 IM Focus: Graphic Design or RB282 IM Focus: Audio...................................... 4 TV251 Non-linear Editing.................................................. 4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

The Video option emphasizes digital filmmaking and its foundation skills that easily transfer to work in a broad creative spectrum— narratives, documentaries, commercial/public services announcements, music videos and experimental formats. Traditional and digital filmmaking is explored from historical, philosophical, aesthetic and technical perspectives. Upon completion, graduates will be qualified to work as: • Camera Operator • Production Assistant

15

49


Sixth Quarter

Cr

• identify measurement system requirements per blueprint specifications (inch vs. metric) • produce appropriate process plan for manufacturing a work piece • produce a layout of part features per blue print specifications • produce a precision layout of part features per blueprint specifications • measure work piece dimensions using typical precision measuring tools • cut material to blueprint or cut-list specifications using standard power band saw • produce a work piece on manual lathe to blueprint specifications • produce a work piece on manual milling machines to blue print specifications • produce a work piece on CNC Turning Center (lathe) and/or CNC Machining Center (mill) per blueprint specifications • interpret basic CNC code for CNC machine tool program • demonstrate basic understanding and use of CAD/CAM software appropriate for machining field • demonstrate basic computer skills for email, file creation/saving/access, internet access.

IM291 Integrated Media Practicum or WE280TV_ Cooperative Education Internship......... 4 IM290 Integrated Media Portfolio...................................... 4 TV252 Documentary Filmmaking........................................ 4 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

15

‡ See pages 7-10.

Machine Tool Technology Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Timothy Polly: 503-491-7207 - Room IT 42 Tim.Polly@mhcc.edu Ron Hartline: 503-491-7237 - Room IT 43 Ron.Hartline@mhcc.edu

The purpose of the two-year Machine Tool Technology curriculum is to prepare students for entry into machining occupations. Students participating in the program will spend considerable time in study and actual operation of industrial equipment and tools used by machinists. This includes emphasis on the setup and operation of a CNC (computer numerical controlled) lathes and milling machines. Students will also be introduced to CAD/CAM (computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing) software and its applications. The program is designed to offer a broad background of experiences in the metalworking occupations. Students will also be able to complete skill building necessary for participation in an individual credential from NIMS (National Institute of Metalworking Skills). NIMS are nationally recognized skill standards established by companies involved in the various metals manufacturing trades. Students are expected to have a set of machinist tools. They are expected to maintain a minimum grade level of “C” on core curriculum classes to progress in the program.

Admission is based on date of application and satisfactory completion of placement criteria. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165. Entry into the Machine Tool Technology Program is permissible Fall, Winter, or Spring terms based on individual qualifications and approval from program advisers.

First Quarter

Cr

MFG110 Machine Shop I Theory............................................ 3 MFG111 Machine Shop I Lab................................................ 3 MFG113 Machine Tool Blueprint Reading and Sketching.......... 3 MFG116 Introduction to Precision Measuring........................ 2 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

Employment Opportunities Many opportunities exist in the manufacturing industries for the machinist. Students completing the Machine Tool Technology program are prepared for entry into the manufacturing workforce leading to careers such as: ‑ manual and CNC machine operators ‑ maintenance machinist ‑ tool and die maker ‑ quality assurance technician ‑ instrument makers Employment opportunities exist that provide support for industries such as: ‑ forest products/paper/lumber ‑ medical technologies ‑ aerospace technologies ‑ computer hardware technologies ‑ heavy industrial manufacturing ‑ hydraulic/pneumatic equipment manufacturing ‑ and many other manufacturing settings

17 Second Quarter MFG130 MFG131 MFG134 MFG135 MFG136 MTH80

Machine Shop II Theory.......................................... 3 Machine Shop II Lab............................................... 3 Metallurgy Theory.................................................. 3 Metallurgy Lab....................................................... 1 Introduction to CNC Machining................................ 3 Technical Mathematics I1. ....................................... 4

17 Third Quarter MFG115 Industrial Safety.................................................... 3 MFG137 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design for Machinists2................................................... 2 MFG150 Machine Shop III Theory......................................... 3 MFG151 Machine Shop III Lab.............................................. 3 MFG153 CNC (Computer Numerical Control) Machining............ 4

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safe work habits in the machine shop environment • demonstrate awareness of environmental issues common to the machine shop manufacturing setting • read and interpret blue prints having typical orthographic projections, auxiliary views, and GDT (Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing) common to most machine shop applications

15 Fourth Quarter MFG213 MFG214 MFG215 MFG216 WLD116

Integrated Machine Shop I Theory........................... 2 Integrated Machine Shop I Lab................................ 3 Inspection and Measurement................................... 4 CNC/CAM............................................................... 4 General Welding I................................................... 3

16

50


Fifth Quarter

Cr

current occupation. This group of courses will focus on the methods of applying MasterCAM in the development of CNC milling programs. This will include study of cutting tool applications in the manufacture of simple parts using the basic Cartesian Coordinate systems through an introduction to 3-D modeling. Each course is 5 weeks long and may be offered in any term depending on sufficient enrollment. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available in the Industrial Division.

MFG212 CAM (Computer Assisted Machining) Concepts I......... 4 MFG231 Integrated Machine Shop II Theory.......................... 2 MFG232 Integrated Machine Shop II Lab............................... 3 MFG236 Quality Control - Statistical Methods........................ 3 SP100 Basic Speech Communications or SP111 Fundamentals of Speech or WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking or...... Distribution requirement3‡.................................. 3

Please note that the following courses will be offered based on sufficient enrollment.

15 Sixth Quarter

MFGX25 MFGX26 MFGX27 MFGX28

MFG250 Applied Machine Shop Theory.................................. 3 MFG251 Applied Machine Shop Lab....................................... 3 MFG256 Quality Issues: ISO 9000 and GDT (Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing)........... 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life or HE250 Personal Health or HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

CAM (Computer Assisted Manufacturing) - CNC Turning, Recognition of Completion, may be given to students who complete the following list of courses. The courses may provide structured review of skills used by persons already employed in the machine tool trade or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. The CNC Turning option will focus on the methods of applying Cartesian Coordinate systems to both mill and lathe applications. Later courses will focus on applying Master CAM in the development of CNC turning programs. This will include study of all tooling options and program documentation. Each course is 5 weeks long and may be offered in any term depending on sufficient enrollment. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available in the Industrial Division.

15

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Minimal computer literacy required. See program adviser. 3 It is strongly recommended that students select a writing or speech course. Please observe the appropriate communication sequences. (WR101 and either SP100 or SP111; or WR121 and WR122). Students transferring to OIT, OSU, or other schools offering a baccalaureate program must take WR121 and WR122. Students wanting to take WR121 may need to take WR115 as a prerequisite if indicated by their writing placement level. 1

Please note that the following courses will be offered based on sufficient enrollment. MFGX25 MFGX26 MFGX31 MFGX32

‡ See pages 7-10.

Note: Students interested in transferring to O.I.T. should consult with program advisers early in the first quarter.

MasterCAM Mill - Level I.......................................... 2 MasterCAM Mill - Level II........................................ 2 MasterCAM Lathe - Level I....................................... 2 MasterCAM Lathe - Level II..................................... 2

NIMS Credential Exam Preparation

Students desiring to prepare for the NIMS Credentialing Exam will have the opportunity to complete the necessary skill building for the practical test through the Machine Tool Applications Lab class. Those interested need to contact program advisers for information on exams and the development of the necessary skills documentation for taking the exam. See Machine Tool Technology Program page for additional information on NIMS.

Computer Numerical Control, Recognition of Completion,

may be given to students who complete the following list of courses. The courses may provide structured review of skills used by persons already employed in the machine tool trade or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. These classes require that all students have a basic set of machinist tools.

Students are expected to maintain a minimum grade level of “C” on core curriculum classes to receive a Recognition of Completion. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available in the Industrial Division. Interested students should contact the Machine Tool Technology adviser, Industrial Division.

Fall, Winter, Spring MFGX11

Machine Tool Applications Lab................................. 2

Medical Assistant

Please note that the following courses will be offered based on sufficient enrollment. MFG110B MFG111B MFG113 MFG116 MFG130B MFG131B MFG136 MFG153 MTH60

MasterCAM Mill - Level I.......................................... 2 MasterCAM Mill - Level II........................................ 2 MasterCAM Mill - Level III......................................... 2 MasterCAM Mill - Level IV........................................ 2

Limited Entry Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Machine Shop I Theory............................................ 2 Machine Shop I Lab................................................ 2 Machine Tool Blueprint Reading and Sketching.......... 3 Introduction to Precision Measuring........................ 2 Machine Shop II Theory.......................................... 2 Machine Shop II Lab............................................... 2 Introduction to CNC Machining................................ 3 CNC Machining....................................................... 4 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3

MHCC Faculty Adviser Sue Boulden: 503-491-7136 - Room AC 2770

Sue.Boulden@mhcc.edu

Medical Assisting requires competency in both clinical and administrative skills for careers in medical offices and other outpatient healthcare settings. This program prepares the student to perform a wide range of duties including preparing the patient for the exam, giving injections, processing lab specimens, working the reception desk, assisting the physician, and numerous other functions in the ever-changing modern medical office.

CAM (Computer Assisted Manufacturing) - CNC Milling, Recognition of Completion, may be given to students who complete

After the Medical Assistant student completes the comprehensive two-year (six quarter) program, he/she is awarded an Associate of Applied Science Degree. Graduates may be employed in a variety of settings: medical centers, outpatient clinics, urgent care clinics, and specialized medical offices.

the following list of courses. The courses may provide structured review of skills used by persons already employed in the machine tool trade or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a

51


Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Admission is based on date of application and satisfactory completion of admission criteria. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7341.

MA240 MA241 MA248 MA249 MO212 WE280MA_

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate professional behavior and judgment • perform clinical procedures to include aseptic procedures, vital signs, prepare patients for examination, phlebotomy and nonintravenous injections, and observe and report patients’ signs or symptoms • assist with patient examination or treatment • operate office medical equipment • collect routine laboratory specimens • administer medications by unit dosage • perform waived laboratory procedures • perform office procedures including all general administrative duties. • compare and contrast verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies.

16

‡ See pages 7-10.

Note: A minimum grade of “C” is required in all courses.

Medical Office Specialist: Accounting

Cr

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Carole Wickham: 503-491-7195 - Room AC 2772 Carole.Wickham@mhcc.edu

17 Second Quarter (Winter)

A Medical Office Specialist in Accounting concentrates on accounts receivable, billing and collection procedures, patient and insurance record keeping, and budget and financial records.

MA118 Introduction to Medication Administration............... 3 MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team.................... 4 MO115 Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures . ..................................... 4 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4

Students interested in accounting work in a medical setting should enjoy working with healthcare professionals, demonstrate strong communication skills, show an interest in medical and health issues, and be dedicated to professionalism. Students should have typing competency and basic formatting knowledge before enrolling in classes in this program.

18 Third Quarter (Spring) Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 Disease Processes................................................... 3 Introduction to Medical Transcription...................... 3 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

Upon graduation students may be hired to work in physicians’ offices, public and private hospitals, teaching hospitals, clinics, laboratories, insurance companies, and governmental facilities.

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies • describe medical terminology, including disease processes and pharmacology • differentiate verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • describe the accounting principles required in a medical office • compare and contrast the billing and coding elements • complete a professional resume • describe job searches and correct interview techniques.

13 Fourth Quarter (Fall) MA220 Clinical Procedures I............................................... 5 MO230 Medical Coding I.................................................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

14 Fifth Quarter (Winter) MA221 MA224 MO240 WE280MA_

2

Prior to beginning the fourth quarter, the student must provide evidence of current CPR for Health Care Providers and current first aid training which may be obtained from any certified training site.

MA116 Fundamentals of Medical Assisting........................... 3 MO114 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........ 4 CIS120L Computer Concepts I Lab1. ...................................... 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‡........................... 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

MA123 MA125 MO120 MO214 HPE295

Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Text (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

Students must have health exams and must document initiation of the three dose Hepatitis B vaccine series, the second dose of measles immunization, and current Tuberculin skin test (PPD) before entering the fourth quarter of the program. All completed health forms must be on file. Please contact the Allied Health Department for the appropriate forms. Additional costs for lab fees, health exams, immunizations and supplies will be the responsibility of the student.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

Medical Assistant Certification Exam Review1............ 1 Basic Electrocardiography Techniques....................... 1 Telephone Triage in the Medical Office...................... 1 Medical Office Specialties........................................ 2 Diversity and Health Care........................................ 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 8

Clinical Procedures II.............................................. 5 Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 Medical Office Billing I............................................ 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

15

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

52


First Quarter (Fall) MO110 MO114 MO116 BA101 BT116

Cr

Medical Office Specialist: Administrative Secretary

Powerful Strategies for the Office Team.................... 4 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 Medical Office Procedures........................................ 4 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 Communication Technologies................................... 3

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Carole Wickham: 503-491-7195 - Room AC 2772 Carole.Wickham@mhcc.edu

18 Second Quarter (Winter) MO115 MO230 BI100 BA131 BA211

Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM.................................... 3 Survey of Body Systems1......................................... 4 Introduction to Business Computing........................ 4 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4

A Medical Office specialist as an Administrative Secretary will gain skills in patient relations, reception, medical records, computers, scheduling, coding, and billing. This option appeals to one who enjoys helping people, wants to work in a professional setting, and prefers a variety of job assignments.

18 Third Quarter (Spring) MO117 MO120 MO231 BA212 BT125

Students interested in administrative work in a medical setting should enjoy working with healthcare professionals, demonstrate strong communication skills, show an interest in medical and health issues, and be dedicated to professionalism. Students should have typing competency and basic formatting knowledge before enrolling in classes in this program.

Hospital Administrative Procedures.......................... 4 Introduction to Medical Transcription1..................... 3 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding...................... 4 Principles of Accounting II...................................... 3 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3

Upon graduation students may be hired to work in physicians’ offices, public and private hospitals, teaching hospitals, clinics, laboratories, insurance companies, and governmental facilities.

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) MO240 Medical Office Billing I............................................ 3 BA222 Finance................................................................. 3 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 SP111 Fundamentals or Public Speaking ............................ 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies • describe medical terminology, including disease processes and pharmacology • differentiate verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • describe the knowledge and skills required of an administrative secretary • compare and contrast the billing and coding elements • complete a professional resume • describe job searches and correct interview techniques.

18 Fifth Quarter (Winter) MA224 Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare......................................... 3 MO241 Medical Office Billing II.......................................... 3 BA177 Payroll Accounting and Payroll Tax Filing Requirements.................................................... 3 BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BT220 Electronic Calculator and 10-Key Operations............. 1

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

MA123 Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 BT118 Records and Information Management ..................... 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡.......................... 3 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

First Quarter (Fall) MO110 MO116 BI100 BT110 BT116

17

Cr

Powerful Strategies for the Office Team.................... 4 Medical Office Procedures . ..................................... 4 Survey of Body Systems1......................................... 4 Business Editing..................................................... 3 Communication Technologies................................... 3

18 Second Quarter (Winter)

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

MO114 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM.................................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing1....................... 4 BT111 Editing Techniques................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

‡ See pages 7-10

Medical Office students are required to have a criminal background check (http://www.mhcc.edu/docs/docsAlliedHealth/criminalbackgroundcheck.pdf), a current Tuberculin skin test (PPD), and the second dose of measles immunization at the beginning of the MO110 Powerful Skills for the Office Team class. Medical Office students must document completion of the three-dose Hepatitis B vaccine series by the beginning of the medical office externship process.

16 Third Quarter (Spring) MO115 MO117 MO120 MO212 MO231

Note: A minimum grade of “C” is required in all courses.

Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 Hospital Administrative Procedures.......................... 4 Introduction to Medical Transcription1..................... 3 Diversity and Healthcare......................................... 3 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding...................... 4

17

53


Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Cr

MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM (F/W)1.......................... 3 MO240 Medical Office Billing I (F/W)1................................. 3 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 4

MA125 Disease Processes................................................... 3 MO121 Medical Transcription I1.......................................... 3 MO240 Medical Office Billing I............................................ 3 BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 PSY201 General Psychology or PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................................ 3

Medical Office Specialist: Management

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) MA224 MO241 BA211 BT125 MTH65

Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 Medical Office Billing II.......................................... 3 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 Microsoft Word Training1......................................... 3 Beginning Algebra II1,2‡.......................................... 3

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Carole Wickham: 503-491-7195 - Room AC 2772 Carole.Wickham@mhcc.edu

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

A Medical Office Specialist in Management prepares to oversee a healthcare facility by learning how to lead people and manage office operations. The Management Specialist most often aspires to eventually manage some segment of a medical organization.

MA123 Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 BT118 Records and Information Management...................... 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

Students interested in management work in a medical setting should enjoy working with healthcare professionals, demonstrate strong communication skills, show an interest in medical and health issues, and be dedicated to professionalism. Students should have typing competency and basic formatting knowledge before enrolling in classes in this program.

17

Prerequisite. See course description in back of catalog.

1

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Upon graduation students may be hired to work in physicians’ offices, public and private hospitals, teaching hospitals, clinics, laboratories, insurance companies, and governmental facilities.

‡ See pages 7-10. Medical Office students are required to have a criminal background check (http://www.mhcc.edu/docs/docsAlliedHealth/criminalbackgroundcheck.pdf), a current Tuberculin skin test (PPD), and the second dose of measles immunization at the beginning of the MO110 Powerful Skills for the Office Team class. Medical Office students must document completion of the three-dose Hepatitis B vaccine series by the beginning of the medical office externship process.

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies • describe medical terminology, including disease processes and pharmacology • differentiate verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • describe the management principles required in a medical office • compare and contrast the billing and coding elements • complete a professional resume • describe job searches and correct interview techniques.

Note: A minimum grade of “C” grade is required in all courses.

Medical Receptionist, Recognition of Completion, may be awarded to a student who completes the following list of courses. The courses may provide structured review of skills used by persons already employed in the medical office field or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. Please check the course description section in the back of this catalog to determine the terms when these courses may be offered. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available with the program adviser.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team.................... 4 MO114 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM.................................... 3 MO240 Medical Office Billing I............................................ 3 BT210YWA Word - Level 1........................................................ 1 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

Please note that the following courses may be offered depending on sufficient enrollment. BT110 Business Editing (F/W/Sp)....................................... 3 BT116 Communication Technologies (F/W/Sp)..................... 3 BT123A Keyboarding Skill Development (F/W/Sp)1................. 2 BT210__ Word - Level I (Su/F/W/Sp)..................................... 1 MA224 Medical Law and Ethics (W)..................................... 3 MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team (F/W)........... 4 MO114 Medical Terminology I (Su/F/W/Sp).......................... 3 MO115 Medical Terminology II (Su/W/Sp)1.......................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures (F/W)............................... 4 MO117 Hospital Administrative Procedures (Sp)................... 4 MO120 Introduction to Medical Transcription (F/W/Sp)1....... 3 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare (W/Sp).............................. 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio (W/Sp)................... 1

17 Second Quarter (Winter) MO115 Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures........................................ 4 MO231 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding...................... 4 MO241 Medical Office Billing II.......................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

18

54


Third Quarter (Spring)

Cr

BI100 Survey of Body Systems1 (F/W)................................ 4 BT11F Basic Keyboarding (F/W/Sp) or BT123A Keyboarding Skill Development1 or BT123B Keyboarding Skill Refinement1................... 2-3 BT116 Communication Technologies (F/W/Sp)..................... 3 BT220 Electronic Calculator/10-Key Operations (Su/F/W/Sp) 1 MA224 Medical Law and Ethics (W)..................................... 3 MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team (F/W)........... 4 MO114 Medical Terminology I (Su/F/W/Sp).......................... 3 MO115 Medical Terminology II (Su/W/Sp)1.......................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures (F/W)............................... 4 MO117 Hospital Administrative Procedures (Sp) .................. 4 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare (W/Sp).............................. 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio (W/Sp)................... 1 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM (F/W)1.......................... 3 MO231 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding1 (W/Sp)........... 4 MO232 Medical Coding III-Evaluation/Management1 (Su/Sp) 3 MO240 Medical Office Billing I1 (F/W).................................. 3 MO241 Medical Office Billing II1 (W/Sp).............................. 3 MO242 Applied Billing and Coding1 (Su/Sp)......................... 3 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 8

MO120 Introduction to Medical Transcription ..................... 3 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare......................................... 3 MO232 Medical Coding III - Evaluation and Management....... 3 MO242 Applied Billing and Coding...................................... 3 BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3 1

19 Fourth Quarter (Fall) MA125 BA205 BA206 BI100 BT110

Disease Processes................................................... 3 Business Communications....................................... 4 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 Survey of Body Systems1......................................... 4 Business Editing..................................................... 3

18 Fifth Quarter (Winter) MA224 BA226 BT116 BT125 MTH65 PSY201

Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 Communication Technologies................................... 3 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡.......................... 3 General Psychology................................................. 3

19 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Prerequisite. See course description in back of catalog.

1

Medical Office Coding, Recognition of Completion, may be

19

given to a student who complete the following list of courses. These courses provide a structured review of skills used by those employed in the medical office field or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. Please check the course description section in the back of this catalog to determine the terms when these courses may be offered. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available with the program adviser.

Please note that the following courses may be offered depending on sufficient enrollment.

MA123 MO117 MO214 BA211 BA224 WE280MO_

Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 Hospital Administrative Procedures ......................... 4 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 Human Resources Management................................ 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

BI100 Survey of Body Systems1 (F/W)................................ 4 BT116 Communication Technologies (F/W/Sp)..................... 3 MA125 Disease Processes1 (F/Sp)........................................ 3 MA123 Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations (Sp)..... 3 MA224 Medical Law and Ethics (W)..................................... 3 MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team (F/W)........... 4 MO114 Medical Terminology I (Su/F/W/Sp).......................... 3 MO115 Medical Terminology II1 (Su/W/Sp).......................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures (F/W)............................... 4 MO117 Hospital Administrative Procedures (Sp)................... 4 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare (W/Sp).............................. 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio (W/Sp)................... 1 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM1 (F/W).......................... 3 MO231 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding1 (W/Sp).......... 4 MO232 Medical Coding III-Evaluation/Management1 (Su/Sp) 3 MO240 Medical Office Billing I1 (F/W).................................. 3 MO241 Medical Office Billing II1 (W/Sp).............................. 3 MO242 Applied Billing and Coding1 (Su/Sp)......................... 3 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 8

‡ See pages 7-10. Medical Office students are required to have a criminal background check (http://www.mhcc.edu/docs/docsAlliedHealth/criminalbackgroundcheck.pdf), a current Tuberculin skin test (PPD), and the second dose of measles immunization at the beginning of the MO110 Powerful Skills for the Office Team class. Medical Office students must document completion of the three-dose Hepatitis B vaccine series by the beginning of the medical office externship process. Note: A minimum grade of “C” grade is required in all courses.

Medical Billing/Claims Analyst, Recognition of Completion,

may be given to a student who complete the following list of courses. These courses provide a structured review of skills used by those employed in the medical office field or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. Please check the course description section in the back of this catalog to determine the terms when these courses may be offered. Applications for the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available with the program adviser.

Please note that the following courses may be offered depending on sufficient enrollment.

55

Prerequisite. See course description in back of catalog.

1


Medical Office Specialist: Unit Secretary

Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Carole Wickham: 503-491-7195 - Room AC 2772 Carole.Wickham@mhcc.edu

17 Fifth Quarter (Winter) MA224 Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4 BT118 Records and Information Management ..................... 3 BT220 Electronic Calculator and 10-Key Operations............. 1 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

A Medical Office Specialist as a Unit Secretary functions as the center of the communications hub found in a hospital unit. She/he works in a dynamic medical setting with physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. Desirable traits of a Unit Secretary include strong communication skills, flexibility, professionalism, and responsibility. Students should have typing competency and basic formatting knowledge before enrolling in classes in this program.

14 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Upon graduation, students may be hired to work in physicians’ offices, public and private hospitals, teaching hospitals, clinics, laboratories, insurance companies, and governmental facilities.

MA123 MA125 MO214 PSY201 WE280MO_

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies • describe medical terminology, including disease processes and pharmacology • differentiate verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • describe the knowledge and skills required of a unit secretary • compare and contrast the billing and coding elements • complete a professional resume • describe job searches and correct interview techniques

MO110 MO114 BA131 BI100 BT116

Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 Disease Processes................................................... 3 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 General Psychology ............................................... 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

14

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‡ See pages 7-10. Medical Office students are required to have a criminal background check (http://www.mhcc.edu/docs/docsAlliedHealth/criminalbackgroundcheck.pdf), a current Tuberculin skin test (PPD), and the second dose of measles immunization at the beginning of the MO110 Powerful Skills for the Office Team class. Medical Office students must document completion of the three-dose Hepatitis B vaccine series by the beginning of the medical office externship process.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

MO122 Medical Transcription II.......................................... 3 BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........ 4 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡.......................... 3

Cr

Note: A minimum grade of “C” grade is required in all courses.

Powerful Strategies for the Office Team ................... 4 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 Introduction to Business Computing1....................... 4 Survey of Body Systems1......................................... 4 Communication Technologies................................... 3

Medical Transcription Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

18 Second Quarter (Winter)

MHCC Faculty Adviser Carole Wickham: 503-491-7195 - Room AC 2772 Carole.Wickham@mhcc.edu

MO115 Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 MO116 Medical Office Procedures . ..................................... 4 MO120 Introduction to Medical Transcription1..................... 3 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM (F/W)........................... 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

Medical transcriptionists transform spoken words into comprehensive records that accurately communicate medical information. These reports are used in the areas involved in all aspects of each patient’s care. These reports function as legal documentation and fulfill requirements for insurance reimbursement. They also serve as references for scientific research.

16 Third Quarter (Spring) MO117 Hospital Administrative Procedures.......................... 4 MO121 Medical Transcription I........................................... 3 MO231 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding (W/Sp)........... 4 MO212 Diversity and Healthcare......................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

Medical transcriptionists utilize their talents in a variety of healthcare settings, including doctors’ offices, public and private hospitals, teaching hospitals, medical transcription services, clinics, laboratories, radiology and pathology departments, insurance companies, medical libraries, government medical facilities, rehabilitation centers, legal offices, research centers, veterinary medical facilities, and associations representing the healthcare industry. Transcriptionists may also choose to work out of their homes as employees of transcription services or hospitals, or as independent contractors.

17

Transcription offers unlimited intellectual challenge to those who possess an interest in learning. Characteristics of a successful medical transcriptionist include dedication to excellence, extensive medical

56


Fifth Quarter (Winter)

knowledge and understanding, sound judgment, deductive reasoning, and excellent English and computer skills. This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions. Academic courses include science and English, with practical courses in computer technology, medical transcription, and medical record coding. Students will use computers to transcribe authentic physician‑dictated medical reports organized by body system or medical specialty. Students will be graded on accuracy, speed, and medical knowledge in the transcription of letters, chart notes, history and physical examination reports, consultations, emergency room reports, and discharge summaries. Students will use reference materials and other resources. Students will edit and proofread each report, using proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring) MA123 Pharmacology for Medical Office Occupations............ 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 MO222 Advanced Transcription Fundamentals...................... 3 MO231 Medical Coding II - Procedural Coding...................... 4 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 8

Program Outcomes

19

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the roles of the healthcare team members, elements of successful leadership, and problem-solving strategies • describe medical terminology, including disease processes and pharmacology • differentiate verbal and nonverbal communication, including gender differences, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and the elements of speaking and listening • describe the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriptionist • compare and contrast the billing and coding elements • complete a professional resume • describe job searches and correct interview techniques.

Note: A minimum grade of “C” grade is required in all courses.

Cr

Mental Health/Human Service

MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team ................... 4 MO114 Medical Terminology I............................................. 3 MO120 Introduction to Medical Transcription1..................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing........................ 4 WR121 English Composition1............................................... 3

Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Leslie Allen: 503-491-7178 - Room AC 2765 Leslie.Allen@mhcc.edu Dr. Ann Bonner: 503-491-7425 - Room AC 2771 Ann.Bonner@mhcc.edu Kathleen Hannigan-McNamara: 503-491-7403 - Room AC 2774 Kathleen.Hannigan-McNamara@mhcc.edu

17 Second Quarter (Winter) MO115 MO121 MO212 BI100 BT110 BT123A

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‡ See pages 7-10. Medical Office students are required to have a criminal background check (http://www.mhcc.edu/docs/docsAlliedHealth/criminalbackgroundcheck.pdf), a current Tuberculin skin test (PPD), and the second dose of measles immunization at the beginning of the MO110 Powerful Skills for the Office Team class. Medical Office students must document completion of the three-dose Hepatitis B vaccine series by the beginning of the medical office externship process.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

MA224 Medical Law and Ethics........................................... 3 MO221 Medical Transcription IV.......................................... 3 MO230 Medical Coding I - ICD-9-CM.................................... 3 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4 WE280MO_ Cooperative Education Internship1........................... 4

Medical Terminology II........................................... 3 Medical Transcription I........................................... 3 Diversity and Healthcare......................................... 3 Survey of Body Systems1......................................... 4 Business Editing..................................................... 3 Keyboarding Skill Development................................ 3

Mental Health/Human Service is a tremendously diverse field of study devoted to preparing students as professionals in mental health, addictions counseling, community corrections, youth work and gerontology. Classroom study and practical experiences are combined to prepare the student to work in community and institutional treatment facilities. These facilities deal with the emotional, social and physical needs of the chemically dependent, the adolescent, the mentally ill and the elderly, as well as others. Courses include basic information in group dynamics, community resources, case management, interviewing, and other helping skills.

19 Third Quarter (Spring) MA125 Disease Processes.................................................... 3 MO122 Medical Transcription II............................................ 3 BT111 Editing Techniques.................................................. 3 BT116 Communication Technologies................................... 3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life........................................ 3

This two-year course of study is designed to meet transfer requirements for Portland State University’s Child and Family Studies Program and Concordia University’s Social Work Program through formal agreements with these institutions. Interested students should contact program advisers for additional information.

18 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Program Outcomes

MO220 Medical Transcription III......................................... 3 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........ 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1,2‡.......................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology ............................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • discuss the emergence of various human services and the forces that influenced their development • understand the structure and dynamics of organizations, communities, and society as well as the nature of individuals and groups to appropriately respond to human needs

16

57


Fourth Quarter

• compare and contrast the needs that arise in identifiable human conditions such as aging, delinquency, crime, poverty, mental illness, physical illness, chemical dependency, and developmental disabilities • assess client needs and select interventions that will assist clients in promoting optimal functioning, growth and goal attainment • periodically evaluate the results of interventions and use the results to adjust a client’s plan • obtain, organize, analyze, evaluate, disseminate and record information such as client data and statistical information to provide the delivery of human services • attain and develop a core of intervention knowledge, theory, and skills to become a change agent for clients • create genuine and empathetic relationships with clients • demonstrate the values and ethics that are intrinsic to the human services profession • develop awareness of his/her values, cultural bias, philosophies, personality, and style and how these personal characteristics affect clients • demonstrate professional interviewing skills • establish and maintain professional relationships with instructors and peers • demonstrate writing skills appropriate to clinical document ation

18-20 Fifth Quarter HS266 Intervention Strategies II....................................... 3 HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 AH210 Research for Allied Health Professions...................... 1 HDFS224 Abuse in the Family................................................ 3 PSY226 Group Counseling Theory and Practice II................... 3 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

16 Sixth Quarter HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 HE208 Aids and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections............ 1 SW201 The Field of Social Welfare3..................................... 3 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 WR123 English Composition: Research3............................... 3 Curriculum Track - A, B, or C4,5.............................. 3-5

16-18

Curriculum Tracks

Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Applications are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7165.

