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MGA NEWSLETTER SUMMER/AUTUMN 2013 #45


FRIENDS OF MGA INC present

JAZZ

in the sculpture park

Sunday 24 February 2013

An outdoor concert for the whole family. Book early for seats on the deck or bring your own picnic and grab a spot on the grass. 5.15 pm BAR OPENS 6.00 pm START Tickets :$20 Friends of MGA/$25 non-members $10 under 18’s. Bookings essential T: 8544 0500


CONTENTS

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CHAIR AND DIRECTOR’S REPORT

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EXHIBITIONS

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FEATURE: MARK STRIZIC

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RECENT ACQUISITIONS

10 REVIEW: BOWNESS PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 13 VOLUTEER PROFILE: NORMA MARTIN 14 PREVIEW: PEACE 16 FRIENDS OF MGA: PRESIDENT’S REPORT 17 FRIENDS EVENTS

MONASH GALLERY OF ART NEWSLETTER Published 3 times/year Edition no. 45 ISSN 1444-4577 Editor and designer: Mark Hislop Printer: Highlight Printing The MGA Newsletter is free to all Friends of MGA Inc. The views expressed in its pages are not necessarily those of MGA, or Friends of MGA Inc. Every effort has been made to ensure the information is correct at the time of printing, however some technical inaccuracies or typographical errors may occur.

MONASH GALLERY OF ART 860 Ferntree Gully Rd Wheelers Hill Victoria 3150 T: 61 3 8544 0500 E: mga@monash.vic.gov.au www.mga.org.au Tue to Fri: 10am–5pm Sat & Sun: 12–5pm closed: Monday and public holidays MGA is the City of Monash’s premier cultural facility

MGA

THE HOME OF AUSTRALIAN PHOTOGRAPHY

COVER IMAGE Tim PAGE born Tunbridge Wells, UK 1944 The enlightening of a Buddha Rupa in Central Colombo, Sri Lanka, Lotus Road, Vihara 5:42am 1983 chromogenic print, printed 2012 collection of the artist

Friends of

Inc.

A 0037650N


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MGA volunteers photograph: Stephanie Richter


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CHAIR AND DIRECTOR’S REPORT

Congratulations to Melbourne’s Jesse Marlow for taking out the 2012 Bowness Photography Prize. Jesse was announced the winner of the $25 000 prize in October by the MGA Foundation’s wonderful Patron Penelope Seidler, and this is our first chance to acknowledge Jesse’s success. Jesse is one of Australia’s most highly regarded street photographers; as it happens, his extraordinary picture of a woman passing a shop front was taken just down the road, on the corner of Ferntree Gully and Blackburn Rds. Great art can be found in all sorts of places. Our program over the first part of 2013 engages both great art and great story telling. The theme of our first major exhibition for the year – PEACE – is self-evident. It seems like the perfect time to show the work of a range of photographers who have tried to find an image of peace in contemporary life. There have been so many wars over the last decade or so, so little evidence of peace in the world. PEACE asks us to think about what peace looks like, and where we might find it – and why it seems so elusive! During the exhibition, Tim Page’s magnificent photograph of

Buddha being enlightened will look out over the intersection of Ferntree Gully and Jells Rds, hopefully casting a peaceful vibe across one of the city’s busiest intersections. Great art needs to be found in all sorts of places! This newsletter flags a few key events we have planned to run alongside the exhibition – be sure to check out our events calendar and mga.org.au for more details. Our key event for the first part of 2013 is our annual Fundraising Dinner & Auction, coming up on 23 March. There is once again a top notch group of artworks and experiences being auctioned on the night; as we all know, MGA needs to raise a significant part of our budget, and the auction plays a big part in this, in helping us to celebrate and promote Australian photography through our exhibition, public and education programs. We are really humbled by the generosity of photographers and collectors who have donated significant works to the auction, and to the many businesses that have offered in-kind support for the evening. We look forward to seeing many of you at what will surely be a fabulous and very entertaining dinner. If you can’t make it to the dinner, come along and enjoy the many free events we have planned for you for summer and autumn. — Debra Knight, Chair of MGA Committee of Management Shaune Lakin, Gallery Director


