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Matthew Potts

Pratt Institute School of Architecture Portfolio of Selected Projects


Matthew Potts

Pratt Institute School of Architecture mattfpotts@gmail.com 856-630-8125

Portfolio of Selected Projects Fall 2009 - Spring 2013


Matthew Potts

Pratt Institute School of Architecture

seleCteD ProJeCts

CoMPrehensive Design ii

Examining Strands: Boathouse for Columbia Rowing Professor Lawrence Blough Spring 2012

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travel stuDio: roMe

Crossing Boundaries, Cultivating Relationships Professor Dagmar Richter Spring 2013

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Design ii

Professor Enrique Limon Spring 2010

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CoMPrehensive Design i

Campus Tie: A Dormitory for Pratt Institute Professor Suzan Wines Fall 2011

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interMeDiate Design ii

uidNETWORKS: A Kindergarten for Staten Island Professor Evan Tribus Spring 2011

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hanD sKetChes

From the Field, Design Process, and Details

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Professor Lawrence Blough

Comprehensive Design II

Examining Strands

Boathouse for Columbia Rowing project by Matthew Potts and Ashley Conolly

Careful examination of existing land forms to produce a building which mediates site pressures The development of the boat house began with a mediation of the two main site grains—the ridge line to the south and the shore line to the north. From this, two strands were formed as reciprocations of the site grains.

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The site itself has been altered over time out of convenience for the site’s programmatic requirements. The strands continue that logic by considering the temporal existing condition of the site lines and inflecting them out of convenience for the site’s new program as a boat house.


HARLEM RIVER

TER

SPUYTEN DUYVIL CREEK

T

VIT SA

NIS

TEN

N CE

LD

IE TF

AF

KR

AD

I

ND

N IA

RO

W

21

8th

ST 5


CLOSED SKIN - FACADE

ConCePt

PEEL FOR VIEW

The two strands are differentiated programmatically—one for training, the other for support—as a bifurcation of the site graining. The strands then explore the three-dimensional upheavals of the grains, lifting out of the ground and floating above where the boats and vehicles move in and out of the building and site. The roof continues the bifurcation, and begins a logic of hybridization between external and

internal influences. Grains of the roof are lifted, exposing them to the south for light and stack-effect ventilati on, but also lifted strategically SCREEN based on interior program. The façade follows the sectional grains of the site and building. The particular conditions of the façade are created again as reactions to both internal structure or program and external site conditions.

Two minor interventions in the strands carve openings to create sectional interchanges. A courtyard carved over the boat shed reveals the kinetic representation of grains created by the movements of the boats from shed to water.

LIGHT SHAFT

MINOR INTERVENTIONS

COURTYARD

DUAL STRANDS

NORTH ELEVATION

LAYERED GRAINS

L DIAGRAMS

RIDGE LINE

ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302

STRAND 1 REACTION SITE LINES

SOUTH ELEVATION STRAND 2 RECIPROCAL REACTION

SHORE LINE

COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE ELEVATIONS

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SITE GRAINS

ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302


DUAL STRANDS

LAYERED GRAINS

RIDGE LINE

STRAND 1 REACTION SITE LINES

STRAND 2 RECIPROCAL REACTION

SHORE LINE

SITE GRAINS

TRAILER LOADING TO BOATS

PEDESTRIAN ENTRANCE TO PROGRAM SPACE ADA / PARKING LOT ENTRY

CIRCULATION BOAT CIRCULATION PROGRAM CIRCULATION

COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE MASSING DIAGRAM AND CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302

NORTH ELEVATION

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B-B

A-A

C-C

B-B

D-D COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE SECTIONS C-C

Sections showing the boat storage and service spaces above (Above). Details of the skin system and passive ventilation systems (Opposite). Detail iew of the skin system (Left).

ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302

D-D COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE SECTIONS

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ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302


COLUMN DETAIL

PASSIVE STRATEGY

PASSIVE STRATEGY VENTILATION

PASSIVE STRATEGY

COLUMN DETAIL

CO

SUN SHADE COLUMN DETAIL

CLOSED SKIN - FACADE VENTILATION

VENTILATION

PEEL FOR VIEW SUN SHADE

SUN SHADE

CLOSED SKIN - FACADE

SCREEN

CLOSED SKIN - FACADE CLOSED

PEEL FOR VIEW

AXONOMY PEEL FOR VIEW

SCREEN

COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE WALL SECTION AND SKIN TAXONOMY

SCREEN

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P


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grounD floor + site Plan SECOND FLOOR