A) Chemical Dependency Counselor/Addictions HS142 Addiction Theories (F)............................................ 3 HS143 Treatment of Addiction (Sp).................................... 3

B) Youth Worker HS153 HS154

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

First Quarter

Cr

HS265 Intervention Strategies I........................................ 3 HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 PSY225 Group Counseling Theory and Practice I.................... 3 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Curriculum Track - A, B, or C4,5.............................. 3-5

Principles of Youth Development.............................. 3 Juvenile Risk Assessment........................................ 3

C) Transfer Track Electives

Cr

HS101 Introduction to Social Services................................ 3 HS107 Orientation to Mental Health Careers....................... 3 HS111 Interviewing Skills I............................................... 2 HE207 Stress Control - Activity Intervention....................... 1 PSY235 Human Development I: Infancy-Adolescence............. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Please see MHCC adviser before selecting MTH105 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics.............. 4 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 Foreign Language elective6 Lab Science elective7

Second Quarter

HS112 HS135 HS141 HS150 PSY222 PSY236

15

Interviewing Skills II.............................................. 2 Case Management I: Intake and Assessment.............. 2 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances1............... 3 The Effective Helper, A Personal Skills Approach........ 3 Diagnosis and Treatment: Clinical Disorders............... 2 Human Development II: Adolescence to Aging........... 3

15 Third Quarter HS113 Interviewing Skills III: Cross Cultural....................... 3 HS136 Case Management II: Process and Practice................ 2 HS223 Diagnosis and Treatment: Personality Disorders ........ 2 HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 HE202 Adult Development and Aging.................................. 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II or higher2‡........................... 3-4 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

17-18

58

Courses open to professionals in the human services field. Students must apply for college admission as a general studies major at www.mhcc.edu/admissions . 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Courses must be taken concurrently. 4 Tracks A and B refer to related courses that allow the student to include further specialization within their AAS degree. Track A references courses related to chemical dependency and Track B references courses related to working with youth. Over the course of the program, the student will select two courses from either Track A ONLY or Track B ONLY or from the Transfer Track Electives (C) list ONLY. 5 Students who plan to transfer to PSU or Concordia should consult with a program adviser before making selection. 6 Students following the transfer track who wish to complete a BA degree will need to complete 2 years of a foreign language or show proficiency. Please consult with your MHCC faculty adviser. 7 Select from the Science distribution list on page 14 - lab science courses are designated with an L. 1

‡ See pages 7-10.


Third Quarter

Program Web Link: www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools Web Links: Portland State University - http://www.cfs.pdx.edu Concordia University - http://www.cu-portland.edu

13 Fourth Quarter

Mental Health/Human Service Youth Worker

HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 PSY225 Group Counseling Theory and Practice I.................... 3 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 Related Elective...................................................1-3

Restricted Entry, Certificate Program

10-12 Related Electives

MHCC Faculty Advisers Leslie Allen: 503-491-7178 - Room AC 2765 Leslie.Allen@mhcc.edu Dr. Ann Bonner: 503-491-7425 - Room AC 2771 Ann.Bonner@mhcc.edu Kathleen Hannigan-McNamara: 503-491-7403 - Room AC 2774 Kathleen.Hannigan-McNamara@mhcc.edu

CJA230 Juvenile Crime and the Juvenile Justice Process (F)... 3 HDFS224 Abuse in the Family (W).......................................... 3 HE261 CPR - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (Su/F/W/Sp)..... 1 HS154 Juvenile Risk Assessment1 (F).................................. 3 HS157 Gangs (F).............................................................. 1 PSY222 Diagnosis and Treatment: Clinical Disorders (W)......... 2

The Youth Worker Certificate program is designed for people who have a high school diploma, associate degree, or bachelor degree and want to work with youth. A one-year sequence of courses, it is designed to prepare the entry-level youth worker for employment in youth serving agencies. Course work is theory and experiential-based.

The certificate can be completed in one year by attending classes during the day or a combination of day and evening/weekend courses. Students may elect to attend part time. Students may also elect to take selected courses from the certificate program listing.

Students interested in this program must apply for and be accepted into the Mental Health/Human Service program. Within the application materials, applicants need to designate the Youth Worker Certificate as their major. Students can obtain the application materials on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Joan DeYoung: 503-491-7322 - Room AC 2569 Joan.DeYoung@mhcc.edu

All coursework (47 credits) can be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Mental Health/Human Services. Students who complete this certificate program have the option of continuing their course work toward the Associate Degree of Applied Science in Mental Health/Human Service. In such a case, the student would need to change their major to Mental Health/Human Service in order to register for core classes.

The Natural Resources Technology program, Forest Resources option prepares students for positions of technical responsibility in natural resources management and research. Forest technicians serve in a wide variety of capacities, and may work in such diverse areas as reforestation, mapping, vegetation inventory, outdoor recreation, timber appraisal, land surveying, harvesting, stream surveying, wildlife habitat enhancement, and fire fighting. The Forest Resources option is recognized by the Society of American Foresters.

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

Good physical condition and the willingness to work in all kinds of weather are important for those interested in outdoor field positions. There are also more limited opportunities for those who would prefer to stay indoors. These would include positions in computerized mapping, aerial photo interpretation and database management.

Cr

HS101 Introduction to Social Services................................ 3 HS111 Interviewing Skills I............................................... 2 HE207 Stress Control - Activity Intervention....................... 1 PSY235 Human Development I: Infancy-Adolescence............. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Second Quarter

Courses open to professionals in the human services field. Students must apply for college admission as a general studies major at www.mhcc.edu/admissions. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Natural Resources Technology: Forest Resources

Students who complete this certificate may work in community justice programs, addictions, residential care, and in some recreational and community facilities.

First Quarter

Cr

HS113 Interviewing Skills III: Cross-Cultural....................... 3 HS291 Practicum Seminar.................................................. 2 HE208 AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections........ 1 WE280HS_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II2‡........................................... 3

Outdoor labs are an integral part of the coursework. Students learn field techniques that they will use on the job in local forests, parks and natural areas. The courses incorporate technologically advanced equipment and software into the field data collection and analysis. In addition, each student completes a cooperative work internship, which gives college credit for on-the-job work experience.

12

HS112 Interviewing Skills II.............................................. 2 HS141 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances1............... 3 HS150 The Effective Helper, A Personal Skills Approach........ 3 Related Elective.................................................. 2-3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • perform relevant field tasks required of natural resource technicians

10-11

59


• use a broad range of technological tools to research, document, map, measure, record and analyze data relevant to natural resources • demonstrate a practical understanding of Pacific Northwest forest ecosystems • demonstrate knowledge of social influences on ecosystem management • demonstrate professional skills needed for successful job performance.

Related Electives The related elective is intended to provide enrichment in an area of interest to the student. In selecting a related elective, students should consult with their adviser to determine which course will best meet their academic and professional goals.

Students desiring to enter the Natural Resources Technology program are advised that admission is on a first-come, first-served basis after satisfactory completion of placement criteria. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions about the admission process, please call 503-491-7256.

See adviser for baccalaureate curriculum. MHCC Program Web Link: www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer School’s Web Link:

Selected courses (up to 65 credits) may be transferred to several fouryear institutions in appropriate bachelor degree programs. Check with the program adviser for current information.

First Quarter (Fall)

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Cooperative Education‑Students are encouraged to satisfy WE280NR during the summer between their first and second years. 1

Oregon State University - www.cof.orst.edu Humbolt State University - http://humboldt.edu (direct transfer and articulation agreement with MHCC)

Cr

F111 Introduction to Natural Resources............................ 3 F141 Tree and Shrub Identification.................................. 3 NR160 Wildland Fire.......................................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3 HPE285OL Wilderness Survival................................................ 3

Natural Resources Technology: Wildlife Resources Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

MHCC Faculty Advisers Kate Holleran: 503-491-7306 - Room AC 2592 Kate.Holleran@mhcc.edu Walter Shriner: 503-491-7362 - Room AC 2591 Walter.Shriner@mhcc.edu

FT122 Forest Measurements I............................................ 4 NR180 Career Development in Natural Resources.................. 1 FW251 Principles of Wildlife Conservation........................... 3 MTH80 Technical Mathematics I1. ....................................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

The Natural Resources Technology program, Wildlife Resources option is designed to educate field technicians for natural resource management with an emphasis on wildlife resources. This ecosystem centered program prepares students for jobs such as 1) conducting wetlands, wildlife, and stream surveys; 2) performing vegetation, aquatic, and botanical inventories; and 3) assessing habitat suitability. Employment opportunities exist in local, state, and federal agencies and in private industry.

15 Third Quarter (Spring)

F200 Introduction to Forest Surveying............................. 4 NR144 Forest Insects and Diseases..................................... 3 NR230 Forest Botany........................................................ 4 MTH85 Technical Mathematics II1....................................... 4

15 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

A majority of the coursework will involve hands-on experiences both in the classroom and in the field. Students use a variety of advanced equipment and technology. Each student in the program completes a cooperative work internship. The curriculum culminates with a final field project which allows the students to integrate their previous coursework into a “real-life” situation.

F240 Natural Resources Ecology....................................... 4 FT221 Aerial Photos and Resource Mapping ....................... 5 FT222 Forest Measurements II........................................... 4 NR242 Watershed Processes............................................... 3

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • perform relevant field tasks required of natural resource technicians • use a broad range of technological tools to research, document, map, measure, record and analyze data relevant to natural resources • demonstrate a practical understanding of Pacific Northwest forest and wetland ecosystems • demonstrate knowledge of social influences on ecosystem management • demonstrate professional skills needed for successful job performance.

FT228 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems....... 3 NR212 Current Issues in Forest Resources........................... 1 NR244 Applied Silviculture I: Reforestation......................... 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations .............................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Related elective..................................................... 3

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring) FT235 Outdoor Recreation................................................ 3 NR238 Timber Harvesting and Products.............................. 5 NR246 Applied Silviculture II: Forest Stand Dynamics........... 3 WE280NR_ Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

Students desiring entry into the Natural Resource Technology Program are advised that admission is on a first-come, first-served basis after satisfactory completion of placement criteria. Application packets

17

60


are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions about the admission process, please call 503-491-7256.

First Quarter (Fall)

Natural Resources Technology Limited Entry, Certificate Program

Cr

MHCC Faculty Advisers Walter Shriner: 503-491-7362 - Room AC 2591 Walter.Shriner@mhcc.edu Kate Holleran: 503-491-7306 - Room AC 2592 Kate.Holleran@mhcc.edu Joan DeYoung: 503-491-7322 - Room AC 2569 Joan.DeYoung@mhcc.edu

F111 Introduction to Natural Resources............................ 3 F141 Tree and Shrub Identification.................................. 3 NR160 Wildland Fire........................................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3 HPE285OL Wilderness Survival................................................ 3

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

Students may earn a certificate in Natural Resources Technology. The curriculum would be suitable for people currently working for industry or public agencies in the areas of forest and conservation work or for anyone interested in entering this field. Students may find this option a beginning point for the associate degree program.

FT122 Forest Measurements I.............................................. 4 NR180 Career Development in Natural Resources................... 1 FW251 Principles of Wildlife Conservation.............................. 3 MTH80 Technical Mathematics I1.......................................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc. edu/LRadmissions or in the Admissions and Records Office. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions about the admission process, please call 503-491-7256.

15 Third Quarter (Spring) F200 Introduction to Forest Surveying............................. 4 NR230 Forest Botany........................................................ 4 FW253 Birds: Biology and Techniques................................. 4 MTH85 Technical Mathematics II1....................................... 4

First Quarter (Fall)

16 Fourth Quarter (Fall) F240 Natural Resources Ecology....................................... 4 FT221 Aerial Photos and Resource Mapping ....................... 5 NR242 Watershed Processes............................................... 3 FW252 Mammals: Biology and Techniques............................ 4

16 Second Quarter (Winter) FT122 Forest Measurements I............................................ 4 NR180 Career Development in Natural Resources.................. 1 FW251 Principles of Wildlife Conservation........................... 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations............................... 3 WR121 English Composition .............................................. 3

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) FT228 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems....... 3 NR212 Current Issues in Forest Resources........................... 1 NR224 Introduction to Wetlands Identification and Management................................................ 3 NR244 Applied Silviculture I: Reforestation......................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Human Relations requirement窶。................................ 3

14 Third Quarter (Spring) FT235 Outdoor Recreation................................................ 3 NR230 Forest Botany........................................................ 4 FW253 Birds: Biology and Techniques or NR144 Forest Insects and Diseases ...................................... 3-4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1............................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking .................... 3

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring) FT235 Outdoor Recreation................................................ 3 NR260 Field Projects......................................................... 3 FW254 Fish: Biology and Techniques................................... 4 WE280NR_ Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

16-17

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Cooperative Education窶全tudents are encouraged to satisfy WE280NR during the summer between their first and second years.

窶。 See pages 7-10.

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

Program Web Link: www.mhcc.edu/programs

16

Cr

F111 Introduction to Natural Resources............................ 3 F141 Tree and Shrub Identification.................................. 3 NR160 Wildland Fire.......................................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH60 Beginning Algebra I................................................ 3 HPE285OL Wilderness Survival................................................ 3

1

Nursing Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Janie Griffin: 503-491-6701 - Room BCAH 130 Janie.Griffin@mhcc.edu

Program Web Link: www.mhcc.edu/programs

Mt. Hood Community College is a partner in the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE). This statewide coalition is composed of seven Community College Nursing Programs and Oregon Health Science University School of Nursing who have come together to develop a competency-based curriculum with similar prerequisites and preparatory work. The curriculum addresses the need for nurses to be skilled

Transfer School Web Links: Oregon State University - http://fw.oregonstate.edu/

61


Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses

in clinical judgment and critical thinking; evidenced-based practice; relationship-centered care; interdisciplinary collaboration; assisting individuals and families in self-care practices for promotion of health and management of chronic and acute illnesses; end-of-life care; and teaching, delegation, leadership and supervision of caregivers. Acceptance to the program allows for co-admission to Mt. Hood Community College and Oregon Health Science University, School of Nursing.

(2008-09)

BI112 Biology for Allied Health (or acceptable transfer biology with genetics)...... 5 BI231 Human Anatomy and Physiology I1,2......................... 4 BI232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II1. ........................ 4 BI233 Human Anatomy and Physiology III1........................ 4 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I or higher level course or proficiency3. ................................................(1) FN225 Nutrition............................................................... 4 MTH95 Intermediate Algebra with Right-Triangle Trigonometry or higher1,2. ................................... 5 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 PSY237 Human Development............................................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Social Science requirement4. ................................... 3 Humanities, Social Science or Science/Math requirement5,6................................ 3

The OCNE curriculum is designed as a four-year course of study, the first year devoted to pre-admission requisites and/or pre-program courses (45 credits) required before starting the nursing program in the second year. The second and third year of designated study will be taken at MHCC. Upon completion of the MHCC Nursing Program requirements, the students will earn an Associate of Science (AAS) degree and will be eligible to apply to take the Registered Nurse National Council Licensure Examination (RN-NCLEX). Licensure is granted through the Oregon State Board of Nursing. The student may elect to continue for the fourth year of study, leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, (BSN) offered by OHSU.

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • provide safe care, effective care across the life-span • practice within the legal scope of nursing practice • be an active, engaged learner, seeking out new opportunities, and reflecting on self performance • practice evidence-based nursing care • provide care that is culturally and age/developmentally appropriate • recognize the role of the nurse as a leader, an advocate for individuals, families and communities, and an agent for access and high quality health care.

Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. All admitted students must pass a criminal background check prior to entering the program. Specific requirements and application packets are available at the MHCC Nursing Program web site www.mhcc. edu/nursing. Program information sessions are offered on a regular basis; dates and place are listed on the Nursing web site. Students are encouraged to address further questions about the program and/or requirements to MHCC’s Academic Advising and Transfer Office 503-491-7315.

The required Math and Anatomy and Physiology courses must be completed within the past ten years. 2 BI231 and either 1) completion of MTH95 (or higher, except MTH211), or 2) placement into MTH105 or higher must be part of the 30 credits. The remaining 21 - 26 credits may be from any of the prerequisite/required preparatory courses. 3 Computer proficiency will be required during the interview process for those who proceed in the application process. 4 Select from any college-level social science distribution course as listed on page 9. 5 Select from any college-level transferable humanities, social science, or science/math distribution course as listed on page 9. 6 Students who complete these requirements at other schools may make their selection based on that institution’s published general education list. 1

Minimum Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Course credits to apply .............................................................. 30 All Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses credits must be completed before starting the Nursing (NRS) courses.......45

For the school year 2007-2008, MHCC’s Nursing Program will not be accepting applications from Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) applying for advanced placement into the program or from transfer students directly from another nursing program.

• All Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses must be completed with a “C” or better and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00. • The courses listed above may have pre-requisite courses - please check course descriptions for prerequisite information.

Students returning to the program after a leave of absence must fulfill all requirements as stated on the “Leave of Absence” form.

In addition, students must complete the following before starting the Nursing courses: • American Heart Association Health care Provider CPR course • Immunization - completion of all required immunizations as listed in the application packet. • Pass the Criminal Background Check. • Pass a drug screen test.

Accommodations are available by following the procedures established by MHCC Disabilities Services Office.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 2008-2009: Students are eligible to be considered for admission to the nursing program after completing 30 credit hours of courses on the Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses listed below. The 30 credits must include BI231, Anatomy and Physiology I and either MTH95 (or higher) or placement into MTH105 (or higher) on the MHCC Placement Test (CPT) by the application deadline. Prerequisites in progress Winter 2008 may be counted toward the 30 credit requirements if an official Winter term transcript is submitted by April 11, 2008. All Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses must be completed with a “C” or better by the deadline. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 is required on all Prerequisite/Required Preparatory Courses.

Please check the MHCC web site for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

Note: The following list of preparatory courses is intended for students taking their preparatory courses at MHCC.

62


Nursing Course Requirements

completed during summer term prior to the beginning of the program. 3 Students who have placed into MTH105 (or higher) in the pre-admission process and have not completed a mathematics course must take MTH105 or MTH111 (or higher). Students who plan to continue to earn a BSN should select MTH105 or MTH111. 4 Students who plan to continue through to OHSU must be aware that to earn their Bachelor’s degree, they must have: a. two years of the same high school foreign language, or two terms of college-level foreign (including American sign language) language credit, or a foreign language proficiency examination. b. MTH243 Probability and Statistics These classes can be applied toward your elective requirements. 5 Select from any college-level transferable humanities, social science, or science/math distribution course as listed on page 9. Natural Science electives must be selected from courses listed on page 9 and beginning with prefix BI, CH, FW, G, GS, PH

(for students admitted for 2007-08)

First Quarter (Fall or Winter)

Cr

NRS110A Foundations of Nursing - Health Promotions-A1......... 5 NRS110B Foundations of Nursing - Health Promotions-B.......... 4 NRS232 Pathophysiological Processes for Nursing I............... 3 BI234 Microbiology2. ....................................................... 4

16 Second Quarter (Winter or Spring) NRS111A Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness I-A............ 2 NRS111B Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness I-B............ 4 NRS230 Clinical Pharmacology for Nursing I.......................... 3 NRS233 Pathophysiological Processes for Nursing II.............. 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life (or any 3 hours of PE)‡..... 3

15 Third Quarter (Spring or Fall) NRS112A Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care I-A.................. 2 NRS112B Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care I-B.................. 4 NRS231 Clinical Pharmacology for Nursing II......................... 3 MTH105 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics or MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences requirement3,4,5.................................. 3-4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3

‡ See pages 7-10.

Office Assistant Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Robin Brush: 503-491-7174 - Room AC 2777 (Students with last name beginning A-G) Robin.Brush@mhcc.edu Brenda Houchen: 503-491-7431 - Room AC 2663 (Students with last name beginning H-O) Brenda.Houchen@mhcc.edu Pam Shields: 503-491-7458 - Room AC 2780 (Students with last name beginning P-Z) Pam. Shields@mhcc.edu

15-16 Fourth Quarter (Fall or Winter) NRS221A Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness II and End of Life-A...................................................... 4 NRS221B Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness II and End of Life-B...................................................... 5 Humanities requirement4,5....................................... 3 Humanities, Social Sciences; Natural Sciences requirement4,5....................................... 3

If you are a self-starter with strong organizational skills and attention to detail, you can use this program to gain entry into positions in any industry or business. Learn to manage time and develop human relations expertise while developing your professional attitude and project management skills. Ensure that offices run smoothly with technology training in MS Office software.

15 Fifth Quarter (Winter or Spring) NRS222A Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care II and End of Life-A...................................................... 4 NRS222B Foundations of Nursing in Acute Care II and End of Life-B...................................................... 5 Humanities requirement4,5....................................... 3 Humanities, Social Sciences; Natural Sciences requirement4,5....................................... 3

Employment opportunities for full-time, temporary, or part-time work in the Portland metropolitan area are excellent. The demand for office support personnel is high in both the private and the public sector. If you are eager to enter the world of work at an entry-level position, you will find this program appealing. For further advising assistance, students are highly encouraged to follow the web link “Additional Program Information” found on this program’s web page at www.mhcc.edu/programs.

15 Sixth Quarter (Spring or Summer) NRS224A Scope of Practice and Preceptorship-A...................... 3 NRS224B Scope of Practice and Preceptorship-B...................... 6 Humanities requirement 3,4....................................... 3 Humanities, Social Sciences; Natural Sciences requirement4,5....................................... 3

First Quarter (Filing Clerk)

15

Cr

BT101 Office Careers Survey.............................................. 1 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT122 Professional Keyboarding1,2 or BT121 Keyboarding Principles.............................. 3 BT118 Records and Information Management...................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing1....................... 4 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

To be admitted into NRS110A, students must have completed all required pre-admission and pre-program courses (minimum of 45 credit hours) and be accepted into the nursing program. 2 BI234 must be completed before 2nd term of the nursing curriculum; other general education courses in this year may be

1

17

63


Second Quarter (Clerk/Receptionist)

Cr

• identify and manage tasks involved in managing meetings • demonstrate accuracy and skill in handling the telephone • receive, interpret, and follow both written and verbal instructions • demonstrate competence in production of business documents. Import graphics, charts and text into business applications • demonstrate flexibility, motivation when faced with change • use the Internet for information searches • organize records with both manual and electronic filing methods • adapt to workplace practices and practice appropriate professional conduct • interact effectively with individuals and groups • create and present effective presentations, (with and without software) • demonstrate knowledge of laws and regulations that affect the US workplace and work force. • identify career paths and advancement criteria typical of office occupations • create effective spreadsheets that communicate financial and other business information.

BT111 Editing Techniques................................................. 3 BT116 Communication Technologies................................... 3 BT123A Keyboarding Skill Development1 or BT122 Professional Keyboarding1,2........................ 3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training1 ........................................ 3 AC120 Accounting for Professional Services........................ 3 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3

18 Third Quarter (Office Clerk) BT250 BT126 BT225 BA205 MO214 MTH65

Procedures for the Office Team................................. 3 Microsoft Word Simulation1..................................... 3 Document Processing1. ........................................... 3 Business Communications....................................... 4 Building A Professional Portfolio............................. 1 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)3‡........................... 3

17

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 2 Students must complete either 1) BT121 and BT122 or 2) BT122 and BT123A. 3 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

Note: The course requirements for this program are subject to change each academic year. For MHCC certificate/degree requirements, a student must follow the program requirements the year the student is officially admitted to the program or the year the student is completing the program.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Additional Coursework In selecting additional coursework, the student should consult with the faculty adviser. Students may choose to earn the Office Software Specialist certificate or expand employment opportunities further by taking additional coursework in the associate degree program, Office Management/Administrative Assistant.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT101 Office Careers Survey.............................................. 1 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management or BT116 Communication Technologies...................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing2....................... 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

Office Management/ Administrative Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

17 Second Quarter (Winter)

MHCC Faculty Advisers Robin Brush: 503-491-7174 - Room AC 2777 (Students with last name beginning A-G) Robin.Brush@mhcc.edu Brenda Houchen: 503-491-7431 - Room AC 2663 (Students with last name beginning H-O) Brenda.Houchen@mhcc.edu Pam Shields: 503-491-7458 - Room AC 2780 (Students with last name beginning P-Z) Pam. Shields@mhcc.edu

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT111 Editing Techniques.................................................. 3 BT116 Communication Technologies or BT118 Records and Information Management . ...... 3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 AC120 Accounting for Professional Services or BA211 Principles of Accounting I...................... 3-4

This is an associate degree program designed for students who seek immediate employment in the wide open field of administrative professionals by providing training for both first-time job seekers and experienced employees who wish to advance in their careers. The Office Management/Administrative Assistant degree allows students to either develop, in consultation with their faculty adviser, an individual custom designed program or elect an AAS with an option in either Human Resource Management or Web, in order to meet their career goals whether that is job-entry preparation, job advancement, or college transfer.

15-16 Third Quarter (Spring) BT___ BT126 BT225 BT250 MO214

Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 Microsoft Word Simulation2..................................... 3 Document Processing . ........................................... 3 Procedures for the Office Team................................. 3 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 ICD electives3........................................................ 3

16 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • apply standard English rules in clear, concise and effective business communications • apply mathematical skill to accounting situations • apply computer skills to all forms of business communication • use office technology for communication

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3 ICD electives3........................................................ 7

16

64


Fifth Quarter (Winter)

BT251 Integrated Office Systems....................................... 3 BA205 Business Communications1...................................... 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2,4‡......................... 3 WE280___ Cooperative Education Internship or ICD electives3.................................................... 4 ICD electives3........................................................ 3

For students interested in transfer to Oregon Institute of Technology’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree, please consult faculty advisers for information . (Also, see Office Management/Administrative Assistance in the transfer section of this catalog.) Transfer School Web Link:

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring) Cr

Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu/

BA226 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 WE280___ Cooperative Education Internship or ICD electives3.................................................... 4 ICD electives3.................................................... 4 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

Office Management/ Administrative Assistant: Human Resource Management

15

‡ See pages 7-10.

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Students must complete a minimum of 4 keyboarding classes to be selected from BT121, BT122, BT123A/B, BT124. This selection must include BT122 and BT123A. See adviser to determine appropriate sequence. 2 Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 3 ICD electives - See below 4 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

(Pending approval of the State Board of Education)

MHCC Faculty Advisers Brenda Houchen: 503-491-7431 - Room AC 2663 Brenda.Houchen@mhcc.edu

Do you value excellence, integrity and client service? Use communication, teamwork and problem-solving skills to pursue a career in a quickly expanding field. Businesses in all industry need administrative professionals to manage benefits, administer insurance programs, generate payroll and provide confidential support for their employees. Students may take a variety of business administrative courses that stress higher-level decision-making.

Individual Custom Designed (ICD) Electives The Office Management/Administrative Assistant degree allows for students to develop with their faculty advisers an individual custom designed program that meets their career goals whether that is job entry preparation or college transfer. The program allows students to customize 25 credits (about a third of the program). Upon entering the program, students will meet with his/her faculty adviser and mutually develop an individual custom designed program that will provide them with the necessary expertise to be successful in their chosen career path.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT101 Office Careers Survey.............................................. 1 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management ..................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing2....................... 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

ICD electives not selected from the following list must be pre-approved by the faculty adviser on a Catalog Exception Form.

17 Second Quarter (Winter)

Suggested Individual Custom Designed (ICD) Electives

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT111 Editing Techniques.................................................. 3 BT116 Communication Technologies . ................................ 3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 AC120 Accounting for Professional Services or BA211 Principles of Accounting I...................... 3-4

BA101 Introduction to Business (Su/F/W/Sp)...................... 4 BA177 Payroll Accounting and Payroll Tax Filing Requirements (W)............................................... 3 BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals (F/W/Sp)...................................... 4 BA218 Personal Finance (F/W)........................................... 3 BA224 Human Resource Management (F/W/Sp).................... 3 BA231 Information Technology in Business (F/W/Sp)........... 4 BA267 eBusiness Project Management (Sp)......................... 3 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations (F/W/Sp)................ 3 BT210___ Access - Level II (Su/F/W/Sp).................................. 1 BT210___ Publisher - Level I (Su/F/W/Sp)............................... 1 BT210___ Publisher - Level II (Su/F/W/Sp).............................. 1 BT210___ Excel - Level II (Su/F/W/Sp).................................... 1 BT210___ Excel - Level III (Su/F/W/Sp).................................. 1 BT210___ PowerPoint - Level II (Su/F/W/Sp)........................... 1 BT210___ Internet for the Business Professional (Su/F/W/Sp)... 1 CIS122 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WGA Web Graphics Animation I....................................... 3 CIS125WSC Web Site Creation Using Dreamweaver....................... 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 MO110 Powerful Strategies for the Office Team.................... 4 WE280___ Cooperative Education Internship......................... 3-4

15-16 Third Quarter (Spring) BT___ BT126 BT225 BT250 BA101 MO214

Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 Microsoft Word Simulation2..................................... 3 Document Processing . ........................................... 3 Procedures for the Office Team................................. 3 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 BA218 Personal Finance.................................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

16

65


Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Cr

Third Quarter (Spring)

Cr

BT251 Integrated Office Systems....................................... 3 BA177 Payroll Accounting and Payroll Tax Filing Requirement2..................................................... 3 BA205 Business Communications1...................................... 4 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)­2,3‡......................... 3

BT___ BT126 BT225 BT250 CIS122 MO214

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

BA224 BA226 BA267 WE280___

Human Resources Management................................ 3 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 eBusiness Project Management................................ 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 3 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 CIS125HTM HTML..................................................................... 3 CIS125WSC Web Site Creation Using Dreamweaver....................... 3 CIS195 Web Development I................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16

15 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Students must complete a minimum of 4 keyboarding classes to be selected from BT121, BT122, BT123A/B, BT124. This selection must include BT122 and BT123A. See faculty adviser to determine appropriate sequence. 2 Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 3 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

BT251 Integrated Office Systems....................................... 3 BA205 Business Communications1...................................... 4 CIS125WGA Web Graphics Animation I....................................... 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2,3‡......................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring) BA226 BA267 WE280___

‡ See pages 7-10.

Office Management/ Administrative Assistant: Web

Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 eBusiness Project Management................................ 3 Cooperative Education Internship............................ 6 Distribution requirement‡....................................... 3

16

Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

(Pending approval of the State Board of Education)

MHCC Faculty Advisers Robin Brush: 503-491-7174 - Room AC 2777 Robin.Brush@mhcc.edu

Are you an intelligent, self-confident individual with integrity and accountability and would like to work in a fast-paced environment? This career path seeks an individual who is highly motivated, detail oriented and creative. Core courses develop your organizational, problem-solving, interpersonal, leadership skills and strong written and verbal communication skills. Learn project management, Internet research skills and have an opportunity to take electives in web page development, support and maintenance. The individual custom designed electives provide an opportunity to concentrate on courses specifically designed to prepare you as an integral part of an office support team.

