Issuu on Google+

www.mexicolivingguide.com – No. 36 May / mayo 2010

Boating & Fishing p.20

■ Scorpions are Back!

Tips to avoid crossing paths with these venomous creatures p.16

■ Is Your Baja Property Really Protected? p.18

■ Baja’s Bottled Treasures

Turn “Ho-Hum” into a “Gourmet Cuisine” p.25


Tijuana

Tecate

2D

Rosarito Beach El Descanso (1767)

Los Algodones

Mexicali

CONSTITUTION OF 1857 NATIONAL PARK

53 mi les

La Mision

BAJA NORTE

Yuma

San Miguel (1797)

Guadalupe (1834)

Valle de Guadalupe

Ensenada Ojes Negros

Bahia Todos Santos La Bufadora

Maneadero 29 M

1791

Santo Tomas 1780

San Vicente

sta

lH

Santo Domingo (1775)

8

wy

Puerto Penasco

National Astronomic Observatory

M 18 M

PACIFIC OCEAN

Co a

SAN PEDRO MARTIR NATIONAL PARK

23

Bahia Colonet

Ne w

Valle la Trinidad

Colonet

Lukeville, AZ Sonoyta

Gulfo de Santa Clara

Heroes de la Independencia

(Rocky Point)

San Felipe

Colonia Vicente Guerrero

Punta Estrella Valle de los Gigantes

San Quintin

Laguna Percebu Puertecitos

35 M

Carborca

!

get gas if southbound

El Rosario

Isla Miramar Isla Lobos Isla Encantada Isla San Luis

San Fernando (1772)

1774

77

Bahia Rosario

M

Calamajue 64 M Santa Maria (1767)

Bahia LA turnoff

Bahia de Los Angeles

San Borja (1762)

33 M

Punta Prieta

Isla Angel de la Guarda

40 M

Bahia Maria

ia

rn fo

Bahia Blanco

ora

li Ca

Chapala

LEGEND:

Son

Bahia San Luis Gonzaga

ja

Ba

Cataviña

Isla Tiburon

Santa Rosalillita

- Page of city map & directory

Bahia Santa Rosalillita

Rosarito

Isla San Lorenzo Isla San Esteban

- Pemex Gas and/or Diesel - Airport - Highway Sign - Marina - Mission Site - Jesuit (17) (1683–1767)

Bahia de Sebastian Vizcaino Lighthouse

PUNTA FALSA

Villa Jesus Maria

Guerrero Negro

(1768–1773)

2

Santa Gertrudis (1752)

OF

91 M

Laguna Ojo de LiebreCALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1 Vizcaino

LF

PUNTA EUGENIA - Mission Site - Dominican (1) BAHIA (1774–1834) TORTUGAS April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California Bahia Tortugas

Bahia San Rafael

GU

- Mission Site - Franciscan (9)

Puerto de Santo Domingo

get gas if northbound


7)

Laguna Ojo de Liebre

LIF CA

Isla Tortuga

46 M

San Ignacio

Santa Rosalia

1705 1728

PUNTA ABREOJOS

Mulegé

El Coyote

Bahia de Concepcion Bahia San Nicolas

of

rni

86 M

z) rte Co

Bahia San Basilio

San Juanico

aS

Bahia de Ballenas

a (Se

Bahia de Ballenas

NIA

o alif aC

Bahia Santa Ines

OR

46 M

Baj

Isla San Marcos

Guadalupe (1720)

PACIFIC OCEAN

Guaymas

OF

91 M

Vizcaino

San Carlos

LF

Santa Gertrudis (1752)

BAHIA ASUNCION Bahia Asuncion PUNTA PRIETA Bahia San Hipolito LA BOCANA

1720

ur

La Purisma

1699

1697

San Javier

Loreto Isla del Carmen

A

San Juan Malibat (1705)

Isla Danzante Isla Monserrat

80 M

AN DA

JU

NA

TI 144 232

76 123

187 301

119 191

43 69

SA

223 359

155 249

79 127

36 58

Ciudad Insurgentes

O

CIUDAD CONSTITUCION

RO SA

112 180

76 122

364 586

296 476

220 354

177 285

141 227

65 105

444 714

376 605

300 483

257 414

221 356

145 234

80 129

532 556

464 747

388 624

345 555

309 497

233 376

168 271

88 142

577 928

509 819

433 697

390 628

354 570

278 449

213 344

133 215

45 72

615 990

547 880

471 758

428 689

392 631

316 510

251 405

171 276

83 134

38 61

699 1125

631 1015

555 893

512 824

476 766

400 646

335 541

255 412

167 270

122 197

84 136

788 1068

720 1158

644 1036

600 667

565 909

489 789

424 684

344 555

256 413

211 430

173 279

89 143

922 854 1083 1374

778 1152

735 1183

699 1125

623 1005

558 900

478 771

390 629

345 556

307 495

223 359

1059 991 915 872 836 760 1704 1594 1472 1403 1345 1226

695 1121

615 992

527 850

482 777

444 716

360 580

Bahia Almejas

Bahia de la Paz Isla Espiritu Santo

Isla Santa Margarita

La Paz Isla Cerralvo 1720

Bahia la Ventana Bahia Muertos

TO C CO IUD NS AD LA TI TU PA CI Z ON CA BO SA N LU CA S

155 249

Isla San Francisco Santa Rita

70 M

LO RE

231 372

BA

CA TA V

299 481

Isla San Jose Delores (1721)

133 M

A AN HI GE A D GU LE E L ER S O JC S RE SA T. R O N NE IG NA SA GR NT CI O O A M R OS UL AL EG IA E

Bahia Santa Maria Bahia Magdalena

IN

EL

Isla Santa Cruz San Luis Gonzaga (1737)

Puerto San Carlos

RI

N

QU

IN

TI

12 M

N

LO NE

T

68 109

CO

SE

Isla Santa Catalina

EN

an (1)

PUNTA EUGENIA BAHIA TORTUGAS Bahia Tortugas

BAJA SUR

Guerrero Negro

PUNTA FALSA

Lighthouse

GU

an (9)

Villa Jesus Maria

Bahia de Sebastian Vizcaino

271 437

137* 221*

Todos Santos

Santa Rosa (1730)

Pescadero

48 M

134 216

SIERRA DE LA LAGUNA NATIONAL PARK

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Los Barriles

Santiago 9 M 4 (1721)

1730

* Mexico Highway 19 is only 96 miles/154 km.

MEXICO HIGHWAY 1 DISTANCE CHART

Bahia las Palmas

Cabo San Lucas

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

San Jose del Cabo www.mexicolivingguide.com M 19

3


Welcome to Baja The Mexican states of Baja California and Baja California Sur make up Baja California as covered by our guide. The region features an enormous diversity of landscapes like no place on earth—a land of quiet, colorful deserts, endless beaches, majestic mountains, forests, unexplained rock formations, brilliant clear skies, an average temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit and some of the most welcoming people in the world. Baja California is the destination of choice for retirees, investors, entrepreneurs, travelers and vacationers alike. The U.S. State Department says that more Americans retire in Mexico than any other place on the globe; 51 percent of all U.S. retirees who live outside of the U.S. live in Mexico.

DRIVER LICENSE INSURANCE

15% OFF

Homeowners Insurance

Call or e-mail TODAY! Mail - YETMAIL 277 segurosalanis@prodigy.net.mx

686-577-2464 • FAX 686-577-2916

613-116-5374

www.bajacaballobooks.com Loreto BCS Mexico

El Caballo Blanco

4

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

Mexico is economical; the dollar goes further here than it does in Europe, Canada and the most popular destinations of Asia. The people of Mexico are accustomed to Americans and vice versa. Mexico welcomes American retirees and tourists and is increasingly prepared to offer the foods, goods and services that Americans like and expect. Whether you’re looking to retire, invest, vacation or operate a business, Baja California is the place.

We hope our guide helps you to enjoy Baja California to the fullest. Explore!

WHAT DO I NEED? Passport. On June 1, 2009, the U.S. government implemented the full requirements of the land and sea phase of WHTI. The new rules require most U.S. citizens entering the United States at sea or land ports of entry to have a passport, passport card or other travel document approved by the Department of Homeland Security. Additional information can be found at: http://travel.state.gov/passport.

Declaration Lane ($75–$1,000) If you are bringing more than US$75 worth of merchandise per person, but not more than US$1,000, you may declare it by driving into the customs facility through the declaration lane (carril de declaración). There you will be able to fill out the proper documents and pay any duty. Duty can be between 15 percent and 25 percent of the value of the merchandise.

What can I bring into Mexico? As you approach the border, there are generally multiple lanes labeled “Nothing to Declare - Nada que Declarar” and “Declaration Lane - Carril de Declaración.”

IMPORTANT NOTES: • Guns are illegal in Mexico. Do not attempt to cross the border with a gun and/or ammunition. You will be put in jail even if you were not aware of the Mexican law. • If you have more than $10,000 in U.S. currency or equivalent, or other monetary instruments, you must declare this with Mexican customs, otherwise it is a crime. • You must declare if you are bringing any animals, agricultural products or medicines for other than personal use. • Amounts over US$1,000 require the use of a Mexican customs broker.

Nothing to Declare Lane This lane is used when you are bringing, as a tourist (FMT) $75 or less. Your personal luggage and other merchandise up to the allowed exemption US$75 per person. The amount is cumulative per number of people in the vehicle. For example two people would have a $150 exemption. You must have receipts and invoices to qualify for the exemption. Personal Items Allowed: • New or used such as clothes, shoes and toiletries in quantities that would be considered not for resale. • Two photographic or video cameras and charger. • Two cellular phones or walkie-talkies. • Laptop, notebook, etc. • Two sports equipment items. • Portable radio recorder and/or player, speakers and accessories. • Five laser discs, 10 DVDs, 30 CDs or cassette tapes. Five storage devices or memory cards. • Books and magazines in quantities that would be considered not for resale. • Five toys, video game console and video games. • Medicine for personal use, one blood pressure instrument, one glucose testing device. In the case of psychotropic drugs, make sure you bring the prescription. Note: Be careful not to bring a large quantity of your prescription medication. • One set of binoculars, one telescope. • Two cartons of cigarettes, 25 cigars or 200 grams of tobacco if you are of age (if bringing more than allowed, you must declare it and pay duties). • Up to three liters of liquor and six liters of wine (if bringing more than allowed, you must declare it and pay duties). • Strollers and baby walkers. • Two musical instruments and accessories. • Tent and equipment for camping. • Crutches, canes, walkers and wheelchairs for personal use. • Tool sets including hand drills, wire cutters, wrenches, screwdrivers, cables, etc. • Bedding sets including one sheet set, one towel set, a set of table linens. • Two dogs or cats and pet items. • Up to $10,000 in U.S. currency or equivalent in other currencies, foreign or national checks, and/or other monetary instruments.