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EXHIBITIONS

PEACE

8 FEBRUARY- 28 APRIL 2013

ANNUAL FUNDRAISING DINNER AND AUCTION

SATURDAY 23 MARCH

PEACE

8 FEBRUARY–28 APRIL 2013

ANNUAL FUNDRAISING DINNER AND AUCTION

SATURDAY 23 MARCH PREVIEW: 13–23 MARCH 2013

BRUCE POSTLE: IMAGE MAKER

2 MAY–30 JUNE 2013

WHAT’S MY SCENE: FACE PAINTED PORTRAITS

2 MAY–30 JUNE 2013

CAROL JERREMS: PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST 6 JULY–29 SEPTEMBER 2013

What does peace look like? This remarkable exhibition responds to this difficult question. Featuring the work of some of Australia’s most important photojournalists, PEACE gives us a sense of why peace remains elusive and why it is so difficult to achieve. PEACE features the work of Ben Bohane, Michael Coyne, Stephen Dupont, Sean Flynn, Ashley Gilbertson, Tim Page, David Dare Parker and Jack Picone. These photographers form the °SOUTH collective, which was established in 2005. The work of °SOUTH photographers represents the largest and most diverse contemporary photographic archive dealing with the Asia Pacific region. The group’s archive covers most of the events to have affected our region in the last fifty years. This exhibition draws on this vast and highly significant photographic record.

Australian photography will be centre stage at the annual Monash Gallery of Art Fundraising Dinner & Auction. This is your opportunity to help support the work of MGA, one of Australia’s only institutions dedicated to collecting, preserving and promoting Australian photography. The night will once again be hosted by the inimitable Bryan Dawe with Mossgreen’s Paul Sumner auctioning works donated by Australia’s best photographers. The Fundraising Dinner & Auction is a glamorous night out, and gives residents and local businesses a chance to come together and support the gallery’s future success.

Iconic Australian actor Jack Thompson, AM will open PEACE on Saturday 16 February 2013 at 3.00pm. Bookings T 8544 0500 Ashley GILBERTSON Occupy Wall Street demonstrator Edgar Cancinos, 17, from Elmhurst, Queens, NY meditates in Zuccotti Park on November 16, 2011 (detail) chromogenic print, printed 2012 collection of the artist

2012 MGA Fundraising Dinner & Auction photograph: © Ari Hatzis


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BRUCE POSTLE: IMAGE MAKER

2 MAY–30 JUNE 2013

Bruce Postle, one of Australia’s most celebrated photojournalists, has taken thousands of images in over half a century of photojournalism. In 27 years working with The Age, Postle captured some of the most iconic images of our times. This special exhibition presents over 50 photographs from a master storyteller. Every photograph in the exhibition tells a vivid story and Bruce has captioned them to disclose the humorous, profound and moving moments behind their making.

WHAT’S MY SCENE: FACE PAINTED PORTRAITS

CAROL JERREMS: PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST

2 MAY–30 JUNE 2013

6 JULY–29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Photographic portraiture has often been a tool for stereotyping the identity of individuals. From mugshots to passport photographs, photographic portraiture establishes and fixes identity. But our understanding of personal identity has shifted recently; rather than being the immutable essence of an individual, we recognise that identity is enacted and negotiated as part of ongoing social processes.

Carol Jerrems’ gritty, poetic and elusive images show people trying to find a new way of life and action in the 1970s. Her images have come to define a decade in Australia’s history.

The exhibition includes some of Postle’s most famous images, such as the ‘one-take’ shot of Bert Newton receiving a kiss from Mohammed Ali during the Logie Awards at the Southern Cross Hotel. It also includes Postle’s legendary photograph of Tommy Woodcock with his horse Reckless on the eve of the Melbourne Cup in 1977, an image that speaks of the love between man and animal.