First Quarter (Fall)

Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 Microsoft Word Simulation2..................................... 3 Document Processing . ........................................... 3 Procedures for the Office Team................................. 3 Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1

Students must complete a minimum of 4 keyboarding classes to be selected from BT121, BT122, BT123A/B, BT124. This selection must include BT122 and BT123A. See faculty adviser to determine appropriate sequence. 2 Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 3 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Office Software Specialist Certificate Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Robin Brush: 503-491-7174 - Room AC 2777 (Students with last name beginning A-G) Robin.Brush@mhcc.edu Brenda Houchen: 503-491-7431 - Room AC 2663 (Students with last name beginning H-O) Brenda.Houchen@mhcc.edu Pam Shields: 503-491-7458 - Room AC 2780 (Students with last name beginning P-Z) Pam. Shields@mhcc.edu

Cr

BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT101 Office Careers Survey.............................................. 1 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management ..................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing2....................... 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

Office Software specialists work in all types of businesses as technicians in a variety of software applications that may include word processing, presentations, database, spreadsheet and electronic communications. The ideal candidate must have the ability to work independently as well as a contributing, collaborative team member.

17 Second Quarter (Winter) BT___ Keyboarding1......................................................... 3 BT111 Editing Techniques.................................................. 3 BT116 Communication Technologies . ................................ 3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 AC120 Accounting for Professional Services or BA211 Principles of Accounting I...................... 3-4

These professionals produce and organize quality publications from handwritten, printed, or electronic material. If you want to be on the cutting edge of technology, you will thrive in this field. Students will be trained in Microsoft applications using Microsoftapproved textbooks that cover the required objectives on the Microsoft Office Specialist exams. Students will become prepared to take Microsoft Office Specialist exams indicating that they have an

15-16

66


understanding of the core and possibly the expert features in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook in Microsoft Office software programs. By passing one or more certification exams, students can demonstrate proficiency in a given Office application to employers.

Physical Therapist Assistant Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

The outlook for jobs in this field of software applications is excellent. Specialists are in high demand with opportunities for advancement. They possess problem solving and technical skills and are prepared for tomorrow’s challenges.

MHCC Faculty Advisers Jane Cedar: 503-491-7464 - Room AC 2775 Jane.Cedar@mhcc.edu Debbie VanDover: 503-491-7465 - Room AC 2769 Debbie.VanDover@mhcc.edu

For further advising assistance, students are highly encouraged to follow the web link “Additional Program Information” found on this program’s web page at www.mhcc.edu/programs.

First Quarter (Fall)

The Physical Therapist Assistant program at Mt. Hood Community College is two years in length, leading to an associate degree. Course work consists of lecture and laboratory instruction on campus, and supervised clinical experience in health care facilities in the Portland metropolitan area and throughout the state. Upon taking the state board examination and becoming licensed, the assistant is qualified to work in any health care facility which provides supervision by a licensed physical therapist.

Cr

BT101 Office Careers Survey.............................................. 1 BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT116 Communication Technologies................................... 3 BT121 Keyboarding Principles1 or BT122 Professional Keyboarding2. ........................ 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing3.........................................4 BT210___ Internet for the Business Professional...................... 1

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to practice as safe and effective entry-level Physical Therapist Assistants • respect for the uniqueness and value of each individual • demonstrate ethical values that reflect this respect for others • demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning and to the maintenance of excellence in the practice of physical therapy • demonstrate a commitment to service.

15 Second Quarter (Winter) BT122 Professional Keyboarding1 or BT123A Keyboarding Skill Development or Related electives2..........................................................................3 BT125 Microsoft Word Training ......................................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management...................... 3 BT210___ Access - Level II..................................................... 1 BT210___ Excel - Level II....................................................... 1 BT210___ PowerPoint - Level II.............................................. 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)3,4‡.......................... 3

Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Further information and applications can be accessed from the MHCC website at www.mhcc.edu/programs. Information sessions are also offered on a regular basis. Dates and times are listed on the website. Once you have read the application materials and attended an information session, you may call 503-491-7256 if you have questions about the admission process.

15 Third Quarter (Spring) BT111 Editing Techniques................................................. 3 BT126 Microsoft Word Simulation...................................... 3 BT250 Procedures for the Office Team................................. 3 MO214 Building a Professional Portfolio.............................. 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 WR121 English Composition3.............................................. 3 Related electives2.................................................. 2

Applicants to the Physical Therapist Assistant Program must be physically and mentally able to cope with the rigors of the curriculum and the demanding nature of the physical therapy profession. Established academic and clinical requirements essential to the program of instruction apply to all students and cannot be waived. Attempts will be made to accommodate and retain qualified applicants with disabilities unless results of evaluations indicate that given reasonable accommodation an individual will still not be able to perform the essential functions required by the program.

18 Related Electives In selecting related courses, the student must consult with the faculty adviser and submit on a Catalog Exception Form. Students may choose to earn the Office Assistant certificate or expand employment opportunities further by taking additional coursework in the associate degree program.

Note: A minimum grade of “C” grade is required in all courses. Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

Students must complete either: 1) BT121 and BT122 or 2) BT122 and either BT123A or a related elective. 2 Students must check with the faculty adviser and submit on a Catalog Exception Form. 3 Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog. 4 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

First Quarter (Summer)

Cr

AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings................. 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I......... 4 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

12 Second Quarter (Fall) PTA100 Introduction to Physical Therapy............................. 3 PTA101 Physical Therapy Interventions 1............................. 5 PTA101L Physical Therapy Interventions 1 Lab....................... 2 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4

‡ See pages 8-9.

14

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Third Quarter (Spring) PTA102 PTA102L PTA132 PTA142

Cr

This program curriculum will prepare students for the ever-changing field of practical nursing within a variety of health care settings. The program focuses on the practical nursing role of providing care under the supervision of a registered nurse, physician or dentist in acute, long term care and clinic health care settings. Curriculum includes coursework from the biological and applied sciences including anatomy and physiology, social sciences and humanities. Students study fundamental principles and procedures of practical nursing, medication administration, infection control, pharmacology and the practical nurse’s contribution to the nursing process. Coursework includes theoretical nursing concepts that address the practical nurse role in patient teaching and the delivery of nursing skills according to current standards of practice. Curriculum threads include: care of the client throughout the lifespan, legal and ethical responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse and working within an interdisciplinary team.

Physical Therapy Interventions 2............................. 5 Physical Therapy Interventions 2 Lab....................... 2 Clinical Kinesiology 1.............................................. 4 Introduction to Clinical Practice I............................ 2 Health/Physical Education Requirement‡.................. 1

14 Fourth Quarter (Spring) PTA103 PTA103L PTA133 PTA143 AH140

Physical Therapy Interventions 3............................. 5 Physical Therapy Interventions 3 Lab....................... 2 Clinical Kinesiology 2.............................................. 4 Introduction to Clinical Practice II.......................... 2 Clinical Emergency Procedures................................. 2

15 Fifth Quarter (Summer)

Program Outcomes

PTA150 Clinical Applications I............................................. 1 PTA160 Clinical Affiliation I................................................ 4 SP115 Introduction to Intercultural Communication............ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 1

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate a personal commitment to service and the profession of nursing • demonstrate ethical and legal behavior in nursing practice • apply logic and problem solving skills when implementing the plan of care • provide culturally sensitive care across the lifespan to individuals within a diverse society • apply established principles of health promotion and preventive health care • use communication and information technology • provide clinically competent care through use of established standards and practice guidelines • use clear and effective therapeutic communication with clients, families, members of the healthcare team, and others • function as a member of the healthcare team.

12 Sixth Quarter (Fall) PTA204 PTA204L PTA254 PTA264

Physical Therapy Interventions 4............................. 5 Physical Therapy Interventions 4 Lab ...................... 2 Clinical Applications II........................................... 1 Clinical Affiliation II............................................... 4 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 1

13 Seventh Quarter (Winter) PTA205 PTA205L PTA255 PTA265

Physical Therapy Interventions 5............................. 5 Physical Therapy Interventions 5 Lab ...................... 2 Clinical Applications III.......................................... 1 Clinical Affiliation III............................................. 4

Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Further information and application packets are available on the MHCC website at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

12 Eight Quarter (Spring) PTA206 PTA206L PTA256 PTA266 MTH65

Physical Therapy Interventions 6............................. 2 Physical Therapy Interventions 6 Lab ...................... 1 Clinical Applications IV........................................... 1 Clinical Affiliation IV.............................................. 6 Beginning Algebra II1‡............................................ 3

For students admitted to the program beginning Spring 2007, follow this curriculum: First Quarter (Spring 2007)

13

Cr

PN100 Introduction to Practical Nursing............................. 4 PN111 Nursing Success Strategies...................................... 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I......... 4 AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings................. 2 CIS120L Computer Concept Lab I.......................................... 1

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Text (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

‡ See pages 7-10.

13 Second Quarter (Summer 2007)

Practical Nursing

PN101 Foundations of Practical Nursing.............................. 8 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1 or higher............................... 3

Restricted Entry Certificate MHCC Faculty Adviser Linda Fleshman: 503-491-6727 - Room BCAH 121 Linda.Fleshman@mhcc.edu

15 Third Quarter (Fall 2008) PN102 Fundamentals of Adult Care....................................11 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

The Practical Nursing program at Mt. Hood Community College is four terms in length. The majority of the Practical Nursing courses offered are web-based learning, evenings and weekends. Upon completion of program requirements students earn a Certificate of Completion and will be eligible to apply and take the Practical Nurse National Council Licensure Examination (PN-NCLEX). Licensure is granted through the Oregon State Board of Nursing.

14 Fourth Quarter (Winter 2008) PN103 Advanced and Specialty Practical Nursing................12 WR101 Workplace Communications I or WR121 English Composition..................................... 3

15

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Pre-Program Requirements (for program beginning spring 2008)

Graduates of the Professional Photography program will emerge after two years of coursework with solid technical and aesthetic photography skills. In addition, they will gain a strong foundation in business and marketing practices essential to survival as an independent operator. Current market demand offers our graduates entry-level positions in general commercial, advertising, industrial, editorial, and free-lance photography. Employment will also be found as technicians in professional processing labs, electronic imaging and multimedia service bureaus, and as members of film or television production crews.

(must be completed before starting the Practical Nursing courses) • High school biology, or BI101, or equivalent • MTH65 or higher • CIS120L • NAX10 Basic Training - Nursing Assistant or documentation of having completed a state approved Nursing Assistant course or submit an active CNA license • CPR - documentation of a current Health Care Provider Card • Immunization - completion of all required immunizations as listed in the application packet.

Success in the competitive field of professional photography not only requires mastery of the craft but also an aptitude for pre-visualizing, problem-solving, teamwork and communication. For this reason, the curriculum ranges from foundations in camera operation, digital editing, and commercial lighting to courses in marketing and professional practices. Second-year students have two terms of a photo business practicum that simulates business environments by servicing the college’s internal photographic needs. Students also have in-depth courses in design and web page construction. Finally, students gain experience in the field as interns with the professional photographers from the Portland metropolitan area.

Note: All pre-admission and preprogram courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required.

For students admitted to the program beginning Spring 2008, follow this curriculum: First Quarter (Spring 2008)

Because students have only two years to gain skills necessary to landing entry-level positions, the Professional Photography program devotes 75 percent of the 90 total program credits to courses directly related to photography. Since its inception in 1998, this unique program has flourished and enjoys an excellent reputation among the local community of commercial and portrait/wedding photographers. All of our students will intern with professionals and for some dedicated students, the experience leads to a first job as an assistant after graduation.

Cr

PN100 Introduction to Practical Nursing............................. 4 PN111 Nursing Success Strategies...................................... 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I......... 4 AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings................. 2

12 Second Quarter (Summer 2008)

Program Outcomes

PN101 Foundations of Practical Nursing.............................. 8 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • apply tools, techniques and processes to effectively communicate their ideas and to initiate, define and solve challenging photographic problems • defend individual work and perspectives in relation to other work and to create multiple solutions to visual problems • evaluate and defend the validity of sources for content and the manner in which subject matter, symbols and images are used in the students’ works and in significant work of others • operate successfully within an owner-operator business environment • identify connections between photography and other disciplines and creative media

12 Third Quarter (Fall 2009) PN102 Fundamentals of Adult Care....................................11 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

14 Fourth Quarter (Winter 2009) PN103 Advanced and Specialty Practical Nursing................12 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

15

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Text (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

1

Photography, whether it is as a professional or a personal interest, is always exciting, challenging and rewarding. We hope that you will consider Mt. Hood Community College to meet your photography education needs. Prospective students must satisfactorily meet admission program criteria and the application deadline to be considered for admission. Further information and application packets are available on the MHCC website at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Professional Photography Restricted Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

Note: Due to the sequencing of courses, students will be admitted only at the fall term. Alternates may be considered for mid-year entry if space is available. Students accepted in the program will be expected to complete prior to the first quarter ART261 (Photography I) or have the program adviser’s waiver.

MHCC Faculty Adviser Dana Spielmann: 503-491-7412 - Room AC 1371 Dana.Spielmann@mhcc.edu

Professional Photography is currently one of the most dynamic and challenging career areas. In the last decade, the industry has shifted to digital technologies and methodologies. Commercial photographers employ more sophisticated systems of lighting and image capture. Studio techniques have changed to reflect the digital workflow where products are processed and delivered via the web. Greater in-house printmaking is occurring which requires more knowledge of color management and workflow. Like most business, Professional Photographers are constantly working through new marketing and sales strategies.

If you would like more information on the application process call the Admissions, Registration and Records at (503) 491-7165 or contact Dana Spielmann, photography program director at (503) 491-7412 or Dana.Spielmann@mhcc.edu.

69


First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

Respiratory Care

ART117 Basic Design III: 3-Dimensional............................... 3 ART266 Color Photography Foundations............................... 3 PHO131 Basic Photographic Lighting.................................... 3 PHO260 Digital Photography and Imaging............................. 3 Related elective..................................................... 4

Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser George Hicks: 503-491-7172 - Room AC 2768 George.Hicks@mhcc.edu

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

Respiratory Care is an allied health discipline that uses scientific principles to carry out physician directed diagnosis and treatment of abnormal respiratory conditions. Respiratory Care Practitioners work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home care, research, education, and medical equipment sales.

ART262 Photography II...................................................... 3 PHO267 Photoshop I........................................................... 4 PHO270 Small Product Photography...................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Health and/or Physical Education requirement‡......... 3

The program combines basic science and modern respiratory care theory with clinical experience in local medical centers. Both campus and clinical learning focus on all areas of respiratory care, which includes adult, neonatal and pediatric, general and intensive care.

16 Third Quarter (Spring) ART263 Field Photography ................................................. 3 ART264 Portrait Photography.............................................. 3 PHO268 Photoshop II......................................................... 4 PHO271 Photographic Style................................................. 3 BA223 Principles of Marketing........................................... 4

The Respiratory Care Program prepares the student for both local and national standards. Graduates are eligible to take the national entry level examination and the national advanced practitioner level examinations administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care. Passing these examinations serves to fulfill state licensure testing requirements.

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

The respiratory care profession continues to develop and diversify. Studies by the American Medical Association indicate that the need for Respiratory Care Practitioners will continue to grow.

IM260 Professional Practice in Integrated Media................. 3 PHO274 Advanced Commercial Photo Applications................. 4 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3 Related elective..................................................... 4

The personal requirements necessary to succeed as a Respiratory Care Practitioner include a general aptitude for the biological and physical sciences. The Respiratory Care Practitioner is required to understand the physiology and pathology of circulation and respiration. Also required is the emotional maturity to deal with decision making in critical life and death situations.

14 Fifth Quarter (Winter) PHO226 PHO273 MTH65 WE280PH_

Photography Business Practicum I........................... 4 Page Layout for Photographers................................ 4 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1‡........................... 3 Cooperative Education Internship2........................... 4

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • apply and relate theory to clinical practice • collect and interpret pertinent physical and laboratory data in the healthcare setting • recommend appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic procedures using patient data from laboratory and physical evaluations in the health care setting • modify therapeutic procedures in response to patient’s condition • apply appropriate judgment while functioning in the healthcare setting • perform therapeutic and diagnostic procedures in accordance with appropriate standards of care, protocols, and clinical practice guidelines in the healthcare setting • efficiently use equipment and supplies in the healthcare setting • demonstrate thorough attention to safety while in the healthcare setting • maintain appropriate records accurately and completely in accordance with healthcare agency standards and HIPAA regulations • communicate effectively in the healthcare setting • conduct himself/herself in an ethical and professional manner • function effectively as a member of the healthcare team • apply constructive criticism and works effectively with supervisory personnel • demonstrate self-direction and responsibility for his/her actions

15 Sixth Quarter (Spring) PHO227 Photography Business Practicum II.......................... 4 PHO269 Web Portfolio Design.............................................. 4 PHO281 Photography Portfolio............................................ 4 Related elective..................................................... 4

16 Related Electives In selecting related courses the student should consult with an adviser to determine whether a selection of courses across divisional areas or a concentration of courses within a specific division is more appropriate to the student’s vocational goals. PHOX26 Digital Printmaking and Color Management............... 4 PHOX27 Editorial and Corporate Photography........................ 4 PHOX28 Advanced Photography Project................................ 4

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 WE280PH may be taken at any time in the second year. Maximum of 12 credit hours may be applied toward degree. 1

‡ See pages 7-10.

Radio Broadcasting Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program (See Integrated Media: Broadcasting)

70


Fifth Quarter

• demonstrate timely arrival at the healthcare setting and be prepared to function and finishes assignments on time. Applicants are admitted on a space-available basis after academic criteria have been met. Applications packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. Once you have read the application packet, if you have questions, please call 503-491-7341.

11-14 Sixth Quarter

Students who used the College Placement Test (CPT) to demonstrate mathematics proficiency for program admission as of 2004 – 2005 will not meet the general education requirement for the Associate of Applied Science Degree. Three credits of a mathematics course (MTH65 or higher, excluding MTH211) must be transcripted before graduation. Please see pages 7-10 for more details about the general education requirements of the Applied Associate of Science Degree.

RT232 RT253

Certificate (less than one-year) MHCC Faculty Adviser David Garlington: 503-491-7467 - Room AC 2687 Dave.Garlington@mhcc.edu Study.Business@mhcc.edu or contact the Business Department: 503-491-7515

Please check the MHCC website for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

Cr

This is a 35-credit program that can be taken over two terms. The curriculum includes skills, knowledge, and abilities that have been identified as essential for a retail management career. Upon successful completion, students receive a Retail Management Certificate.

BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I......... 4 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4

8

The Certificate incorporates ten core courses that provide basic business skills and knowledge required for successful retail management. The educational foundation includes communication, computation, and computer skills. Adding to the foundation is a cluster of business, marketing, human resource, leadership and retailing courses. Together these courses provide a core to meet the immediate demands of business and retailing. This certificate can easily transfer into a two-year Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Management and beyond.

RT111 Cardiopulmonary Physiology.................................... 6 RT112 Cardiopulmonary Physiology Lab.............................. 1 AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings................. 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........ 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

12-16 Second Quarter RT121 Respiratory Care Procedures.................................... 5 RT122 Respiratory Care Procedures Lab.............................. 2 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II1. ..... 4 BI234 Microbiology1. ....................................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

The Western Association of Food Chains, www.wafc.com, endorses this certificate. The following are the ten courses required in this certificate: BA101 Introduction to Business (Su/F/W/Sp)...................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing1 (Su/F/W/Sp) or CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab­1 (Su/F/W/Sp)......................................... 4 BA205 Business Communications1 (Su/F/W/Sp).................... 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I (Su/F/W/Sp).................... 4 BA223 Principles of Marketing (F/W/Sp)............................. 4 BA224 Human Resources Management (W/Sp)...................... 3 BA249 Retail Management (Sp).......................................... 3 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations (F/W/Sp)................ 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1 (Su/F/W/Sp)........................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Su/F/W/Sp).......... 3

10-18 Third Quarter RT131 Respiratory Diseases and Pharmacology....................... 6 RT141 Mechanical Ventilation............................................. 4 RT142 Mechanical Ventilation Lab....................................... 2 RT150 Clinical Clerkship..................................................... 1 Health and Physical Education requirement‡................ 3

16 (Optional Summer Quarter) BI234 Microbiology.......................................................... 4 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3

Fourth Quarter

See (Optional Summer Courses) ‡ See pages 7-10. 1

Retail Management

A minimum grade of “C” is required in all RT courses and BI121, BI122 and BI234.

First Quarter

Cardiopulmonary Critical Care II.............................. 3 Clinical Practice III................................................ 8 Social Science/Humanities requirement‡.................. 3

14

Note: Although BI121 and BI122 is the anatomy and physiology sequence currently offered within the program, it is strongly recommended that students complete BI121 and BI122 prior to admission into the program.1

(Optional Summer Quarter)

Cr

RT231 Cardiopulmonary Critical Care I................................ 3 RT252 Clinical Practice II.................................................. 8 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology1................................ 3

7

The following is a suggested two term curriculum.

First Quarter (Winter)

RT211 Pulmonary Assessment............................................ 3 RT220 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care................... 4 RT251 Clinical Practice I................................................... 9

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing1 or CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab­1. .............. 4 BA205 Business Communications1...................................... 4 BA223 Principles of Marketing........................................... 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1............................................. 3

16

19

71


Second Quarter (Spring)

• demonstrate understanding of blowpipe and material handling systems, food service equipment, industrial sheet metal applications, architectural sheet metal and stainless steel fabrication and finishing techniques.

BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 BA224 Human Resources Management................................ 3 BA249 Retail Management................................................. 3 BA285 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

For additional information regarding the AAS degree contact the MHCC Apprenticeship Coordinator at 503-491-7401 located in room AC 1162 in The Center for Continuing Education and Apprenticeship at MHCC. For additional information regarding the application process into the Sheet Metal Apprenticeship program contact the Sheet Metal Training Center at 503-257-1022.

16

1

Prerequisite for this course is not included in this curriculum. See course description in back of catalog.

The degree requirements are as follows:

For students interested in the Business Management AAS Degree, please refer to pages 24-26 in this catalog.

Related Training

60 credits

A minimum of 60 credit hours of course work earned through apprenticeship training must be completed.

Sheet Metal Technology

Supervised Trade Experience 12 credits Supervised trade experience is a process that combines work experience with specific trade instruction. It is dependent upon employers and educators cooperating to form a comprehensive training program for the students. This unique approach to training is designed to develop skills and knowledge and to improve self-understanding by integrating trade specific instruction with planned supervised work experience. A maximum of 12 credits may be earned that can be applied to the degree.

Restricted to students participating in a Sheet Metal Apprenticeship program, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Melodie Barber: 503-491-7401 - Room AC 1167 Melodie.Barber@mhcc. edu

General Education 18 credits

The associate degree in Sheet Metal Technology is designed for individuals serving in the sheet metal trades industry or individuals who have been accepted into the sheet metal apprenticeship program affiliated with Mt. Hood Community College.

In addition to the related training and industrial work experience, a minimum of 18 credit hours (effective 2002-03) is required to satisfy the general education requirements.

Total Credit Hours Required

This degree combines a five-year sheet metal apprenticeship-training program, with apprenticeship trade experience, related industry training and general education courses leading to journeyman status and the awarding of the A.A.S. Degree.

1st Year

90 credits Cr

SMT110 Introduction to Sheet Metal.................................... 3 SMT111 Sheet Metal Transitions........................................... 3 SMT112 Welding and Electrical Fundamentals........................ 3 SMT113 Sheet Metal Triangulation I..................................... 3 Communications requirement1...............................6-7

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrated competency in Math, Reading and Writing as determined by industry standard need • work safely in a sheet metal and construction work environment • organize and apply problem solving skills to sheet metal related problems • use sheet metal triangulation, radial line and parallel line development in real world situations • demonstrate understanding of heavy metal stretch outs through real world projects • demonstrate the use of a calculator to solve sheet metal layout problems Demonstrated understanding of traditional and computer aided drafting in the sheet metal industry • read and interpret blueprints as they apply to the sheet metal industry • apply electrical fundamentals to welding theory and practice • differentiate and demonstrate welding practices including GMAW, SMAW, and GTAW welding • demonstrate understanding of bidding and job costing • demonstrate understanding of air and its properties, ventilation, environmental systems • demonstrate understanding of material handling, hoisting and rigging • demonstrate understanding of installation of HVAC equipment and installing package units • demonstrate understanding of duct leakage testing, adjusting and balancing duct systems

2nd Year SMT120 Sheet Metal Triangulation II.................................... 3 SMT121 Architectural Sheet Metal I..................................... 3 SMT122 Architectural Sheet Metal II.................................... 3 SMT123 Fundamentals of Calculator Layout........................... 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‡........................... 3 Science/Mathematics/Computer Science distribution requirement‡................................... 3

3rd Year

SMT230 Introduction to Environmental Systems.................... 3 SMT231 Advanced Environmental Systems............................. 3 SMT232 Gas Metal Arc Welding............................................. 3 SMT233 Plans and Specifications.......................................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

4th Year SMT240 Sheet Metal Triangulation III.................................. 3 SMT241 Testing, Adjusting and Balancing HVAC Systems........ 3 SMT242 Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding................ 3 SMT243 Food Service Equipment.......................................... 3

72


5th Year

Program Outcomes

SMT250 Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding......................... 3 SMT251 Industrial Sheet Metal............................................ 3 SMT252 Introduction to Detailing........................................ 3 SMT253 Advanced Detailing................................................. 3 APP200E Trade and Industrial Experience..............................12

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate acceptable knowledge-based competencies in accord with national standards for surgical technology • demonstrate technical (psychomotor) competency in the scrub role in accord with national standards for surgical technology • demonstrate professional behaviors consistent with national standards and employer expectations • demonstrate compassion for the patient and maintain his/her confidentiality • demonstrate safe health care practices consistent with employer expectations • exhibit a strong sense of ethical behavior and surgical conscience • exhibit self-direction and responsibility for actions • become employed in an entry-level Surgical Technology position.

Select WR101 and WR102; or WR121 and WR122; or three credits in writing and RD117; or three credits in writing and BA205. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 1

The Oregon State Bureau of Labor and Industry journeyman’s card in the trade of Sheet Metal Worker may be used in conjunction with transcripts to verify that the SMT and the APP200E requirements of the MHCC Sheet Metal Technology AAS degree program have been met. The student must satisfy all other MHCC degree requirements, which includes a minimum of 90 college credits earned.

Applicants are admitted on a space-available basis after academic criteria have been met. Application packets are available on our web site at www.mhcc.edu/LRadmissions. In addition, information meetings are held regularly and are listed in the application packet. Once you have read the application materials and attended an information session, you can call 503-491-7256 if you have questions about the admission process.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Surgical Technology Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program MHCC Faculty Advisers Tracy Woodsworth: 503-491-7459 - Room AC 2764 Tracy.Woodsworth@mhcc.edu

Applicants to the Surgical Technology Program must be physically and mentally able to cope with the rigors of the curriculum and the demanding nature of the field of surgical technology. Established academic and clinical requirements essential to the program of instruction apply to all students and cannot be waived. Attempts will be made to accommodate and retain qualified applicants with disabilities unless results of evaluations indicate that given reasonable accommodation an individual will still not be able to perform the essential functions required by the program.

The Surgical Technology program at Mt. Hood Community College is six quarters in length leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree. It is designed for selected men and women who wish to prepare for a paramedical career as members of a multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operating room and in the surgical practice setting. The program combines academic study with clinical practice in metropolitan hospitals. After completion of this program, the graduate is eligible to take the national certification examination. Successfully passing this exam is a requirement for employment in many hospitals.

All students must pass a criminal background check and pass a drug test before entering the program. Applicants must provide documentation of all required immunizations as listed in the application packet.

The Surgical Technology Program at Mt. Hood Community College has been accredited by CAAHEP (formerly CAHEA), since 1978. The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), in collaboration with the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and the Association of Surgical Technologists (AST), which sponsor the Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology (ARC-ST), is the accrediting agency that acts on the accreditation recommendation formulated by the ARC-ST. The ARC-ST is located at 7108-C South Alton Way, Centennial, Colorado, 80112-2106. The ARCST’s phone number is 303-694-9262; their web site is www.arcst.org.

The mathematics pre-program requirement, completion of MTH65, satisfies the mathematics requirement for the AAS. Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement.

Surgical technologists are allied health professionals who are an integral part of the team of medical practitioners providing surgical care to patients in a variety of settings. The surgical technologist works under medical supervision to facilitate the safe and effective conduct of invasive surgical procedures. This individual works under the supervision of a surgeon to ensure that the operating room or environment is safe, that equipment functions properly, and that the operative procedure is conducted under conditions that maximize patient safety. A surgical technologist possesses expertise in the theory and application of sterile and aseptic technique and combines the knowledge of human anatomy, surgical procedures, and implementation tools and technologies to facilitate a physician’s performance of invasive therapeutic and diagnostic procedures.

Please check the MHCC web site for any curricular changes that have occurred since the catalog was published.

Students entering second year must also show proof of CPR certification for the Professional Healthcare Provider, Adult and Pediatric, valid September through June of the second year. Note: A grade of “C” or better is required for all Surgical Technology courses and for BI121, BI122, BI234 and AH110.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

ST101 Surgical Technology Theory I................................... 4 AH110 Medical Language for Healthcare Settings................. 2 BI234 Microbiology1. ....................................................... 4 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement‡............. 3

16 Second Quarter (Winter) ST102 Surgical Technology Theory II.................................. 4 ST111 Surgical Technology Lab.......................................... 2 BI121 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........ 4 Human Relations‡.................................................. 3 Approved communications distribution requirement‡..................................................... 3

Providing safe patient care is the primary focus of all the actions and responsibilities of the surgical technologist.

16

73


Third Quarter (Spring)

Cr

• explain and perform maintenance and minor external repair procedures on welding equipment, torches and accessories • demonstrate familiarity with machine component nomenclature • perform safe set-up, adjustments and operations of welding equipment • prepare and assemble welding practice plates • employ the safe use of shears, grinders, saws, torches and other equipment used in metals fabrication • describe the welding processes and terms as they relate to the welding of ferrous and non-ferrous metals • identify various electrodes, filler wires, shielding gasses and current types and their relationship to base-metal varieties • describe and apply the variables and techniques used to weld carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum to print specifications • identify joint types, weld types and positions of welding • visually examine welds for discontinuities, defects, correct weld size and placement • provide solutions for welding procedure errors • produce acceptable test plate weldments according to American Welding Society Standards.

ST103 Surgical Technology Theory III................................ 6 ST112 Surgical Technology Lab.......................................... 2 BI122 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II........ 4 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I ....................................... 1

16 Fourth Quarter (Fall) ST204 ST205 ST221

Surgical Technology Theory IV................................. 4 Surgical Technology Theory V.................................. 4 Surgical Technology Clinical Practicum..................... 6

14 Fifth Quarter (Winter) ST206 ST207 ST222

Surgical Technology Theory VI................................. 4 Surgical Technology Theory VII................................ 4 Surgical Technology Clinical Practicum..................... 6

14 Sixth Quarter (Spring) ST208 ST209 ST223

Surgical Technology Theory VIII.............................. 4 Surgical Technology Theory IX................................. 4 Surgical Technology Clinical Practicum..................... 6

14

What are the employment opportunities?

Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog.

1

Students who apply themselves in the program and obtain a satisfactory level of competence in welding should be able to secure employment in many areas, such as in ship repair, metal fabrication, construction and maintenance welding. Most companies require the prospective employee to pass a welding test as a condition of employment. This program will assist the student in preparing for the welder qualification testing.

‡ See pages 7-10.

Television Production Limited Entry, Associate of Applied Science Degree Program

You are required to have the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Heavy duty clothes suitable for welding. Leather work boots.” One pair gauntlet gloves. Leather welding jacket, burning glasses. Miscellaneous small tools, pliers, rule, tip cleaners, igniter, slag hammer and tool box. 6. Welding, metallurgy and blueprint reading textbooks. 7. Welding helmet. 8. Safety glasses and ear plugs.

(See Integrated Media: Video)

Welding Technology Certificate Day Program MHCC Faculty Adviser Rick Walters: 503-491-7209 - Room IT 41 Richard.Walters@mhcc.edu

Lab Fees

The program is designed to prepare the person with little or no welding skill to enter the welding field with skill, knowledge and confidence. Also, it is designed for those wishing to upgrade their welding skills or to learn a new process. MHCC Welding Technology is an AWS accredited welding testing facility. The day program is a participating organization in the American Welding Society entry level welder program. The curriculum is designed to meet AWS standards.

A lab fee for each term is charged for the welding program. All electrodes, materials, gas, supplies, and power tools are furnished by the college.

Welding Technology (Day Program) 9-Month Certificate First Quarter

Cr

WLD110 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Stick)........................... 2 WLD111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Lab (Stick)..................... 4 WLD114 Blueprint Reading for Welders.................................. 3 WLD118 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG)............................... 2 WLD119 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Lab (TIG)......................... 2 MTH20 Applied Arithmetic and Pre-Algebra......................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate safety procedures and safety inspections for welding processes and related equipment and successfully complete the comprehensive safety test • follow written and verbal instructions to complete work assignments • prepare written reports or records of laboratory work • identify welding equipment and accessories • explain power source principals of operation • list set-up and adjustment procedures for the welding and cutting of ferrous and non-ferrous metals

16

74


Second Quarter

Special Studies

Cr

WLD130 Gas Metal and Flux Core Arc Welding Theory (Wire Feed)........................... 2 WLD131 Gas Metal and Flux Core Arc Welding Lab (Wire Feed)..................................... 4 WLD132 Welding Metallurgy................................................. 3 WLD133 Welding Metallurgy Lab........................................... 1 WLD134 Automated Manufacturing....................................... 4 WR101 Workplace Communications or WR121 English Composition................................. 3

General Studies........................................................75 Performing Arts Special Studies: Music................................... 76-77 Special Studies: Theatre Arts.........................77-78

Associate of General Studies Degree

17 Third Quarter

The purpose of the Degree in General Studies is to provide the student an opportunity to pursue a broad general education during the two years at a community college. It is intended as a flexible program for the student who is not pursuing a specified curriculum in the lower division transfer or professional-technical area. The general studies degree may, in addition to including the number of hours in the divisional areas as listed below, include courses in lower division collegiate transfer, occupational education, professional-technical education and general education. Because of the flexibility and broad approach of this degree, a student may find that it may not fulfill all of the requirements of full junior standing when transferred to a four-year institution. The transferable credits generally include only those courses numbered 100 or above. Please refer to pages 217-218, “Courses Numbered 100- 299”, for more information.

WLD150 Fabrication Practices.............................................. 2 WLD151 Fabrication Practices Lab........................................ 3 WLD152 Welding Processes and Procedures............................ 2 WLD153 Welding Certification Preparation Lab....................... 4 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II1,2. .......................................... 3 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.................................................... 3

17

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 This course has a prerequisite of MTH60 with a grade of “C” or better or suitable placement on the Mathematics Placement Exam (CPT). 1

The Associate of General Studies Degree will be awarded to students who satisfy the following requirements: 1. Complete a minimum of 90 applicable credit hours. 2. Successfully complete all required courses in the general studies curriculum as follows. Progression of classes must be vertical. That is, once a course has been successfully completed, a lower level course may not be taken for credit. Repeated courses may be counted only once toward graduation unless specified in the course description or unless specifically required in a program curriculum. Courses (except for electives) must be selected from a list of approved general education courses (see page 9). The list is available in the Admissions and Records Office, the Academic Advising and Transfer Center or from the program adviser.

A Recognition of Completion, Welding, may be given to students who complete the following list of courses. The courses may provide structured review of skills used by persons in the welding field or are for those who wish to attain additional knowledge related to a current occupation. Applications for this non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available with the program adviser. Please note that the following courses are typically held in the evening and may not be offered each term (please refer to the quarterly schedule of classes) and will only be offered based on sufficient enrollment.

A. Health and Physical Education A minimum of three credit hours which must include one class in Physical Education (PE) and one class in Health Education (HE). Other options: HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life, or HPE285OL (3 credits) satisfies the total HPE requirement. A student successfully completing PE285OL Wilderness Survival for 2 credits may satisfy the HPE requirement by completing one additional credit in either health or physical education. Two (2) credit hours of PE185 credit may be granted toward an Associate degree at Mt. Hood for completion of military basic training. A copy of the DD214 form is required. B. Communications Six quarter credit hours at a level equivalent to WR101 and WR102; or WR121 and WR122; or three credits in writing and three credits in speech; or three credits in writing and RD117; or three credits in writing and BA205. C. Mathematics

WLD110 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Stick)........................... 2 WLD111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding Lab (Stick)..................... 4 WLD130 Gas Metal and Flux Core Arc Welding Theory (Wire Feed)................................. 2 WLD131 Gas Metal and Flux Core Arc Welding Lab (Wire Feed)..... 4 WLD150B Blueprint Reading................................................... 2 WLD153 Welding Certification Prep Lab................................. 4

Additional Supporting Courses

WLDX11 TIG-GTAW (Heli-Arc) Welding................................... 2 WLDX13 MIG-GMAW (Wire Feed) Welding............................... 2 WLD116 General Welding I................................................... 3 WLDX34 CNC Burning........................................................... 3 MTH20 Applied Arithmetic & Pre-algebra . .......................... 3 VT10WE Special Projects.................................................. 1-4

Three quarter-credit hours at a level equivalent to MTH65 or higher (except MTH211). D. Human Relations Three quarter credit hours; refer to the general education course list on page 9. E. Humanities (Arts and Letters) 12 credit hours in humanities (arts and letters) (maximum of six credit hours in skill oriented classes).

75


F. Social Sciences 12 credit hours in social science. G. Science/Mathematics/Computer Science 9 credit hours in science or mathematics or computer science. (MTH20 and MTH40 are excluded and will not meet this requirement.) H. Complete the above requirements plus elective courses (no more than 25 credits of one discipline may apply as electives, with the exception of Special Studies curricula) to total 90 applicable credit hours. Elective courses may be any course number 10 or higher, not including those listed as Developmental Education courses, see page 217-218. A maximum of 25 credits of ENL courses, numbered 100 and above, may be applied toward the AGS degree. (ENL94R, ENL94S, and ENL94W are not to be included. See Developmental Education Courses.) 3. Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher. 4. Maintain a 2.00 GPA for all courses being applied toward the degree and maintain a 2.00 GPA in the core requirements (an average; not a “C” in every class). 5. Satisfactorily earn a minimum of 24 hours of credit at Mt. Hood Community College and be in attendance at MHCC the term in which the degree is completed. Non-traditional credit (College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement Program, Challenge, Experience-Based Credit, International Baccalaureate) does not satisfy this requirement. If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from being in attendance the last term, the student may petition to take the remaining credits (maximum of nine) at a regionally accredited college or university within one year from the date of last attendance at MHCC. This request must be in writing and indicate the school at which the courses will be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain written approval from MHCC of course acceptance prior to enrollment and to send an official transcript to MHCC upon completion of the course work. 6. Complete the application process and pay a non-refundable application fee two quarters prior to the quarter of completion (i.e., spring term graduates must apply during fall term).

thoroughly this situation and the intent of the special studies programs, and thus avoid possible disappointment later. Students who intend to earn a four-year degree in the arts should choose a college transfer program.

Special Studies: Music The curriculum in music is designed to give the student a broad background in the understanding of music and in the development of skills, with an opportunity to select areas in which he/she would like to specialize. It includes course work in music and in general education to total 90 hours; other related courses may be substituted with the approval of the Performing and Visual Arts program manager.

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • demonstrate original thinking by composing a musical sonata • demonstrate proficiency at harmonizing at the keyboard • discourse on any musical composition in historical and social context • demonstrate music performance proficiency on primary instrument or voice • identify basic diatonic and chromatic chord progressions and scale passages • perform vocally at sight, basic scale passages of diatonic and/or chromatic nature,

First Quarter

Cr

MUS111 Music Theory I........................................................ 3 MUS114 Sight Singing/Ear Training........................................ 1 MUS131 Group Piano I......................................................... 2 MUS147 Class Percussion Beginning I................................... 1 MUP Music Performance Group1.....................................1-3 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1...................................1-2 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 3

15-18 Second Quarter

Please see pages 7-10 for additional information on Associate of General Studies degree.

MUS112 Music Theory II...................................................... 3 MUS115 Sight Singing/Ear Training....................................... 1 MUS132 Group Piano II....................................................... 2 MUS148 Class Percussion Intermediate II.............................. 1 MUP Music Performance Group1.....................................1-3 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1...................................1-2 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 3

The Performing Arts

The special studies curricula at Mt. Hood Community College are designed to provide opportunities for students who wish to attain an optimum of self-development in the performing arts. The programs also provide a basis for those who may later wish to expand into more specialized areas. The special studies program is a two-year associate of General Studies degree program designed to provide students with the basic skills and techniques necessary for the development of their music or theatre interests. It differs from a transfer program in that the course requirements provide for breadth as well as an opportunity to concentrate in special interest areas. Specialized courses not otherwise available in a transfer program are included.

15‑18 Third Quarter MUS113 Music Theory III..................................................... 3 MUS116 Sight Singing/Ear Training....................................... 1 MUS133 Group Piano III...................................................... 2 MUP Music Performance Group1.................................... 1‑4 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1...................................1-2 PE Physical Education2................................................ 1 PSY101 Psychology of Human Relations or PSY201 General Psychology................................. 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Speech.......................................... 3

Students who plan to graduate from Mt. Hood Community College with this associate degree should fulfill all the requirements in one of the curricula. Provision for related electives adds flexibility to the programs. Substitutions can be made for parallel or related courses on either the transfer or non-transfer levels with the approval of the associate dean.

15‑19

The special studies curricula are not intended to meet prerequisites or to be transferable to a four-year college. Any student who is planning to enroll in a special studies curriculum should understand

76


Fourth Quarter

Cr

First Quarter

Cr

MUS211 Music Theory IV..................................................... 3 MUS214 Keyboard Harmony................................................. 2 MUP Music Performance Group1.................................... 1-4 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1...................................1-2 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1............................. 3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 6

TA106 Introduction to Theatre I........................................ 3 TA141 Acting Fundamentals I............................................ 3 TA153D Theatre Workshop: Children’s Workshop, First Year...... 2 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Human Relations requirement‡................................ 3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 3

16-20 Fifth Quarter

17 Second Quarter

MUS212 Music Theory V....................................................... 3 MUS215 Keyboard Harmony................................................. 2 MUP Music Performance Group1.................................... 1-4 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1...................................1-2 General Education requirement‡.............................. 6

TA107 Introduction to Theatre II....................................... 3 TA142 Acting Fundamentals II.......................................... 3 TA153A/B/C Theatre Workshop, First Year..................................1-3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 General Education Requirement‡.............................. 6

13-17 Sixth Quarter

16-18 Third Quarter

MUS213 Music Theory VI....................................................... 3 MUS224 Advanced Sight Singing/Ear Training.......................... 1 MUP Music Performance Group1...................................... 1-4 MUP Applied Individual Lessons1.................................... 1-2 HE250 Personal Health2. .................................................... 3 General Education requirement‡................................ 3

TA101 Appreciating Theatre.............................................. 3 TA143 Acting Fundamentals III......................................... 3 TA153A Theatre Workshop, First Year.................................... 1 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)1............................. 3 General Education Requirement‡.............................. 6

16 Fourth Quarter

12-16

TA111 Theatre Technology I or General Education requirement‡.......................... 3 TA253D Theatre Workshop: Children’s Workshop, Second Year....................................................... 2 TA227 Theatrical Makeup.................................................. 3 TA241 Intermediate Acting Techniques: Styles.................... 3 HE250 Personal Health2. ................................................... 3 General Education Requirement‡.............................. 3 PE Requirement2‡................................................... 1

It is recommended that students take a minimum of 18 credits of MUP courses in order to meet the minimum degree requirement of 90 credits. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Students who complete HE252 Standard First Aid or HE250 Personal Health are required to complete at least one additional credit of P.E. activity to satisfy the Health and Physical Education requirement for the Associate of General Studies degree. 1

18 Fifth Quarter

Note: This program is a unique version of a General Studies degree.

TA35 Theories of Directing.............................................. 3 TA112 Theatre Technology II or General Education requirement‡.......................... 3 TA148 Movement for the Actor.......................................... 3 TA199A Special Studies in Theatre....................................... 1 TA253A/B/C Theatre Workshop, Second Year..............................1-3 SP262 Voice and Articulation............................................ 3

‡ See pages 7-10.

Special Studies: Theatre Arts (Actor Director) Two programs in theatre are offered, one concentrating in acting and directing and one in stage technology and design. The Actor-Director program is designed to give the student a broad background in the understanding of drama and in the development of skills in acting and directing. The curriculum includes course work in theatre and related electives, and in general education to total 96-101 hours; other related courses may be substituted with the approval of the Performing and Visual Arts program manager.

14-16 Sixth Quarter TA113 Theatre Technology III or General Education requirement‡.......................... 3 TA144 Improvisation........................................................ 3 TA199A Special Studies in Theatre....................................... 1 TA213 Stage Lighting Design............................................. 3 TA253A/B/C Theatre Workshop, Second Year..............................1-3 General Education Requirement‡.............................. 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • identify, interpret and apply stage and blocking terminology • speak and write fluently about performances, correctly using specific vocabulary of the art and craft • work independently and as an ensemble team member in accomplishing performance tasks • present an expressive, disciplined performance of a scene and/or monologue in a manner that is original, lucid, structured and crafted.

14-16

Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 2 Students who complete HE252 Standard First Aid or HE250 Personal Health are required to complete at least one additional credit of P.E. activity to satisfy the Health and Physical Education requirement for the Associate of General Studies degree. N ote: This program is a unique version of a General Studies degree.

Forecast: Sequence of offerings may be altered in a given year.

77

1

‡ See pages 7-10.


Fifth Quarter

Special Studies: Theatre Arts Technician-Designer The Technician-Designer program objective is to train students in the planning and construction of sets, lighting operations and design, sound systems and stage management. The curriculum includes course work in theatre and related electives, and in general education to total 90 hours; other related courses may be substituted.

16-18 Sixth Quarter Cr TA199A/B/C Special Projects in Theatre....................................1-3 TA213 Stage Lighting Design............................................. 3 TA214A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, Second Year................1-3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 6 Related Elective3.................................................... 3

Program Outcomes At the completion of this program, the student should be able to: • present a completed production design, demonstrating process from script analysis, concept development to final presentation • safely rig, operate and maintain scenery and equipment for a theatrical fly system • read and execute technical drawings for scenery and lighting • create a resume and support materials (head shot and/or portfolio) suitable for an audition/interview in professional or educational theatre.

14-18

Forecast: Sequence of offerings may be altered in a given year.

First Quarter

Cr

TA121 Costuming............................................................. 3 TA211 Scene Design ........................................................ 3 TA214A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, Second Year................1-3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 6 Related Elective3.................................................... 3

Cr

TA106 Introduction to Theatre I........................................ 3 TA111 Theatre Technology I.............................................. 3 TA114A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, First Year....................1‑3 HE252 First Aid: Responding to Emergencies1...................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 General Education Requirement‡.............................. 3

Students who complete HE252 Standard First Aid or HE250 Personal Health are required to complete at least one additional credit of P.E. activity to satisfy the Health and Physical Education requirement for the Associate of General Studies degree. 2 Students may not use demonstrated proficiency on the College Placement Test (CPT) to satisfy this requirement. 3 Selections not from the following list must be pre-approved by a faculty adviser and submitted on a Catalog Exception Form. 1

Suggested Related Electives ART115 Basic Design 1: Two-dimensional ART116 Basic Design 2: Color Theory ART117 Basic Design 3: Three-dimensional ART281 Painting I ART291 Sculpture: Beginning ENG105 Introduction to Literature: Drama ENG201 Shakespeare: The Early Plays ENG202 Shakespeare: The Later Plays ESR285 Safety and Health Standards and Laws ET120 Architectural Drawing ET154 Computer-Aided Design I ET231 Basic Strengths of Materials FA257 Films and Society FA258 Understanding the Film FA266 The Great Film Directors TA35 Theories of Directing TA199A/B/C Special Studies in Theatre (up to 9 credits maximum) WLD110 and WLD111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding

16‑18

Second Quarter TA107 Introduction to Theatre II....................................... 3 TA112 Theatre Technology II............................................. 3 TA114A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, First Year....................1‑3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 PE Requirement1. ................................................... 1 Related elective.................................................. 3-4

14-17 Third Quarter TA101 Appreciating Theatre.............................................. 3 TA113 Theatre Technology III........................................... 3 TA114A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, First Year....................1-3 Human Relations Requirement‡............................... 3 General Education Requirements‡............................ 6

Note: This program is a unique version of a General Studies degree.

16-18 Fourth Quarter

TA141 Acting Fundamentals I or TA144 Improvisation or TA153A/B/C Theatre Workshops, First Year or TA153D Theatre Workshop: Children’s Workshop First Year.........................................................1-3 TA214A/B/C Technical Theatre Workshop, Second Year................1-3 TA227 Theatrical Makeup.................................................. 3 MTH65 Beginning Algebra II (or higher)2‡........................... 3 General Education requirement‡.............................. 3 Related Electives3.................................................. 3

14-18

78

‡ See pages 7-10.


Transfer Information Students can prepare for more than sixty transfer majors at MHCC. MHCC’s transfer subject areas allow students to begin work on the Bachelor’s degree requirements of their chosen majors. Advantages of starting a four-year program at MHCC include smaller classes, lower costs, instructors’ focus on teaching excellence, and the availability of skill-building courses in reading, writing and mathematics.

• Chemistry/Biochemistry • Environmental Science • Forest Resources Management • Geology • Pre-professional Studies • Chiropractic • Dentistry • Medicine • Optometry • Pharmacy • Physicians Assistant • Veterinary Medicine • Physics Social Science ...................................................... 503-491-7480 • Anthropology • Criminology • Economics • Education • General Social Science • Geography • History • Law (pre-professional) • Philosophy • Political Science • Psychology • Sociology Visual Arts ...................................................... 503-491-7309 • Art

Planning for Transfer It is vital to plan ahead for transfer. With careful planning, students can complete lower division general education requirements and meet many requirements for their intended major while at MHCC. Professional academic advisers and faculty advisers can help students plan ahead by assisting in developing educational plans that meet the requirements of their chosen majors and transfer schools.

Transfer Departments and Advisers Faculty advisers provide advising assistance to students majoring in their fields of expertise. A list of advisers for all majors is updated annually and can be found at www.mhcc.edu/pages/162. asp. Students may also contact the college departments listed below for the names of advisers in their chosen majors. The Academic Advising and Transfer Center................503-491-7315 • General Studies Allied Health ...................................................... 503-491-7180 • Dental Hygiene • Pre-professional Studies • Medical Technology • Nursing • Occupational Therapy • Physical Therapy Business .......................................................503-491-7196 • Business (AS/OT-Bus) • Business Management • Computer Information Systems • Hospitality and Tourism Management Career Planning and Counseling Center........................503-491-7452 • Undeclared and/or exploring majors Engineering, Computer Science .................................503-491-7292 • Computer Science • Engineering (Pre-professional) English, Language and Speech................................... 503-491-7290 • Communications • English • International Studies • Journalism • Modern Languages Health and Physical Education...................................503-491-7450 • Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism • Physical Education/Exercise and Sport Science Industrial Technology...............................................503-491-7470 Mathematics ...................................................... 503-491-7480 • Mathematics Performing Arts ...................................................... 503-491-6969 • Music • Theater Science ...................................................... 503-491-7364 • Biological Sciences • Biology • Botany • Entomology • Microbiology • Zoology

Academic Advising and Transfer Center The Advising and Transfer Center’s resources include a library of regional college catalogs, comprehensive college directories, and on-line advising guides for colleges and universities. Students may use the center’s computer kiosks to access web pages for hundreds of colleges and universities. Regular visits by transfer college representatives also enable MHCC students to make personal inquiries related to their transfer plans.

Transfer Days Representatives from regional colleges and universities visit MHCC bi-annually for Transfer Days. Personal contact with college representatives offers a chance to ask for detailed information about transfer subjects and procedures. These “college fairs” give students the opportunity to investigate several colleges at one time. For information on upcoming Transfer Days, contact the Academic Advising and Transfer Center at 503-491-7315.

Associate of Arts-Oregon Transfer Degree This degree is designed for students planning to transfer into a bachelor’s degree program at one of Oregon’s public universities (University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Eastern, Western, Southern, Portland State University, or Oregon Institute of Technology). All of these universities accept the AA/OT as a “block transfer,” enabling a student to enter as a junior with all of the transfer school’s lower division general education requirements met. The AA/OT offers students the flexibility to choose courses that interest them while fulfilling requirements at their transfer schools. Several Oregon Private Institutions and a limited number of out-ofstate institutions also accept the AA/OT. These include Concordia University, Pacific University, Warner Pacific College, George Fox University and Marylhurst University in the Portland area, as well as Western Baptist College, BYU - Hawaii, Hawaii Pacific University, Boise State University, Seattle Pacific University, and Washington State University.

79


It is important to note that the AA/OT is not the best degree option for all majors. Students should consult advisers in their major areas for educational planning related to required courses in their majors.

• Plan Ahead: Enroll in HD100: College Success and/or contact an adviser during your first term at MHCC to develop an education plan. If you need help with choosing a major or career, enroll in HD110 or HD208.

Associate of Science – Oregon Transfer in Business

• Maintain Contact: Establish early contact with admissions representatives and major advisers at MHCC and transfer colleges. Keep in touch with them in order to keep up to date on major and transfer requirements.

The AS/OT – Business degree is designed for business majors planning to transfer to a baccalaureate degree program at four-year institutions in the Oregon University System (OUS). It does not guarantee admission to the Business school/program of any OUS institution. Any student who holds the AS/OT – Business degree transferring to any institution in the Oregon University System, will have met the lower-division general education requirements for that institution’s baccalaureate degree programs. Students will also have junior standing for admission and registration purposes.

• Know the Rules: Pay attention to GPA and transfer credit policies, application deadlines and both general education and major course requirements of transfer schools. • Confirm Transferability of Courses: Not all 100-200 level courses transfer to all four-year schools. Transfer colleges have the “last say” on transferability.

Associate of Science

• Utilize Transfer Resources: This catalog, the Advising and Transfer Center, quarterly Transfer Days; and MHCC faculty advisers are key sources of information and guidance.

The Associate of Science degree is designed for students who plan to transfer and complete a Bachelors of Science degree at a four-year institution. The degree requirements allow students more flexibility in course selection allowing them to focus on their major requirements. NOTE: completion of this degree does not guarantee that all lower-division General Education requirements have been met for a baccalaureate degree (i.e. this is not a block transfer degree as is the AA/OT). In selecting courses for this degree, students are highly encouraged to consult the specific transfer curriculum pages in this catalog, the faculty adviser, and the institution to which they intend to transfer to determine if it is an appropriate choice.

• Ask for Help: Make sure you have current and complete information; ask for what you need to complete the transfer process successfully.

Transfer Hotline If a student has a problem transferring classes to a college or university, the student should first try to resolve the problem through contact with the transfer school. MHCC advisers may be of assistance in such cases. However, if a problem cannot be resolved, the student may call the Transfer Problem Hotline at the Oregon Department of Education for help. The hotline number is 503-3788609, ext 367.

Associate of General Studies degree This flexible degree option enables a student to complete an associate’s degree that is tailored to the general education requirements of the transfer school. Students must exercise caution in using the AGS option, as the degree does not guarantee transferability of courses completed. Educational planning for the Associate of General Studies should be done with the help of an adviser.

Oregon Transfer Module The Oregon Transfer Module is a sub-set of the AA/OT. It is not a certificate or a degree. The Oregon Transfer Module is designed to provide students with the typical general education requirements required during the freshman year at the Oregon University System schools.

Direct Transfer Transfer without a degree is an option for MHCC students. A student may select a major and transfer school, then take only the specific courses required for that major and/or college. Students in certain majors may need to transfer after one year to take advantage of critical major courses offered in the sophomore year. When a student opts for direct transfer, MHCC courses are evaluated and accepted on a course-by-course basis by the transfer school. Direct transfer students must meet the transfer schools’ freshman’ or ‘transfer admission’ requirements. Catalogs from transfer institutions contain information about credit hour and grade point average requirements and transfer application procedures.

Successful Transfer Success in the transfer process is largely the result of careful planning. It is each student’s responsibility to learn the program requirements of any prospective transfer school, and to keep up to date on changes in those requirements. Therefore, students should periodically contact the Academic Advising and Transfer Center and/or the transfer schools for updates. Prudent use of available resources and advising can help ensure smooth transition to a fouryear institution. Students can benefit from following these tips for successful transfer:

80


Quick Transfer Reference Guide Page

Transfer Subjects

Curricula as listed will lead to the following degree. (The subject area will not appear on the student’s degree.)

In addition to preparing for transfer to a four-year university, the student might also complete a two-year MHCC Associate of Science or an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer. See pages 10-14.

82

Anthropology

83 84

Degree or Direct Transfer

Phone

Transfer Agreements

MHCC has current formal transfer agreements with the following schools

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

Art

503-491-7309

AS

*

Biology, Botany, Zoology

503-491-6081

AS

*

85

Business (AS/OT-Business)

503-491-7196

AS/OT - Bus

*

86

Business Management

503-491-7196

AS

Oregon Institute of Technology

87

Chemistry/Biochemistry

503-491-6081

AS

88

Computer Information Systems

503-491-7196

AS

89

Computer Science

503-491-7017

AS

*

90

Criminal Justice Administration

503-491-7480

AS

Western Oregon University

91

Economics

503-491-7480

AS

*

92

Education

503-491-7480

AA/OT

Eastern Oregon University

93

Engineering

503-491-7017

AS

*

94

English

503-491-7018

AA/OT

*

(Direct)

Portland State University, Concordia University, Marylhurst University Oregon State University

Oregon Institute of Technology

95

Environmental Science

503-491-6081

96

Forest Resources Management

503-491-6081

AS

97

General Social Science

503-491-7480

AA/OT

97

Geography

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

98

Geology

503-491-6081

AS

*

99

History

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

101 Hospitality and Tourism Management

503-491-7196

AS

Portland State University, Oregon State University - Cascades, Washington State University

102 Journalism

503-491-7410

AA/OT

University of Oregon

103 Mathematics

503-491-7292

AS

104 Modern Languages

503-491-7018

AA/OT

105 Music

503-491-6970

(Direct)

*

106 Office Management/Administrative Assistant

503-491-7196

AS

Oregon Institute of Technology Oregon State University - Cascades

*

107 Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism

503-491-7450

AS

110 Philosophy

503-491-7018

AA/OT

111 Physical Education/Exercise and Sport Science

503-491-7450

AA/OT

*

112 Physics

503-491-6081

AS

*

112 Political Science

503-491-7480

(Direct)

*

113 Pre-Law

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

503-491-6081

AS

*

115 Psychology

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

116 Sociology

503-491-7480

AA/OT

*

117 Theatre Arts

503-491-7157

AA/OT

*

114

Pre-Professional (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine)

AS: Associate of Science degree AA/OT: Associate of Arts – Oregon Transfer degree AS/OT – Business: Associate of Science – Oregon Transfer in Business (Direct): Direct Transfer * The curriculum guides listed in this section transfer to many four-year schools.

81


Fourth Quarter

Anthropology

Cr

MHCC Faculty Adviser please contact the Social Science Department at 503-491-7480

Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1. ...... 3-4 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5........................................ 4 Elective6............................................................... 3

Anthropology is commonly defined as “the study of humankind”. Anthropologists conduct this study by focusing on humanity’s most unique and essential attribute: culture. At Mt. Hood Community College, human culture is explored and explained via introductory coursework reflecting various anthropological subdisciplines as well as courses on specific topics.

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer

13-14 Fifth Quarter

13-14 Sixth Quarter

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • apply knowledge of human behavior and social phenomena to social and community issues • recognize the values, behaviors and viewpoints of diverse populations • develop interdependent skills while functioning autonomously within the context of social systems.

Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5........................................ 4 Electives6.............................................................. 7

17

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts -Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon or Washington State University/Vancouver, Western Oregon University. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education requirements. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty advisers and /or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

Suggested quarterly program:

First Quarter

Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1. ...... 3-4 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5........................................ 4 Social Science requirement1,4................................... 3

Cr

ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 First-year language elective2................................... 5 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements for course options, pages 10-14. 2 First-year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, ITAL101-103, JPN101-102, or SPAN101-103. 3 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities requirements include: (must be earned in at least two disciplines, no more than 9 credits in one discipline) PHL201-203, SP112, SP114, R210, ENG104 or FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 4 Suggested courses to fulfill social science requirements include SOC204-206. 5 Suggested course sequence to fulfill lab science requirements is BI101-103, G201-203 6 Suggested courses to fulfill elective requirements include ANTH180, ANTH211-213, ANTH215, ANTH231-232, R210, SOC204-206. 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/anthsoc

15 Second Quarter

Portland State University - http://www.anthropology.pdx.edu/

ANTH101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology.................. 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions or MTH105 Contemporary Mathematics.................. 4-5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year language elective2................................... 5

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/cla/ anthropology/

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/socsci/ anthro/anthdeg.htm

University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/%7Eanthro/

15-16 Third Quarter

MHCC Course Web Link: http://www.mhcc.edu/programs/

ANTH102 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory..... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year language elective2................................... 5 Oral Communication/Rhetoric requirement1. ............. 3 Social Sciences requirement1,4 ................................ 3

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Anthropology. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

17

82


Third Quarter

Art

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Advisers Basic Design, Digital Art: Mary Girsch 503-491-7416 Drawing, Painting, Animation: Lori Lorion 503-491-6967 Ceramics: Stephen Mickey 503-491-7149 Sculpture, 3D Design: Tamsie Ringler 503-491-6968 Art History, Printmaking, Life drawing: Georganne Watters 503-491-6947

girschm@mhcc.edu

16 Fourth Quarter

lorionl@mhcc.edu

ART234

mickeys@mhcc.edu ringlert@mhcc.edu wattersg@mhcc.edu

Life Drawing I........................................................ 3 Studio Course: Digital 3 or 2-D ................................. 3 Studio Course: 3-D ................................................ 3 Oral Communication1,2............................................. 3 Science requirement2 4......................................... 3-4

15-16 Fifth Quarter

How we see, create and respond to color, form, line, content and meaning are common to all forms of visual communication in a world of increasing dependence on visual information. The Department of Visual Arts at MHCC offers useful and relevant preparation for careers in technology, information, imaging and self-expression. At MHCC you work with instructors who have earned national and international recognition as practicing artists. Their goal is to provide you with a strong foundation in design and drawing while encouraging you to explore other studio options as well. You will learn, too, how to develop portfolio work that prepares you for transfer to both private and public art schools.