WHAT CAN I TAKE HOME? You can take home US$800 of duty-free merchandise per person, per month, including one liter of alcohol. Mexican arts and crafts, including handcrafted furniture, are duty-free and do not count toward the $800 limit.

DIALING INSTRUCTIONS Mexico City: (011) 52-55, plus the 8-digit telephone number. Guadalajara: (011) 52-33, plus the 8-digit telephone number. Tijuana: (011) 52-664, plus the 7-digit telephone number. USA to MX Cell Phone: 011+52+1+Area Code+(Tel #) USA to MX Landline: 011+52+Area Code+(Tel #) MX to USA: 001+Area Code+(Tel #) MX Landline to MX Cell Phone: 045 or 044+Area Code+(Tel #) MX Cell Phone to MX Landline: Area Code+(Tel #) DIALING 800 NUMBER: Some charges may apply when call 800 numbers internationally, please check with the telephone carrier. 800 DIALING to the USA From MX (dial 001+)

TOURIST VISA and VEHICLE PERMIT Tourists staying 72 hours or less within “the border zone” do not need a visa. Those traveling beyond the border zone or entering Mexico by air must pay a fee to obtain a tourist card, also known as an FMT, available from Mexican consulates, Mexican border crossing points, Mexican tourism offices, airports within the border zone and most airlines serving Mexico. The fee is generally included in the price of a plane ticket for travelers arriving by air. Please note that travelers not in possession of their FMT card at the point of exit from Mexico may face a fine from Mexican Immigration. A vehicle permit is NOT required to travel the Baja Peninsula; however, you must obtain a vehicle permit if you travel to Mexico’s mainland.

To Dial USA 800.................... dial 880

MILITARY CHECKPOINTS There are military checkpoints along the way to all the northwest border cities. These checkpoints serve the same purpose as the California and Arizona highway inspection stops you’ll encounter on the return north. The soldiers will be carrying weapons, but there is nothing to be concerned about, the soldiers are looking for drugs and guns. You’ll find them to be polite and friendly. They may ask to look inside your or RV. Checkpoints on both sides of the border were established based on an agreement between the United States and Mexico to fight the war on drugs.

Fire dept...................................... 068

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

visitmexico.com

To Dial USA 866.................... dial 883 To Dial USA 877.................... dial 882 To Dial USA 888.................... dial 881 IMPORTANT NUMBERS: Emergency dial 132 free from any phone and Mexican cell phone carriers Red Cross................................... 066 Police Dept................................. 060 Electricity (emergency and nonemergency)................................ 071 Legal Assistance......................... 061 Tourist Assistance....................... 078 Tourism Department.................... 078 Secretary of Tourism - BC Arturo Martínez Esquer (Facilitation and Tourist Assistance Sub Direction) amartineze@baja.gob.mx Secretary of Tourism - BCS.....612-24-0100


Saturday July 3rd, 2010

Playa San Rafael (behind Blowin’ Smoke), San Felipe BC

Join us for:

SALSA MAKING COMPETITION HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT BAR-B-QUE ARTS & CRAFTS BOOTHS LIVE MUSIC

FREE TO THE PUBLIC

WWW.MEXICOLIVINGGUIDE.COM


’S R O T LE I D E NG A

8–9

p. Calendar

Let’s Go Phishing

When I was a kid and my dad in visiting a site, then type the address into your would say, “Let’s go fishing,” in browser. my mind it translated to, “Let’s 2. Know this: Most banks will NEVER send an email go have some fun!” That was telling you to update your information. then . . . today, hearing the word 3. NEVER provide personal information unless you’re “fishing” sometimes makes me on a SECURE site. You can tell if a site is secure two nauseous. different ways: the URL (web address) begins with Even though I LOVE to fish, https:// and a “padlock” will appear (either at the when we started working on the bottom right or at the right of the URL). boating and fishing articles this month, “phishing” brought 4. Add a link to companies that you do business with back some very bad memories for me. See, phishing (yes, in your “Favorites” and ONLY use that when updatit’s spelled correctly) is a way that some nasty, horrible ing and/or providing information to them. people can disrupt and ruin your life. This month, this is just friendly info from your editor. This has been going on for years; however, many peo- If you’d like to start seeing more articles about Internet ple still don’t know about it or forget to be super careful security, applications and easy-to-use tools, please, let when using the Internet. The sad part about phishing is me know. that you could fall prey to it very easily if you don’t stay on Oh . . . if you really want to go “fishing,” just give me guard at all times. call! How it works: You receive an email telling you that you need to update your account or it will be closed, or there’s a special promotion/discount/award for the first 100 to respond, etc. “Phishing” is a way to get your personal information—address, credit card number(s), Social Security number . . . How you’re tricked into believing it: The email includes P.S. As always, I’m interested in hearing from you, what legitimate logos and even seems to be sent from them. you think of Mexico Living and any ideas or comments An example: Your bank’s site is www.abcbank.com. You you may have to improve YOUR GUIDE TO THE GOOD receive an email from gail@abcbank.com saying, “There LIFE. So, send your suggestions and comments to has been some suspicious activity on your account. Click editor@mexicoliving.info. on the link below to update your information immediately or your account will be closed.” The hyperlink will read www. abcbank.com but it links to the hacker’s website. And the worst part is that when you land on the HACKER’S site, it will look almost like your bank’s site. Well . . . you know the rest of the story . . . they’ve got all the inforGet the News! Get the Events Info! Get it Weekly mation they need to create havoc and misery in your life for a long, Go to www.bajareport.com and subscribe today! long time. So, how do you protect yourself? 1. Never, never, never . . . I repeat, NEVER click on a hyperlink (unless you Your one-stop Baja 411 resource for finding business know FOR A FACT that it’s people, products and services in your area. legit). If you’re interested

MEXICO LIVING Guide to Pacific BajaBenjamin & The SeaPack of Cortez Published by John

Publisher/Editor John Pack john@mexicoliving.info Publisher Rachel Pack rachel@mexicoliving.info

6

p.

12–13

ART

NewS

14–15 16

p. Natural Wonders

17

p. Activity Guide

18–19

p. Business & Money

20–23

p. FISHING Guide

24–26

p. COOKING & Dining

26

p. Lodging

27

p. Health & BeaUty p. p.

28–29

Fishing

30–33

Home &

Real estate

34–35

p. Destinations p.

36–41

City DirectorY

42

p. Spanish

877-LUVMEX1

Mexico City, DF: (558) 421-4027 Website: www.mexicolivingguide.com Email: info@mexicoliving.info

10–11

p. People & Voices

GET YOUR BAJA REPORT!

U.S. Toll-free: (800) 395-9019 Ex.3 San Diego, CA: (619) 550-2730 San Felipe, BC: (686) 230-9933

p.

43

p. Classifieds Mexico Living is a guide committed to promoting Northwest Mexico to the limits of our abilities and to provide a valuable resource to visitors and residents, while showing that Northwest Mexico is a great place not only to visit and play, but also to live and work—a place to call home.

Editor Brenda Judy, editor@mexicoliving.info

Regional Sales Associates – Baja California Sur Rachel Pack, Publisher, rachel@mexicoliving.info

Mexico Mailing Address Mexico Living / Yet Mail, Etc. Ave. Mar de Cortez #1049, San Felipe, BC 21850

Regional Sales Manager Lisa Shannon, lisa@mexicoliving.info

Distribution Regional, Carlos Durán San Felipe, Bill Maine, San Felipe

USA Mailing Address PO Box 9019, PMB#460, Calexico, CA 92232

Regional Sales Associates – Baja California Norte Bill Maine, Associate Publisher, bill@mexicoliving.info

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

Production Layout, Carolyn Sheltraw, info@csheltraw.com

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. All contributors and advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the accuracy of their statements and claims. All readers assume responsibility for actions or decisions they might make as a result of reading this publication. We reserve the right to refuse any advertising.


Contributors Mexico Living is only possible through the continued contributions from all these knowledgeable and talented people. If you would like to become a contributor, email mexicoliving@gmail.com. George Bergin, Steve Dryden, Benjamin Eugene, Steven Forman, Tom Gatch, Bob Ham, Lynn Hamman, Stockton Hill, La Huerita, Lucy E. Jackson, Graham Mackintosh, David Mandich, Dann Manz, Alexa Verdugo Morgan, Karri Moser, Penny Nask, Greg Niemann, John Pack, Rachel Pack, Lynn Russ, Lisa Shannon, June Snow, Cai Tierra and Robin Waters. .............

Featured Contributor: Steve Dryden

Mailbag

Registering Cell Phones

Just checking out a story you printed in the April edition about the deactivating of cell phones that were activated before April 2009. The article, “Register Your Cell Phone Before April 10 or It WILL be Deactivated” by Karri Moser, suggested that you could easily avoid this by going through “your provider.” What the article didn’t address were all the thousands of cell phone holders that have purchased their phones at OXXO stores, Walmart, Office Depot, etc., and choose to buy phone cards to replenish your account. There is no direct provider, unless the clerk at the store is supposed to take this task on. I have not yet talked with the store chains to see if they know anything about this. For many people, including myself, this would be a train wreck for those who prefer to be free of the provider system. Thanks! —Martina, Baja Norte The Baja Sun, Editor

Martina, all cell phones purchased in Baja have one of two providers, either Telcel or Moviestar. It makes no difference where the phone was purchased. The cost to register is 50 pesos and has to be done from either a Telcel or Moviestar retailer.

Inexpensive Communication Solutions

Your March addition, great as usual! Regarding the News Brief “An Easy-to-Use Solution to Communicate with People in the U.S.” I’ve never heard of Cherple, but I have been using Skype and Messenger for years—call free computer-to-computer and a few cents to call a phone, but NOW we have Magic Jack and call anywhere in the U.S. with unlimited time for an annual fee of approximately $20 and a few cents internationally. Magic Jack is available for Canada also. Available at Radio Shack, Best Buy and Walmart for about $20, or some places in Mexico for about $50. —Joe Wachter, Loreto, BCS

Joe, just like you, I have used Skype and Messenger for years. Magic Jack is a great solution to long distance calling; inexpensive, easy-to-use and available everywhere, including here in Baja. Plus, you can plug any standard phone into it. Thanks for the great info and feedback.

Recipes

Just a quick note to let you know that I tried the recipe “White Fish with Cilantro Cream Sauce” (April 2010 edition) . . . FABULOUS! Hope to see more recipes. —Peggy, Ensenada, BC

Thank you, Peggy. We plan on publishing a new recipe each month. But . . . this month you’re in for a real treat . . . there are two! ¡Buen Provecho!

As always, we’re interested in your HONEST feedback. So, send your opinions and comments to editor@mexicoliving.info. Letters may be edited for length and content. Make sure to visit us online or pick up a copy of next month’s edition to find out what others REALLY THINK!