B

D C

1

5 6

A

A

4

3 2

B

D

C

GROUND FLOOR

COLUMBIA BOAT HOUSE

10 PLANS

ASHLEY CONOLLY & MATT POTTS PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BLOUGH DESIGN 302


PLAN KEY 1. LOBBY 2. COXLESS PAIR (2-) BOAT RACKS 3. 2- AND 4- BOAT RACKS 4. COXED EIGHT (8+) BOAT RACKS 5. REPAIR SHOP 6. WASH YARD 7. CLASSROOM 8. MULTI-PURPOSE SPACE 9. OFFICES 10. WOMEN’S LOCKERS 11. MEN’S LOCKERS 12. WEIGHT ROOM 13. VIDEO LOUNGE 14. VIEWING BALCONY

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9

7

1

10

11 14

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13

seConD floor Plan SECOND FLOOR

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Professor Dagmar Richter

travel stuDio: roMe

Caravanserai Crossing BounDaries, Cultivating relationshiPs

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Concessions made to modern traffic planning wounded this site; it lost the urban density favorable to pedestrians and so characteristic of Rome. This project heals that wound reclaiming it for pedestrians by introducing a maximum volume on the site thus achieving a density and scale once again conducive to foot traffic. That volume is then carved away to find favorable conditions for public space and access to light and air. Inserted within that volume is a path that follows the Via Crucis, culminating at the chapel. The path interacts with the building and the public space of the city crossing the boundary between sacred and secular space and therefore fostering dialogue between differing spaces and the people within them.

This project heals a wounded urban site and then cultivates relationships between people and places in this city of religious, artistic, and sojourning pilgrims.

ST. PETER’S

ROME

Below: Site plan and ground floor level

SITE

COLISEUM

N

GROUND FLOOR / SITE PLAN

13 0

5’

10’

20’

pedestrian zones: conditioned space:

30’


re-PeDestrianizeD site

1750 - PEDESTRIAN-BASED PLAN 1750 1750 - PEDESTRIAN-BASED -1750 1750 PEDESTRIAN-BASED - PEDESTRIAN-BASED PLAN PLAN PLAN - PEDESTRIAN-BASED

PLAN

2013 2013 - TRAFFIC-BASED -2013 TRAFFIC-BASED - TRAFFIC-BASED PLAN PLAN PLAN 2013 - TRAFFIC-BASED PLAN

2013 - TRAFFIC-BASED PLAN

FUTURE - Re-PEDES

FUTURE FUTURE FUTURE - Re-PEDESTRIANIZED - Re-PEDESTRIANIZED FUTURE -- Re-PEDESTRIANIZED Re-PEDESTRIANIZED

14 CARVED VOLUME

13 12

10 11

9

inserteD voluMe: via CruCis 14

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Conceptual diagrams of site development (Opposite), Aerial render of site (Above), Street view showing new urban gateway (Right), Diagram showing embedded Stations of the Cross (Below).

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7

5

6

4 2 1

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13 10

12

11

7 9 8

01 08

06 02

09 07

05

10

04

03

FIRST FLOOR Second floor plan (Above), lateral section through courtyard (Opposite, Top), Interior render of carved space (Right), Diagrammatic elevations showing carving (Below).

elevations: CarveD voluMe 1750 - PEDESTRIAN-BASED PLAN

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N

0

5’

10’

20’

30’

MAIN VOLUME - OUTER FACADE CARVED VOLUME - PUBLIC SPACE ENVELOPED EXISTING BUILDING 2013 - TRAFFIC-BASED PLAN FUTURE - Re-PEDESTRIANIZED


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B A

0

5’

10’

20’

30’

3 5

6

4 2 1 0

VIA CRUCIS PATH MASSING DEVELOPMENT CARVED ELEVATIONS

CARVED VOLUME

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5’

1


Professor Enrique Limon

Design II

Landscape - invention, analysis, intervention

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Landscape Aggregation

This design studio began with a series of hand drawings exploring and analyzing intensive fields. Two images were given of abstract landscapes-- a microscopic image of broccoli florets and an image of a field of used tires. A four step analysis of the landscapes produced drawings that focused on structure, network, depth of field, and intensity. As the first step in beginning to understand and create a unique abstract landscape, a series of these drawings was done as a composite of the two initial studies.

Clockwise from top: Network, Structure, intensity, and Depth of Field

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Landscape Aggregation

After a study of Duchamp's idea of irony and chance, the next step of the project was to utilize found objects to create an abstract landscape. Crown moldings were attained and cut at different angles. Explorations with these objects as well as ideas learned from the hand drawings established a rule set by which a landscape aggregation could be created.