The popularity of face-painting in contemporary culture testifies to this shift. From Cosplay and kid’s parties to sporting events and political rallies, we paint the face as a way of expressing our moods, affiliations and desires. This exhibition surveys a range of recent photographic portrait projects that use face-painting to cast identity as something that is provisional and uncertain, and includes work by Eric Bridgeman, Bindi Cole, Ray Cook, Sandy Edwards, Siri Hayes, Owen Leong, Darren Sylvester, Nat Thomas & Concettina Inserra, Christian Thompson and Justene Williams.

Bruce Postle Ali and Newton (detail) 1979 gelatin silver print Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection courtesy of the artist

Darren Sylvester What happens will happen #3 (detail) 2010 chromogenic print 120 x 90 cm courtesy of the artist and Sullivan and Strumpf, Sydney

Carol Jerrems was the first contemporary Australian woman photographer to have work acquired by a number of museums including the National Gallery of Australia. The National Gallery holds an extensive archive of Jerrems photographs and film work gifted by the artist’s mother Joy Jerrems in 1983. This exhibition concentrates on prints signed or formally exhibited, by Carol Jerrems in her lifetime dating from 1968-1978.

Carol Jerrems Butterfly behind glass [Red Symons from Skyhooks] (detail) 1975 gelatin silver photograph National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Gift of Mrs Joy Jerrems 1981 © Ken Jerrems and the Estate of Lance Jerrems


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FEATURE JUST 10 YEARS AFTER ARRIVING IN MELBOURNE MARK STRIZIC WAS THE FIRST PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST TO HAVE A SOLO EXHIBITION AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA AND THE FIRST TO BE ACQUIRED BY THE NEW NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA IN 1973. STRIZIC PASSED AWAY PEACEFULLY ON THE 8TH OF DECEMBER 2012.

Mark Strizic was born in Berlin in 1928 and grew up in the region of Yugoslavia now known as Croatia. At the age of 22 he decided to migrate to the ‘new world’, and ended up settling in Melbourne in 1950. He began studying applied physics at RMIT but by the end of the 1950s he had turned his amateur interest in photography into a vocation that occupied him for the rest of his life. With a note of envy, Henry Talbot once described Strizic as being ‘by far the most prolific creative photographer in Melbourne, if not Australia.’ Strizic’s productivity is testified to by a long list of exhibitions, including a solo show at the NGV in 1968; the first by a photographer. He also produced several photobooks, over 20 photo-media murals and tackled almost every genre of photography doing commercial work for other artists, architects, government organisations and industrial corporations. Strizic’s contribution to the history of ‘creative’ photography in Australia revolves around his

interest in continually pushing the formal parameters of the photograph and experimenting with its expressive potential. He played a central role in the proliferation of photobooks in Australia during the 1960s, working both as a photographer and designer, and exploring how images could be arranged in sequences for dramatic effect. He began experimenting with colour photography in the late 1960s, developing his own photo-chemical processes and pioneering the use of colour in art photography. And his large-scale murals similarly championed new printing processes in a way that expanded previous conceptions of photographic art.

OPPOSITE TOP LEFT Mark STRIZIC No U-turns 1984 from the series ‘Mannequins and manikins’ chromogenic print courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE TOP RIGHT Mark STRIZIC Nude descending the staircase 1984 from the series ‘Mannequins and manikins’ chromogenic print courtesy of the artist OPPOSITE BOTTOM Mark STRIZIC Grahame King 1968 gelatin silver print courtesy of the artist

PHOTOBOOK CLUB

7–8.30PM TUESDAY 19 FEBRUARY Melbourne’s first Photobook Club will meet every second month on the third Tuesday in Feb/April/June/August/October. A different speaker or activity will feature at each meetup. MGA Curator Stephen Zagala will kick off our year of guest speakers on Tuesday 16 February with the extraordinary work The Road 1974–75 by Wesley Stacey (see p9). What to bring? If you have a favourite photobook or two bring them along. MGA has partnered with PHOTOBOOKCLUB.ORG for this event FREE event; All welcome. Bookings preferred email or phone 03 8544 0500