Us Send a k c b d Fee

Guide on the Go Juan Carlos Luke Herrera and Amir Abdullah Al-Anazi Lopez pose with Mexico Living’s Baja California in Guerrero Negro, BCS while collecting for CRREAD (International Campaign on Prevention and Treatment of Drug and Alcohol Abuse).

Steve Dryden had two major careers and several minor endeavors over the years. His main interests were Natural Resource Management and Wine. He worked for many years as a Naturalist, a seasonal Park .... Ranger in several National Parks, west of the Rockies and in Hawaii. He also worked in Have a humorous or creative picture Mail Center the wine industry of California as a vineyard of you and your guide to the good manager, wine salesman, broker, special New owners: • your Internet life? Email photo to editor@ events planner, winery general manager and wine tour operator. Ron & Susie Stephens mexicoliving.info and show the world! • Copy Upon retirement, Steve moved to Valle Same Great Service • Fax de Guadalupe, bought a small piece of land, Same Great Price planted 120 Nebbiolo grapevines and built US Mailing Address • Shipping a small adobe workshop/studio/winery. His new career focuses on educating tourists • Forwarding KM 178.5, about Mexican wines and other amenities in • Stamps Plaza Paraiso, the wine country. In 2004 he brought motor e r Mail Center coach wine tours into Baja, and designed San Felipe • Envelopes and published The Guadalupe Grapevine, ers: New owners: • Free Wifi a self-guided wine tour guide. Over the MENS years he has written extensively about Baja T-Shirts ens • Copy & Fax Ron & Susie Stephens California wine and gourmet cuisine for sev• Shipping Tanks ice Same Great Service eral local, regional, national and international • Forwarding publications. ice Same Great Price • Stamps Today, he hosts a cable TV show, The LADIES ess US Mailing Grapevine, for El Ocho, Channel 8 of T-Shirts Address Choose Internet Café & Business Center • Envelopes Ensenada, which features local wineries Tanks from several Copies • Internet • Email • Greeting Cards and gourmet food establishments. In addi3/4 Sleeve Snail mail • Coffee • Muffins colors • US Mail Service 5, KM 178.5, tion, Steve guides customized wine tours Soda • Snacks A v aParaiso, i l a bKM l e 178.5, a t S uPlaza n r u nParaiso ner for individuals and small groups. He can be so, Plaza 01(661)614-0513 reached at sbdryden@hotmail.com. San Felipe, Baja pe www.bajasclick-on.com San Felipe

Sunrunner

r Sunrunner

Get a U.S. Mailing Address

• Internet • Copy • Fax • Shipping • Forwarding • Stamps 6• 8Envelopes 6 - 5 7 6 - 0 3 76 806 - 1 4 7 - 6 7 5 2

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MENS

T-Shirts

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

7


{Calendar}

Send your calendar events to calendar@mexicoliving.info. Please tell them you found their event in Mexico Living.

8th Annual International Chili Cookoff – May 1  by Joseph Malek

IMPORTANT DATES

Gene Jensen serving up his chili.

May 1: Día del Trabajo/Labor Day (MX) May 5: Cinco de Mayo May 9: Mother’s Day (U.S. & Canada) May 10: Mother’s Day (MX) May 13: New Moon 6:04 p.m. May 15: Armed Forces Day (U.S.)  May 20: 1st Quarter Moon 4:43 p.m. May 24: Victoria Day (Canada) May 31: Memorial Day (U.S.)

LOCAL WEEKLY EVENTS See the Community Calendar on www.mexicolivingguide.com for a weekly schedule of events for each city. May 1: VI Craft ExpoTijuana 2009. Contact 664-700-7429 or www.expoartesanal.com May 9: Second Chance Animal Alliance Tradepost (SCAAT) FREE SPAY/NEUTER CLINIC 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more info, contact Karen Patonai at (661) 613-0737 or karenpatonai@ yahoo.com May 14: 28th Book Fair Tijuana 2010 10AM Cost is free. Contact 664-688 1721 or http://28ferialibrotijuana.blogspot.com May 23: Party un La Mision8AM Cost: Free. Party in honor of the Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Contact UABC Tourism Faculty, Prof. Mario Reyes 664-682-1697. May 24: VIII Sushi Festival - Tijuana Pueblo Amigo Mall. Contact Canirac Tijuana 664-6828749 May 30: 7th Festival of Paella and Wine in Tijuana 1 p.m. Cost is Free. Contact 664-6383641 May 31: Linda Novia Expo at the Marriot Hotel contact 664-621-6006 or www.artemodelos. com.

ENSENADA

May 1–2: Cabalgata Vaquera El Alamar. A 4–5 hour guided horseback riding adventure at Parque Nacional. Contact Alfredo Vizcarra at (646) 179-5074 May 2: Craft Fair 10 a.m. Contact Adalberto Pérez Meillón 646-175-7848 Addmission: Free May 2: Spring Ride 2010 - Rancho El Alamar National Park Constitution of 1857 (Laguna Hanson) 9 a.m. Contact Mr. Alfredo Vizcarra 664-902-3681 or ranchoalamar@yahoo.com May 3: Taco Festival - Taco tasting event, with family or friends Contact 646-174-0448. May 10: 9th International Half Marathon 8AM Cost: Free Athletic career of 21 km. Contact Felipe Borrego Escobedo 646-176-4445 May 16: Fiesta of the Flowering Vineyards/ Fiesta de los Viñedos en Flor. Info and tickets: Baja California Winemakers Association (Provino), (646) 178-3038 May 16: Feast of the vineyards in bloom 2010. Family Festival with games, bocce, rides, food and music sales. Cost $150.00 & Children $30.00 Contact contacto@provinoac.org May 22–23: 17th Annual Guillermo’s Yellowtail Sportfishing Tournament in Bahía de los Angeles. Contact Guillermo Satellite, (200) 124-9104  May 22–23: 31st Annual La Misión Fiesta. Contact Mario Reyes, (664) 682-1697 8

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

Set to simmer on the afternoon of Saturday, May 1, is the 8th Annual Club De Pesca International Chili Cookoff. This gastronomical contest is held on the Ramada Patio of Club De Pesca R.V. & Trailer Park from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.  I know that you’ve heard that the Chili Cookoff is a “smokin’ hot time,” and one of the most anticipated events in San Felipe, but did you know that anyone can and should enter their chili team to compete for Judges’ trophies and town-wide bragging rights . . . Come on down and talk to us at Club De Pesca and we’ll make it easy for you to get all signed up. (Many of last year’s teams are coming back to chili-size up the new competitors and defend their own pot of bubbling hot love.)  The public is invited to be our guests and ease on down to the Chili Cookoff to sample every chili teams’ concoction. Last year, 20 teams participated and about 400 guests enjoyed the ambiance and fun. So, come on down to socialize and sample great chili at this year’s event.   This year, to sample chili, you will have to purchase a “chili tasting kit” at the administration tent at a cost of $2. Your tasting kit will allow you unlimited sampling of the teams’ chili (just hold on to your cup and spoon). Let me turn up the heat and bring this event to a full boil. As always, all beef hot dogs, grilled to perfection, will be offered with all the trimmings for only $1.25 (onions, tomatoes, cheddar cheese . . . and chili?).  Local rock-abilly-blues band, Vatos Locos, has been hired to provide sizzle for dancing all afternoon; while the full no-host bar competes to quench your thirst with hand-mixed blended margaritas, ice-cold beer, a neat selection of wine, and most mixed cocktails, effortlessly. No coolers will be allowed. Pancho and Jorge Limon have made this International Chili Cookoff the most looked-forward to event in San Felipe.  Sign up to enter your chili team with Joseph Malek at Club De Pesca. View rules and respon-

Photo by Rachel Pack

ROSARITO BEACH

sibilities online at www.sanfelipe.com.mx, click on accommodations, click Club De Pesca R.V. & Trailer Park. For further information about the Chili Cookoff, call Elayne Caldwell (577-2649) or

Joseph Malek (686-233-5206); or email us at clubdepescachilicookoff@gmail.com. Gene Jensen is happy to share his chili at the Club de Pesca chili cook-off.

LIVING IN BAJA HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER SAT OCT 30, 2010•10AM - 5PM

THE PAVILION, LA VENTANA del MAR San Felipe Baja California

HUNDREDS OF EXHIBITORS & DOZENS OF EXPERT SPEAKERS “Everything you need to start living your dream, all in one place!

BAJA TOUR

10 city flamenco guitar and dance tour of Baja being presented by Mexico Living

www.bajaflamenco.com

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MEXICOLIVINGHOMESHOW.COM


{Calendar}

The 14th Annual Loreto Fest, April 30–May 2  The Hidden Port Yacht Club invites you to join them for their 14th Annual Loreto Fest, Friday, April 30, through Sunday, May 2. Loreto Fest is held at beautiful Puerto Escondido south of Loreto. Loreto Fest 2010 is 14 years in the making and guaranteed to be 3 days of fun in the sun.  Loreto Fest is a charity event that supports higher education of students from rural villages and ranches. The proceeds raised at last year’s event supported 35 high school students, 16 “Internado” students and 2 students at the University level.

Activities are coming together and we are excited! The fest starts on April 30 with the celebrated Annual Chili Cookoff. The evening dinner will include the chili and an appetizer potluck. There will be a kid’s carnival, local vendors displaying their crafts and much more. There will also be a makeyour-own potluck taco bar.  In addition, activities include the annual bay clean up, games for the kids, the annual dinghy race, and the “Blast from the Past,” the '50s” dance with a '50s costume contest and prizes. So, get out your old attire and come dance the night away! Dessert will be root beer floats.  Hot dogs and beer will be served all day long with Happy Hour beginning at 4 p.m. Loreto Fest is “pet friendly” and well-behaved dogs on leashes are welcome. For more information, visit hiddenportyachtclub. com. 

Cinco de Mayo – May 5 debts, and vowed to pay nothing to European powers. Napoleon’s troops occupied the port city of Veracruz on December 8, 1861. Soon thereafter, the accompanying British and Spanish forces returned home, having established a truce with Mexico. The Battle of Puebla took place on May 5, 1862, near the city of Puebla during the French intervention in Mexico. Under the leadership of Mexican General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguín the battle ended in a victory for the Mexican Army against the occupying French forces.  The Battle of Puebla, May 5, 1862, was a single, important victory for the Mexican people over the occupying French Army. The French Army at the time was led by General Charles de Lorencez. The battle came about by a misunderstanding of the French forces’ agreement to withdraw to the coast. When the Mexican people saw these French soldiers wandering about with rifles, they took it that hostilities had recommenced.  Cinco de Mayo is not “an obligatory federal holiday” in Mexico, but rather a holiday that can be observed voluntarily. While Cinco de Mayo has limited significance nationwide in Mexico, the date is observed in the United States (also voluntarily) and other locations around the world as a celebration of Mexican heritage and pride. Cinco de Mayo is not Mexico's Independence Day, which is September 16, the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico.

