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UKB to host Day of Champions football camp The United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma will host a special camp on June 16. A Day of Champions Football Camp is led by coach Ken Heupel and a special team of veteran coaches and players from various state colleges, university and professional NFL organizations. Although the camp is labeled a football camp, it is open to athletes of all sports – both boys and girls – ages 8 to 14. The camp provides the kids coaching in athletics, mentoring on health, reading, fitness life choices and focuses on the four principles of leadership: discipline, respect, trust and hard work. The cost of the camp is free, and the UKB will accept the first 150 boys and girls ages 8 -14. For more information, contact Marilyn Craig at 456-6533. Or you can fax a form to Craig at (918) 431-1873, or the form may be mailed to: Day of Champions Football Camp, United Keetoowah Band, PO Box 746, Tahlequah, OK 74465.

STATE Drillers to host South Division foes at ONEOK The Tulsa Drillers will host a pair South Division teams during a six-game homestand that starts on Wednesday. The Midland RockHounds (Oakland Athletics) will be at ONEOK Field for a three-game set from Wednesday through Friday. The Frisco RoughRiders (Texas Rangers) will provide the opposition for the final three games Saturday through June 7. All but two of the games in the homestand will begin at 7:05 p.m. The two exceptions include the game on Saturday that will start at 6:05 p.m. and the contest on Sunday that will begin at 2:05 p.m. Tickets for all six games in the homestand are now on sale at the ONEOK Field Ticket Office at 201 N. Elgin Avenue and at TulsaDrillers.com. Tickets are also available by calling (918)744-5901.

NATION Bochy wants Linecum to relax SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy met with struggling ace Tim Lincecum and had a simple message for the reigning two-time NL Cy Young winner: relax. One day after Lincecum gave up six earned runs in 4 2-3 innings en route to his first loss of the season — the third straight rough outing by the Giants' righthander — Bochy sought out the pitcher prior to San Francisco's series finale against the Washington Nationals and offered a few bits of advice. “We talked about a lot of things,” Bochy said. “When things aren’t going so well for a player there’s some times as a manager you do want to talk to them to see where they're at. I talked to Timmy and basically he’s fine. He’s a little frustrated.”

Sports Camps • Looking for a summer sports camp to attend? See all the local sports camps going on this summer in the “Sports Roundup.”

Sports Stories • Have an idea for an interesting sports story or feature this summer? Contact the Tahlequah Daily Press sports desk at 4568833 ext. 22.

BuschHamlin dispute seems far from settled By MARK LONG Associated Press

Jeff Konya (far left) was recently selected as a member of the NCAA Division II Men’s and Women’s Tennis Committee. In the photo, Konya stands with (from left): Ken Hayes, Jack Dobbins and Larry Gipson during an NSU basFile photo by Ben Johnson ketball in January.

Northeastern State's Konya receives NCAA Committee assignment. Jeff Konya, director of athletics at Northeastern State University, has been selected as a member of the NCAA Division II Men’s and Women’s Tennis Committee. Konya will begin serving on the committee Sept. 1, for a term of four years running through 2014. “Our tennis program is recognized as one of the best in NCAA Division II,” said

Konya. “Being on this committee is good for Northeastern State from the standpoint of witnessing what other institutions are offering with their tennis programs. This will allow us to continue to be one of the premier programs nationally.” Konya’s duties as a committee member will include assessing criteria for the selection process for the NCAA Division II Ten-

nis Championships, assisting at the championship site and handling the administrative functions of the tournament, including the academic recognition. Northeastern State was 15-5 this season and qualified for its 11th consecutive NCAA Women’s Tennis Regional this spring. After advancing to the Sweet 16 in Altamonte Springs, Fla., the RiverHawks lost to No.

1-ranked Armstrong Atlantic State, who went on to claim its second straight national title. Konya is one of two personnel from Northeastern State Athletics who serves on national committees. Larry Gipson, men’s basketball head coach, is the second vice president on the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) board.

NCAA: 8 violations in UConn men's hoops By PAT EATON-ROBB Associated Press STORRS, Conn. – Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun and the men's basketball program he took from obscurity to national titles have been accused of eight major NCAA infractions, with investigators citing hundreds of improper calls and texts from UConn staff to recruits. The school released a notice from the NCAA that lays out the allegations against the Hall-of-Fame coach, his staff and the school. Besides the calls and texts, the accusations include giving recruits improper benefits and improperly distributing free tickets to high school coaches and others. Calhoun is cited for failing to promote an atmosphere of compliance. "It's not exactly, certainly anywhere near the high point of my career, as a matter of fact it's certainly one of the lowest points at any time that you are accused of doing something," said Calhoun, who has led the Huskies since 1986 and taken them to the Final Four three times. "It's a very serious matter." Athletic director Jeff Hathaway offered support for Calhoun and defended the university. "Let me be clear," he said. "The University of Connecticut is fully committed to NCAA rules compliance and takes this matter very seriously. With regard to coach Calhoun, he personally has a long-standing demonstrated commitment to NCAA rules compliance."