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RECENT ACQUISITIONS

While Micky Allan is now better known as a painter, she was an extremely influential photographer during the 1970s. Allan’s photographs were usually hand-coloured, initially with coloured pencils and watercolour and later with oil paint, and many were presented in series. In this way, she rejected the conventions of fine photography, which favoured fine printing and the single, iconic view. Allan’s hand-colouring also recalled nineteenth-century photography, when photographs were often tinted or overpainted.

Micky ALLAN Making camp – Wade’s mistake, NSW 1980 gelatin silver print 37.5 x 48.0 cm Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection donated by Christine Godden 2012

This work is part of Allan’s series, Travelogue, which records a trip taken through the north of New South Wales and up the Queensland coast as far as Yeppoon. It also includes one image from Victoria and several from Mountain Lagoon, New South Wales. The negatives were taken over several years. The work is typical of Allan’s hand-colouring technique and ironically recalls nineteenth century popular visual culture, when pictures of male pioneers making camp were common.


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The road is Wesley Stacey’s most iconic work, and could justifiably be described as his masterpiece. The work incorporates a leather briefcase containing 22 spiralbound drawing pads of Holbein paper, which have been turned into photobooks that contain 385 Instamatic prints. Each book has a hand-written inscription on the cover and on the first page. This project grew out of Stacey’s interest in Instamatic cameras and automated colour printing, which became readily available during the early 1970s. Stacey saw the potential for these new technologies to capture the experience of driving through the landscape, and he made a practice of documenting his road trips back and forth across Australia in his Kombi Van during 1973 and 1974. Wesley STACEY The road 1974-75 385 chromogenic prints 9.0 x 12.6 cm each Monash Gallery of Art, City of Monash Collection courtesy of the artist

As Gael Newton has noted The road, ‘revealed Stacey’s interest both in process and in extended repetition as a rhythm with its own hypnotic beauty, and also indicated that he was responding to contemporary developments in conceptualist art.’


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at the end of the day with a photograph that will be with me forever constantly drives and excites me.’

REVIEW JESSE MARLOW WINS $25 000 BOWNESS PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE Australia’s most celebrated street photographer Jesse Marlow has been awarded Australia’s most prestigious photography prize, the $25 000 Bowness Photography Prize. Penelope Seidler AM named Marlow the winner of the Bowness Photography Prize at a cocktail party at MGA on Thursday 4 October 2012. This is the first time a street photographer has won the $25 000 prize. Marlow’s winning photograph Laser vision is an ambiguous and disorientating image of a chance encounter during the photographer’s daily travels around the streets of Melbourne. Marlow said, ‘contrived photographic shoots and intricately designed set-ups have never interested me. Rather it is the uncertainty of street photography that continues to stimulate. The idea that I can leave the house one morning and come home

For the judges, the winning picture expressed in a very satisfying way a significant aspect of contemporary photographic practice. Street photography, which has a long tradition in photographic history, is experiencing a significant rebirth. Armed with smart phones, we are all potential street photographers. For MGA Director Shaune Lakin, ‘Marlow’s picture is in many ways the perfect street photograph: it is a candid image of everyday life, but one that makes the everyday seem both extraordinary and strange.’ Penelope Seidler AM also presented Adobe Honourable Mentions to Siri Hayes, Christian Thompson, and William Yang. These photographers received the software package Lightbox 4, proudly sponsored by Adobe. 42 finalists were selected from over 2 500 entries – the largest number received in the history of the prize. A special thanks goes to MGA Foundation, Sofitel Melbourne Montalto Vineyard & Olive Grove, Crumpler and Adobe for their continued support of the Bowness Photography Prize.