Courtesy of Mike Manning 

Charge of the mexican calvary at the Battle of Puebla. Depictions of the battle showing Mexican cavalry taking over the French troops below the fort at Loreto. 

Cinco de Mayo (Spanish for “fifth of May”) is a regional holiday in Mexico, primarily celebrated in the state of Puebla, with some limited recognition in other parts of Mexico. The holiday commemorates the Mexican army's unlikely victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla.  In late 1861 Napoleon III, Emperor of the French, under the Treaty of London (1861) sent troops to Mexico, alongside Spanish and English forces, to collect debts owed by a previous Mexican government. President Benito Juárez had announced the annulment of these

NEWSFLASH SINGLAR MARINA - PUERTO ESCONDIDO HAS JUST ANNOUNCED THAT THEY WILL BE OFFERING A 20% DISCOUNT ON MOORING & DOCK FEES FROM APRIL 20–MAY 10. THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO COME ENJOY LORETO FEST AND THE BEAUTIFUL SINGLAR FACILITIES AT A DEEP DISCOUNT.

Benefit Auction and Entertainment in La Paz – May 15 “Raise the Roof” features an evening of entertainment, refreshments and a gala auction to raise money to replace the roof of the printshop of La Ciudad de los Niños y Niñas de La Paz.The printshop provides more than half of the orphanage’s annual budget; a leak could damage the presses, jeopardizing the work of this organization. The event begins at 6 p.m. at the orphanage, at Revolución and 5 de Febrero. If you can volunteer time to help out or if you have an item to donate to the auction, contact Chris at 124-8302 or email cgk@jumpstart1.com. For more information about Ciudad de los Niños y Niñas, visit www. lapazchildrenshome.org.  

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

May 23: 8th Annual Festival del Caballo, Arte y Vino. (646) 120-5878 May 24: 7th Horse, Art and Wine Festival 10 a.m. Pre-sale $200 pesos, event day $250 pesos. Contact 646-947-7146 & www. diadelcaballo.com May 30: 128th Anniversary “Ensenada de Todos, Suma de Culturas” International Festival. FREE admission. Contact Yukio Nishikawa, (646) 176-2763

SAN FELIPE

May 1: 8th Annual Chili Cook Off Club DePesca, 1–5 p.m.  Contact Joseph Malek, (686) 233-5206  May 15: Dia del Maestro/Teachers Day by the City of San Felipe and DIF. May TBA: Laguna Percebu Poker Run  June 25–27: RECORD Off-Road Series Ensenada-San Felipe 250 Off-road Race. (646) 176-1637 May 2: VII Sport fishing tournaments(CHYPI). Contact Cotuco San Felipe 686-577-2300 & cotucosf@hotmail.com May 15: VII Sportfishing Tournment (Hotel Cortez) Contact Cotuco San Felipe 686-5772300 & cotucosf@hotmail.com May 23: Off Road Poker-Run, Percebu Lagoon. Contact Cotuco San Felipe 686-5772300 & cotucosf@hotmail.com. May 29: Cortez Sea Festival. Contact Cotuco San Felipe 686-577-2300 & cotucosf@hotmail. com

MULEGé

May 8: Hotel Serenidad Pig Roast.  (615) 153-0530 or www.serenidad.com 

LORETO

May 1–2: Loreto Fest 2010. Three days of fun. Contact Neil Charlton, wdc7139@yahoo. com.

LA PAZ

May 7: Piano Recital. Sudcaliforniano pianist Juan Pablo Bautista Cano performs at 8 p.m. at the Sala de Conciertos. Admission is 100 pesos, www.bcs.gob.mx May 15: “Raise the Roof” Benefit Gala for La Ciudad de los Niños y Niñas. Contact Chris at 124-8302 or cgk@jumpstart1.com. May 22: Alberto Cruzprieto and Jesús Suaste perform Mexican poems in concert music, 7:30 p.m. at the Sala de Conciertos. Admission is 100 pesos. www.bcs.gob.mx May 28:  Piano Recital.  Józef Olechowski performs in honor of Chopin’s 200th anniversary at 8 p.m. at the Sala de Conciertos. Admission is 100 pesos. www.bcs.gob.mx

LOS Barriles

May 1: Rotary 3rd Annual “Tres Pez” Fishing Tournament. Contact BIG DADDY, (612) 142-8008 or bajarhino@yahoo.com

LOS CABO

Every Thursday Night: San José del Cabo Art Walk  along Obregon Street behind the church, sipping wine and viewing fine art. 5–9 p.m.  May 7–14: Rolex Invitational IGFA Offshore Championship Release Tournament.  www. igfaoffshorechampionship.com or 1-866- LOSCABOS May TBA: Yellowtail Shootout.  A day trip from Cabo San Lucas. (818) 762-5873  Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

9


{Arts}

Baja California Cultural Heritage Suffered No Earthquake Damage Historical building of the National Institute of Anthropology and History in Ensenada

San Felipe Gift and Crafters Guild  The newly formed San Felipe Gift and Crafters Guild will showcase their wares each month at various locations. The events will highlight selected crafters and gift purveyors from the San Felipe area. Watch for ads with dates and locations. The Guild will offer a cross section of some of the most unique and highest quality gifts and crafts available in our area. For information, email Vickie Silva at vicirae99@yahoo.com or (686) 175-5420.

“Big Surf”

30” x 40” oil on canvas $2700 by JILL LOGAN

10

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

The National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) reports that after several inspections conducted at main cultural centers

and archaeological sites guarded by INAH, Baja California cultural heritage shows no damages from the earthquake on April 4, 2010. 

Daniel Aguilar Hernandez, administrator of the center, pointed out the epicenter of the quake was located 18 kilometers away from Mexicali, where there are no historical buildings. El Vallecito is the nearest archaeological center but no damage was registered. “Monday and Tuesday, when the site is closed, we conducted inspection and confirmed that rock paintings found there suffered no harm,” he declared. Aguilar Hernandez mentioned that two historical buildings in Ensenada, Ex Aduana Maritima (Former Maritime Customs) and Ex Cuartel de la Compañia Fija (Former military headquarters), the present seat of Baja California Regional Museum, were also inspected and found without damage. Missionary vestiges located to the north of Ensenada were not affected. “We remain in alert state due to replicas,” he concluded.  http://www.inah.gob.mx/

Horse, Art and Wine Festival  The Festival del Caballo Arte y Vino is a oneday event with quality attractions and activities for all ages in the beautiful Valle de Guadalupe. Bring the whole family, you are sure to have fun! The festival takes place at the  Adobe Guadalupe Winery on May 23, with Spanish horses and western style riding, jumping, in addition to Mexican folk, flamenco and cuban contemporary dancing, as well as painters, sculptors and artisians from Baja California. The opportunity to taste the best wine in the region coupled with a rich variety of dishes will make this an unforgettable day. For children we have bounce houses and clowns, and supervised rides for the kids throughout the day. There is also a lighting contest for the kids 12 and under with prizes.   For more Information, contact Rancho Equestrian Cucapá, Elisa Arredondo Morales, Mobile (646) 947 7146, Nextel 152*133205*5, or visit www.diadelcaballo.com.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


2010 Blues & Arts Fiesta

{Arts}

Photo by Dave Anderson

is only possible through the tireless efforts of the San Felipe Lions Club, whose extraordinary volunteers work many months to organize and produce it, and countless organizations and behind-the-scenes individuals who work to keep    it growing in talent and attendance. The crowd is loving it!!

The BEST OF BAJA

Cover CONTEST

$500 in cash and priZes Mexico Living’s Baja California magazine needs your help to determine the cover of our January 2011 - BEST OF BAJA EDITION. We have been decided to let the readers choose our cover from all the Baja artists and creative folks that wish to submit their interpretation of Baja’s Best. Top 3 winning covers will be award at the Mexico Living Home Show October 30, 2010. 2011 Mexico Living’s Baja California BEST OF BAJA COVER CONTEST We’re looking for that painting, photograph, sculpture, sketch or other art format that represents the best of Baja. This is a readers choice contest. Mexico Living staff will not participate in selecting the winners. Contest Rules: 1. Submissions can be any medium. 2. All submissions must illustrate the BEST OF BAJA. 3. All submissions must be as a photo in JPEG format. 4. All submissions must be made via email to bajaartcontest@gmail.com. 5. All submissions must be owner submitted and owned.

Chet & The Committee of San Diego always a crowd favorite.

Photo by Victor Rodriquez Ratliff

Guitarist Tom Boyle and Becky Sue or Becky Sue & Her Big Rockin’ Daddies!

Photo by Dave Anderson

The 2010 Blues & Arts Fiesta was a huge success.  The mind-blowing musical talent and the dozens of accomplished artists exhibiting their work and the 2010 International Blues and Arts Fiesta largest and most entertaining yet.  On Saturday, March 27, the fourth year the fiesta was held along the picturesque Sea of Cortez in San Felipe Baja California. The day started with March winds blowing powerful gusts and uprooting many artist booths and even blowing one clear over the perimeter wall. Tecate tents here staked down and by lunch time, the wind had stopped and the party was in full swing. The amazing stage was the centerpiece of the festival. The musical acts this year was astounding, and if the musical talent alone was not enough to ignite excitement and please the senses, the selection of one-of-a-kind art pieces by the regions top artists, was sure to do it. The Blues and Arts Fiesta money has been vital to the building of an orphanage that gives abused or abandoned children a safe place to rest their heads. This year an additional home for children and women was supported.   This increasingly popular and growing festival

Photo by Dave Anderson

From wind to wonderful. An amazing day of music and art.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 2010.

January 2011

?

BEST OF BAJA 2010

All submissions will be anonymously published online and voting will begin Monday, August 9, 2010, and will continue until Monday, September 6, 2010. On October 1, 2010, the TOP 10 readers choice picks will be published with full profile articles online and in the OCTOBER edition of Mexico Living’s Baja California magazine. The TOP 3 readers choice winners will be announced and awarded at the 2010 Mexico Living Home Show on October 30, 2010, at the Pavilion, at La Ventana del Mar Resort. El Dorado Ranch, San Felipe, Baja California.

www.mexicolivingguide.com CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

11


{Opinion opinion}

Five Myths about Mexico’s Drug War by Andrew Selee, David Shirk and Eric Olson

Violence in Mexico has escalated dramatically in recent years. In 2009 alone, at least 6,500 people were killed in apparent drug-related incidents, and more than 2,000 have already died in such violence this year. The recent killings of three people linked to the U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez (just across the border from El Paso) have left many wondering whether the situation is hopeless. In Mexico last week, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton lamented the «cycle of violence and crime that has impacted communities on both sides of the border» and pledged continued U.S. engagement. With Washington's support, the Mexican government has been pursuing an aggressive multiyear campaign to confront criminal groups tied to the drug trade. To understand those efforts' chances of success, let's look beyond common misperceptions about Mexico's plight.