Map of Connections details the the connections of modules. 20


Molding A

Molding B

Molding C

Molding D

Module 1.1: A+B=AB -Basic Module -Connected at shared curve -Can rotate at connection

Module 1.2: AB+C=ABC -Allows for linear connection of modules -Added piece “C” continues straight line of AB’s curve

Module 2.1: ABC+C2=(ABC)2 -Allows for angular shift in aggregation -”C2” can rotate to change angle

Connection 1: ABC+AB or ABC+ABC -Used for horizontal contours Connection 2: AB+AB -Pieces rotate at connection to articulate flow of landscape

Connection 3: (ABC)2+AB -”AB” connects to “C2” via the flat surface on the face of molding “B”

Connection 4: AB+D -Molding “D” articulates the elevation of the aggregation according to six points of intensity found in the drawings

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Light Analysis As a way of rationalizing the abstract landscape, digital surfaces were created to help in understanding the landscape. Section cuts of these surfaces were then hand drawn, and geological strata was drawn beneath the surfaces. The open space analysis drawing combined with a series of summer and winter light studies created the drawings below. In the longitudinal sections, the light conditions at 9AM and 4PM were drawn to show where light penetrates the surface.

Times of Day: 9AM, Noon, 4PM on the Summer Solstice.

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lanDsCaPe intervention

The brief for the space to be built on the landscape was a place for meditation, including a space for meditation, a spa with pools, an exercise space, and a vista space. Lakota spirituality drove the concept. Associations with the Cardinal directions became the diagrammatic plan of program within the space.

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Professor Suzan Wines

CoMPrehensive Design i

CaMPus tie

DorMitory for Pratt institute

project by Matthew Potts and Wilson Cheng

Dormitory as Generator of Community: Promoting collaboration by challenging conceptions of public and private space

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the DorMitory- ConCePt FUTURE PRATT BUILDING

EXISTING PRATT DORMITORY

The dormitory is a generator of community. Its purpose is to promote collaboration between students by challenging the relationship of public and private spaces. Connectivity is served by seeing this building as a tie between two other off-campus Pratt sites, creating a new remote mini-campus for graduate students. This dormitory serves as the heart of this new campus and the community which is thereby developed. The tie is conceived as an axis of transparency through the new dormitory, which is utilized as a means of invitation to the shared spaces and services offered in the building.

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PRATT GRADUATE DORMITORY 79-89 GRAND AVE

A section through and model of the LATERAL SECTION - LONGITUDINALFACING SECTION GRAND ST DRAWINGS

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COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN 301 WILSON CHENG & MATTHEW POTTS SUZAN WINES, critic DECEMBER 2011

atrium show the sequence of public to private space through the dormitory. The glass atrium provides visual connectivity between the double height corridors, while colored glass at the unit walls and “lantern” work spaces hovering above the corridor foster a space of interaction and collaboration.


Ground floor plan (Above). Grand Street elevation (Left).

PRATT DORMITORY GRADUATE DORMITORY PRATT GRADUATE 79-89 79-89 GRAND AVEGRAND AVE PRATT GRADUATE DORMITORY 79-89 GRAND AVE

GROUND FLOOR GROUND FLOOR PLANPLAN GROUND FLOOR PLAN

DRAWINGS DRAWINGS

DRAWINGS

COMPREHENSIVE COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN 301DESIGN 301 WILSON CHENG &POTTS MATTHEW POTTS WILSON CHENG & MATTHEW SUZAN SUZAN WINES, criticWINES, critic COMPREHENSIVE DECEMBER 2011DESI DECEMBER 2011 WILSON CHENG 27 & MATTHEW SUZAN WINE DECEMBE


UNIT UNIT CAMPUS TIE

LANTERN LANTERN PRATT GRADUATE DORMITORY 79-89 GRAND AVE

INCREMENTAL SHIFTS: PUBLIC TO CONCEPT

UNIT

LAN

A work space inside a study “lantern” (Top). An image of corridor “avenue” and atrium (Middle). The portico over the entry is composed of the transfer beams that allow for the large open public space that the atrium opens into. (Bottom).

AVENUE

AVENUE

ATRIUM 28

CAMPUS TIE

ATRIUM


Short section through the atrium (Left). Typical plan showing corridor “avenue” (Below).