Studio Course: Digital 3 or 3-D.................................. 3 Studio Course: 2-D . ............................................... 3 Studio Course: 2-D or 3-D ....................................... 3 Science requirement2, 4......................................... 3-4 Social Science requirement2.................................... 3

15-16 Sixth Quarter HPE295

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • exhibit competence in visual communication through the process of creating art • employ aesthetic and critical thinking skills when transforming concept to form • identify the historical, multicultural, and contemporary context • articulate ideas expressed in artwork by integrating verbal, written, and visual communication skills.

Studio Course: Digital 3 or 3-D ................................. 3 Studio Course: 2-D or 3-D ....................................... 3 Studio Course: 2-D or 3-D ....................................... 3 Studio Course: 2-D or 3-D ....................................... 3 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3

15

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC. Visual Arts courses from MHCC generally transfer to most Oregon four-year educational institutions which grant baccalaureate degrees to art majors. However, it is highly recommended that students contact their transfer institution of choice immediately to begin the process of degree planning and to fulfill requirements for application and acceptance. MHCC Visual Arts faculty and advising staff will assist students in communicating with transfer institutions and assessing methods for meeting the transfer school’s requirements.

Required art course. Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12. 3 Computer Literacy is a requirement in this Associate of Science degree. A digital art course from ART225, ART226 or ART227 fulfills your general education Computer Literacy requirement. 4 BI121 and BI122 are highly recommended. 1 2

2-D Studio Courses ART115/116/117* Basic Design I, II, III ART219 Calligraphy (1 credit) ART225/226/227** Digital Art I, II, Digital Art: 3D Animation ART231*/232/233*** Drawing I, II, III ART234*/235/236 Life Drawing I, II, III ART240/241 Drawing: Cartooning I, II ART271/272/273 Printmaking I, II, III ART281/282/283 Painting I, II, III ART294/296/297 Watercolor I, II, III

Be sure to see an adviser in the Department of Visual Arts (from the list above) to personalize this plan for your educational needs.

First Quarter

Cr

ART117 Basic Design III1.................................................... 3 ART206 History of Western Art: Baroque - Modern1................ 4 Studio Course: 2-D or 3-D ....................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research ............................... 3 Social Science requirement2.................................... 3

3-D Studio Courses

Cr

ART254/255/256 ART257/258/259 ART287 ART288 ART291/292/293

ART115 Basic Design I1. ..................................................... 3 ART204 History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Byzantine1........ 4 ART231 Drawing I1............................................................. 3 MTH105 Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics or MTH111, Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions... 4-5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Ceramics I, II, III Jewelry Making/Metalsmithing I, II, III Sculpture: Iron Casting (seasonal) Sculpture: Ceramics Sculpture I, II, III

* Course is included as a requirement in this degree curriculum. ** ART225 OR 226 OR 227 is a required course for majors, one of which will also fulfill your general education Computer Literacy requirement *** ART232, 233: It is highly recommended that the entire drawing sequence be completed before transfer.

17-18 Second Quarter ART116 Basic Design II1..................................................... 3 ART205 History of Western Art: Medieval - Renaissance1........ 4 Studio Course: 2-D . ............................................... 3 Studio Course: 3-D ................................................ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking .................... 3

16

83


First Quarter

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University – http://oregonstate.edu/dept/arts/ Portland State University – http://www.art.pdx.edu Southern Oregon University – http://www.sou.edu/overview/art. html

17 Second Quarter

University of Oregon – http://art-uo.uoregon.edu/

CH222 General Chemistry II............................................... 5 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 PH202 General Physics II.................................................. 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Marylhurst University – http://www.marylhurst.edu/art/bfa-art.php Pacific Northwest College of Art – http://www.pnca.edu/programs/ bfa/majors/ Oregon College of Arts and Crafts – http://www.ocac.edu

17 Third Quarter

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Art. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

CH223 General Chemistry III............................................. 5 PH203 General Physics III................................................. 5 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Social Sciences requirement1 .................................. 3

Fourth Quarter

16

BI211 Principles of Biology I............................................ 5 CH241 Organic Chemistry I2 .............................................. 5 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3

Biology, Botany, Zoology Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser Lee Mitchell: 503-491-7441 - Room AC 2595

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 PH201 General Physics I . ................................................. 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16 Fifth Quarter

Lee.Mitchell@mhcc.edu

BI212 CH242

Biology is a tremendously diverse field of study devoted to examining life processes. Courses offered by the Department of Life Science are tailored to allow graduating students to function as informed citizens or to move on to careers as practicing scientists, educators and health professionals.

Principles of Biology II........................................... 5 Organic Chemistry II2 . ........................................... 5 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

16 Sixth Quarter

Curricular Outcomes

BI213 CH243

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate mastery of discipline-specific biological concepts • demonstrate the ability to ask and answer questions using the scientific method • demonstrate an ability to collect, manipulate, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data • select and use appropriate equipment to conduct field and laboratory investigations • demonstrate an ability to conduct field and laboratory exercises independently and in groups • select, evaluate, and utilize discipline-specific scholarly material • demonstrate an ability to communicate biological information in written and/or oral form to practitioners and the public.

Principles of Biology III.......................................... 5 Organic Chemistry III2 ........................................... 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1

14

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12. 2 This sequence replaces the 300-level Organic Chemistry requirement at colleges and universities. With an acceptable score on the ACS National Exam and a minimum of a C or better in each course, this sequence transfers as 11-15 credits of 300-level coursework to all OUS schools.

1

Related MHCC Program Web Links: http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www2.eou.edu/%7Ejrinehar/ biodept.htm

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science in the Biological Sciences at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, or University of Oregon. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

Oregon State University - http://www.science.orst.edu/majors.html Portland State University - http://www.bio.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/biology/ University of Oregon - http://biology.uoregon.edu/ Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Biological Sciences. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

84


Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Business (AS/OT - Bus)

Associate of Science/Oregon Transfer - Business MHCC Faculty Advisers : Jim Arnold: 503-491-7468 - Room AC 2664 (Students with last name beginning A-F) Jim. Arnold@mhcc.edu Rodney Barker: 503-491-6971 - Room AC 2688 (Students with last name beginning G-L) Rodney.Barker@mhcc.edu Jerry Kohler: 503-491-7408 - Room AC 2682 (Students with last name beginning M-Z) Jerry.Kohler@mhcc.edu Lola Lackey: 503-491-7313 - Room AC 2688 (Students with last name beginning T-Z) Lola.lackey@mhcc.edu

15 Fifth Quarter (Winter) EC202 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 Arts and Letters requirement3 . ............................... 6 Lab Science requirement3 ....................................... 4 Elective or university-specific prerequisite4 ............. 3

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

If your goal is to earn a four-year degree in Business Administration, start that degree at MHCC. Mt. Hood Community College business courses offer tremendous opportunities to the transfer student. Students can complete the first two years of course work at MHCC and seamlessly transfer their college credits to many four-year colleges and universities.

BA226 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 Arts and Letters requirement3. ................................ 3 Lab Science requirement3 ....................................... 4 Elective or university-specific prerequisite4 ............. 3

14

Curricular Outcomes

AS/OT-Bus General Requirements: see pages 12-14. Some universities will accept BA131 Introduction to Business Computing. Please check directly with the four-year university. 3 AS/OT-Bus Distribution Requirements: see pages 12-14. 4 AS/OT-Bus Electives and/or University-Specific Requirements: (This list of prerequisites and recommendations is subject to change without notice. ) 8 to 9 credits, depending on choice of transfer institution. Eastern Oregon University: WR227, Technical Report Writing; The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Oregon Institute of Technology: The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Recommendations: PSY201, General Psychology; BA206, Management and Supervisory Fundamentals (equivalent to BUS215 at OIT); WR227, Technical Writing Oregon State University: BA275, Business Quantitative Methods; MTH241 Calculus of Biological/Management/Social Sciences; MTH245, Math for Biological/Management/Social Sciences; The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required. Portland State University: CIS122 Computer Concepts III; BA205, Business Communications Using Technology; STAT244, Introduction to Probability and Statistics II; GPA: 2.75 overall and 2.75 in pre-business courses. Southern Oregon University: BA271 or BA282, Applied Business Statistics; GPA: 2.0 overall and 2.5 in all business courses. Students must apply for admission to the Business School/Program University of Oregon: DSC199 Special Studies: Business Applications Software; MTH241, MTH242, Calculus for Business and Social Science I, II; Multicultural requirement; GPA: 2.9 overall and 2.75 in pre-business core. Students must apply for admission to the Business School/Program Western Oregon University: The Business Law course for the AS/OT-Bus is required.

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate an understanding of critical thinking in business • describe basic business functions • apply basic accounting principles to analyze and classify transactions • explain the role of marketing • prepare basic financial statements • explain the legal concepts related to business. The two-year course of study outlined below is designed to meet transfer requirements for business majors and results in the awarding of an Associate of Science - Oregon Transfer in Business (AS/OT-Bus) degree from Mt. Hood. Please be advised the program has entry-level expectations for skill levels in reading, writing, and mathematics and therefore, completion time may vary. The curriculum is specifically tailored to follow transfer requirements for Oregon University System four-year schools. Note: students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty advisers and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center. Note: For students transferring to EOU, see Business Management Marketing, Management and eBusiness Associate of Applied Science Degree.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Lab Science requirement3 ....................................... 4 Social science requirement 3 . .................................. 4 Elective or university-specific prerequisite4 ............. 3

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions1 ...................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16 Second Quarter (Winter) CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab2................................. ­4 BA212 Principles of Accounting II1 ................................... 3 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I .................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Oral communications requirement1 .......................... 3

1 2

Related MHCC Program Web Link: http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Business Administration. Some colleges have specific requirements for admission to their Business Administration programs that may include, transfer GPA, specific course completion, and application deadlines. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

17 Third Quarter (Spring) BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 Arts and Letters requirement3 . ............................... 3 Mathematics requirement1. ..................................... 4

14

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Third Quarter (Spring)

Business Management

BA206 BA213 CIS125DB PSY201 WR227

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Advisers:

Jim Arnold: 503-491-7468 – Room AC 2664 Jim.Arnold@mhcc.edu Rodney Barker: 503-491-6971 – Room AC 2688 Rodney.Barker@mhcc.edu Dave Garlington: 503-491-7467 – Room AC 2687 Dave.Garlington@mhcc.edu Jerry Kohler: 503-491-7408 – Room AC 2682 Jerry.Kohler@mhcc.edu Lola Lackey: 503-491-7313 – Room AC 2665 Lola.Lackey@mhcc.edu

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) BA226 BA231 EC201

The two-year curriculum listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from Mt. Hood Community College and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science Degree in Operations Management at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT).

Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 Information Technology in Business......................... 4 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Lab Science Elective2.............................................. 4

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) BA223 BA224 BA285 EC202

The Business Management Program at Mt. Hood Community College prepares students to work in financial management, marketing management, small business management and much more. The degree offers a core of courses in accounting, finance, business law, economics, management, marketing, human resources, and leadership. Preparing students to be successful in business is key. Now students have an opportunity to transfer these business courses and general education courses to OIT’s Operations Management Bachelor of Science Degree. This four-year degree is designed for people who are interested in careers in industrial and operations management – planning, directing, and/or coordinating the operations of companies or public and private organizations. There are many employment opportunities in management and administration in areas of personnel, purchasing and other administrative services.

Principles of Marketing........................................... 4 Human Resource Management.................................. 3 Leadership and Human Relations.............................. 3 Principles of Economics (Macro)............................... 4 Lab Science Elective2.............................................. 4

18 Sixth Quarter (Spring) BA250 Small Business Management.................................... 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Humanities Elective5.............................................. 3

13 Once students have completed the A.S. Degree at MHCC and before transferring to OIT, they may take 18 additional credits at MHCC. These credits serve as a bridge to OIT and the BS Degree in Operations Management.

Curricular Outcomes

Seventh Quarter (Summer)

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate an understanding of critical thinking in business • describe basic business functions • apply basic accounting principles to analyze and classify transactions • explain the role of marketing • prepare basic financial statements • explain the legal concepts related to business.

BA

Business Electives4................................................. 8 Humanities Elective3.............................................. 3 Sciences/Math Electives5........................................ 7

18 Notes:

Specific program and class information can be obtained by calling the Business Dept. at 503-491-7515 or 503-491-7196, or visit our web site at www.mhcc.edu.

The following is a sample schedule for completing the AS degree in two years:

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 Desktop Database................................................... 3 General Psychology................................................. 3 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

Cr

BA101 Introduction to Business......................................... 4 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing........................ 4 MTH111 Pre-Calculus: Elementary Functions1. ....................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

MTH111 Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. 2 OIT transfer students can choose lab science courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 3 OIT transfer students can choose humanities courses from the approved Humanities courses on pages 13-14. 4 BA electives include: AC261, AC262, BA150, BA177, BA202, BA212, BA215, BA218, BA220, BA222, BA228, BA238, BA239, BA249, BA265, BA267, BA271 5 OIT transfer students can choose science/math courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 1

The following courses are required at OIT and can be taken at OIT Portland, by distance education, or at Klamath Falls. These 66 credits in addition to the 116 at MHCC equal the 182 required for the BS Degree in Operations Management

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

BUS445 Business Presentations........................................... 3 BUS458 Process Improvement.............................................. 3 BUS467 Services Management............................................. 3 IMGT311 Principles of Operations Management....................... 3 IMGT312 Ops Scheduling and Control..................................... 3 IMGT326 Operations Budgeting............................................. 3 IMGT336 Total Quality Management....................................... 3 IMGT345 Engineering Economy.............................................. 3 IMGT445 Project Management............................................... 3

BA205 Business Communications....................................... 4 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

18

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IMGT457 Cases in Strategic Management................................ 4 IMGT481 Quality Control Techniques...................................... 3 IMGT486 The Lean Enterprise................................................ 3 IMGT495 Senior Project Proposal........................................... 1 IMGT496 Senior Project........................................................ 3 IMGT497 Senior Project........................................................ 3 Math361 Statistical Methods................................................ 4 Math371 Finite Math and Calculus I....................................... 4 MIS375 Decision Support Systems....................................... 3 PSY347 Organizational Behavior.......................................... 3 PSY410 Organizational Change and Development................... 3 SPE321 Small Groups and Team Comm.................................. 3 WRI327 Advanced Technical Report Writing.......................... 3

Second Quarter

Chemistry/Biochemistry

CH241 MTH254 PH211

MHCC Faculty Advisers Dr. Elizabeth Cohen: 503-491-6012 - Room AC 2594 Elizabeth.Cohen@mhcc.edu Dr. Michael Russell: 503-491-7443 - Room AC 2596 Michael.Russell@mhcc.edu

15 Fifth Quarter

15 Third Quarter CH223 General Chemistry III............................................. 5 MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3 Social Science requirement1 .................................... 3

15 Fourth Quarter

Associate of Science

Organic Chemistry I2............................................... 5 Calculus IV: Vector Calculus . .................................. 5 General Physics with Calculus I................................ 5

CH242 Organic Chemistry II2 ............................................. 5 PH212 General Physics with Calculus II.............................. 5 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Social Science requirement1 .................................... 3

The science of chemistry deals with the composition, analysis, structure, and properties of matter and the various transformations matter may undergo. Chemical processes are the foundation of many diverse systems that are of great interest to mankind, including biological functions, the natural and polluted environment, industrial processes, food and agriculture, etc.

16 Sixth Quarter CH243 CIS120 CIS120L PH213

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • retain and apply critical chemistry concepts while enrolled in the curriculum and upon transfer • use chemistry principles and logical reasoning skills to solve problems • demonstrate proper laboratory techniques with attention to detail, including the use of associated equipment and instrumentation • communicate scientific topics effectively • transfer to four-year institutions and succeed in upper-division coursework • recognize connec t ions between chemistr y and other disciplines.

Organic Chemistry III2 . .......................................... 5 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 General Physics with Calculus III............................. 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 ............. 3

17

1

2

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12. This sequence replaces the 300-level Organic Chemistry requirement at colleges and universities. With an acceptable score on the ACS National Exam and a minimum of a C or better in each course, this sequence transfers as 11-15 credits of 300-level coursework to all OUS schools. Check with your transfer institution to determine any additional Organic Chemistry requirements.

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www2.eou.edu/chem/

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science/Art in Chemistry/Biochemistry at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon or Western Oregon University. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

Cr

CH222 General Chemistry II . ............................................ 5 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

Oregon State University - http://www.chem.orst.edu/ or http:// oregonstate.edu/dept/biochem Portland State University - http://chem.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/chem/ University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~chem/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/physci//chem. html Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Chemistry/Biochemistry. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

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• identify career and transfer options early in students’ academic careers • demonstrate competency in information literacy, quantitative reasoning and critical thinking • demonstrate the ability to translate oral and written specifications into an effective solution using established problem-solving techniques • explain and discuss ethical, legal, and societal implications inherent in the information technology field and an understanding of the historical context of modern computing.

Computer Information Systems Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Advisers: Robert Buroker: 503-491-6019 – Room AC 2779 Robert.Buroker@mhcc.edu Gary DeRoest: 503-491-7339 – Room AC 2781 Gary.DeRoest@mhcc.edu Jack Fassel: 503-491-7672 – Room AC 1274 Jack.Fassel@mhcc.edu Wayne Machuca: 503-491-76341 – Room AC 2783 Wayne.Machuca@mhcc.edu Paul Morris: 503-491-7303 – Room AC 2778 Paul.Morris@mhcc.edu

Specific program and class information can be obtained by calling the Computer Applications (or Computer Information Systems) Dept. at 503-491-7515 or 503-491-7196, or visit our web site at www.mhcc. edu.

The two-year curriculum listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from Mt. Hood Community College and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science Degree in Operations Management at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT).

The following is a sample schedule for completing the A.S. degree in two years:

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

CIS120 Concepts in Computing I......................................... 3 CIS120L Concepts in Computing Lab I................................... 1 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 MTH111 Pre-Calculus: Elementary Functions.......................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

The Computer Information Systems (CIS) program offers many opportunities to students interested in careers in Database Management, Information Technology, Networks and Operating Systems, and Web Management. Students can now learn these technical skills, while earning an A.S. Degree that transfers to Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Operations Management Degree program. This program is designed for people who are interested in careers in industrial and operations management, as systems designers, program analysts, production managers, etc. Employment opportunities exist and this degree and transfer opportunity give students a competitive advantage in the workplace.

16 Second Quarter (Winter) CIS125HTM HTML ................................................................... 3 CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Curricular Outcomes

18 Third Quarter (Spring)

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate appropriate knowledge of computer equipment and peripherals characteristically used in a business environment • describe and demonstrate the functions and features of the Windows operating system • demonstrate prof iciency in common industry sof tware applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access) to effectively communicate in a professional setting • demonstrate ability to research business and employment information using published materials, electronic media, databases, and the Internet • demonstrate the ability to communicate orally and in writing at a level necessary for successful employment in business • perform business-related mathematical operations using database and spreadsheet applications • demonstrate the ability to research employment opportunities and prepare an effective e-portfolio • use ef fec t ive wr it ten and oral communicat ion skill s techniques • use critical thinking skills during the problem solving process • work cooperatively to share information, resolve conflict and make decisions • demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot and solve technical problems • apply technology in using available resources to identify and describe viable solutions • demonstrate knowledge and skills that meet industry standards and certification requirements in the use of computer hardware and operating systems technology • prepare a comprehensive plan for implementing a LAN (local area network) in a small business environment

CIS122 CIS125DB BA206 PSY201 WR227

Computer Concepts III............................................ 4 Desktop Database................................................... 3 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 General Psychology................................................. 3 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall) CIS140W Windows Operating System...................................... 2 CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 Lab Science2 ......................................................... 4

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) CS/CIS Electives3.............................................................. 6 EC202 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 HUM202 Age of Technology: Ethics in the Workplace.............. 3 Lab Science Elective2.............................................. 4

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring) CIS247 Information Analysis.............................................. 4 CS/CIS Electives3.............................................................. 3 BA226 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Humanities Elective5.............................................. 3

17 Once students have completed the A.S. Degree at MHCC and before transferring to OIT, they may take 15 additional credits at MHCC. These credits serve as a bridge to OIT and the BS Degree in Operations Management.

88


Seventh Quarter (Summer)

Cr

Computer Science

CIS/CS Electives3.............................................................. 5 Humanities Elective5.............................................. 3 Science/Math Electives4. ........................................ 7

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser David Todd, Ph.D.: 503-491-7198 - Room AC 2668 David.Todd@mhcc.edu

15

MTH111 Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. 2 OIT transfer students can choose lab science courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 3 CIS/CS Electives include: CIS125GA; CIS125GB; CIS125GC; CIS125SS; CIS125WGA; CIS125WSC; CIS125WP; CIS135DBM; CIS133JS; CIS133SQL; CIS133XML; CIS140U; CIS145; CIS151; CIS152; CIS154; CIS188; CIS195; CIS225; CIS279A; CIS279S; CIS284; CIS297; CS133PRL; CS133VB; CS160; CS161; CS162; CS233JA; CS233VB; CS244; CS260 4 OIT transfer students can choose science/math courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 5 OIT transfer students can choose humanities courses from the approved Humanities courses on pages 13-14. 1

The Computer Science Transfer curriculum offered at Mt. Hood Community College provides a solid foundation for the student who wishes to earn a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science at a four-year institution. A bachelor’s degree in Computer Science prepares a student for careers in the computing industry or for graduate school. The curriculum offered at Mt. Hood Community College is designed to closely follow the lower division Computer Science program at Oregon State University and to meet the eligibility requirements of Portland State University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science - Computer Science, and of other professional Computer Science schools.

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • analyze the professional and ethical issues involved in the use of computers • develop and implement a plan for testing a program for correctness • implement an abstract data type given the specifications.

The following courses are required at OIT and can be taken at OIT Portland, by distance education, or at Klamath Falls. These 66 credits in addition to the 116 at MHCC equal the 182 required for the BS Degree in Operations Management BUS445 Business Presentations........................................... 3 BUS458 Process Improvement.............................................. 3 BUS467 Services Management............................................. 3 IMGT311 Principles of Operations Management....................... 3 IMGT312 Ops Scheduling and Control..................................... 3 IMGT326 Operations Budgeting............................................. 3 IMGT336 Total Quality Management....................................... 3 IMGT345 Engineering Economy.............................................. 3 IMGT445 Project Management............................................... 3 IMGT457 Cases in Strategic Management................................ 4 IMGT481 Quality Control Techniques...................................... 3 IMGT486 The Lean Enterprise................................................ 3 IMGT495 Senior Project Proposal........................................... 1 IMGT496 Senior Project........................................................ 3 IMGT497 Senior Project........................................................ 3 Math361 Statistical Methods................................................ 4 Math371 Finite Math and Calculus I....................................... 4 MIS375 Decision Support Systems....................................... 3 PSY347 Organizational Behavior.......................................... 3 PSY410 Organizational Change and Development................... 3 SPE321 Small Groups and Team Comm.................................. 3 WRI327 Advanced Technical Report Writing.......................... 3

The MHCC curriculum has entry-level expectations of the student for skills in reading, writing, and mathematics. The recommended high school preparation is four years of mathematics, science and English. High school programming or computer applications courses should not be taken in place of other college preparatory courses.

First quarter

Cr

CIS140 Introduction to Operating Systems.......................... 4 CS160 Computer Science Orientation.................................. 4 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3

18 Second Quarter CS161 Computer Science I................................................. 4 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

14 Third Quarter CIS144 Problem Solving Methodologies............................... 3 CS162 Computer Science II............................................... 4 MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 or Social Science requirement1. .............................. 3

Additional notes: All students should work with a Computer Information Systems faculty advisor to formulate a program of classes that meet the individual’s needs and MHCC’s requirements.

17 Fourth Quarter

Transfer school web site: Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu

CS133JA JAVA - Design and Programming............................... 4 PH211 General Physics with Calculus I................................ 5 Science requirement1,2 ........................................ 4-5 Elective3,4 ............................................................. 3

16-17

89


Fifth Quarter

Cr

If you have no prior programming experience, it is recommended that you begin with CIS122, Computer Concepts III.

CS260 Data Structures...................................................... 4 PH212 General Physics with Calculus II.............................. 5 Humanities requirement1 or Social Science requirement1. .............................. 3 Science requirement1,2,4 . ..................................... 4-5

The introductory Computer Science courses CS161, CS162, and CS260 may also be taken by non-major students if the prerequisites are met.

16-17 Sixth Quarter

Criminal Justice Administration

PH213 General Physics with Calculus III............................. 5 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3 Elective3, 4 ............................................................ 6

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser Chris Gorsek Ph.D.: 503-491-7321 - Room AC 2674 Chris.Gorsek@mhcc.edu

17

Refer to Associate of Science requirements, pages 11-12. Some universities may have specific preferences. 2 Requirements may vary among universities, but typically the science requirement is a set of two courses from among BI211, 212, 213; CH221, 222, 223; and G201, 202, 203. 3 Some universities may have specific recommendations for elective course choices. 4 Programming courses acceptable as electives include: CS233JA, CS234JA, CS133VB, CS233VB, CS234VB. May also be used to satisfy Science requirement for A.S. degree. 1

This curriculum is recommended for students interested in studying criminal justice at MHCC, earning an Associate of Science Degree, and transferring to a four-year college or university to work toward a bachelor’s degree. Courses provide students with knowledge about the nature and causes of crime and delinquency, law and the legal system in American society, and the decision processes of criminal justice agencies. A criminal justice major is broadly educated and also provided with courses that directly apply to careers in law and the justice system.

Curricular Outcomes

It is highly recommended that you meet with the MHCC faculty adviser before the beginning of your first term.

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • explain how the criminal justice system functions as well as how it fits into the overall society of the US • compare and contrast the various theories of why people offend • compare and contrast the structure and function of the federal and state court system • illustrate the fundamentals of the law in the US • compare and contrast the various goals of punishment • explain the history of confinement for both juveniles and adults • explain the value of prison treatment programs.

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://cs.eou.edu/ Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu/Default. aspx?DN=2734,2676,2666,2,1,Documents Oregon State University - http://eecs.oregonstate.edu/ Portland State University - http://www.pdx.edu/cecs/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/CS/

Students may transfer to institutions within the Oregon University System. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education requirements. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

University of Oregon - http://www.cs.uoregon.edu/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/cs/ Washington State University - Vancouver - http://www.vancouver. wsu.edu/encs/ Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Computer Science. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year school to confirm specific admission requirements.

First Quarter

Cr

CJA111 Introduction to Criminal Justice: Law Enforcement.... 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Adviser approved elective....................................... 3

Computer Science Courses Available to non-majors The Computer Science program offers a number of programming courses that may be taken by students who are not majoring in Computer Science. These courses may be used within other degree programs, or for personal or professional development. These include:

17 Second Quarter CJA112 Introduction to Criminal Justice: The Court System... 3 CJA280_ Cooperative Work Experience - Criminal Justice......... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Adviser approved elective....................................... 6

CS133JA JAVA - Design and Programming CS233JA JAVA - Advanced Topics for Programmers CS234JA JAVA - Networking Topics for Programmers CS133VB Introduction to MS Visual Basic Programming CS233VB Intermediate MS Visual Basic Programming CS234VB Advanced MS Visual Basic Programming

15

90


Third Quarter

Cr

Economics

CJA113 Intro to Criminal Justice: The Corrections System...... 3 GEOG107 Introduction to Cultural Geography.......................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Adviser approved elective....................................... 3

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Adviser Ted Scheinman: 503-491-7104 - Room AC 2662 Ted.Scheinman@mhcc.edu

15

Economics at MHCC focuses on improving economic literacy - the ability to apply economic principles to personal, business, and government issues. Transfer students who follow the Principles of Economics sequence at MHCC report superb preparation for upper division courses in economics. Students also report back that economics was one of the most significant classes they took as an undergraduate — it taught them how to think critically.

Fourth Quarter CJA211 CJA230 CJA270 CIS120/L PSY201

Introduction to Criminal Law: Fundamentals............. 3 Juvenile Crime and the Juvenile Justice Process........ 3 Criminology/Geography of Crime.............................. 3 Computer Concepts I (with lab)............................... 4 General Psychology................................................. 3

Fifth Quarter

Economic majors find jobs in private industry and government. They continue in graduate school in law, political science, economics, business administration, and engineering.

16

So, if you want to have a broad background that can be applied to numerous other areas, economics is the major for you.

CJA212 Introduction to Criminal Law: Criminal Justice Procedure.................................. 3 CJA214 Introduction to Criminal Investigation..................... 3 PHL202 Fundamental Ethics................................................ 3 PSY239 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology....................... 3 Adviser approved elective....................................... 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • understand the basic concepts and principles of economics • draw correct conclusions from published graphs and statistics of the economy and economic behavior • verbalize the economic arguments behind current economic policies • distinguish between domestic and international economic issues.

15 Sixth Quarter CJA123 CJA213 CJA219 WR227

Contemporary Issues In Criminal Justice................... 3 Introduction to Evidence........................................ 3 Introduction to Community Policing......................... 3 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1 .......... 3

Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

15

1

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12.

Adviser Approved Electives:

Beginning in summer, 2007, Mt. Hood Community College will change from three, three-credit economic courses (EC201, EC202 and EC203) to two, four-credit economics courses (EC201 and EC202). This is in alignment with Oregon University requirements for economics.

ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology GEOG106 Introduction to World Regional Geography PS201 American Government PSY202 General Psychology PSY203 General Psychology PSY216 Social Psychology SOC204 General Sociology SOC205 General Sociology SOC206 General Sociology SOC213 Race Relations in the United States SOC225 Social Issues SP115 Introduction to Intercultural Communication WR228 Police Report Writing

The two-year curriculum listed below is designed to meet requirements of the Associate of Science degree from MHCC and to prepare students to complete a Bachelor degree in Economics from an accredited college or university including: Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon and Western Oregon University. This curriculum may be started in any quarter. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent).

First Quarter

Cr

MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Oral Communication requirement1 ........................... 3 General Electives1 . ................................................ 6

Related MHCC Program Web Link http://:www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Portland State University - http://www.hatfieldschool.pdx.edu/CCJ/ index.php

17 Second Quarter CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 General Electives1 . ................................................ 3

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/socsci/cj/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/overview/ criminology.html Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Criminal Justice Administration. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

14

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Third Quarter

Cr

determine if teaching is really for you and prepare you for transfer to a four-year university. Three courses, ED142, ED200 and ED209A/B, are recommended for students who want to more fully explore the profession before beginning an educational program.