1

Mexico is descending into widespread and indiscriminate violence.

The country has certainly seen a big rise in drug violence, with cartels fighting for control of major narcotics shipment routes—especially at the U.S. border and near major seaports and highways—and branching into kidnapping, extortion and other illicit activities. Ciudad Juarez, in particular, has been the scene of major battles between two crime organizations and accounted for nearly a third of drug-linked deaths last year. But the violence is not as widespread or as random as it may appear. Though civilians with no evident ties to the drug trade have been killed in the crossfire and occasionally targeted, drugrelated deaths are concentrated among the traffickers. (Deaths among military and police personnel are an estimated 7 percent of the total.) A major reshuffling of leaders and alliances is occurring among the top organized crime groups, and, partly because of government efforts to disrupt their activities, violence has jumped as former allies battle each other. The bloodshed is also geographically concentrated in key trafficking corridors, notably in the states of Sinaloa, Chihuahua and Tamaulipas. While the violence underscores weaknesses in the government's ability to maintain security in parts of the country, organized crime is not

12

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

threatening to take over the federal government. Mexico is not turning into a failed state.

2

The Mexican government lacks the resources to fight the cartels.

Last week, the Mexican newspaper Milenio released a survey indicating that 59 percent of Mexicans believe the cartels are winning the drug war; only 21 percent believe the government is prevailing. Such assessments are well founded, but the battle against organized crime is not a lost cause. Thanks to a genuine commitment by Mexican officials and greater cooperation with the United States, important cartel leaders have been arrested over the past several years. Some cartels, such as Arellano Felix in Tijuana, have been seriously weakened. The Mexican government has the tools to succeed, but it must redirect its efforts. To date, its campaign against drug traffickers has relied on the massive deployment of federal security forces, both police and military. But their «presence and patrol» strategy presents only a minor inconvenience to criminal groups, which work around it by shifting their trafficking routes. To strengthen law enforcement and restore public confidence, there is an urgent need to modernize and professionalize Mexico's police and courts. The 2008 passage of constitutional reforms in this area was a good start. As they are implemented, the changes will transform the country's judiciary from one that relies on closed courtrooms and mostly written evidence into a system where evidence is presented in open court. The federal government has also made strides in developing a professional national police force. It is devoting resources to the improvement of state and local forces and boosting investigative capabilities, including creating a national police database that allows authorities to track crimes in different parts of the country.

3

Endemic corruption allows the cartels to flourish.

Corruption does continue to be a major challenge for Mexico. In 1997, for instance, the country's drug czar was found to be on the take from the Juarez cartel, and last year, the Federal

Investigative Agency was dissolved after a third of the force was placed under investigation for corruption. But there appears to be a real commitment by honest officials to root out malfeasance. Recent arrests and prosecutions have brought down the head of Mexico's Interpol office, senior officials in the attorney general's office, three state public security chiefs, hundreds of state and local police officers, and a few mayors and local police commanders. Meanwhile, Mexico is slowly cultivating a culture of lawfulness, thanks to courageous journalists and new civic organizations calling for greater accountability. Far more can be done, but this is a good start.

4

4. Drug violence is a Mexican problem, not a U.S. one.

Hardly. Mexico and the United States share a 2,000-mile border, and our southern neighbor is also our third-largest trading partner. Since the drug cartels run a bi-national business—moving drugs from south to north and weapons from north to south—both the problem and the solution will inevitably involve Washington.

for treatment. Such funding pales in comparison to law enforcement budgets, but it's a step in the right direction.

5

Mexican drug violence is spilling over into the United States.

Despite the violent confrontations between drugtrafficking organizations in Mexico, there has been little of the same spectacular violence on the American side of the border, even though the cartels operate with U.S.-based distribution networks. El Paso, one of the least violent cities in the United States, sits right across from Ciudad Juarez, the most violent in Mexico. This points to important institutional differences. In Mexico, a crime has only a 1 to 2 percent chance of leading to a conviction and jail time; the greater likelihood of arrest in the United States leads traffickers to keep most of their violent activities south of the border. Of course, drug violence does occur here, but not with the severity or impunity found in Mexico.

Perhaps the top contribution the United States could make is to redouble its efforts to reduce American demand for illegal narcotics. The trafficking in Mexico is driven overwhelmingly by U.S. consumption—especially of cocaine, marijuana, heroin and methamphetamine—which is estimated to exceed $60 billion annually. Moreover, the U.S. government estimates that $18 billion to $39 billion flows south each year as a result of American sales of illegal narcotics. Some of this money is invested in high-caliber weapons purchased in the United States and taken across the border illegally. Little surprise that while in Mexico last month, Clinton referred to «our shared responsibility to combat and defeat organized transnational crime.»

For better or worse, the United States and Mexico are in this together. It is hard to imagine a solution that does not involve a joint strategy to disrupt organized crime; a shift in U.S. drug policy to address consumption; shared efforts to improve Mexican law enforcement and judicial institutions; and continued cooperation to foster greater economic opportunity in Mexico.

In a positive development, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy announced this month that it will seek more funding for programs to reduce U.S. demand for illicit drugs—with a 13 percent increase for prevention and 4 percent

Andrew Selee is the director of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. David Shirk is a fellow at the center and an associate professor at the University of San Diego. Eric Olson is senior adviser at the center.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

mexico@wilsoncenter.org


{News}

Good Deeds to Good Times in La Paz by Alexa Verdugo Morgan

¿Qué Pasa San Felipe?

Photo by Lisa Shannon

At the races

What an amazing month March was for our little town?! There were more people in town for the Baja 250 this year than ever before! The streets were packed on Contingency Friday, wall-to-wall fans hoping to catch a glimpse of their favorite driver. Race Day was no different. Traveling out to the end of Saltito Road in El Dorado Ranch used to be one of the less-known places to see the race, not so easily accessible without 4-wheel drive; but this year, it was overrun with spectators and vendors. Yes. Even the Ice Cream truck made it out there! Party foul to someone who visited the JollyMon Bar on that Friday night before the race . . . they stole the Agave Blues banner off the wall. Spring Breakers started to arrive about a week later, inundating the local establishments with lots of beer business and loads of fun, a refreshing flow of youthful energy. The Blues

and Arts Fiesta on March 27 brought even MORE people to San Felipe! Not only the bands, artists and their entourages, but people came from all over Mexico, the U.S. and Canada to visit the exhibits, feast on local grub and enjoy the music. Pre- and post-parties for Fiesta were held at the JollyMon Bar. Both days of entertainment were standing room only. Friday’s party featured the music of Becki Sue & Her Big Rockin’ Daddies, followed by jams of various bands in town for the event. Sunday performances included a rare glimpse of Javier Batiz, solo on the piano and then performing with his band. Also performing at the post-party were Agave Blues, Ruta 69, 820 Band and Michele Lundeen. Sonshine Hacienda received a check from the Lions Club in the amount of $10,000 from Blues proceeds to continue preparation of the children’s home. A record number of attendees for both the Baja 250 and Blues, as well as the return of Spring Breakers this year, prove that the U.S. media can’t cramp San Felipe Style. One visitor told me, “I come to San Felipe because it’s the safest city in the world.” And we residents and the regular visitors tend to agree! As we prepare to say goodbye to the snowbirds, let’s remember that many residents stay all year long and we need to support one another’s efforts in the community.

y a d n u S r Easte

e k a u q Earth by Lynn Russ

A crack in the middle of a road in Mexicali, Mexico, after the earthquake.

The Easter Sunday earthquake that struck the Baja California region still has nerves a little rattled. The quake measured an astounding 7.2 on the Richter scale, compared to the 7.0 Haiti earthquake, which caused massive casualties and debilitated the small island country. Luckily, damage and loss of life was much less in comparison. Even with less damage, the sheer size of the quake and the large area affected made the Easter Sunday quake the worst one felt in the area in over two decades. There have been two reported deaths resulting from the quake. One person was killed when a house collapsed in Colonia Nueva and the other person died in the downtown area of the capital city of Mexicali. Over 200 people had injuries from the quake and thousands were considered to be homeless due to structural damage to their homes. Four shelters in Baja California were set up to accommodate anyone in need. The Baja capital city of Mexicali, home to approximately one million people, sustained some damage, while the outer rural regions to the south sustained the bulk of the damage. Calexico also reported damage to structures. The downtown area of Calexico is primarily made up of historic buildings dating back to the 1930s and 1940s. Due to age, these structures were not up to current earthquake codes. Many of the historic buildings had cracks and damaged ceilings. Blocks of the historic portion of downtown were closed to the public while broken glass, cracked facades, fallen bricks and collapsed ceiling tiles were cleared away. Aside from disrupted downtown businesses, the border crossing from Mexicali and Calexico

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Photograph: La Cronica De Mexicali/EPA

club's new website at www.velerosdebaja.com. For over 50 years, the La Paz Ladies' Luncheon has offered a place to exchange information, socialize, and provide support to both foreign and local English-speaking women residents of La Paz. The monthly luncheons were first attended by only a handful of American and Canadian women, with most of them living on land in La Paz and its surrounding areas. However, in recent years, the idea has grown in popularity with the sailing fleet. As the Ladies' Luncheon coordinator for over a year, La Paz resident Luiza Lanoy has worked to increase communication within the group, bringing attendance levels for each meeting to new heights. The March luncheon was held at the La Cantina Mejicana restaurant in Marina Costa Baja. One of the goals of the Ladies' Luncheon is to help integrate the two communities by networking. One attendee said it “warmed her heart” to discover how much North American women love living here in La Paz. Indeed, the Ladies' Luncheon is an excellent opportunity to bridge the differences between two cultures in a friendly atmosphere of good food, great entertainment and simple conversation.

also had to deal with a short-term disruption in border entry procedures until engineers cleared the building's safety. All border crossing operations are currently back to normal. Phone and electricity service were also disrupted for countless citizens on both sides of the border. The Comision Federal de Electricidad was working hard to fix any and all damage to lines due to swaying and fallen service poles. All 27 substations of the government-owned utility company were correcting issues and quickly getting everyone’s power and phone service restored. Tijuana, Baja California, and El Centro, California, also suffered some minor damage. California had damage to water mains and some water storage facilities. The quake was felt as far away as Phoenix, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Nevada. There have also been hundreds of aftershocks felt throughout the region, some measuring over 5.0 on the Richter scale.

A car passes over a crack in a Mexican highway after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake struck on April 4, 2010.