The allegations come at the end of a 15-month investigation into the recruiting of former player Nate Miles, who was expelled from UConn in October 2008 without ever playing a game for the Huskies. He was charged with violating a restraining order in a case involving a woman who claimed he assaulted her. The NCAA alleges 160 impermissible telephone calls and at least 191 impermissible text messages between recruits and coaches, including assistants Beau Archibald, Patrick Sellers, Andre LeFler, associate head coach George Blaney, and then-assistant Tom Moore, who is now the head coach at Quinnipiac. Moore did not immediately return messages seeking comment. UConn is to appear before the governing body on Oct. 15 to respond. Attorney Rick Evrard, an outside counsel who advises UConn on NCAArelated matters, said the school likely will spend the next three months reviewing the allegations. He said if the school confirms them, it is obligated to impose its own sanctions. Evrard said that, in cases such as UConn's, penalties most often affect recruiting and could include the loss of scholarships. They don't usually include a ban on postseason play or the forfeiting of any games when there was no competitive advantage obtained from the violations, he said. Still, recruiting violations can devastate a program. Indiana hasn't recovered from an overhaul of its famous

basketball program prompted when former coach Kelvin Sampson was forced out in February 2008 because more than 100 impermissible calls to recruits came to light. Sampson had already been sanctioned for recruiting violations while he was coach at Oklahoma. Among the allegations against UConn is that Archibald and Sellers provided false and misleading information to NCAA investigators. Sellers and Archibald, who served as director of basketball operations, have both resigned. Hathaway said Archibald left last week and Sellers quit on Sunday. Both men released statements Friday saying they needed to devote their full attention to the allegations against them. "Coaching is my passion and something I have spent many years of enjoyment doing," Sellers said. "I want the record to reflect this and for the people to see the respect and integrity that I will show toward the process in the months ahead." Calhoun has coached 24 seasons at UConn and 38 overall, compiling a record of 823-358 that includes two national titles and another trip to the Final Four in 2009. He recently signed a five-year, $13 million contract. UConn was just 18-16 last season and lost in the second round of the NIT, as Calhoun faced an undisclosed medical problem. He took a medical leave of absence in January and missed seven games.

CONCORD, N.C. – Just as Kyle Busch settled into a chair in the media center, someone dropped a package in front of him. It was a FedEx box. That's Denny Hamlin's NASCAR sponsor. Busch smiled, opened it up and found a pair of boxing gloves inside. Busch initially shrugged off the gag that came five days after his on-track altercation with Hamlin in the All-Star race at Charlotte Motor Speedway, but then sounded like he might consider going a round or two with his Joe Gibbs Racing teammate. If so, Hamlin is ready. Ding, ding. "Kyle brings this stuff on himself, and he gets mad at the media for asking him questions about his blowups," Hamlin said. "But he does it to himself. I don't want to be part of it. Any drama that he wants to create is on him. Anything he says on the radio is on him. "All I'm going to say, and I'm going to be done with it, is that each year I think Kyle's going to grow and he just doesn't. Until he puts it all together, that's when he'll become a champion, and right now he just doesn't have himself all together." So much for playing nice, settling their differences in private and preventing another Sprint Cup feud. Although Busch insisted he and Hamlin have moved on from last weekend's incident, he didn't back down from radio chatter in which he threatened to kill Hamlin. Any regrets? "Absolutely not," Busch said. "It was the heat of the moment and that's who I am and that's my expression and I am not going to be sorry for what I say. It's freedom of speech. "I was frustrated. ... It was a saying that is said a lot, and take it for what it's worth. ... It wasn't joking, but it wasn't going to happen. It wasn't meant (like I was going to kill him). With what? With my great looks?" Busch sure looked intent on doing some damage. Busch attempted to pass Hamlin for the lead with 10 laps to go in the non-points race, but Hamlin blocked him high and forced him into the wall. A few laps later, Busch blew a tire and crashed. He responded by lashing out at Hamlin, threatening him over his team radio and then confronting him at Hamlin's hauler after the race. Team owner Joe Gibbs stepped in and calmed Busch down. Busch ducked reporters afterward, making his media session his first reaction to the melee. See Feud, page 2B

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Sports Camps Drillers to host South Division foes at ONEOK NATION STATE Sports Stories Jeff Konya (far left) was recently selected as a memb...