MTH244 Statistics II........................................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3 General Electives1 . ................................................ 9

Curricular Outcomes

16 Fourth Quarter EC201

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate the reflective practitioner skills of observation and reflection • demonstrate their writing skills • provide an educational plan for their preferred Teacher Education program.

Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 General Electives1 . ................................................ 8

15 Fifth Quarter EC202

The sample two-year course of study listed below is designed to meet the requirements of the Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) from MHCC and to prepare students to complete a baccalaureate degree in Education from Eastern Oregon University. Education program requirements vary widely at the baccalaureate level so a student’s course work must be planned in accordance with their chosen transfer institution. Students completing an Associate of Arts degree are strongly encouraged to work closely with the MHCC Education faculty adviser and their transfer institution to develop a meaningful course of study at MHCC.

Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 General Electives1 . ................................................ 6

16 Sixth Quarter EC203 Principles of Economics III..................................... 3 MTH241 Elementary Calculus................................................ 4 General Electives .................................................. 8

The following sample assumes that two years of High School foreign language were completed. If not, two terms of college-level modern language must be completed.

1

15 1

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements for options, pages 11-12. General electives should be selected with the assistance of an academic adviser.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

ED142 Education Orientation............................................. 1 ED200 Introduction to Education....................................... 3 GS105 Physical Science - Chemistry1.................................. 4 MTH211 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I2 . ........... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

MHCC Transfer Center http://www.mhcc.edu/advising/

15 Second Quarter (Winter)

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/catalog/economics. html

ED209A Education Theory and Practicum.............................. 1 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 ENG104 Introduction to Literature: Fiction........................... 4 GS104 Physical Science - Physics1...................................... 4 MTH212 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II3............ 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/dept/econ/ Portland State University - http://www.econ.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/economics/ University of Oregon - http://economics.uoregon.edu/

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/business/ majore.php

ED209A Educational Theory and Practicum........................... 1 GS106 Physical Science - Geology1..................................... 4 HST112 World Civilizations: Modern World............................ 3 MTH213 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III3.......... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Economics. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

15 Fourth Quarter (Fall) MUS101 Music Fundamentals............................................... 3 PH121 General Astronomy4................................................ 3 PHL201 Introduction to Philosophy..................................... 3 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 Art skills class5...................................................... 3

Education

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Dain Smith: 503-491-7105 - Room AC 2671 Dain.Smith@mhcc.edu

15 Fifth Quarter (Winter)

If you want to be an elementary or secondary school teacher, you will be making a number of decisions: What age group do you want to teach? What subject do you want to teach? Will you transfer to a school with an undergraduate (four-year/Bachelors) or graduate (fifth year/Masters) teaching program? Which school do you want to transfer to? The answer to these questions will help determine the appropriate courses to take. MHCC offers a number of education courses to help you

ED258 Multi-cultural Education6........................................ 3 GEOG106 Introduction to World Regional Geography................ 3 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 PH122 General Astronomy4................................................ 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

15

92


Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Cr

• design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability • function on multi-disciplinary teams • identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems • describe professional and ethical responsibility • communicate effectively • discuss the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context • engage in life-long learning • discuss of contemporary issues • demonstrate the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

ED209A Education Theory and Practicum.............................. 1 ANTH180 Language and Culture............................................. 3 ART206 History of Western Art: Baroque - Modern................. 4 HST203 U.S. History 1910 - Present..................................... 3 PH123 General Astronomy4................................................ 3

14

1

2

The GS sequence may be taken in any order. This course is required for elementary education majors and has a prerequisite of MTH95 with a grade of C or better, or suitable performance on the mathematics placement exam. 3 These courses are required for elementary education majors. All other education majors should check with their faculty adviser or transfer school. 4 Student also has a choice of either the G201, G202, G203 sequence or the BI101, BI102, BI103 sequence. 5 The following are art skill classes that can be taken: ART115, 231, 240, 254, 257, 251, 271, 281, 291, 294, MUS117, MUS137. 6 ED258 may also be taken during the summer term.

The MHCC program has entry-level expectations of students for skills in reading, writing, and mathematics. Prior to fall term registration, it is highly recommended that you consult the MHCC engineering faculty adviser or The Academic Advising and Transfer Center (see below). You should also make early contact with an adviser at the institution to which you plan to transfer. It is especially important that you do so, because the requirements at each institution may vary by engineering field. In addition, you will need to keep abreast of any changes in the program of your choice. It is your responsibility as a student to learn the program requirements of the school that you plan to attend.

MHCC Program Web Links: http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Concordia University - http://www.cu-portland.edu/catalog/ undergraduate_education/coe/ Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/ed/cueste/

NOTE: This program is specifically designed for transfer to a four-year institution and is not intended for students who seek direct entry into the job market after completion of an associate degree. MHCC’s Engineering Technology program offers an AAS program intended for direct entry to the engineering technician job market.

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/education/ Portland State University - http://www.ed.pdx.edu/program.shtml University of Oregon - http://education.uoregon.edu/path. htm?setpath=19

First Quarter

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/education/

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 GE101 Engineering Orientation.......................................... 4 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Education. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

16 Second Quarter CH222 General Chemistry II............................................... 5 GE102 Engineering Computations...................................... 3 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Engineering Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser Nikolene Schulz: 503-491-7463 - Room AC 2581 Niki.Schulz@mhcc.edu

18 Third Quarter

The Engineering Transfer curriculum offered at Mt. Hood Community College is designed to closely follow the pre-engineering program at Oregon State University, Portland State University and Oregon Institute of Technology and meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC. This program is intended, specifically, for civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering majors, however, it may be modified to meet the needs of students transferring into other disciplines of engineering and/or to other institutions. In all cases, the student must make application to both the transfer institution and the College or School of Engineering.

GE115 Engineering Graphics.............................................. 3 MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

16 Fourth Quarter ENGR201 Electrical Fundamentals I........................................ 5 ENGR211 Statics.................................................................. 4 MTH254 Calculus IV: Vector Calculus . .................................. 5 PH211 General Physics with Calculus I................................ 5

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering • design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

19

93


Fifth Quarter ENGR213 MTH256 PH212

Cr

• define and apply vocabulary appropriate to the study of literature and the humanities (e.g., hero, myth, symbols, irony).

Strength of Materials.............................................. 4 Differential Equations............................................. 5 General Physics with Calculus II.............................. 5

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet requirements of the Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree (AA/OT) from MHCC and to prepare students to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from an accredited college or university. Students are urged to consult catalogs and web sites of the four-year institutions they are considering in order to meet their lower division course requirements. English majors also need to be aware that to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree they are required to achieve two years of college-level second language competency.

14 Sixth Quarter ENGR212 PH213

Dynamics............................................................... 4 General Physics with Calculus III............................. 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1. ............ 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

After consulting with their advisers, students may also choose to add a focus on creative writing by taking some of the following classes:

18 NOTE: The curriculum shown above consists of all of MHCC’s Engineering Transfer courses, and some of the other math and science courses available at MHCC that are required during the first two years of a typical pre-engineering curriculum. Not every course required by the various programs at different schools is offered at MHCC.

WR240 Creative Writing: Nonfiction WR241 Creative Writing: Fiction I WR242 Creative Writing: Poetry I WR244 Creative Writing: Poetry II WR245 Creative Writing: Fiction II WR247A/B The Literary Publication WR248 Strategies for Revision: Advanced Professional Writing

MHCC Transfer Center http://www.mhcc.edu/advising

Students should consult with their faculty adviser as they plan their individual course of study within the framework suggested below and the requirements of MHCC’s AA/OT degree.

1

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12.

First Quarter

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.edu/programs

Cr

WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 ENG107 World Literature: The Classic World (7th Century B.C. to 1200 A.D.)............................ 4 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 First-Year Modern Language elective . ...................... 5 Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon Institute of Technology -http://www.oit.edu/ Oregon State University - http://engr.oregonstate.edu/ Portland State University - http://www.pdx.edu/cecs

17-18 Second Quarter

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Engineering. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the university to which they plan to transfer to confirm specific admission requirements. The MHCC Engineering Transfer Adviser may be able to assist with this process.

WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 ENG108 World Literature: The Renaissance to the Age of Reason (1200 - 1800)............................... 4 First-Year Modern Language elective . ...................... 5 Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5

16-17 Third Quarter WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 ENG109 World Literature: Romanticism to Contemporary Writings (1800 - present)............... 4 First-Year Modern Language elective . ...................... 5 Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5

English

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser Jonathan Morrow: 503-491-7147 - Room AC 2390 Jonathan.Morrow@mhcc.edu

16-17 Fourth Quarter

English majors study a range of classes that may cover modern literature as well as writers from the United States, Great Britain, and around the world. Career paths for English majors are various; they may plan on careers in creative writing, education, journalism, law, technical writing - indeed, any field in which expert command of the English language is central.

Select a sequence from the following three options. ENG 201-202 Shakespeare or ENG 204-205 British Literature or ENG 253-254 Survey/American Literature.............. 4 ANTH180 Language and Culture2 ........................................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1 Oral Communication/Rhetoric requirement1 . ............ 3 Second-Year Language (humanities) requirement1, 3.... 4 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate the ability to discuss and explicate, orally and in writing, themes, plots, characterization, symbolism, and other conventions and practices of literature and literary genres • demonstrate knowledge of key events, ideas, and social and cultural developments which shaped the attitudes and styles of the authors and materials on which the course focuses

18

94


Fifth Quarter

Cr

Environmental Science

ENG 201-202 Shakespeare or ENG 204-205 British Literature or ENG 253-254 Survey/American Literature.............. 4 MTH105 Intro to Contemporary Mathematics or MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elem Functions1 ............ 4-5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1 Second-Year Language (humanities) requirement1, 3 ... 4 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

Direct Transfer Curriculum

MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Javid Mohtasham: 503-491-7440 - AC 2571 Javid.Mohtasham@mhcc.edu

The study of Environmental Science equips students with a general understanding of the environmental challenges facing our world. It is an interdisciplinary science that prepares students for positions in a variety of fields including environmental policy, natural resource management, pollution control, conservation, lobbying, environmental education, and environmental communication.

16-17 Sixth Quarter ENG 201-202 Shakespeare or ENG 204-205 British Literature or ENG 253-254 Survey/American Literature.............. 4 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1 Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1 . ........ 3 Second-Year Language (humanities) requirement1, 3 ... 4 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 6

The two-year course of study listed below is designed to meet the transfer requirements for Portland State University, Concordia University, and Marylhurst University through formal agreements with these institutions. However students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC are highly encouraged to consult with the program adviser and the institution they will be attending. It should be noted that an Associate Degree is not awarded at the completion of this course of study; rather students direct transfer to the four-year institution of their choice.

18 Note: A maximum of 15 credits of the highest level of ENL courses may be applied as electives only toward the AA/OT Degree.

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) requirements, pages 10-11. 2 Recommended course to fulfill social science general education requirement 3 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities requirements include: FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-202 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 1

First Quarter

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I1 .............................................. 5 EHS100 Introduction to Environment Health and Safety......................................................... 2 EHS101 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations I......... 3 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus1 ............................. 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

17 Second Quarter

Transfer Schools’ Web Links: Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/engwrite/

CH222 General Chemistry II1 . ........................................... 5 EHS143 Environmental Science Lab I: EPA Methodology Lab and Sampling...................... 3 ESR281 Elements of Industrial Hygiene................................ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Marylhurst University - http://www.marylhurst.edu/english/index. php Oregon State University - http://www.orst.edu/dept/english/ Portland State University - http://www.english.pdx.edu

14 Third Quarter

Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/catalog/00-01/ English/INDEX.HTM

CH170 Environmental Chemistry........................................ 4 CH223 General Chemistry III1 ........................................... 5 EHS171 Environmental Science I: Chemistry of Hazardous Materials ....................... 3 ESR285 Safety and Health Studies and Laws......................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

University of Oregon - http://www.uoregon.edu/~engl/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/humanities/ english/index.php (Oregon Institute of Technology - No English Major or Department) Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in English. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

18 Fourth Quarter BI211 Principles of Biology I1 .......................................... 5 EHS221 Environmental Safety I: Emergency Response Planning............................. 4 EHS225 Human and Environment Toxicology ........................ 3 ESR271 Environmental Science II: Intro to Environmental Engineering.................... 4

16

95


Fifth Quarter

Cr

Fall Quarter, First Year

12 Sixth Quarter

16 Winter Quarter, First Year

BI213 Principles of Biology III ....................................... 5 EHS230 Sustained Business Practice.................................... 3 EHS243 Environmental Science Lab II: Introduction to Instrumental Analysis.................. 4 WE280EV_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 3 1

FT122 Forest Measurements I2 .......................................... 4 CH105 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II . .......... 5 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

15 Spring Quarter, First Year

15

1

Cr

F111 Introduction to Natural Resources ........................... 3 CH104 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I.............. 5 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions1...................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

BI212 Principles of Biology II1 ......................................... 5 EHS201 Environmental Health and Safety Regulations II........ 3 EHS222 Environmental Safety II: Environmental Auditing...... 4

CH104-106, MTH111 and BI101-103 may be substituted if you are planning to obtain an Environmental Policy or Management degree.

FT235 Outdoor Recreation ............................................... 3 CH106 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry III .......... 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.edu/programs

15 Fall Quarter, Second Year FT221 Aerial Photos and Resource Mapping2 ...................... 5 BI211 Principles of Biology I ........................................... 5 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Social Science or Humanities elective4..................... 3

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Concordia University - http://www.cu-portland.edu Marylhurst University - http://www.marylhurst.edu

17 Winter Quarter, Second Year

Portland State University - http://www.esr.pdx.edu Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Environmental Science. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

FT228 BI212 CIS120L EC202

Forest Resources Management

BI213 WR227

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems....... 3 Principles of Biology II . ........................................ 5 Computer Concepts Lab I5.....................................................................1 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 Humanities distribution requirement 3,4..................... 3

16 Spring Quarter, Second Year

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser Joan DeYoung: 503-491-7322 - Room AC 2569 Joan.DeYoung@mhcc.edu

Principles of Biology III ......................................... 5 Technical Report Writing5........................................ 3 Humanities distribution requirement 3,4..................... 3 Social Science or Humanities elective4..................... 3

14

Opportunities to study Forest Management, Forest Engineering, Forest Recreation, Natural Resources or Forest Products exist at many universities throughout the United States and Canada. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from institution to institution, but in general, most programs require a year of Biology, a year of Chemistry and Mathematics through Calculus.

The following is a two-year transfer guide for the Forest Resources Management degree at Oregon State University. Students completing this curriculum will earn an A.S. degree from MHCC. This curriculum satisfies lower division general education requirements for the B.S. in Forest Resources Management at OSU. Please see an adviser if you are interested in a related degree or alternate college.

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • perform forest inventory field tasks required of natural resource technicians • use a broad range of technological tools to research, document, map, measure, record and analyze data relevant to natural resources • demonstrate knowledge of social influences on ecosystem management.

This curriculum assumes placement into MTH111. Students may have to adjust the curriculum if starting at a lower math level. 2 FT122 and FT221 together satisfy the requirements for FOR220 Aerial Photo Interpretation and Forest Measurements. 3 Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12. 4 For appropriate liberal arts courses to meet OSU baccalaureate core, see a faculty adviser, refer to the OSU Baccalaureate Core web site: http://catalog.oregonstate.edu/bcc.aspx, or run a MHCC DARS audit report. 5 WR227 and CIS120L are MHCC requirements for the A.S. degree, but are not required by OSU. Students wishing to forgo the A.S. degree may substitute F200, Introduction to Forest Surveying for these two courses (taught spring quarter) It transfers as OSU’s FE308. 1

Related MHCC Program Web Link Two thirds of MHCC’s Forest Resources Technology program credits transfer to area universities. For program information, visit the website listed below. http://www.mhcc.edu/programs

Please note: Oregon State University is currently revising their Forest Management degree requirements. Please check with an advisor for current information.

96


Fourth Quarter

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University - http://www.cof.orst.edu (direct transfer and articulation agreement with MHCC) Humbolt State Univerity - http://humboldt.edu (direct transfer and articulation agreement with MHCC) University of Idaho - www.cnr.uidaho.edu/forres/ (direct transfer ) University of Montana - http://www.forestry.umt.edu (direct transfer ) University of Washington - http://www.cfr.washington.edu (direct transfer) Washington State University - http://wsu.edu (direct transfer)

14 Fifth Quarter

Lab Science requirement1,3...................................... 4 Oral Communications/Rhetoric requirement3............. 3 Second-year Language (humanities) requirement2. .... 4 Social Science requirement3.................................... 6

17 Sixth Quarter PSY237 Human Development............................................... 4 Fine Arts requirement4............................................ 3 Lab Science requirement1,3...................................... 4 Second-year Language (humanities) requirement2. .... 4

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Forest Resources Management. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

15

General Social Science Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer

MHCC Faculty Adviser Robert Shunk: 503-491-7190 - Advising and Transfer Center Robert.Shunk@mhcc.edu

General Social Science is an interdisciplinary major that allows students to take a concentration of courses in the social sciences (anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies). The following curriculum is intended for those students preparing to enter Portland State University’s Degree Completion Program and graduate with a B.A. or a B.S. in Social Sciences. A social science degree provides a solid foundation for students preparing for teaching, social work, counseling, graduate study, or for those seeking to remain generalists while earning their Bachelor’s degree. There are no specific courses required to enter the social science major at PSU. However, students are strongly encouraged to complete at least 20 credits of lower division social science and begin fulfilling the modern language requirement for a Bachelor of Arts or complete science/math courses for a Bachelor of Science1. Students may transfer up to 124 MHCC credits toward their Bachelor’s degree requirements for this PSU major.

First Quarter

Cr

HST201 U.S. History - Pre-Colonial to 1830........................... 3 Fine Arts requirement4............................................ 3 Lab Science requirement1,3...................................... 4 Second-year Language (humanities) requirement2. .... 4

Students who choose to pursue the B.S. are required to complete 12 credits of science course work, of which 8 credits must be lab science, and 4 credits of college-level mathematics. Students who choose to pursue the B.A. are required to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language through the second-year of college-level coursework and complete an additional 4 credits in science, and 4 credits in fine arts. These may be completed within this prescribed AA/OT curriculum. 2 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities elective requirements include: FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, or SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 3 Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements, see pages 10-11. 4 Fine Arts courses may be selected from Art, Music, and Theatre Arts. MHCC students will need to complete two courses (6 cr) to fulfill PSU’s requirement. 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Portland State University - http://www.pdx.edu/clas/socsci.html Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in General Social Science. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

Cr

CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab.................................. 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 First-year Language elective.................................... 5 Social Science requirement3.................................... 3

15 Second Quarter

Geography

PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year Language elective.................................... 5 Mathematics requirement 3. .................................. 4-5

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser Chris Gorsek, Ph.D. : 503-491-7321 - Room AC 2674 Chris.Gorsek@mhcc.edu

15-16 Third Quarter

This curriculum is recommended for students interested in studying geography at MHCC, earning an Associate of Arts — Oregon Transfer Degree and transferring to a four-year college or university to work towards a bachelor’s degree. Courses provide students with general theoretical knowledge of the field of geography, as well as the ability to work as a field researcher or a computer map technician (using GIS — a Geographic Information System).

SOC204 General Sociology................................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year Language elective.................................... 5 Health/PE requirement3.......................................... 3

14

97


Curricular Outcomes

Fifth Quarter

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • explain the dynamics of weather and climate on our planet • describe the processes involved in plate tectonics especially as it relates to mountain building and earthquakes • demonstrate a working knowledge of the various biomes on our planet • explain the various challenges (such as political, economic and environmental) faced in the various regions of our planet • describe the basic concepts and theories of cultural geography both as they relate to the US and the world • demonstrate an understanding of the main religious belief systems of the world • explain the various environmental threats facing our planet today • demonstrate a basic knowledge of the political geography of the world • demonstrate the ability to interpret and create maps.

GEOG202 Geography of Europe3............................................. 3 GEOG214 Geography of Mexico and Central America................. 3 GEOG290 Environmental Problems.......................................... 3 ART205 History of Western Art: Medieval - Renaissance......... 4 BI102 General Biology II.................................................. 4

17 Sixth Quarter GEOG265 BI103 CIS120 HPE295

Introduction of Geographic Information Systems 3. ... 3 General Biology III................................................. 4 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 Humanities distribution requirement2....................... 6

19

Many of our students transfer to such schools as Portland State University, the University of Oregon and Oregon State University. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions of their choosing. These institutions may require different courses within the various General Education requirements. Students interested in transferring to any four-year college or university after attending MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent)

First Quarter

Cr

First year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, ITAL101103, JPN101-103, and SPAN101-103. 2 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities requirements include: PHL201-203, SP112, FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, and SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English before graduation from their transfer school. 3 Offered every other year. 1

P rofessional Association and Transfer Schools’ Web Links Association of American Geographers - http://www.aag.org/ Association of Pacific Coast Geographers - http://www.csus. edu/apcg/

Cr

GEOG105 Introduction to Physical Geography......................... 3 ART261 Photography I........................................................ 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 First-year Language elective1................................... 5

Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/catalog/ geography.html Oregon State University - http://www.science.orst.edu/majors/ Geography.pdf Portland State University - http://geog.pdx.edu/degrees/degrees. html

15 Second Quarter

University of Oregon - http://www.geography.uoregon.edu/ department/undergrad/index.html

GEOG106 Introduction to World Regional Geography . ............. 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year Language elective1................................... 5

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Geography. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

16 Third Quarter GEOG107 Introduction to Cultural Geography ......................... 3 GEOG180 Map Reading and Interpretation.............................. 3 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 First-year Language elective1................................... 5

Geology

14 Fourth Quarter

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Adviser Rick Bolesta: 503-491-7361 - Room AC 2564

GEOG206 Geography of Oregon.............................................. 3 GEOG209 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa3........ 3 BI101 General Biology I................................................... 4 HST110 World Civilizations: Ancient World............................ 3 SOC204 General Sociology................................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

Rick.Bolesta@mhcc.edu

Geology is the science discipline that seeks to describe, classify and analyze the earth’s physical and chemical characteristics and catalog the history of earth and its life forms. It is deeply concerned with the ties between the nature of our physical environment and the quality of human life.

19

98


Curricular Outcomes

Sixth Quarter

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate mastery of discipline-specific fundamental geologic concepts • utilize the method of scientific inquiry with respect to geosciences • communicate ideas and views regarding the geosciences as these relate to current issues and daily life • acquire the ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate geologic data and information • apply geologic knowledge and skills to a range of problems and propose scientifically reasonable and acceptable solutions • demonstrate technical skills in the collection and analysis of geologic data in field and laboratory settings.

CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 G203 Principles of Geology.......................................... 4 PH203 General Physics III or PH213 General Physics with Calculus III............... 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 ............. 3

16

Refer to Associate of Science degree requirements, pages 11-12.

Portland State University - -http://www.geol.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/overview/geology. html University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~dogsci/ Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Geology. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3

History

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Advisers Patrick Casey: 503 491-7302 - Room AC 2669 Pat.Casey@mhcc.edu Elizabeth Milliken: 503 491-7127 - Room AC 2679 Elizabeth.Milliken@mhcc.edu

15 Second Quarter CH222 General Chemistry II . ............................................ 5 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Social Science requirement1 .................................... 3

The History transfer curriculum is designed to closely follow the lower division general education requirements for History majors at many colleges and universities in Oregon. History majors systematically observe and document the past; a History degree can lead to a career teaching History, or to founding or managing a business, or reporting the news, or managing an archive, or government, law and the professions.

15 Third Quarter CH223 General Chemistry III............................................. 5 MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

Corporate management trainers report liberal arts majors advance further in business careers than students with other majors, and recent figures show that students majoring History score especially well in entrance examinations for Masters’ of Business Administration (MBA) programs and for law school.

15 Fourth Quarter G201 Principles of Geology.......................................... 4 MTH254 Calculus IV: Vector Calculus..................................... 5 PH201 General Physics I or PH211 General Physics with Calculus I.................. 5 Elective1 . ............................................................. 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • identify and analyze major events and developments of prominent cultures and civilizations • identify and analyze the interrelationships of selected social, cultural, political, economic and ecological systems • recognize the effects of historical events upon current issues and situations • demonstrate basic competence in geography and understand the effects of geography upon historical events • use basic tools of historical inquiry---especially the practice of finding evidence, weighing its import and validity, and applying it to a historical problem • recognize different interpretations of historical events • research an historical question using conventional and electronic data, and be able to present findings in writing.

17 Fifth Quarter G202 Principles of Geology.......................................... 4 PH202 General Physics II or PH212 General Physics with Calculus II................. 5 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University - http://terra.geo.orst.edu/index.html

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science/Art in Geology at Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, or University of Oregon. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

Cr

15

99


Third Quarter

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student to obtain a Bachelor of Science/Arts in History at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon, Western Oregon University, Lewis & Clark College, Reed College and University of Portland.

17 Fourth Quarter

However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college after MHCC should consult with the institution they plan to attend, their academic adviser, as well as the MHCC academic Advising and Transfer Center.

HST201 PHL201

Six MHCC History courses (The American History series: HST201-203; and the World History series: HST110-112) will transfer directly to Oregon’s public universities as History credit; each may be taken individually or as part of a sequence. All other MHCC History courses transfer as a social sciences distribution requirement or a social sciences elective. As transfer policies differ, it is vital to check with the transfer institution directly for specific information.

HST202 MTH243

U.S. History 1830 - 1917......................................... 3 Probability and Statistics I .................................... 4 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement1 ....................................... 4

14 Sixth Quarter

MHCC History Courses which transfer as History credit: Cr

HST203 U.S. History 1910 - Present..................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Lab Sciencee requirement1 ..................................... 4 Electives............................................................... 4

HST110 World Civilization: Ancient World............................. 3 HST111 World Civilization: Medieval World........................... 3 HST112 World Civilization: Modern World............................. 3 HST201 U.S. History: Pre-Colonial - 1830.............................. 3 HST202 U.S. History: 1830 - 1917 ....................................... 3 HST203 U.S. History: 1910 - Present.................................... 3

14

Other MHCC History Electives World History HST104 History of the Middle East*..................................... 3 HST195 History of the Vietnam War...................................... 3 HST270 History of Mexico*................................................. 3 HST272 History of South America*....................................... 3 HST294 History of Ancient Greece*...................................... 3

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) requirements, page 10-14. 2 First-year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, ITAL101103, JPN101-102, or SPAN101-103. 1

Useful History Web Links American Historical Association - http://www.historians.org/ Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www3.eou.edu/history/ Portland State University - http://www.history.pdx.edu/

United States History - specialized HST237 America in the 1960s.............................................. 3 HST240 History of Oregon................................................... 3

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/cla/history/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/overview/history. html University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~history/

Women’s History HST204 Women in U.S. History............................................ 3 HST225 Women in World History.......................................... 3

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/socsci/ history Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in History. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

* Courses offered only as Independent Study options

First Quarter

U.S. History - Pre-Colonial - 1830............................. 3 Lab Science requirement1 ....................................... 4 Humanities requirement1, 3...................................... 3 Introduction to Philosophy..................................... 3 Social Science requirement1. ................................... 3

16 Fifth Quarter

Each of the History courses listed below is offered at least once a hear at MHCC and several are available in an Independent Study format.

Cr

HST112 World History: Modern World................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-Year Modern Language elective2 ...................... 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Social Science requirement1. ................................... 3

Cr

HST110 World History: Ancient World................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 First-Year Modern Language elective2....................... 5 Mathematics requirement1 . .................................... 4

16 Second Quarter HST111 World History: Modern World................................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-Year Modern Language elective2....................... 5 Oral Communication/Rhetoric requirement1 . ............ 3

14

100


Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Hospitality and Tourism Management Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Advisers Court Carrier: 503-491-7486 - Room AC2665 Court.Carrier@mhcc.edu

The Mt. Hood Community College Hospitality and Tourism program offers tremendous opportunities to the student who is interested in a four-year degree. This curriculum is recommended for students interested in transferring to Portland State University’s Business Administration Bachelor of Science Degree Program. The courses listed below have been selected with the PSU program in mind as part of current articulation agreement discussions.

17 Fifth Quarter (Winter) HT206 BA212 EC201

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • identify and interpret laws specific to our industry • demonstrate physical, cultural, and destination geographic knowledge.

HT230 BA205 BA213 EC202

Hotel, Restaurant, and Travel Law............................ 3 Business Communications....................................... 4 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 Humanities requirement4. ....................................... 3

18

Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

For alternative degree opportunities, please refer to Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism, Associate of Science degree, page 109 or Hospitality and Tourism Management, Associate of Applied Science degree, pages 43-44.

Cr

HT140 Travel and Tourism Geography.................................. 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions1 ..................... 5 WR121 English Composition1.............................................. 3 Hospitality and Tourism Elective2............................. 6

17 Second Quarter (Winter)

Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. PSU transfer students can choose from the following list five, 3-4 credit Hospitality and Tourism classes, of which 12 credits will transfer to PSU: HT104, HT105, HT106, HT133*, HT142*, HT180W*, HT181*,HT235*, HT236*, HT237*, HT238*, HT241, HT245*, HT246*, HT247*, HT270*, WE280HT. Those HT classes listed with an asterisk* are considered professional-technical courses. PSU will accept a maximum of 12 professional-technical credits. 3 PSU transfer students can choose lab science courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 4 PSU transfer students can choose humanities from the approved courses on pages 13-14. 1

2

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.edu/programs/

CIS122 Computer Concepts III ........................................... 4 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Hospitality and Tourism Elective2............................. 3 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Portland State University - http://www.sba.pdx.edu/programs/ undergraduate/ OSU/Cascades - http://www.osucascades.edu/academics/orlt/

17 Third Quarter (Spring) BA101 HPE295 MTH244

Hotel and Resort Operations Management................. 3 Principles of Accounting II...................................... 3 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 Humanities requirement4. ....................................... 3 Lab Science requirement4........................................ 4

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

However, students from MHCC seeking a four-year degree, may transfer to other institutions such as University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Oregon State/Cascades (see Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism, page 108), Washington State University, and others. These institutions may require different courses.

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

HT242 Supervisory Management for the Hospitality Industry........................................... 3 HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing or HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing.................. 3 BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3 Lab Science requirement3........................................ 4

University of Nevada-Las Vegas - http://hotel.unlv.edu/ Washington State University - http://academics.wsu.edu/fields/ study.asp?ID=HBM#352

Introduction to Business......................................... 4 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 Statistics II........................................................... 4 Hospitality and Tourism Elective2............................. 6

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Hospitality and Tourism Management. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

17

101


Second Quarter

Journalism

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Advisers Bob Watkins: 503-491-7413 - Room AC 1383

Bob.Watkins@mhcc.edu

This curriculum is recommended for students interested in studying journalism at MHCC, earning an Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer Degree, and transferring to a four-year college or university to work toward a bachelor’s degree in journalism. This is not a degree in journalism.