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

13

Photograph by Guillermo Arias, AP

Seventeen vessels lined up at Roca Lobos on March 14 to participate in Rock to the Dock, the inaugural sailing event of Veleros de Baja, a newly established sailor's club. After a raft-up the night before, the group set out to complete the 11-mile course. Several boats stayed neckand-neck as the end neared, fighting the tide that nearly brought the race to a halt in the middle of La Paz Bay. Ultimately, Poco Loco Dos, captained by Keith Sangster, crossed the finish line first with a time of 2 hours, 34 minutes and also took the winning place in her division. Afterwards, the sailors attended a beach party on El Mogote, which lasted long after sunset. But the fun doesn't stop there! Veleros de Baja has already planned the Tax Day Regatta, a 3-leg race from La Paz north to Loreto and back, which starts on April 15. For more information, visit the


{People & Voices voices}

La Huerita on . . . Everything!

Centavo’s Two Cents

Built For Speed New Shoes, New Country.

Photo by Kathy Craig

by Penny Nask

Romeo and Gunnar out for a joy ride!

Now that the Baja 250 is a completed event here in our town of San Felipe I can now look at my friend Patricia’s Chihuahua dogs with certain liberation. They are lying on my couch in a blissful state, no doubt dreaming that they could take a trophy next year. Really! If you are one of those people that believe your dogs can think, get what you are saying, and have real feelings, then you will certainly understand that Gunnar and Romeo (the Chihuahuas) are at the edge of something big here. It’s not just that they are spectacular dogs . . . no . . . But racing quads has become their obsession. I know this because Patricia rides them on top of her quad, which they are fanatical about. I also know that they know how to ride it by themselves (see photo). Impossible you say? Tut, tut . . . you nonbelievers! Romeo and Gunnar did not go to the Blues and Arts Fiesta that was here last March. Although they are great about going places, and they especially like to look at the art, they wouldn’t come out of the garage since the race. Patricia told me that they have been eating their meals so fast and running back to the quad . . . apparently to do something to it that I hope is not illegal for the next Baja 250. While I settled the dogs on the couch, I told them how disappointed I was that they showed no interest in attending the Fiesta. I explained

Massage Therapy FULL HOUR - ONLY $35

Call for an appointment

686-577-1431 www.sanfelipe.tv

14

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

Centavo aka Pamela Esther Nask (“Penny”) Co-owner of Simpatico Arts, she is a writer and an art historian, whose luck in these fields has given her an early retirement. She attributes “laughter” as the best possible stimulus for life. pennynask@yahoo.com about the food . . . that at any given moment part of a taco could have fallen off a plate and onto the ground. It could have been theirs in seconds. They barely stirred. Romeo rolled his eyes indicating that I would have to do better than that. Now Gunnar . . . I knew that he liked blues music. He tried to play the harmonica once . . . or maybe he was just chewing on it. So upon asking him why he didn’t attend, all I got was a sigh and I thought he barked something that sounded like, ”Too windy.” Both of their postures indicated to me that their miniature intellects were somewhere else. When a neighbor drove up to my house in her quad, the boys flew off the couch and began to jump like bungee cords to get a good look out the window. I would like to consider that they were protecting me, but I know they were just trying to get a first-rate look at the quad.  If I am watching Romeo and Gunnar at their house, I usually let them spend hours in the garage, because what’s the point of believing that they would watch TV with me.   I did tell them about the Chihuahua Race in November. They both dropped their wrenches and did a point move to the quad, and then proceeded to jump up and down. I don’t want to tell them that it is a 2K pet walk . . . not yet, anyway. I’ll wait till they finish the tune-up.

by La Huerita

So there I was wandering around in the shopping district in La Paz wearing a pair of air-conditioned sneakers—which should have been given a decent burial long before—when I spotted a shoe store with a sale on huaraches. Eureka! Huaraches and Sale, two of my favorite words! Ten minutes later I walked out wearing my new sandals, and I tossed my old sneakers in the trash on my way out the door. I had forgotten the part about breaking huaraches in. Oops. Within three blocks I was wishing I hadn’t thrown my sneakers away. At another three blocks I had to stop at a farmacia for Band-Aids. Another three . . . I was barefoot and hailing a taxi. My feet felt like they had died and gone straight to hell, without passing “Go.” I cursed my decision and called myself names for succumbing to the word “Sale.” This was buyer’s remorse at large. Over the next several days many friends commiserated with me on the state of my feet and my sandals. I was given much advice on how to make those stiff leather straps more supple and comfortable and I followed all of it. I oiled them. I soaked them. I soaked AND oiled them. None of it worked. I thought maybe if I just wore them around the house for a few days my feet would get used to them and all would be well. Ha! My feet started screaming as soon as I pointed them towards those huaraches; I couldn’t wear them for longer than half an hour even if I was sitting down. My toes were blistered, the straps cut into my instep, it was impossible. So I threw them into the closet in a fit of pique. Ever a glutton for punishment, a couple of weeks later I dragged them out of their place of

La Huerita An artist and writer, La Huerita and her husband operated an online travel magazine for nearly a decade— until they noticed they were doing more writing than traveling. Her philosophy: When it stops being fun, stop doing it. La Huerita now operates the blog Rocky Point Tides, and she’s having fun! lahuerita2@gmail.com shame and cautiously put them on again. Well, I can’t explain it, but they not only fit perfectly, they no longer hurt my feet at all, even though the straps were not yet supple and soft. Those quickly became my favorite shoes ever, and I wore them for the better part of two decades before I finally had to throw them out. The odd thing is that when I bought a new pair I had no probem at all breaking them in. What had changed? Breaking in a new country can be like that. Living in a foreign country is a lot different from visiting there. Things that you found charming or cute while on vacation can drive you to distraction once you live there full time. It can be a painful experience. My suggestion: Spend a little time there first; break it in a bit, make sure that the things you love about it are not overwhelmed by things you just can’t live with. Given a little time (and a little oiling?), you just might find that it’s a perfect fit after all. Certified Certified Certified Master Master Master Dog Groomer Groomer Dog Grooming Estética Canina DogGrooming Grooming-- Estética - EstéticaCanina Canina Groomer

Located just south of PEMEX AM-PM across from Tacos Jr. Located just south of of PEMEX AM-PM across from Tacos Jr.Jr. Located just south PEMEX AM-PM across from Tacos Libre Km 28.5, Popotla Blvd. Rosarito, Appts: Tues, Weds and Thurs Libre Km 28.5, Popotla Blvd. Rosarito, Appts: Tues, Weds and Thurs Libre Km 28.5, Popotla Blvd. Rosarito, Appts: Tues, Weds and Thurs

661-100-6218 661-100-6218• •125*317*7317 125*317*7317

Thank Thank You You ROTARY! ROTARY!

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

The Rotary Club San Felipe TheofRotary Club of San Felipe Meets every Meets every Monday 8 AM Monday 8 AM at the at theBar Barefoot Bar ElBarefoot Cortez Hotel El Cortez Hotel

For Information call 686-576-8974 For Information call 686-576-8974


{People & Voices voices}

Los Barriles is a small community on the east cape of Los Cabos. The area is known for great wind surfing, kite surfing and fishing. For most of January and February it was home. We met many new friends and reconnected with some old friends. We traveled the cape from Los Barriles to Todos Santos ever week, exploring all the amazing locations in between.  Now it was time to leave. The Blues & Arts Fiesta was March 27, and we had to be there. We didn’t want to rush north, so we gave ourselves a little time.  Here’s a timeline, so we can skip to the good stuff . . . you know, like they do in movies.    Sunday, February 21, 2010: La Paz, BCS. In La Paz you can get anything. This week we needed our generator serviced and a “movie fix.” We saw four new release movies that week, in English.  Monday, March 1, 2010: Loreto, BCS. We arrived in Loreto to familiar spaces and good friends, but it was our deadline. When Rachel finally appeared from the RV, the neighbors were shocked—they thought the RV was storage and no one was inside.

Friday, March 5, 2010: Mulegé, BCS. We stayed at Playa Santispac. It was the first beach in Baja where Rachel and I camped together, six years earlier. We stopped to visit an RV park to get info; they already knew us and wanted to advertise in the magazine. Wish that would happen every day.   Tuesday, March 9, 2010: San Ignacio, BCS. Arrived at Rice & Beans in San Ignacio, three hours from Mulegé. Rice & Beans is 250 pesos per night, but has full hookups. So, we recharged our batteries and took advantage of the full hookup. Wednesday, March 10, 2010: San Ignacio River & Lagoon, BCS. We moved from Rice & Beans to a wonderful spot on the west side of the San Ignacio river for only 100 pesos, which included water. We could hear the frogs outside on the river bank, something you don’t hear much in Baja. It was beautiful and very quiet. Thursday, March 11, 2010: San Ignacio, BCS. NO GAS. The station was out until tomorrow. We were stuck in San Ignacio, so we explored.    Friday, March 12, 2010: Guerrero Negro, BCS. GAS. We only had 200 pesos left . . . not a problem. We’re finally back on the highway. I was getting anxious to get home.  

Photo by Dave Anderson

Rachel Pack, Raine Fisher and John Pack enjoying the “good life” at the Blues & Arts Fiesta.

The day was sunny and beautiful, and the recent rains had transformed the desert into a blanket of flora of purple and yellows. I was daydreaming, lost in my thoughts and the landscape, when SMASH . . . my driver-side mirror exploded. I could see in the fragments that remained that it was a van, and it wasn’t braking. We had only traveled about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) when it happened. With no place to turn around, and no gas to chase anyone down, we continued forward to the military checkpoint. We waited in line . . . still no van. We went through inspection . . . still no van. We waited and talked with soldiers . . . still no van.  Just as we started to pull away onto the highway again, the van pulls into the checkpoint and a small heavyset woman came running from the van screaming for us to stop. I could see the van successfully pushing through the checkpoint. Soon several soldiers, the screaming woman, the driver of the van—who was also the husband of the screamer—and half a dozen teenagers had converged on the RV. The soldiers seemed to only be curious.  The mirrors of the RV and van hit so hard, the impact swung the van mirror back 180 degrees and smashed out his driver-side window. The husband wanted to head back to San Ignacio, but I told him we had no gas and no money, and all those things were in the next town, not back in San Ignacio. After a brief discussion in Spanglish and body language, we pulled out onto the highway to Vizcaino; me following the van and Rachel following me.  Vizcaino had the bank, the gas station and auto parts store. Rachel went to the bank, while I took care of the van. The husband and I both thought the other was at fault, but rather than blaming him—and since it would be easier, without any bullshit—I followed the husband into the auto parts store and bought him a new window and mirror for 1,200 pesos. I thought the price was fair, and besides, he had to drive out of his way. I told him good-bye and we were on our way. Sometimes these types of things can turn into big hassles, so we were thankful it was only 100 bucks and 10 minutes.  Here’s the rest of the timeline (you know, like they do in movies). I’d get more detailed but my editor only gives me so many words.     Saturday, March 13, 2010: Guerrero Negro, BCS. We drove to the Guerrero Negro lagoon to have lunch and check on the whales. The lagoon was still very alive with whales, but only a single