IMAGES TOP TO BOTTOM: Jesse Marlow Guest judge: Penelope Seidler AM Bill Bowness, Jesse Marlow, Natasha Bowness Neil Graham, MGA Foundation Trustee Barbara Thompson OAM, John Thompson


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Jesse Marlow is Australia’s most acclaimed street photographer. In 2011 he travelled to London to receive the International Street Photography Award. His work has received many other awards both in Australia and internationally. Marlow maintains a very active practice as a photojournalist: he is a member of the collectives in-public.com and Oculi, and his work is distributed by the prestigious French agency Agence Vu. In 2011 Marlow was named by The Age’s Melbourne Magazine’ in Melbourne’s Top 100.

Jesse MARLOW Laser vision 2011 from the series Don’t just tell them, show them pigment ink-jet print 90.0 x 125.0 cm courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery and the artist

JUDGES Magnum photographer Trent Parke Deputy Director NGV Isobel Crombie MGA Gallery Director Shaune Lakin PRIZES $25 000 first prize Jesse Marlow Adobe Honourable Mentions Siri Hayes Christian Thompson William Yang Crumpler People’s Choice Georgia Metaxas


SATURDAY 23 MARCH Join us for a gala evening of fabulous entertainment, sumptuous food and wine, and the best of Australian contemporary photography for sale Bookings essential. Please contact MGA for details

2013 FUNDRAISING DINNER & AUCTION


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VOLUNTEER PROFILE with Norma Martin

Norma has been a regular Thursday morning volunteer since 1997. During this time she has made an extremely significant contribution to the gallery, particularly in the position as MGA’s Volunteer Librarian. Coming from a career as a librarian, Norma continues to use her skills to catalogue and maintain MGA’s specialised collection of photographic books, catalogues and magazines. Norma’s skills also find her attending to front-of-house duties and administrative tasks. These include welcoming visitors, fielding questions, answering phone calls, assisting with mail outs and filing. 2012 marked Norma’s 15th year of voluntary service at MGA. To celebrate this tremendous commitment and dedication to the gallery, we awarded Norma with a gold certificate of appreciation as part of National Volunteer Week in May. Gold certificates are awarded to volunteers who serve at the gallery for 15 years or more and Norma is one of only three people who have received this award. As further recognition of our appreciation and also the appreciation of our community for Norma’s contribution to the gallery as a volunteer, we nominated her for a Caroline Chisholm Award. Caroline Chisholm Awards recognise the achievements of individual volunteers in the local community. On Saturday 27 October Anna Burke MP presented Norma with her award at a special ceremony in front of a crowd of almost 500 people at Clayton Church of Christ. We are extremely grateful for Norma’s hard work, dedication and contribution to the gallery over so many years and we look forward to working with her well into the future. —Stella Loftus-Hills, Gallery and Curatorial Assistant


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Generously supported by Fujifilm Professional

PREVIEW PEACE SHOWCASES A SELECTION OF IMAGES THAT LOOK TO FIND AN IMAGE FOR PEACE. MANY OF THE IMAGES PROVIDE A PERSONAL REFLECTION ON A SUBJECT THAT REMAINS STUBBORNLY ELUSIVE. °SOUTH IS A COLLECTIVE OF DEDICATED AND AWARD-WINNING AUSTRALIAN PHOTOJOURNALISTS WHO HAVE DOCUMENTED THE EVENTS OF THE WORLD OVER THE LAST FIFTY YEARS. SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS AND WILBOW GALLERIES

8 FEBRUARY- 28 APRIL 2013 IMAGES OPPOSITE TOP TO BOTTOM

Ashley GILBERTSON born Melbourne, Victoria 1978; lives New York City, USA Occupy Wall Street demonstrator Edgar Cancinos, 17, from Elmhurst, Queens, meditates in Zuccotti Park on 16 November 2011. Prior to being evicted on 15 November, demonstrators had been living in the park, a privately owned area in the Financial District of New York City, since 17 September 2011, to express anger at financial inequality in the American financial system 2011 chromogenic print, printed 2012 collection of the artist Stephen DUPONT born Sydney, New South Wales, 1967 Woman in burqa: Shamsatoo Afghan Refugee Camp, Peshawar, Pakistan 2001 collection of the artist Jack PICONE born Moree, NSW 1958; lives in Bangkok, Thailand Golden Horse Monastery: novices monks bathe their horses on the Thai-Burma Border 2005 chromogenic print, printed 2012 collection of the artist