13-14 Third Quarter J215A Publications Lab.................................................... 1 J218 Copy Editing.......................................................... 3 HST201 History of the United States.................................... 3 MTH111 Pre Calculus I: Elementary Functions........................ 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 WR240 Creative Writing: Non-fiction................................... 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate a sense of news judgment, using critical thinking skills to identify issues, trends and events of interest and importance to the local community • deliver information in a clear and technically appropriate style that matches the current styles and conventions of the journalistic community • articulate the publication production process, taking a project from original concept to final printed form • analyze available space, understand current design trends and arrange content in both a functional and attractive presentation • articulate the role and responsibility of journalists and communicators to readers and the general public • review and revise the works of others, providing thoughtful editing without abandoning the original message • explain the difference between fair and balanced reporting and fact-based opinion.

18 Fourth Quarter BI101 General Biology I................................................... 4 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 J204 Visual Communication............................................. 4 J215B Publications Lab.................................................... 2 WR227 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3

17 Fifth Quarter Cr BI102 General Biology II.................................................. 4 EC202 Principles of Economics II (Macro)........................... 4 HST202 History of the United States.................................... 3 J215B Publications Lab.................................................... 2 WR248 Strategies for Revision: Advanced Professional Writing........................................... 3

Students from MHCC most often transfer to the University of Oregon to work toward a Bachelor of Arts/Science degree in journalism. Students transferring from Mt. Hood Community College to the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication will be given full credit for the courses listed below upon acceptance to the university. This MHCC program is designed as an Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) which enables a student to enter the university with all lower division general education requirements met and three pre-major journalism requirements completed.

16 Sixth Quarter HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 J202 Information Gathering............................................ 4 J215B Publications Lab.................................................... 2 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Lab Science requirement2 . ...................................... 4

However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree in journalism, communications or new media may also transfer to other institutions, including Southern Oregon University, University of Portland, Oregon State University, Washington State University, the University of Washington and Marylhurst University. These institutions may require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education.

16

Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

Pre-Fall Quarter (First and Second Year)

1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links University of Oregon - http://jcomm.uoregon.edu Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Journalism. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

Cr

CS125J Digital Typography for Journalism............................ 1 J211 Introduction to Mass Communication....................... 3 J215A Publications Lab.................................................... 1 J216 Reporting I............................................................ 3 J226 Introduction to Journalism Production..................... 2 Humanities requirement1 . ................................... 3-4

13-14

The humanities literature course requirement may be satisfied with any of the following: FA257-258, ENG104-106, ENG107109, ENG201-202, ENG204-205, ENG212, ENG214, ENG222, ENG253-254. 2 The lab science course requirement may be satisfied with any of the following: CH104-106, CH151, CH170, CH221-223, G201203, GS104-106, PH201-203, PH211-213.

Related MHCC Program Web Link http://www.mhcc.edu/programs

J215B Publications Lab*................................................... 2 * This special session is required for journalism majors. It runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for 2 1/2 weeks just prior to the start of fall quarter. See fall course schedule for exact dates. The course includes orientation sessions, skill-building drills and production of the first newspaper of the year.

First Quarter

Cr

J215A Publications Lab.................................................... 1 J217 Reporting II.......................................................... 3 PH122 General Astronomy................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 . ................................... 3-4

102


Journalism, Recognition of Completion, may be awarded to

contact a math instructor, the career advising center, or visit the web site of the Mathematical Association of America www.maa.org.

a student who completes the following courses. The courses are designed to provide a structured review of skills used by persons in the journalism field or for those seeking to add to their skill-base in communications, or for students who already hold a degree in another field. This set of courses encompasses skills specific to the profession, will help build a strong and diverse portfolio and offers the opportunity for practical experience in an accelerated format. Students may take coursework in reporting, technical writing, editing, computer design, publication production, photojournalism, advertising and public relations, among other areas.

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • interpret verbally and graphically function notation in a given context • interpret verbally and graphically instantaneous rates of change and related quantities • interpret verbally and graphically definite integrals of change and related quantities. Students interested in transferring to a specific university or fouryear college should consult with the institution they plan to attend regarding which MHCC courses will satisfy specific degree requirements and which will transfer as general electives.

Students may take a variety of other journalism-related courses from the additional list printed below. For more information on this nontranscripted, institutional award of attendance, consult the faculty adviser, Bob Watkins at 503-491-7413 or by email at watkins@mhcc. edu . Please note that the following courses will be offered based on sufficient enrollment.

See an adviser to personalize this plan and/or to create a plan that starts with the math sequence before calculus. It is possible to start the calculus sequence as late as spring of the first year, take summer classes, and finish by spring of the following year.

CS125J Digital Typography for Journalism............................ 1 J202 Information Gathering (Sp)..................................... 4 J204 Visual Communication (F)........................................ 4 J211 Introduction to Mass Communications (F/Sp)............ 3 J215A Publications Lab (Su/F/W/Sp).................................. 1 J215B Publications Lab* (Su/F/W/Sp)................................ 6 J216 Reporting I (F/W)................................................... 3 J217 Reporting II (W).................................................... 3 J218 Copy Editing (Sp)................................................... 3 J226 Introduction to Journalism Production (F)................ 2 WR227 Technical Report Writing (F/W/Sp)........................... 3 WR248 Strategies for Revision: Advanced Professional Writing (Sp)........................................ 3

First Quarter

14 Second Quarter MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3 Electives2.............................................................. 6

Additional Journalism-Related Courses

16 Third Quarter

Individuals are encouraged to consider additional coursework from the list below to strengthen their skills and further develop their portfolios.

MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Oral Communication/Rhetoric requirement1. ............. 3 Social Science requirement1. ................................... 3 Elective2. .............................................................. 3

ART261 Photography I (Su/F/W/Sp)..................................... 3 J134 Photojournalism (W)............................................... 3 J205 Public Relations (W)............................................... 3 J225 Introduction to Advertising (W).............................. 3 J280 Cooperative Education Internships.......................3-12 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Su/F/W/Sp).......... 3

16 Fourth Quarter MTH254 Calculus IV: Vector Calculus..................................... 5 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3 Lab Science requirement3..................................... 4-5 Electives2.............................................................. 4

Mathematics

16-17 Fifth Quarter

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Adviser Cathy Curtis: 491-7396 - Room AC 2577 Sara Williams: 491-7475 - Room AC 2578

Cr

MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy1................................................. 1 Health and Physical Education requirement1. ............ 3 Elective2. .............................................................. 3

MTH256 Differential Equations............................................. 5 Lab Science requirement3..................................... 4-5 Electives2.............................................................. 6

Cathy.Curtis@mhcc.edu Sara.Williams@mhcc.edu

The mathematics program at Mt. Hood is nationally known for a mathematics curriculum focused on real applications, problem solving, appropriate technology use, conceptual understanding, mathematical skills, and a discovery/experiential approach to math. We enthusiastically welcome mathematics majors entering at all mathematical levels.

15-16 Sixth Quarter MTH261 Linear Algebra........................................................ 4 Social Science requirement1. ................................... 3 Electives2.............................................................. 8

15

The math department is pleased to honor exemplary mathematics students at all level with recognition awards, which may include scholarship funds. Details are available from your current math instructor around the fifth week of the term.

There are many careers available for students majoring in math, including actuarial work, education, and positions as the math expert in industry and computer science4. For more information, please

103

Refer to Associate of Science requirements, pages 11-12. Recommended Electives: MTH243/244 (some schools, including PSU, require a statistics sequence for math majors); CS161; German, French, or Russian (recommended for those pursuing graduate work in math); MTH211/212/213 (recommended for those interested in teaching math at any

1 2


Second Year (Intermediate): • listening—sustain comprehension over longer stretches (beyond the sentence level) • speaking - express personal information by creating with the language - initiate, sustain, and close a general conversation with a number of strategies - exhibit evidence of connected discourse, particularly for simple narration and description • reading—read consistently with increased understanding simple connected texts dealing with a variety of basic and social needs • writing—demonstrate most practical writing needs including simple letters, paraphrases, and summaries of biographical data, work, and school experiences.

level, sequence starts fall); PH211/212/213 (sequence starts fall). Other areas of study that would support continuing education and/or employment in mathematics: Engineering, PHL203 - Elementary Logic, WR227 - Technical Report Writing, Economics, Computer Science, Science. 3 Lab science is required by most universities for a B.S. degree; it is not required for MHCC graduation. 4 Students hoping to teach at any level are strongly encouraged to apply for work as a tutor in the Learning Assistance Center for hands-on experience.

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/dept/sci_mth_education Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/natsci_math/ math/bamath.html Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Mathematics. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Arts in Modern Languages from a four-year public university in Oregon. Students transferring from MHCC may also seek a baccalaureate at a different institution, which may require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. It is recommended that students consult with their adviser and refer to the catalogs and web sites of the institutions in which they have interest.

Modern Languages

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer

Please note: Oregon transfer students must fulfill a second language requirement. For admission: two college terms of the first year (101 and 102) of a language other than English OR four semesters in high school. For graduation with a B.A.: the second year (201, 202 and 203, or equivalent) of a language other than English.

MHCC Faculty Adviser Eric Tschuy: 503-491-7469 - AC 2376 Eric Tschuy@mhcc.edu Aurora Benenati: 503-491-7494 - AC 2393 Aurora Benenati@mhcc.edu

In a world that is increasingly interdependent, knowledge of other cultures and languages is crucial. In East Multnomah County, the three languages most needed by local businesses and service agencies, after English, are Spanish, Russian and American Sign Language (ASL). Statewide, Oregon’s two biggest trade partners are Japan (world’s second largest economy) and Canada (one-quarter French speaking). Other important Oregon customers and investors are Germany, France and Mexico. French is the world’s second most studied language. German is the second most prominent language in the global business world. Germany has the world’s third largest economy. Spanish is the second most spoken language in the United States, and the main language of 19 countries. All three are important heritage languages in the USA. MHCC offers: ASL, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

Study Abroad options are available and recommended as part of language study at MHCC. Currently, there are spring term and summer programs in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico (Spanish); summer programs in Costa Rica (Spanish) and in Kyoto, Japan, for Japanese; a fall program in Florence, Italy; and a spring program in Paris, France. In all cases, language study is facilitated and enriched by cultural immersion. Check with the faculty adviser in Languages for details. (Programs may be changed or cancelled due to circumstances at the time of offering or departure.)

First Quarter

Cr

(Modern Language)1011 ......................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement2 .............................. 1 Mathematics requirement2 . .................................... 4 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: First Year (Beginning): • listening—understand short, learned utterances and some sentence-length utterances • speaking - express personal information by relying on learned phrases or re-combinations of these - manage uncomplicated communicat ive t ask s in straightforward social situations - ask simple questions or make statements involving learned material • reading—exhibit sufficient control of the writing system to interpret written language in limited areas of practical need • writing—produce material consisting of re-combinations of learned vocabulary and structures into simple sentences on familiar topics

16 Second Quarter (Modern Language)1021 ......................................... 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement2 ............ 1 Oral Communication requirement 3 ........................... 3 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3

15 Third Quarter (Modern Language)1031 ......................................... 5 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement2 ............ 1 Science/Math/Computer Sci requirement2 ................ 3 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3

15

104


Fourth Quarter

Cr

institutions will have varying General Education requirements, so it is important that students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center and/or the advisers listed above.

(Modern Language)2014 ......................................... 4 Health and Physical Education requirement2 ............ 1 Humanities requirement (other than Modern Languages)2 ......................... 3 Lab Science requirement2 .................................... 4-5 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3

First Quarter

15-16 Fifth Quarter (Modern Language)2024 ......................................... 4 Lab Science requirement2 .................................... 4-5 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3 Elective................................................................. 3

Second Quarter

14-15 Sixth Quarter

MUP101-146 Band, Choir, or Orchestra...................................... 1-4 MUP171-192 Applied Individual Lessons................................... 1-2 MUS112 Music Theory II...................................................... 3 MUS115 Sight Singing/Ear Training . .................................... 1 MUS132 Group Piano II....................................................... 2 General Education classes5

(Modern Language)2034 ......................................... 4 Lab Science requirement2 ....................................... 4 Electives............................................................... 7

15

Cr

MUP101-146 Band, Choir, or Orchestra1 ................................... 1-4 MUP171-192 Applied Individual Lessons2 ................................. 1-2 MUS111 Music Theory I3 ..................................................... 3 MUS114 Sight Singing/Ear Training3 . ................................... 1 MUS131 Group Piano I4 . ..................................................... 2 General Education classes5

Modern Language includes French, German, Japanese, Russian, Spanish or ASL. ASL courses are 4 credits. 2 Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements and course options, pages 10-14. 3 SP115, Intercultural Communication, is recommended. 4 Students taking second-year Spanish are also required to take one one-credit course of Intermediate Spanish Conversation during the year: SPAN 211 or 212 or 213. A similar requirement is being set up in the other languages. This would add one elective credit to one of the above terms. 1

Third Quarter MUP101-146 Band, Choir, or Orchestra...................................... 1-4 MUP171-192 Applied Individual Lessons................................... 1-2 MUS113 Music Theory III..................................................... 3 MUS116 Sight Singing/Ear Training....................................... 1 MUS133 Group Piano III...................................................... 2 General Education classes5

Recommended social sciences, humanities and elective courses: Social Sciences Courses: ANTH103, ANTH180, GEOG106, GEOG107, GEOG214, HST111, HST112, HST225, HST270, HST271, HST272, HST293

Fourth Quarter MUP201-246 Band, Choir, or Orchestra...................................... 1-4 MUP271-292 Applied Individual Lessons................................... 1-2 MUS211 Music Theory IV6 ................................................... 3 MUS214 Keyboard Harmony I............................................... 2 MUS261 Music History I7 .................................................... 3 General Education classes5

Humanities courses: ART204, ART205, ART206, ENG107, ENG108, ENG109, ENG212, R210 Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/dept/foreign_lang/ Portland State University - http://www-adm.pdx.edu/user/fll/

Fifth Quarter

University of Oregon - http://rl.uoregon.edu/index.shtml (Romance Languages); http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~gerscan/ (Germanic Languages); http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~eall/ (East Asian Languages)

MUP201-246 Band, Choir, or Orchestra...................................... 1-4 MUP271-292 Applied Individual Lessons................................... 1-2 MUS212 Music Theory V....................................................... 3 MUS215 Keyboard Harmony II.............................................. 2 MUS262 Music History II..................................................... 3 General Education classes5

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Modern Languages. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to learn the specific requirements of the transfer school.

Sixth Quarter MUP201-246 Band, Choir, or Orchestra...................................... 1-4 MUP271-292 Applied Individual Lessons................................... 1-2 MUS213 Music Theory VI.................................................... 3 MUS224 Advanced Sight Singing/Ear Training........................ 2 MUS263 Music History III.................................................... 3 General Education classes5

Music

Direct Transfer Curriculum MHCC Faculty Advisers Dave Barduhn: 503-491-6970 - Room AC 2130 Dave.Barduhn@mhcc.edu Susie Jones: 503-491-7158 - Room AC 2133 Susie.Jones@mhcc.edu Marshall Tuttle: 503-491-7010 - Room AC 2132 Marshall.Tuttle@mhcc.edu

The two-year program listed below is designed for direct transfer to four-year colleges/universities, but completion of it does not result in an associate degree. Students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree in music may transfer to any four-year institution. These

105

Four years of large Ensemble courses (MUP101/201; MUP121/221; MUP146/246) are required by most baccalaureate programs. 2 Most baccalaureate programs require four years of Applied Individual Lessons. An approved instructor list is available in Performing Arts. 3 First year Music Theory and Sight Singing/Ear Training requires concurrent enrollment in Group Piano. Students who wish to strengthen their music background may also want to register for MUS101, Music Fundamentals. 1


• organize records with both manual and electronic filing methods • adapt to workplace practices and practice appropriate professional conduct • interact effectively with individuals and groups • create and present effective presentations, (with and without software) • create effective spreadsheets that communicate financial and other business information.

One year of Group Piano (or proficiency) is required prior to taking Keyboard Harmony classes in the second year. 5 Fewer General Education classes are required for the Bachelor of Music (B.MUS or BM) degree than for other baccalaureate degrees. Students should consult an adviser to determine which General Education courses are required for transfer to their selected school. 6 Second year Music Theory requires concurrent enrollment in Keyboard Harmony or Advanced Sight Singing/Ear Training. 7 Two years of Music History are required for a baccalaureate degree. The second year of Music History is taken at the junior level. 4

The Office Management/Administrative Assistant Degree offers many opportunities for students who are interested in employment in the diverse field of administrative professionals. Students can now learn these technical skills, while earning an A.S. Degree that transfers to Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Operations Management Degree program. This program is designed for people who are interested in careers in industrial and operations management including formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources. Employment opportunities abound and this degree and transfer opportunity give students a competitive advantage in the workplace.

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/cla/music// Portland State University - http://www.pdx.edu/fpa/ University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~music Central Washington University - http://www.cwu.edu/~music/ University of North Texas - http://www.unt.edu/pais/insert/umusic.htm University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire -http://www.uwec.edu/admissions/ facts/music.htm

Specific program and class information can be obtained by calling the Business Dept. at 503-491-7515 or 503-491-7196, or visit our website at www.mhcc.edu.

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Music. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

The following is a sample schedule for completing the A.S. degree in two years:

First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

BT110 Business Editing..................................................... 3 BT118 Records and Information Management...................... 3 BA131 Introduction to Business Computing........................ 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 MTH111 Pre-Calculus: Elementary Functions1. ....................... 5

Office Management/ Administrative Assistant

18 Second Quarter (Winter)

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Advisers:

BA211 Principles of Accounting I....................................... 4 BT111 Editing Techniques................................................. 3 HUM202 Ethics in the Workplace or other approved Humanities elective 2. ........................................ 3 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

Robin Brush: 503-491-7171 – Room AC 2777 (Students with last name A-G) Robin.Brush@mhcc.edu Brenda Houchen: 503-491-7431 – Room AC 2663 (Students with last name H-O) Brenda.Houchen@mhcc.edu Pam Shields: 503-491-7458 – Room AC2780 (Students with last name P-Z) Pam.Shields@mhcc.edu

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

The two-year curriculum listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from Mt. Hood Community College and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science Degree in Operations Management at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) Portland or Klamath Falls.

BT116 Communication Technologies................................... 3 BA206 Management and Supervisory Fundamentals.............. 4 BA213 Principles of Accounting III.................................... 4 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Curricular Outcomes

17 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • apply standard English rules in clear, concise and effective business communications • apply mathematical skill to accounting situations • apply computer skills to all forms of business communication • use office technology for communication • demonstrate accuracy and skill in handling the telephone • receive, interpret, and follow both written and verbal instructions • demonstrate competence in production of business documents • import graphics, charts and text into business applications • demonstrate flexibility, motivation when faced with change • use the Internet for information searches

BT125 CIS125DB EC201 WR227

Microsoft Word Training.......................................... 3 Desktop Database................................................... 3 Principles of Economics I........................................ 4 Technical Report Writing......................................... 3 Lab Sciences Elective3............................................ 4

17 Fifth Quarter (Winter) BT126 BA231 EC202

Microsoft Skills Simulation...................................... 3 Information Technology in Business......................... 4 Principles of Economics (Macro)............................... 4 Humanities Elective2.............................................. 3 Lab Sciences Elective3............................................ 4

18

106


Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism

Cr

BA226 Introduction to Business Law.................................. 4 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 BT or BA Electives4................................................. 7 Science/Math Elective5........................................... 4

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Advisers For Outdoor and Experiential Education : Bryan Anaclerio: 503-491-7201 Bryan.Anaclerio@mhcc.edu Cindy Harnly: 503-491-7355 - Room PE 158 Cindy.Harnly@mhcc.edu or contact the Health/Physical Education department at 503-491-7450

18 Once students have completed the A.S. Degree at MHCC and before transferring to OIT, they may take 11 additional credits at MHCC. These credits serve as a bridge to OIT and the BS Degree in Operations Management.

For Commercial Recreation Management and Tourism ; and International Ecotourism Court Carrier: 503-491-7486 - Room AC 2665 carrierc@mhcc.edu

BT or BA Electives4................................................. 5 Humanities Elective3.............................................. 3 Science/Math Elective4........................................... 3

A world of careers is open to students entering the Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism (ORLT) program at Mt. Hood Community College. The program provides industry career paths ranging in scope from guiding mountaineering trips to managing an eco lodge to starting one’s own recreation-based small business. This unique program provides a core of courses including outdoor recreation, travel and tourism, hospitality, computer applications, management, and cooperative education internships. Then, students can select courses from one of three curricula - Commercial Recreation Management and Tourism, International Ecotourism, or Outdoor and Experiential Education. These curricula line up with options offered in the Bachelor of Science Degree in Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism from Oregon State University - Cascades campus. The opportunities in this field are exciting and vast. Why not work at something you love?

11

MTH111 Prerequisite: See course description in back of catalog. 2 OIT transfer students can choose humanities courses from the approved Humanities courses on pages 13-14. 3 OIT transfer students can choose lab science courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 4 BT/BA Electives include: BT121, BT122, BT123A, BT123B, BT124, BT225, BT250, BT251, BA177, BA206, BA218, BA224, BA267, BA285 5 OIT transfer students can choose science/math courses from the approved Science/Mathematics courses on page 14. 1

The following courses are required at OIT and can be taken at OIT Portland, by distance education, or at Klamath Falls. These 66 credits in addition to the 116 at MHCC equal the 182 required for the BS Degree in Operations Management

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • develop a basic understanding of how the human body responds to exercise, stress and performance • identify risks and treatments for common injuries due to physical exercise • perform adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and first aid skills in accordance with American Red Cross standards • explore a variety of career opportunities in physical and/or outdoor education • identify and interpret laws specific to our industry • demonstrate physical, cultural, and destination geographic knowledge.

BUS445 Business Presentations........................................... 3 BUS458 Process Improvement.............................................. 3 BUS467 Services Management............................................. 3 IMGT311 Principles of Operations Management....................... 3 IMGT312 Ops Scheduling and Control..................................... 3 IMGT326 Operations Budgeting............................................. 3 IMGT336 Total Quality Management....................................... 3 IMGT345 Engineering Economy.............................................. 3 IMGT445 Project Management............................................... 3 IMGT457 Cases in Strategic Management................................ 4 IMGT481 Quality Control Techniques...................................... 3 IMGT486 The Lean Enterprise................................................ 3 IMGT495 Senior Project Proposal........................................... 1 IMGT496 Senior Project........................................................ 3 IMGT497 Senior Project........................................................ 3 Math361 Statistical Methods................................................ 4 Math371 Finite Math and Calculus I....................................... 4 MIS375 Decision Support Systems....................................... 3 PSY347 Organizational Behavior............................................ 3PSY410 Organizational Change and Develoment.................... 3 SPE321 Small Groups and Team Comm.................................. 3 WRI327 Adv Technical Report Writing................................... 3

The two-year curriculum listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science in Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism from Oregon State University - Cascade campus. Students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other four-year institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they plan on attending, the faculty adviser, and the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

Outdoor and Experiential Education (OEE) First Quarter (Fall)

Additional notes:

Cr

HT140 Travel and Tourism Geography.................................. 3 PE185OA Backpacking.......................................................... 1 PE185OB Day Hiking............................................................. 1 PE185RK Beginning Rock Climbing......................................... 1 HPE285OL Wilderness Survival................................................ 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

All students should work with an Office Management faculty adviser to formulate a program of classes that meet the individual’s needs and MHCC’s requirements. Transfer school website: Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu/

15

107


Second Quarter (Winter)

Cr

Second Quarter (Winter)

HE253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid................................. 3 PE185OF Winter Camping...................................................... 1 PE185OG Backcountry Winter Mountain Travel . ...................... 1 PE285OH Adventure Education.............................................. 2 SOC213 Race Relations in the United States.......................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Outdoor Activity Course2......................................... 1

Cr

HE253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid................................. 3 HT107 Introduction to Leisure and Recreation Management.. 3 HT141 Customer Service Management................................. 3 PE285OH Adventure Education.............................................. 2 SOC213 Race Relations in the United States.......................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

17 Third Quarter (Spring)

14 Third Quarter (Spring) FT235 Outdoor Recreation................................................ 3 GS106 Physical Science: Geology3 or PH104 Descriptive Astronomy.............................. 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 PE282OL Professional Activities: Outdoor Leadership Field Skills......................................................... 2 PE285ON Outdoor Leadership................................................ 2 PS217 Introduction to Public Land Management: The Politics of Recreation.................................... 3

GS106 Physical Science: Geology3 or PH104 Descriptive Astronomy.............................. 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 HT105 Catering, Restaurant and Food Management: Concept to Customer........................................... 3 HT207 Managing and Programming of Recreation and Sports Facilities (alternating years)............... 3 PE282OL Professional Activities: Outdoor Leadership Field Skills......................................................... 2 PE285ON Outdoor Leadership................................................ 2

17 Fourth Quarter (Summer)

14-17 Fourth Quarter (Fall)

PE280_

ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...................... 3 F240 Natural Resources Ecology....................................... 4 HT241 International Hospitality and Tourism...................... 3 HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing or HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing.................. 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

Cooperative Education Internship............................ 3

3 Fifth Quarter (Fall) ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...................... 3 F240 Natural Resources Ecology....................................... 4 HT241 International Hospitality and Tourism...................... 3 HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing or HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing.................. 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) GS104 Physical Science - Physics....................................... 4 HT206 Hotel and Resort Operations Management................. 3 HT270 Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Control..................... 3 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I4.................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

16 Sixth Quarter (Winter) GS104 Physical Science - Physics....................................... 4 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I4.................................... 4 PE185RKI Intermediate Rock Climbing..................................... 1 PE280_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

17 Sixth Quarter (Spring) BA226 Introduction to Business Law or HT230 Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Law............ 3-4 PE233 Place Mapping: Place-Based Learning Methods.......... 2 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WE280HT_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

15 Seventh Quarter (Spring) BA226 Introduction to Business Law or HT230 Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Law............ 3-4 BA231 Information Technology in Business......................... 4 PE185ON High Angle Rescue.................................................. 1 PE233 Place Mapping: Place-Based Learning Methods.......... 2 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3

12-13

International Ecotourism (IE) First Quarter (Fall)

13-14

Commercial Recreation Management and Tourism (CRMT) First Quarter (Fall)

Cr

BA131 Introduction to Business Computing or CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab................. 4 HT104 Introduction to Travel and Tourism........................... 3 HT140 Travel and Tourism Geography.................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

Cr

16 Second Quarter (Winter)

BA131 Introduction to Business Computing or CIS120/L Computer Concepts I and Lab................. 4 HT106 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry.................. 3 HT140 Travel and Tourism Geography.................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

HE253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid................................. 3 HT107 Introduction to Leisure and Recreation Management.. 3 HT141 Customer Service Management................................. 3 PE285OH Adventure Education.............................................. 2 SOC213 Race Relations in the United States.......................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

16

17

108


Third Quarter (Spring)

Cr

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Outdoor Recreation. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

GS106 Physical Science: Geology3 or PH104 Descriptive Astronomy.............................. 4 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 HT142 Travel and Tourism Agency Operations...................... 3 HT144 Destination Specialist............................................. 2 PE282OL Professional Activities: Outdoor Leadership Field Skills......................................................... 2 PE285ON Outdoor Leadership................................................ 2

Outdoor Education, Recognition of Completion, may be

awarded to a student who completes the following courses. The courses are open to individuals interested in integrating outdoor education into their current work. A small sample of individuals utilizing outdoor education techniques in their professions include; school counselors, physical education teachers, scout and youth group leaders, community organizers and group-home recreation coordinators.

16 Fourth Quarter (Fall) ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...................... 3 F240 Natural Resources Ecology....................................... 4 HT241 International Hospitality and Tourism...................... 3 HT250 Travel and Tourism Marketing or HT260 Hospitality Industry Marketing.................. 3 Humanities requirement1. ....................................... 3

Applications for completion of the non-transcripted, institutional award of attendance are available in the Health and Physical Education Department (PE 155). Please note that the following courses may not be offered each term (please refer to quarterly class schedules) and will be offered based on sufficient enrollment.

16 Fifth Quarter (Winter) GS104 Physical Science - Physics5...................................... 4 HT144 Destination Specialist............................................. 2 HT247 Cruises and Tours.................................................... 3 MTH243 Probability and Statistics I4.................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

For information please contact: Bryan Anaclerio: 503-491-7201 Bryan.Anaclerio@mhcc.edu Cindy Harnly: 503-491-7355 - Room PE 158 Chris.Harnly@mhcc.edu or contact the Health/Physical Education department, 503-491-7450

16 Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Required Courses

BA226 Introduction to Business Law or HT230 Hotel, Restaurant and Travel Law............ 3-4 BA250 Small Business Management.................................... 4 PE233 Place Mapping: Place-Based Learning Methods.......... 2 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WE280HT_ Cooperative Education Internship............................ 4

16-17

Cr

HE253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid (W)........................... 3 HPE285OL Wilderness Survival (F/W/Sp)................................... 3 PE185OB Day Hiking: Walking the Watershed (F)..................... 1 PE185OF Winter Camping (W)................................................ 1 PE185OG Backcountry Winter Mountain Travel (W)................... 1 PE185ON High Angle Rescue (Sp)........................................... 1 PE185RK Beginning Rock Climbing (Su/F/W/Sp)...................... 1 PE185RKI Intermediate Rock Climbing (W)............................... 1 PE233 Place Mapping: Place-Based Learning Methods (Sp alt years)........................... 2 PE282OL Professional Activities: Outdoor Leadership Field Skills (Sp).................................................. 2 PE285OH Adventure Education (W)........................................ 2 PE285ON Outdoor Leadership (Sp).......................................... 2 PS217 Introduction to Public Land Management: The Politics of Recreation (Sp)............................. 3 WR121 English Composition: Nature Writing (F) .................. 3 PE280_ Cooperative Education (2 quarters).......................... 6 Activity Electives*................................................. 2 Wilderness First Responder Certification Course (Su)

Refer to Associate of Science requirements, pages 11-12. Three credits must be selected to meet OSU’s Literature and Arts requirement; suggested courses are ART204-206, ENG104-106, ENG204-205, ENG212, ENG253-254 2 Students must choose at least one other activity from the following and are encouraged to take more: PE185KY, PE185OD, PE185OJ, PE185OK, PE185OL, PE185OS, PE185OT. 3 The Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Leadership program accepts either GS106 or PH104. 4 MTH243 has a prerequisite of MTH105 or MTH111 with a grade of ‘C” or better. 5 Program also accepts GS105 (GS104 or GS105). GS104 is offered winter term only; GS105 is offered fall term only. 1

Activity Electives*

MHCC Program Web Link: For alternative degree opportunities, please refer to Hospitality and Tourism, Associate of Applied Science degree. http://www.mhcc.edu/programs/

Select two credits from the following: PE185KY River Kayaking (F).................................................. 1 PE185OA Backpacking (Su/F)................................................ 1 PE185OD Beginning Kayak Touring (Sp).................................. 1 PE185OJ Mountaineering Fundamentals (Sp).......................... 1 PE185OK Mountaineering Field Skills (Sp).............................. 1 PE185OL Progressive Fly Fishing, Level I (F/W/Sp).................. 1 PE185OT Snowboard and Ski: Backcountry Safety Skills (W/Sp) 1 PE185OY Introduction to Outdoor Adventure Activities (F)...... 1 PE185SB Beginning Snowboarding and Skiing (W)................... 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Oregon State University-Cascades - http://www.osucascades.edu/ academics/orlt/

109


Second Quarter

Philosophy

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser: Chris Jackson: 503-491-7284 - Room AC 2672 Chris.Jackson@mhcc.edu

14-15 Third Quarter

Philosophers are interested in trying to provide plausible answers to life’s most profound questions. 1. What, ultimately, is going on? Is there a God who created us for some purpose? Must we grasp this purpose and take specific actions or be on the losing side of some great spiritual battle? Is God perhaps merely interested in watching the show? Is nature all there is and God a mere figment of our imaginations? 2. What kind of thing is a human being? Are we creatures of God possessing an immortal soul, or are we merely animals? Were we created by intelligent design, or are we the product solely of naturalistic evolutionary processes? Do we have sufficient freedom of the will to be truly deserving of praise and blame for what we do, or are we only complicated physical systems like computers and storms that are not responsible morally for what they do? 3. How should a human being live? Should I seek mainly my own happiness? How concerned with the welfare of others should I be? How should I treat others and expect others to treat me? It is true that philosophers rarely reach a consensus about which answer is indisputably the right one for any given philosophical question. But it is still the case that, like with wines, the connoisseur of ideas can at least identify the few best answers, and from these few he or she can sometimes reach personal closure - an intelligent and informed personal closure. So why let others answer these questions for you? Why settle for being a second-hand person? Isn’t it time to own your mind?