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

John & Rachel Pack After marrying John & Rachel traveled the United States full time producing live events, until moving to San Felipe Baja to slow down. That only lasted a couple of months. Since then they’ve dedicated themselves to sharing life in Mexico with the world. They have fallen in love with so many of you that they want you to join them as they explore the wonders of Mexico living.

camper. Turned out the couple in the camper were on their way to the Blues & Arts. We shared our excitement for the event without mentioning our connection, then we said, “Good-bye,” thinking to ourselves, “How cool is that?”  Sunday, March 14, 2010: El Rosario, BC. The drive to El Rosario was the most magnificent display of Baja flora I had ever seen; lush green or blossoming in brilliant colors.  Monday, March 15, 2010: San Felipe, BC. Highway 3 from Ensenada to San Felipe junction was the worst road in Baja. The rain storms had created potholes too large and too frequent to consider driving around. It was a matter of driving slow, dodging the bigger of the holes and hanging on.  The last 20 miles into San Felipe was a race. Rachel slowly shrank in the rearview mirror as I accelerated towards home. We were looking forward to relaxing and being with friends and family. The 2010 Blues & Arts Fiesta (www.bluesandarts.com) was a day to remember with double the crowd from last year, as a couple thousand people filled the baseball arena in downtown San Felipe. The morning winds caused some concerns and disruption to vendors, with gusts so strong I watched a large, 50-gallon-drum-sized BBQ get lifted and toppled. One artist’s EZup actually flew into the air high enough and far enough to carry it over a row of parked cars and a 10-foot wall. By early afternoon the wind had stopped, the magnificent sound of blues filled the air, and the festival goers enjoyed a fun-filled day of music, the region’s best artists, food provided by local restaurants, along with plenty of libations and beverages throughout the day.  We are happy to be home.

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

15


{Natural wonders Wonders}

Baja Scorpions are here A little knowledge of the scorpion and basic tips to avoid a sting can help keep the summer nights carefree and safe

Photo by Raine Fisher

by Karri Moser

Christine Wood proudly shows off the scorpion she killed near her home. After nearly 400 million years, scorpions still awaken from their winter hibernation to creep around seeking prey during the warm nights in the Baja region. While these creatures typically aspire to pounce on insects, spiders or other scorpions, they are encroaching more and more on humans. Or, we may be encroaching on their habitat. Regardless of how you look at it, the encounters are usually unwanted by both parties. Scorpions have a distinctive body, namely due to their long pincers and unique tails. The tail of a scorpion is divided into five segments, with a

stinger off of the last segment. Scorpions are fluorescent under ultraviolet light. With a small black light outside, it can be very easy to locate scorpions either in their natural habitat or around the house. There are two kinds of scorpions found in Baja—the bark scorpion and the striped tail scorpion. The striped tail scorpion is venomous, but not considered dangerous. A striped tail scorpion sting can cause the same affects of a bee or wasp sting. There may be some localized swelling and burning that will generally subside

      



         

                           16

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California



within 30 minutes. Some people may be allergic to the sting and have a more severe reaction. The striped tail scorpion is a burrowing scorpion and can be found under rocks and in sand. This kind typically grows to be around two inches in length and has dark colored ridges on the underside of its body. Because it does burrow, it can sometimes be found in sleeping bags and in shoes. The bark scorpion has longer pincers and a longer tail than the other varieties. It has a yellowcolored body and can grow to three inches long. The bark scorpion is the only kind that does not burrow. It is a climber. They can climb fences, stucco walls and trees. You can find them living under the bark of palm and other trees. They are also the only scorpion variety that will congregate with other kinds of scorpions. The sting of a bark scorpion can be more severe than the sting of others, especially for children and  the elderly. The sting may result in severe pain, numbness of the site, frothing at the mouth, respiratory distress, twitching or convulsions. You should seek medical attention if you think you have been stung by a bark scorpion.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

There are a few basic steps you can take to avoid scorpion encounters or stings: • Try to seal any cracks around the house, such as loose doors or windows. Scorpions only need 1/16 of an inch to get through a crack. • It is also advisable to remove piles of bricks or wood farther away from the house. Standing water or trash may also attract them. • If you leave any shoes or clothing outdoors, such as wet towels, always shake them out to remove any hiding scorpions. • One other tip is to use yellow lights outside. Regular outdoor lights attract insects, which, in turn, attract scorpions. General knowledge of the scorpion and basic tips to avoid a sting can help keep the summer nights carefree and safe. While stings can be irritating and rarely dangerous, antivenins work well and can prevent any lingering effects of a scorpion encounter.


{Activity activity Guide guide}

Santiago Zoo 

A hidden treasure in the heart of southern Baja’s East Cape For those traveling Highway 1, it can be easy to pass by the small rural town of Santiago unless you are looking to find it. If you head south on Highway 1 from Los Barriles 15 miles (24km), then veer west (right) just about a half mile (2 km.), you will find yourself rolling right into the town square area of this quaint, if not frozen in time, village. Like Todos Santos on the Pacific side, Santiago is almost directly on top of the Tropic of Cancer. If you park your vehicle in the town square, you can explore the town, which seems to have an oasis feel as it is set somewhat in the middle of nowhere.

Santiago was founded in 1721 by Italian Jesuit Ignacio María Nápoli and was known as the Mission Santiago de los Coras. The mission took part of its name from the “Coras,” the native people of the region. Because it was the scene of fierce Indian wars and fighting, Santiago lay virtually abandoned until the 1800s. Now the town economy and survival revolves primarily around agriculture. The lush gardens and crops of citrus, mango, aloe vera, eucalyptus, pear, plum, avocado and other native plants are what keeps this small town afloat. Aside from the rich and delicious natural crops and gardens that are sure to entice the senses, there are other sights to take in if you find yourself in Santiago. The Santiago Zoo is a nice place to relax and explore. It just so happens to be the only zoo in Baja California Sur. The zoo is free and open to the public. Since there are very few forms of entertainment for children living in Santiago, you will notice much of the actual caretaking and work at the zoo is done by the children who live in Santiago.

While the actual environment and conditions under which the animals are kept may be rudimentary and unsatisfactory for some, the community’s heart is in the right place. The zoo just suffers from lack of adequate resources and funding to give the animals a better life and atmosphere than they currently have. Those who care for the animals hope more visitors who appreciate the idea and opportunity to see the animals will donate money to provide what is so badly needed. Donations are the only source of funding for the zoo. Despite the less than ideal conditions, there are quite a few impressive animals for visitors to observe. One draw is the rattlesnake pit. There are a few monkeys, mountain lions, deer, coyotes, leopards, a tiger and even a lion. There are also plenty of local specimens such as possums, rabbits, raccoons, geckos, iguanas, salamanders and ground hogs. Those who appreciate exotic birds will enjoy observing the spectacular peacocks, parrots, ostriches, eagles, falcons and hawks at the zoo. After a visit to the zoo, an 8 km journey south will take travelers to the hot springs. Just outside of Santiago, there is also a fossil museum. Visitors are often surprised to see the whale bone fossils and other sea life fossils at the top of the mountain, proving the area was once under the sea millions of years ago.  Santiago is a small surprise and a hop away from the ordinary tourist resorts and attractions dotted along Highway 1. The zoo, small shops in the town square, hot springs and fossil museum make it worth the detour whether for a day or afternoon picnic surrounded by the sweet smells of the native flora.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

17


{Business & Money}

Mexican Wills

A “Must” for Anyone with Assets in Mexico by Kristy Deegan

In general, in the United States there is a right of survivorship when a death occurs. The United States law provides for a joint will for the married couple. Many married couples have a joint Will, living trust, family trust or the like. When one partner dies under these circumstances, the “property” (all belongings, homes, land, etc.) is passed on to the designated parties with relative ease. If there is no Will or trust, the “property” must go through probate—a legal process to determine the rightful heirs. Part of that process is to publish a notice in all the surrounding areas requesting that any person who feels they are a rightful heir or have liens on the “property” come forward. If no one comes forward, the right of survivorship is implemented and the surviving spouse becomes the heir. What is the law in Mexico? There is no right of survivorship provision in Mexico. If a spouse dies, and there are no children, the court will search for heirs for the spouse’s 50 percent in the following order: parents, grandparents, siblings and cousins. If there are children, the court would rule equal percent to surviving spouse and children. If there were two sons, the two sons and the spouse would each get an equal part of the ownership. The legal process is governed by the Baja California Civil Code, so each state may have varying processes for the court. This is not a Federal issue. If there is no Will and all the heirs agree to the distribution, one can resolve the property ownership through the Notaria. If there is any conflict, it must go through the court.

Tecsys Securidad Privada

Tecsys Securidad Privada is a private security company located in San Felipe. The company provides security services for residential and commercial customers on an hourly, weekly or monthly basis. Jesus Jimenez, the Director of Operations, started his security business in 1999 because there was need for this type of service. Jesus knows San Felipe and is bilingual. He can answer your questions about security for your property. Call him today at (686) 100-9225. 18

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

How it works in Mexico: Because there is no right of survivorship, each individual owner of “property” should have a Will. When a spouse dies, and a Will is in place, the transfer of property is relatively simple. The designated heirs present the Will to the Notaria and the transfer is made with a signature. The “new” owners of land are registered with the bank and the Public Records. There are two choices if there is no Will. 1) If there is no conflict, the heirs can go directly to the Notaria for distribution of the property. 2) If there is any conflict, the heirs must go through a process similar to probate in the United States. For example: When a spouse dies, the courts will start the process of “looking” for heirs. They will first look for the children, then parents, then grandparents, then siblings and then cousins. When this search is exhausted, the court de-

termines the rightful heirs and the surviving spouse can possibly be totally disinherited and excluded. A Will or Family Trust written in the United States, it is NOT valid in Mexico. In order to make it valid, one must have the document translated by a court approved translator (up to $20 per page) and presented to the Judge for official acceptance. This is a lengthy and costly process. If a Mexican Will is in place, this process can be avoided. Why do you need a Will if you have a fideicomiso? A fideicomiso is a legal document that allows foreigners to own property within the protected zone in Mexico. It is a renewable trust held and administrated by the bank and it designates the legal owners of the property. In the Mexican constitution it states that no foreigners may be allowed to own property in Mexico. The fideicomiso is regulated by secondary legislation as an exception, which states that under certain conditions, foreigners may own property with the implementation of a fideicomiso. For El Dorado Ranch in San Felipe there are two classifications of fideicomiso: Master Trust and Individual Fideicomiso. Both have the same rights and privileges but differ in the rules about beneficiaries. The purpose is to define the beneficiary differences and how a Will relates, not to fully explain the fideicomiso. The Master Trust consists of a large number of lots at El Dorado Ranch. The Master Trust is the only method of privatizing a large number of lots at the same time, in order to facilitate the transfer. The owner owns a “beneficiary interest” in the whole. Each lot is not correlated to a specific person. One cannot designate a survivor beneficiary if he is a member of the Master Trust. Every person listed on the Master Trust should have a Will in order to avoid the above process. For example, If Mary and John are married and they purchased a lot in the Master Trust with Joe and Sarah (married), who is the heir if Sarah dies? If Sarah does not have a Will, one quarter of the ownership is unclaimed. Joe, nor Mary and John, automatically get Sarah’s quarter. The court begins the process to locate Sarah’s family and rightful heir. Each of the four people in this partnership of land ownership should have a Will to avoid any conflict of rightful ownership.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