Iconic Australian actor Jack Thompson, AM will open MGA’s upcoming exhibition PEACE on Saturday 16 February 2013 at 3.00pm. This important exhibition of photographs seeks to find a picture of peace and includes photographs made by prominent photographers from the Australian photographic collective °SOUTH. These photographers include Tim Page, Ashley Gilbertson, Stephen Dupont, Ben Bohane, Michael Coyne, Jack Picone and the late Sean Flynn. What does peace look like? We all know what war looks like. We see images of it every day in the media. It has been a staple of photography since photographs were first made. Many of the world’s most famous photographs show scenes of war. People even describe war as being ‘photogenic’, so perfectly suited is conflict to being photographed. But we don’t really know what peace looks like. Or at least, peace has never captured our imagination in the way that war has. War is easy to represent; peace seems much more difficult. The only images we

have of peace tend to be clichés or pejoratives: hippies and daisy chains; olive branches and white doves; rainbows and peaceniks. But is peace merely the absence of war? Does it only exist because it has such a strong counter-point in human conflict? How to make it more than fleeting? This exhibition of pictures by members of the °SOUTH collective of Australian photographers is driven by these questions. Each of these photographers has spent much of their lives documenting conflicts around the world; they have come to feel deeply about the possibilities of peace. The photographers were set a challenge: what images of peace did they picked up along the way, and which can resonate as powerfully as the pictures they have made of actual conflict? Consensus among the group was that this was a difficult theme. Going through their vast archives, it was relatively easy to come up with ‘strong’ images of conflict, so often experienced in dramatic or highly emotional terms. But finding images that reflect peace required some reflection. No one wanted to be sentimental; there are no


rainbows or white doves. It meant probing the archive and finding new meaning in old images. In the end, these are – almost by necessity – personal photographs. Rather than providing an overarching or grand narrative for peace, they might better suggest a time when the photographers found peace, or saw a glimpse of it in the world around them. What became clear to the photographers is that peace is often most profound in mundane circumstances. This might help explain something of its elusiveness, both as a state of being and as a ‘story’.   This exhibition is timed to remind us of the absence of peace in contemporary life. The exhibition will mark the tenth anniversary of the Coalition’s invasion of Iraq (18 March 2003). Monstrous conflict has been a fact of life for many in the world for decades; just like its image, peace has been difficult to find. At the exhibition opening Actor Jack Thompson will discuss his own peace-making experiences when, as the UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador in the 1990s, he made a documentary film about the lives of Cambodian children displaced by the Khmer Rouge. With his late best mate photographer Peter Carrette, Thompson helped establish a child protection agency called Krousar Thmey (’new family’ in Khmer) that enabled the lost children of Site II – the largest refugee camp in the world at the time – to return to their homeland of Cambodia.


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I hope you’ve all had a Merry Christmas and happy New Year and are looking forward to another year.

FRIENDS OF MGA FRIENDS OF MGA INC. IS A LARGE GROUP OF ENTHUSIASTS DEDICATED TO SUPPORTING THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF MGA AND ENCOURAGING AN INTEREST IN THE VISUAL ARTS.