FLOOR 2, AVENUE 1

FLOOR 1, AVENUE 1 PRATT GRADUATE DORMITORY

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TYPICAL PLANS

COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN 301 WILSON CHENG & MATTHEW POTTS


An image shows the uppermost corridor “avenue” with access to the roof garden above (Above). A rendering of a typical common space found in each unit (Left). Two images show a typical bedroom and “lantern” study space off the upper level of a typical unit (Below).

UNIT

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LANTERN SECTIONS

TE DORMITORY AVE DETAILS

The lanterns, study spaces that tie individual units together suspended over the avenue spaces, are finely tuned to Pratt ’s graduate programs in Architecture and Design, Studio Art, and Library Science.

The unit is designed to maximize ventilation despite the challenges put forth by a double-stacked corridor scheme. Clerestory windows on each level of the unit ventilate conversely in or out, using the prevailing winds as a cyphon pulling air through the unit via the stairs and transom windows.

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Professor Professor EvanEvan Tribus Tribus

INTERMEDIATE DESIGN II

Intermediate Design II

fluidNETWORKS

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Kindergarten for Staten Island


The educational process of a kindergarten contains both determined and indeterminate programs throughout. Organizationally, the circulation zones are the indeterminate spaces that bleed from the shared spaces into the more determined spaces of the school. The indeterminate circulation zone encourages use of the shared spaces (gym, music, lobby). This stems from the idea that as the classroom becomes a new “home” for a child as they leave theirs, the child should be encouraged to move into the shared spaces—outside of the classroom—to enhance their comfort and ability to operate and excel outside of the home. Morphologically, the shared spaces form a core space under a continuous folded surface from which circulation and auxiliary spaces (classroom and administrative) stem. The primary surface becomes enclosure for the indeterminate spaces, with folds creating outdoor spaces intermixed with circulatory paths, while the auxiliary spaces are enclosed by a secondary condition of that same surface. The morphology is guided by a system of small, medium, and large typologies.

THE KINDERGARTEN

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Morphology + Organization

TRANSLUCENT SKIN

MORPHOLOGY

OCCUPIED SKIN TRANSPARENT SKIN

FLOORS + STAIRS

GRADING

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Program Diagram

O UTDOOR PLAYSCAPE O UTDOOR PLAYSCAPE

ADMINISTRATIVE CLASSROOM CLASSROOM

GYM

LOBBY

ME P

courtyard

courtyard MUSIC ROOM

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

courtyard

I NDETERMINATE ZONE (CIRCULATION)

CLASSROOM OUTDOOR PLAYSCAPE

O UTDOOR PLAYSCAPE

OUTDOOR PLAYSCAPE

PROGRAM

CLASSROOM PROGRAMMATIC BLEEDING

This diagram was used to understand programmatic relations per the project’s conceptual backing.

15%

Outdoor Spaces

30-40% Hardscape

Outdoor ~1:1

15-20%

Occupied Skin

Indoor 50%

Performance

30-35% Playscape

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Y

X Y

X

A view from the music room looking onto the rest of the space. From this central view point, one can see the interaction of the large and small scale morphology (Above). A view of the approach to the kindergarten (Above Left). A plan through the lower section of the kindergarten (Left). A view inside a typical classroom (Below).

UP

UP

ENTRANCE

LOBBY UP

PLAYSCAPE

UP

UP

PLAYSCAPE

GYM

UP

A

UP

CLASSROOM

GYM

UP

CLASSROOM

UP

UP

MUSIC

X Y

X

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Y

A

A


A view of a classroom’s exterior playscape and the skin system applied to the facade (Above). A lateral section shows the connection between classrooms and shared spaces through the indeterminate zone (Right). A longitudinal section through the shared spaces (Below). A longitudinal section through the indeterminate zone (Bottom).

CLASSROOM MUSIC

GYM

CLASSROOM

MUSIC

GYM

DROP-OFF

LAV

CLASSROOM

CTYD COURTYARD

COURTYARD LOBBY ADMINISTRATION

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fielD sKetChes

Church of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme Rome, Italy

Villa Rotonda Vicenza, Italy

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University of Urbino Giancarlo De Carlo, architect Urbino, Italy

Villa Doria Pamphilj Rome, Italy

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Field Sketches

Ponte Rialto Venice, Italy

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Ancient Greek Temples Paestum, Italy

Cattedrale di San Nicola Pellegrino Trani, Italy 41


Design Development

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Detail Studies

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Matthew Potts Portfolio  

Portfolio of selected projects up to Fall 2013.