PHL203 Elementary Logic.................................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year Language elective2. ................................. 5 Oral Communication/Rhetoric requirement1. ............. 3 Social Science requirement4. ................................... 3

17 Fourth Quarter Lab Science requirement1........................................ 4 Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1. ......... 3 Social Science requirement4. ................................... 3 Elective3............................................................ 3-4

13-14 Fifth Quarter Lab Science requirement1........................................ 4 Social Science requirement4. ................................... 3 Elective3............................................................ 6-7

13-14 Sixth Quarter Health and Physical Education requirement1. ............ 3 Lab Science requirement1........................................ 4 Social Science requirement4. ................................... 6 Elective3............................................................ 3-4

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • identify questions addressed in the three main areas in philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology (including logic) and ethics • articulate some of the contributions of the major philosophers (e.g., Socrates, Plato, Descartes, Kant, Nietzsche, Mill, Rawls, et cetera) • articulate some of the main problems and proposed solutions/ criticisms in philosophy, along with the concepts instrumental to participating in the philosophical dialogue regarding these problems • define the basic vocabulary of logic • translate an argument from English into the terms of symbolic logic • distinguish the main valid forms from invalid impostors • perform proofs.

16-17

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon or Western Oregon University. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education requirements. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty advisers and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

Cr

PHL202 Fundamental Ethics................................................ 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year Language requirement2............................. 5 Humanities requirement 3. .................................... 3-4

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements, pages 10-11. 2 First-year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, ITAL101103, JPN101-103, SPAN101-103. 3 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities electives include PHL208, R210-212, SP112, SP114, ENG104 or FR201-203, GER201-023, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. Note: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 4 Suggested courses to fulfill social science distribution requirements include: ANTH103, PSY201-203, PS200, HST110, HST294. 5 Consult adviser for suggestions concerning course options. 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links: Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/~jjohnson/ ppehomejeff.htm Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/dept/philosophy/ Portland State University - http://www.philosophy.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/philosophy University of Oregon - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~uophil/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/humanities/ philosophy/philprograms.html

Cr

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Philosophy. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 PHL201 Introduction to Philosophy..................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1............................... 1 First-year Language requirement2............................. 5

17

110


Fourth Quarter

Physical Education/Exercise and Sport Science

BI231 CIS120 CIS120L PSY237

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer

MHCC Faculty Advisers Daryle Broadsword: 503-491-7350 - Room PE 153 Daryle.Broadsword@mhcc.edu Cindy Harnly: 503-491-7355 - Room PE 158 Cindy.Harnly@mhcc.edu Keith Maneval: 503-491-7140 - Room PE 161 Keith.Maneval@mhcc.edu Diane Peterson, 503-491-7351, Room PE 160 Diane.Peterson@mhcc.edu Fred Schnell: 503-491-6984 - Room PE 159 Fred.Schnell@mhcc.edu

15 Fifth Quarter BI232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II........................... 4 Social Science requirement2  .................................. 6 Humanities requirement2 . ...................................... 3 Elective3 .............................................................. 3

Physical education is the study of sport, athletics, exercise and fitness. Historically, the major has prepared students to be teachers of Physical Education. The field has now broadened significantly to include opportunities in health and nutrition, exercise science, sports medicine, sports psychology, wellness, and fitness management.

16 Sixth Quarter BI233 Human Anatomy and Physiology III......................... 4 Social Science requirement2 ................................... 3 Humanities requirement2  . ..................................... 6 Elective3 .............................................................. 3

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • develop a basic understanding of how the human body responds to exercise, stress and performance • identify risks and treatments for common injuries due to physical exercise • perform adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and first aid skills in accordance with American Red Cross standards • explore a variety of career opportunities in physical and/or outdoor education.

16

Prerequisite. See back of catalog for course descriptions. Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) requirements, pages 10-11. 3 Suggested Electives: HE202 Adult Development and Aging HE204 Diet and Weight Control HE205 Diet Appraisal HE207 Stress Control HE208 AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections HE213 Men’s Health Issues HE240 Introduction to Holistic Health Care HE250 Personal Health HE252 Responding to Emergencies HE253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid HE255 Alcohol and the Family HE261 CPR HE265 Women’s Health Issues PE270 Introduction to Sports Psychology

1

2  

 

The two-year course of study listed below is designed to meet the requirements of the Associates of Arts Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) degree and most closely aligns with four-year programs at Oregon State University, Portland State University, University of Oregon, Western Oregon University, Eastern Oregon University and Southern Oregon University. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution of choice for advising/ admissions information and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent). For alternative degree opportunities, please refer to Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Tourism, Associate of Science degree, pages 107-109.

First Quarter

Cr

Human Anatomy and Physiology I1........................... 4 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 Human Development............................................... 4 Humanities requirement2 ........................................ 3

Transfer School’s Web Links Eastern Oregon State - http://www.eou.edu/peh/ Oregon State University - http://www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/pe/ Portland State University - http://healthed.pdx.edu University of Oregon - http://uoregon.edu/~ems

Cr

CH104 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I............. 5 MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 PE131 Introduction to Physical Education.......................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16 Second Quarter

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Physical Education. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

CH105 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II............ 5 MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry/Geometry................... 5 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

16 Third Quarter CH106 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry III.......... 5 HPE295 Health and Fitness for Life...................................... 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking ............................ 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3

14

111


Fifth Quarter

Physics

Associate of Science MHCC Faculty Adviser David Faust: 503-491-7358 - Room AC 2593

David.Faust@mhcc.edu

16 Sixth Quarter

Physics is the study of the structure and organization of the universe. It encompasses the observation of forces and matter, of motion, of cause and effect, and of the intrinsic properties of space and time. Physics analyzes these concepts in detail and uses them to synthesize models of complex phenomena.

PH213 General Physics with Calculus III............................. 5 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Elective2 . .......................................................... 3-4

Curricular Outcomes

14-15

At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • retain and apply critical physics concepts while enrolled in the curriculum and upon transfer • work cooperatively, use equipment and instruments properly, and carefully analyze data in the laboratory setting • demonstrate mastery of physics concepts • transition conceptual material into accurate mathematical models • utilize calculus-based mathematics to solve physics problems • transfer to four-year institutions and succeed in upper-division coursework.

1

2

Refer to Associate of Science requirements, pages 11-12. Suggested electives include: PH109C, PH121-123, MTH243244, MTH261.

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://physics.eou.edu/ Oregon State University - http://www.physics.orst.edu/ Portland State University - http://physics.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/physics/ University of Oregon - http://physics.uoregon.edu/

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science/Arts in Physics at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, or University of Oregon. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

Cr

MTH256 Differential Equations............................................. 5 PH212 General Physics with Calculus II.............................. 5 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3 Elective2 . ............................................................. 3

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Physics. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to learn the specific requirements of the transfer school.

Political Science Direct Transfer Curriculum

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

MHCC Faculty Adviser Janet Campbell: 503-491-7430 - Room AC 2677 mhcc.edu

Janet.Campbell@

The courses listed below are designed for direct transfer to four-year colleges/universities and completion of them does not result in an associate degree. They transfer to most universities and colleges as a social science distribution requirement or elective. As transfer policies at four-year schools differ, it is vital to check with the transfer institution directly for specific information.

15 Second Quarter CH222 General Chemistry II . ............................................ 5 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

Each of the Political Science courses on this page is offered at least once a year at Mt. Hood Community College, and some are available in an Independent Study format.

15 Third Quarter CH223 General Chemistry III............................................. 5 CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 MTH253 Calculus III........................................................... 4 WR123 English Composition: Research or WR227 Technical Report Writing........................... 3

So why study politics? Many students think political science is “dry” and “boring.” NOTHING could be further from the truth. Politics affects the way you think, eat, dress, socialize, and work, so it may be worth knowing about. Once you DO know about it you can begin to 1) understand what is going on around you, and 2) think for yourself. Here’s what students say: “I feel more powerful now knowing what I know”, “it changed my life”, “it was fun!”

16 Fourth Quarter

Cr

PS200 Introduction to Political Science1 ,2.......................... 3 PS201 American Government1 . ......................................... 3 PS203 State and Local Government1 .................................. 3 PS204 Introduction to Comparative Politics1. ..................... 3 PS205 International Relations........................................... 3 PS209 Problems in American Politics.................................. 3

MTH254 Calculus IV: Vector Calculus..................................... 5 PH211 General Physics with Calculus I................................ 5 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3 Elective2 . ............................................................. 3

16

112


Cr

In addition, completion of these courses fulfills the degree requirements for the Associate of Arts-Oregon Transfer degree which provides junior standing at all of the Oregon University System schools. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, and an MHCC adviser or the Academic Advising and Transfer Center. These recommendations are meant to serve as a general guideline for students pursuing Pre-Law.

PS215 Global Issues......................................................... 3 PS217 Introduction to Public Land Management: The Politics of Recreation................................... 3 PS220 American Foreign Policy and World Order.................. 3 PS225 Political Ideology: Ideas about Government.............. 3 PS241 Political Terrorism.................................................. 3 PS242 The U.S. Intelligence System................................... 3 PS297 Introduction to Environmental Politics..................... 3 PS298 Political Science Research....................................... 1 PS280_ Cooperative Work Experience...............................3-12

1

2

First Quarter

Cr

PS200 Introduction to Political Science............................. 3 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 First-year language elective1 .................................. 5

Courses offered in an Independent Study format: Courses offered in Web format:

NOTE: Students who are planning to major in Political Science upon transfer and want to obtain an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree are referred to the curriculum guide presented on the Pre-Law transfer page. It is suggested that the following courses be taken as electives within that curriculum:

14 Second Quarter PHL202 Fundamental Ethics................................................ 3 PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year language elective1 .................................. 5

PS200 Introduction to Political Science............................. 3 PS201 American Government............................................. 3 PS204 Comparative Politics............................................... 3 PS205 International Relations........................................... 3 PS209 Problems in American Politics.................................. 3 PS225 Political Ideologies................................................ 3

14 Third Quarter BI101 General Biology I................................................... 4 PHL203 Elementary Logic.................................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year language elective1 .................................. 5

Students are highly encouraged to consult their MHCC faculty adviser and/or the Office of Academic Advising and Transfer Center for academic planning.

15 Fourth Quarter CIS120 Computer Concepts I............................................... 3 CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I......................................... 1 EC201 Principles of Economics I (Micro)............................. 4 GS105 Physical Science - Chemistry................................... 4 Humanities requirement2 . ................................... 3-4 Elective3 .............................................................. 3

Related MHCC Web Link: http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Portland State University -http://www.upa.pdx.edu/POLISCI/index. html University of Oregon - http://www.law.uoregon.edu/

18-19 Fifth Quarter

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Political Science. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school for specific requirements.

MTH111

Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3 Science/mathematics requirement1 . ........................ 3

14 Sixth Quarter GS106 Physical Science - Geology...................................... 4 HST203 US History 1910 - Present........................................ 3 SP114 Argument and Critical Discourse.............................. 3 Humanities requirement2 . ................................... 3-4 Electives3 .......................................................... 4-6

Pre-Law

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser Janet Campbell: 503-491-7430 - Room AC 2677 Janet.Campbell@mhcc.edu

17-20

This curriculum follows suggestions of the Association of American Law Schools for students contemplating the study of law. The required skills include language, critical thinking, and a broad liberal arts background.

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate understanding of basic principles/concepts of political phenomena using critical thinking skills • demonstrate basic knowledge of US Government • analyze political phenomena from a comparative perspective.

113

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements, pages 10-11. 2 Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) Language requirements may be satisfied with the following course sequences: FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. 3 Suggested courses to fulfill elective requirements include: BA211, BA226, CJA112, CJA211-213, EC202, ENG104-106, ENG107-109, ENG201-202, ENG204-205, ENG212, ENG214, ENG222, ENG253-254, HST112, HST201-202, PHL208, PS201, PS203, PS205, PS225, SOC206, SP221. Other courses meeting AA/OT degree requirements may be substituted. 1


First Quarter

Transfer Schools’ Web Links University of Oregon - http://www.law.uoregon.edu/academics/ degree.php Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to study Pre-Law. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

17 Second Quarter CH222 General Chemistry II............................................... 5 MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus................................... 4 PH202 General Physics II.................................................. 5 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3

Pre-Professional (Medicine, Chiropractic, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine)

17 Third Quarter CH223 General Chemistry III............................................. 5 PH203 General Physics III................................................. 5 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

Associate of Science

MHCC Faculty Advisers Pre-Medicine: Susan Spencer: 503-491-7335 - Room AC 2589 Susan.Spencer@mhcc.edu Lee Mitchell: 503-491-7441 - Room AC 2595 Lee. Mitchell@mhcc.edu Pre-Veterinarian: Lee Mitchell: 503-491-7441 - Room AC 2595

Cr

CH221 General Chemistry I................................................ 5 MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus............................... 4 PH201 General Physics I.................................................... 5 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3

16 Fourth Quarter BI211 Principles of Biology I............................................ 5 CH241 Organic Chemistry I2 .............................................. 5 SP111 Fundamentals of Public Speaking............................. 3 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

Lee.Mitchell@mhcc.edu

Pre-Pharmacy: Dr. Joyce Sherpa: 503-491-7443 - Room AC 2565 Joyce.Sherpa@mhcc. edu

16 Fifth Quarter BI212 CH242

Pre-Dental: Dr. Jeff Brunner 503-491-6915 - Room AC 2731 brunnerjh@yahoo.com

Many students plan to seek admission to health-related professional schools that provide advanced degrees in specialties such as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary medicine. The Division of Science provides a complete array of courses that are required by professional schools for admittance.

Principles of Biology II........................................... 5 Organic Chemistry II2 . ........................................... 5 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

14 Sixth Quarter BI213 CH243

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate mastery of discipline-specific biological concepts • demonstrate the ability to ask and answer questions using the scientific method • demonstrate an ability to collect, manipulate, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data • select and use appropriate equipment to conduct field and laboratory investigations • demonstrate an ability to conduct field and laboratory exercises independently and in groups • select, evaluate, and utilize discipline-specific scholarly material • demonstrate an ability to communicate biological information in written and/or oral form to practitioners and the public.

Principles of Biology III.......................................... 5 Organic Chemistry II2 ............................................. 5 Health & Physical Education requirement1 ................ 3 Humanities requirement1 ........................................ 3

16 Refer to Associate of Science requirements, pages 11-12. This sequence replaces the 300-level Organic Chemistry requirement at colleges and universities. With an acceptable score on the ACS National Exam and a minimum of a “C” or better in each course, this sequence transfers as 11-15 credits of 300-level coursework to all OUS schools.

1

2

Related MHCC Program Web Links http://www.mhcc.cc.or.us/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www2.eou.edu/%7Ejrinehar/ biodept.htm

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Science degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science in the Biological Sciences at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon Health Sciences University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, or University of Oregon. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions that require different courses within the various subject areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty advisers, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

Oregon Health and Science Univ. - http://www.ohsu.edu/academic/ Oregon State University - http://www.science.orst.edu/majors.html Portland State University - http://www.bio.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/biology/ University of Oregon - http://biology.uoregon.edu/ Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Biological Sciences in pre-professional preparation. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to learn the specific requirements of the transfer school.

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Fourth Quarter

Psychology

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Advisers Nicole Bragg: 503-491-7291 - Room AC 2680 Nicole.Bragg@mhcc.edu Stephanie Cram: 503-491-7626 - Room AC 2678 Stephanie.Cram@mhcc.edu Nancy Olson: 503-491-7426 - Room AC 2681 Nancy.Olson@mhcc.edu Larry Wise: 503-491-7308 - Room AC 2673 Larry.Wise@mhcc.edu

14 Fifth Quarter MTH244

The discipline of psychology encompasses the understanding of individual human behavior in the context of our social, cultural and physical environment. Psychology is inherently interdisciplinary as it adheres to the scientific method in its approach and explores fundamental questions concerning human motivation and values.

Statistics II........................................................... 4 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5 ....................................... 4 Social Science requirement4 . .................................. 3

14 Sixth Quarter

Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 3 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5 ....................................... 4 Electives6 ............................................................. 6

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • apply knowledge of human behavior and social phenomena to social and community issues • recognize the values, behaviors and viewpoints of diverse populations • develop interdependent skill while functioning autonomously within the context of social systems • demonstrate knowledge of the field of psychology and understand the major assumption of psychology as a science • demonstrate an understanding of the scientific methods and statistical principles of psychology • demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of psychological knowledge to function in interpersonal relations and society • demonstrate critical thinking in drawing conclusions regarding the causes and explanation of behavior.

16

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student for obtaining a Bachelor of Science/Arts in Psychology at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon or Western Oregon University. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education requirements. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty advisers and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

Cr

MTH243 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 Humanities requirement 3 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement5 ....................................... 4 Elective6 .............................................................. 3

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements for course options, pages 10-11. 2 First year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, JPN101103, and SPAN101-103. 3 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities requirements include: PHL201-203, SP112, SP114, R210, ENG104 or FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 4 Suggested courses to fulfill social science elective requirements include: ANTH101-103, PS200 or any PS course that fulfills AA/OT requirements, SOC204-206. 5 Suggested course sequence to fulfill lab science requirements is BI101-103. 6 Suggested courses to fulfill elective requirements include: ANTH101-103, PS200 or any PS course that fulfills AA/OT requirements, PSY101, PSY151, PSY214, PSY216, PSY237, PSY239 or SOC204-206. 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www2.eou.edu/psych/ Oregon Institute of Technology - http://www.oit.edu/default. aspx?DN=6448,5660,2676,2666,2,1,Documents

Cr

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/cla/psychology//

PSY201 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5 Humanities requirement 3 ........................................ 3

Portland State University - http://www.psy.pdx.edu/ Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/overview/ psychology.html University of Oregon - http://psychweb.uoregon.edu/

15 Second Quarter

Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/psychology/

MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions....................... 5 PSY202 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5

Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Psychology. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

16 Third Quarter PSY203 General Psychology................................................. 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5 Oral Communication and Rhetoric requirement1 ........ 3 Social Science requirement4 . .................................. 3

17

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Third Quarter

Sociology

Cr

MHCC Faculty Adviser Dr. Naomi Abrahams, 503-491-7604, Room AC 2676 Nancy.Abrahams@mhcc.edu

PHL201 Introduction to Philosophy..................................... 3 WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5 Health and Physical Education requirement 3 ............ 1 Electives1 ............................................................. 3

The sociology transfer curriculum is designed to closely follow the lower division general education requirements for sociology majors at many universities and colleges in Oregon. Sociology majors develop a strong understanding of the social structures that create, maintain, and transform societies. A bachelor’s degree in sociology provides excellent liberal arts foundation for embarking on a wide range of career paths.

HST201 U. S. History - Pre-Colonial - 1830............................ 3 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement7 ....................................... 4 Sociology elective5 . .............................................. 3 Electives1 ............................................................. 3

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer

15 Fourth Quarter

16 Fifth Quarter

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • demonstrate knowledge of key sociological concepts and apply them to the real world • understand the connection between the individual and the broader society • describe major theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches of sociology • apply sociological concepts and principles to contemporary social problems • apply sociological methodologies at an introductory level to developing an understanding of particular sociological phenomenon • apply knowledge of human behavior and social phenomena to social and community issues • embrace diversity and promote social understanding • develop interdependent skills while functioning autonomously within the context of social systems.

HST202 MTH243

15 Sixth Quarter

Health and Physical Education requirement 3 ............ 1 Humanities requirement6 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement7 ....................................... 4 Political Science elective8 ...................................... 3 Sociology elective5 . .............................................. 3

14

The two-year program listed below is designed to meet the requirements for an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree from MHCC and prepare a student to obtain a Bachelor of Science/Arts in Sociology at Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon, Western Oregon University, Lewis & Clark College, Reed College and University of Portland. However, students from MHCC seeking a baccalaureate degree may also transfer to other institutions. These institutions may require different courses within the various areas of General Education. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, the faculty adviser and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

First Quarter

U. S. History 1830 - 1917 ....................................... 3 Probability and Statistics I...................................... 4 Health and Physical Education requirement 3 ............ 1 Humanities requirement1 . ...................................... 3 Lab Science requirement7 ....................................... 4

Cr

SOC204 General Sociology................................................... 3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Computer Literacy requirement1 .............................. 1 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5 Mathematics requirement1 . .................................... 4

Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree requirements for course options, pages 10-14. 2 First year language electives may be satisfied with the following course sequences FR101-103, GER101-103, ITAL101.103, JPN101-103, and SPAN101-103. 3 Suggested courses to fulfill health and physical education requirements include: HE202, HE207, HE208, PE185. 4 Suggested course to fulfill oral communication requirement is SP115 5 Suggested courses include: SOC206, 213, 215, 216, 232 6 Suggested courses to fulfill humanities elective requirements include: ART115, 201, 211, ENG104-107, 212, 214, 222, HUM110, MUS101 or FR201-203, GER201-203, JPN201-203, SPAN201-203. NOTE: Oregon transfer students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the second year of a language other than English (201-203 or equivalent) before graduation from their transfer school. 7 Suggested courses to fulfill lab science elective requirements include: BI101-103, 132, CH104-106, 170, FW251, FW254, G201, GS104-106 8 Suggested courses include: PS105, 200, 201, 203-205, 241 1

Transfer Schools’ Web Links Eastern Oregon University - http://www.eou.edu/anthsoc/

16 Second Quarter

Lewis & Clark College - http://www.lclark.edu/COLLEGE/DEPAR/ SOAN

ANTH103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology...................... 3 SOC205 General Sociology................................................... 3 WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 First-year Language elective2 . ................................ 5 Oral Communication requirement4 ........................... 3

Oregon State University - http://oregonstate.edu/cla/sociology/ students/undergrad.php Portland State University - http://www.sociology.pdx.edu/und-grad. htm/

17

Reed College - http://academic.reed.edu/sociology Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/sociol/soc_main. shtml

116


Second Quarter

University of Oregon - http://sociology.uoregon.edu/undergraduate/ index.php/ University of Portland - http://college.up.edu/sbs/sociology/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/socsci/ sociology Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Sociology. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

14-17 Third Quarter TA101 Appreciating Theater.............................................. 3 TA143 Acting Fundamentals III or TA113 Theater Technology III and TA114 Technical Theater Workshop - First Year .......................... 3-4 TA153A/B/C Theater Workshops, First Year or TA199A/B/C Special Studies in Theater.........1-3* WR123 English Composition: Research................................. 3 Computer Literacy requirement1,2 ............................. 1 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1 Science/Math/Computer Science requirement1 . ........ 3

Theatre Arts

Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer MHCC Faculty Adviser Rick Zimmer: 503-491-7157 - Room AC 2135 Rick.Zimmer@mhcc.edu Daryl Harrison-Carson: 503-491-7159 - Room AC 2129 Daryl.Harrison@mhcc.edu

15-18 Fourth Quarter

“The play’s the thing....,” Shakespeare said, and ever since people have been fascinated with the world of theater. This curriculum is recommended for students interested in studying theater arts at MHCC, earning an Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer degree, and transferring to a four-year college or university to work toward a bachelor’s degree in theater.

TA241 Intermediate Acting Techniques: Styles or TA227 Theatrical Makeup................................. 3 TA253A/B/C Theater Workshops, Second Year or TA214A/B/C Technical Theater Workshop - Second Year..................................1-3* Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 6

Curricular Outcomes At the completion of this curriculum, the student should be able to: • identify, interpret and apply stage and blocking terminology • speak and write fluently about performances, correctly using specific vocabulary of the art and craft • work independently and as an ensemble team member in accomplishing performance tasks • present an expressive, disciplined performance of a scene and/or monologue in a manner that is original, lucid, structured and crafted.

14-17 Fifth Quarter TA148 Movement for the Actor or TA213 Stage Lighting Design........................ 2-3 TA253A/B/C Theater Workshops, Second Year or TA214A/B/C Technical Theater Workshop - Second Year..................................1-3* SP262 Voice and Articulation............................................ 3 Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 3

Students in Theater Arts participate in quarterly productions and study a comprehensive program of courses that includes acting and technical aspects of theatrical productions. After completing the Oregon Transfer degree at MHCC, they are prepared to transfer to a four-year college or university and pursue a baccalaureate degree in Theater. Students planning to transfer and complete a bachelor’s degree after MHCC should consult with the institution they will be attending, their faculty adviser, and/or the MHCC Academic Advising and Transfer Center.

13-17 Sixth Quarter TA144 Improvisation or TA211 Scene Design........................................ 3 TA253A/B/C Theater Workshops, Second Year or TA214A/B/C Technical Theater Workshop - Second Year..................................1-3* Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1 Lab Science requirement1 .................................... 4-5 Social Science requirement1 . .................................. 6

Students interested in pursuing a two-year Associate of General Studies degree at MHCC, should consult the Special Studies programs in Acting/Directing and Technical Theater found on pages 77-78 of this catalog.

First Quarter

Cr

TA107 Introduction to Theater II....................................... 3 TA142 Acting Fundamentals II or TA112 Theater Technology II and TA114 Technical Theater Workshop - First Year .......................... 3-4 TA153A/B/C Theater Workshops, First Year or TA121 Costuming........................................1-3* WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking...................... 3 Mathematics requirement1. ..................................... 4

Cr

15-18

TA106 Introduction to Theater I........................................ 3 TA141 Acting Fundamentals I or TA111 Theater Technology I and TA114 Technical Theater Workshop - First Year .......................... 3-4 TA153D Theater Workshop: Children’s Workshop, First Year or TA227 Theatrical Makeup.............................. 2-3 WR121 English Composition............................................... 3 Oral Communication requirement1 . .......................... 3 Health and Physical Education requirement1 . ........... 1

15-17

117

* Students must make their selection to ensure a minimum of 90 credits for this curriculum. 1 Refer to Associate of Arts - Oregon Transfer (AA/OT) requirements, pages 10-11. 2 CIS120 and CIS120L are recommended to fulfill the Science/Math/Computer Science and the Computer Literacy requirements.


Related MHCC Program Web Links: MHCC Theatre Arts Department http://www.mhcc.edu/programs Transfer Schools’ Web Links: Portland State University - http://www.theaterarts.pdx.edu/ Western Oregon University - http://www.wou.edu/las/creativearts/ theater_dance/theatre_info.php Southern Oregon University - http://www.sou.edu/theatre/ University of Oregon - http://theatre.uoregon.edu/ Eastern Oregon University - http://www2.eou.edu/theatre/ Disclaimer This information is meant to serve as a general guide for students intending to major in Theatre Arts. Specific requirements for transfer will vary from school to school. It is the student’s responsibility to contact his/her four-year transfer school to confirm specific admission requirements.

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119


Understanding Course Requirements Mt. Hood Community College is committed to student success. The college offers courses for students who need additional academic preparation. Mt. Hood Community College requires that students are proficient in reading, writing, and math or a combination of these basic skills before they can enroll in most college courses.

Proficiency is defined as course placement above: RD90 Effective Reading and Learning Strategies WR90 Writing Skills—Paragraph to Essay

Proficiency Levels

Proficiency in reading, writing and mathematics can be determined by taking the College Placement Test (CPT) or by successfully completing previous college course work. There are two proficiency levels: Proficiency Needed or Proficiency Required. Proficiency levels for each course can be found at the end of individual course descriptions.

Proficiency Needed

All students registering for proficiency-needed courses must meet the proficiencies in reading, writing, and mathematics either through the CPT or through self-evaluation. Self-evaluation can be used only if the student plans to enroll in five (5) or fewer credits. Students enrolling in five (5) or fewer must realize that they are expected to possess the needed reading, writing and math proficiencies to enroll in the specified course.

MTH20 Applied Arithmetic and Pre-Algebra Note: Students who have completed a reading, writing, or math prerequisite numbered higher than RD90, WR90 and MTH20 will meet the reading, writing, or math proficiency requirement.

Reading, Writing, and Math Proficiencies

Proficiency Required

All students registering for proficiency-required courses will be required to take the CPT and place above RD90, WR90 and MTH20 or prove proficiency with successfully completed college course work regardless of the number of credit hours taken.

Reading Proficiency A student who meets the reading proficiency generally is able to read pre-college textbooks (9th grade level) and find main ideas and supporting details. Students may still have great difficulty when the amount of reading material is high, content is abstract, or vocabulary is difficult.

Writing Proficiency A student who meets the writing proficiency is able to generate ideas to write a logical nonfiction paragraph on a single topic. The writing will be free of distracting technical errors. The student may have difficulty writing long papers or answering essay questions. They should have little difficulty writing one or two paragraph essays or lab reports.

Other Helpful Course Description Terms Proficiency: Having suitable or sufficient skill, knowledge and /or experience.

Prerequisite: A requirement that must be successfully completed before taking the course.

Co-Requisite: A requirement or course that must be either successfully completed beforehand or taken in combination with the course.

Math Proficiency A student who meets the math proficiency is able to understand and do basic mathematical problems with fractions, decimals, and percentages. Note: A student who places beyond a specific course may not have all the skills contained within the prior courses.

Concurrent: A course that must be taken in combination with another course.

Recommended/Suggested Requisite: Students are strongly encouraged to complete the stated requirement in order to be better prepared for the course.

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Course Descriptions AC110 General Accounting I

Credits 4 (4 Lecture Hrs/Wk) - F/W/Sp This is an introductory course covering basic small business accounting systems. The course is intended to provide the student with practical knowledge of basic accounting including transaction recording, journalizing, and posting. Basic financial statement preparation is also covered. The course assumes no previous accounting courses or experience. Proficiency Needed: Reading, Writing, Math.

AC120 Accounting for Professional Services

Credits 3 (3 Lecture Hrs/Wk) – W Designed for a true novice to accounting theory; this course assumes no previous accounting courses or experience. An introductory course presenting a system of accounting for use in an office providing professional services. Using the cash basis of accounting, the complete accounting cycle is presented with special emphasis on analyzing transactions, posti