The Paper Place 197 Blackburn Road, Mount Waverley VIC 3149 T: (03) 9802 4297

Our last event for 2012 was our annual Art in the park in November. Once again the weather was kind to us and we had hundreds of people of all ages enjoying the workshops, musical events, classic car display, Friends BBQ and the childrens’ events. It will be a tough job to match it this year, but we will try. Many thanks to the entire gallery staff, especially Stephanie Richter and Mark Hislop, volunteers and our Friends committee, for all their hard work.

fascinating talk with hundreds of photos of his travels. Each picture was a stunner, and all done at a breathless pace! In November, one of our regular contributors, Neville Turner, gave us a musical treat. Our Morning Coffee program for 2013 kicks off on 18 February with our very own Director, Shaune Lakin, outlining MGA’s events and exhibitions for the year. On 18 March, we will have art collector and former gallery owner, Guy Abrahams, co-founder of Climarte, giving us a talk on the arts in a changing world. In coming months guest speakers include photographer, Michael Coyne and Dr Charlotte Smith from Museum Victoria, telling us all about the history of the Royal Exhibition Building. Once again thanks to Barry Sanders for organising our program and if you’ve heard anyone giving a good talk somewhere, please contact him.

Coming up on Sunday 24 February we will be having our Jazz in the sculpture park concert. This year we’re making the most of the end of summer with an outdoor concert suitable for the whole family. The Clare Castle Jazz Band will be playing old favourites in the grounds of MGA. Book early for seats on the deck, or bring your own picnic and grab a spot on the grass. This event will be moved indoors in the case of inclement weather.

Our Evening of light classics in October was a great success, financially and socially, with nearly 100 people enjoying a delightful and accomplished programme of music.

Last year our Morning Coffee program included the famous architectural photographer John Gollings who gave us a

The Friends are looking at the purchase of high quality lightweight stools for the gallery to use at the talks and events.


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MORNING COFFEE SPEAKERS 10AM MONDAY 18 FEBRUARY

ICONIC FACES & TORN EDGES: Director Shaune Lakin takes us through MGA’s 2013 exhibition program.

10AM MONDAY 18 MARCH:

I think these will be a good asset for everyone and also for those of us, like me, who can’t stand up too long! After many years of great work on the Committee, three of our long standing members stood down. Irma Dymke, Marion Butt and Stan Paul have resigned will be missed, as will Anna Murchie. I thank all of them for all their work and input, but we will still see them around the gallery. Joining us is Mel Santangelo, our new Membership Secretary, and also Noel Denton, who I am sure many of you will already know. I welcome them and look forward to working with them. Once again I thank our Friends committee for all their help. I look forward to seeing you at the gallery in 2013. Kind regards Godfrey Clay President, Friends of MGA Inc. A0037650N

GUY ABRAHAMS: THE ARTS IN A CHANGING WORLD Climarte founder Guy Abrahams talks about the creative power of the Arts to inform, engage and inspire action on climate change.

10AM MONDAY 15 APRIL

PEACE: photographer Michael Coyne talks about the PEACE exhibition. $10 Friends of MGA/$5 talk only $12 non-member/$6 talk only Bookings essential T: 8544 0500

OTHER EVENTS MGA LOCAL WALKING GROUP

10AM THURSDAY 31 JAN 2013 THEN EVERY THURSDAY DURING SCHOOL TERM A FREE beginners walking group for fun and fitness. Travel at your own pace. Parents with prams welcome. Walk departs and concludes on the Cafe@MGA deck. Our group is free to join and casual, come every week or once a fornight or even once a month. --------------------------------------------

FIND AN OASIS OF CALM: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDITATION 2–3.30PM SATURDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2013 $5 FRIENDS OF MGA/$10 NON-MEMBERS BOOKINGS PREFERRED EMAIL OR CALL 03 8544 0500 Find an oasis of calm in the midst of your busy life by learning how to relax quickly and reduce stress using mindfulness meditation. This workshop is suitable for people who are new to meditation: it’s simple, straightforward and nonreligious. The workshop will be conducted on chairs in the gallery space and uses simple and widely-practised mindfulness meditation practices, focusing on sounds, breathing and body sensations. Please bring a blanket and wear comfortable clothing. Facilitated by Paul Majewski, Director of Meditation Solutions.


MGA newsletter #45  

MGA newsletter #45

MGA newsletter #45  

MGA newsletter #45

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