The Individual Fideicomiso does allow for a designated survivor beneficiary. For example, Susan and Ron are married and they are both listed on the fideicomiso. They designated their son to be the beneficiary. When either Susan or Ron (or both) die, the son will present the fideicomiso to the Notaria and the transfer will go smoothly. However, the fideicomiso only covers the land and the structures. All other possessions are not covered. If anyone in the family wants to take possession of any of the contents or vehicles, the heirs must go through the court process described above. The purpose of the Will is to avoid any possible conflict and to preserve the legal rights of the land. Even though we think that today there will be no conflict, obtaining a Will ensures it. Leased Land: Any agreements entered into before the spouse dies are still legally binding and continue as agreed. Therefore, a lease agreement signed prior to the spouse’s death will continue to the end of the lease. The same legal process as previously stated applies to the contents, vehicles and bank accounts. What a foreigner should do to be protected: A Mexican Will is a very simple process: 1. Fill out the form 2. Attorney prepares the document 3. Signature by Notaria, you and witnesses 4. Final copy received in Spanish. You may obtain an English translation for a fee. We, at San Felipe Management Services, have a process where you fill out the form with us, we send the form to the Attorney and the document is prepared. The Notaria, or designee, comes to San Felipe for signature, and the final document is sent to us by bus and available for local pickup. The cost is US$400 per person and the inconvenience is minimal. The laws are different in Mexico. We may or may not agree with the laws here, but we must live by them. I can’t state this strongly enough: There is NO right of survivorship in Mexico.


{Business & Money}

Baja Nueva Will Close Their Doors for Good on May 16 by Benjamin Eugene

Baja Nueva owners Jerry and Sherry Lankin.

Sunday, May 16, will be the last day of business for Baja Nueva, San Felipe’s premiere gallery and purveyor of fine home decor. Owners Jerry and Sherry Lankin have been avid supporters of the arts since they opened on Highway 5, north of town in October 2007. In April of 2008, they moved to the Plazita downtown on Ave. Mar de Cortez. The new location allowed them the opportunity to grow, expand their offerings and even provide exhibitions for local and regional artists.

The store, art and furniture galleries have been growing every year, and they are very profitable. According to Jerry, “[Baja Nueva] has provided us with a nice income.” Sadly, they could not find anyone to take over and continue the great business that they have created. At the beginning of July, they’ll be moving to Tucson, Arizona, to be closer to family. They are building a new home and it will be ready by midJune. “We will miss all of the wonderful clients and friends that we have made, the interesting tourists that we meet from all over the world, and the compliments that we receive from everyone who comes into the store.” says Jerry. “Shopping for new and interesting merchandise has been a hoot. Putting it together and displaying it into a coherent and salable product that has been so well accepted has been very fulfilling.” Baja Nueva is not yet closed, so visit them before the 16th, when the doors will be closed for the last time, and we all wave good-bye to two people that have helped make San Felipe and Baja beautiful.

BajaMart in BAJAMAR will close on April 30 BajaMart is the store sharing The Whale’s Tail building. The Whale’s Tail restaurant will continue to be open from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily for breakfast and lunch. They will carry only bread, water, milk, eggs and soft drinks. All other products carried by BajaMart will be discontinued.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Tel: 011-52-686-576-0664 Cell: (686)573-0526 English

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

19


{Fishing Guide}

(

Quick Start Guide to Deep-Sea Fishing in by Jay Jenkin 90 percent of people, if you go out on the ocean without sunscreen, you will soon resemble a hard-boiled lobster, so sun protection is vital. If the sun is out, it will also likely be very hot, so bring plenty of liquids to avoid dehydration and dress appropriately. Take safety precautions: Have enough life preservers on your boat for everyone, make sure that someone knows you are gone and will report you missing if you do not come back, and also be sure to take a working radio. Moreover, of course, make sure that you have a valid fishing license and a copy of the current fishing regulations. Being caught with an illegal fish will result in heavy fines and most likely a loss of fishing privileges.

Okay, that is out of the way. Now what? You need to make sure that you bring the correct bait and gear, or you won't be catching anything. Don't bother bringing your freshwater fishing rod—you need a saltwater rig with a beefy reel and some quality fishing line. Select an appropriate hook, and make some choices about bait. Do you want to use live or artificial? I recommend live, as it is often more effective. The preferred method is to use cut squid bait purchased from a store; go out with that, and use it to catch baitfish, which you can then turn around and use to catch the big fish that you are really after. If you do this, you will need a boat that is equipped with a bait well or some

other container with salt water in it to hold these baitfish in. When you are actually fishing, be ready for a whole lot of reeling. Depths of 200 feet or more are not uncommon, depending on your location, and some find that electric reels are a good choice. In addition, on deep-sea fish, you often do not need to set the hook. You will feel some preliminary nibbles on your line, and then a powerful strike that will set the hook for you. If you pull up too early, you lose the fish. The last thing to have on your boat is a Fish Finder or other sonar rig. These incredible devices will tell you where the fish are with astounding accuracy, and are fantastic time savers. Don't leave home without one!

San Felipe Bay with Pangas

20

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Photo by Victor Rodriguez Ratliff

Any chance to fish is exciting and can be great fun, but for many freshwater anglers, a chance to go offshore and do some real deepsea fishing is the opportunity of a lifetime. The sun, the waves and the humongous fish— what's not to like? Before you can head out, however, you need to know what you are doing, so this guide will explain how to fish in the ocean. First off, preparation. If you are like


{Fishing Guide}

Fishing · Discharging firearms. · Filleted fish aboard the vessel. For more details, please visit www.conapescasandiego.org/contenido. cfm?cont=REGULATIONS As of January 2008, only fishing permits are required to fish in Mexico’s ocean and inland waters. Boat permits are not required. (But, if crossing the border in your boat, a vehicle import permit is required.)   Purchasing Fishing Licenses from the Mexican Government’s CONAPESCA: (Comisión Nacional de Acuacultura y Pesca) office in San Diego: 2550 Fifth Avenue Suite 15 San Diego, CA 92103 Telephone: (619) 233-4324 Fax: (619) 233-0344 Monday–Friday, 8 a.m–2 p.m. Payment: money orders, cashier’s checks   Purchasing Licenses by Mail: 1)   Download form from www.conapescasandiego. org 2)   Mail in application with money order/cashier’s check payable to Oficina de Pesca 3)   Include a return, selfaddressed, stamped envelope 4)   Certified mail for both envelopes is recommended  

Fishing License Cost (subject to change) One day – $12.40 One week – $25.80 One month – $37.00 One year – $48.20   HANDY TIP: Fisherman’s Landing sells Mexican fishing licenses and boat permits, and is open daily. It also has a great tackle selection and friendly staff. 2838 Garrison Street San Diego, CA 92106 Telephone: 619.221.8506 Fax: 619.222.0799 www.saltwatertackle.com Winter: 7 a.m.–6 p.m.; Summer: 7 a.m.–1 p.m. Payment: cash, personal checks, major credit cards Fishing licenses: One week, $39; One year, $64 So, let a glorious fishing trip in Baja waters turn into a whale of time for you, your family and friends—by following the simple rules listed above.

Captain Morgan Fishing Charters A new family-oriented fishing charter business with a one-on-one customer service. Captain Morgan Fishing Charters isn’t to take out the most anglers or make the big profit, but to offer a day on the Sea with your fishing buddies. Owner Dax Morgan has been fishing the Sea Of Cortez his whole life and after moving full-time to La Paz in 2006, he established his fishing charter. Day Trip Package for only $300. www.captainmorganfishingcharters.webs.com • Cel. 044 612 140 3070 • Ssmorgan5@aol.com • La Paz, BCS, Mexico

SAN FELIPE BAJA

Your Adventure Fishing The bigger the fish you catch, the bigger the Specialists! boat you’ll need. MEXICO LIVING

FISHING

As you head off to Baja with dreams of reeling in those tall tales, be aware of Baja’s sportfishing permit requirements.   Primary Fishing Concerns: 1. Fishing licenses for «every person» on board—even if they’re unable to throw a line and regardless of age (but unnecessary if fishing from land). 2. Only one hook or line per person on board, although unlimited placements. 3. Only 4 hooks to every vertical line while fishing for bottom fish. 4. Electric reels are restricted to disabled fishermen, and only after written authorization from the Ministry beforehand. 5. Bagging limits for fin fish (no shellfish, mollusks, crustaceans, totuava, turtles or marine animals) are: 10 daily from ocean waters and estuaries (a shark is equivalent to half the day’s allowed catch); 5 daily from inland waters (rivers, lakes, dams). 6. Bag limit for boats at sea for three days is three times the limit for one day. 7. “Catch and release” over the bag limit is encouraged to return fish to their environment in good survival condition.   Violations Include: · Capturing fish for ornamental purposes. · Financial gain from sportfishing. · Dumping trash or toxic substances that harm aquatic flora or fauna. · Disturbing the original ecosystem environment by collecting shell, coral, anemone or snails · Fishing within 250 meters of swimmers. · Using artificial lighting to attract schools of fish.

Best of

VOTED BEST FISHING IN SAN FELIPE 2009!

El Dorado Resident Discount

2009 686-946-1028 www.AztecaBajaFishing.com Azteca Sportfishing  provides a safe, comfortable and reliable half- or full-day sportfishing trip. Proprietor Alex Herrera hosts Fishing Clinics for beginners and advanced fishermen alike at El Dorado Ranch as an activity for residents and guests. Azteca was voted  Best Fishing Tours in San Felipe 2009  in  Mexico Living Readers’ Poll . . . for obvious reasons! Visit www.aztecabajafishing.com, or call: U.S. (760) 618-0521, MX (686) 577-0741 or MX Cell (686) 946-1028.

Robert Sportfishing in La Ribera

Hotel Los Pescadores & Fishing Charters

Robert Sportfishing is located in La Ribera, a small community just south of Los Barriles. It’s here that Captain Pedro Mejia has been fishing for over 25 years. From El Cardonal in the north all the way down to Gorda Banks, Pedro knows the area like the palm of his hand. Captain Pedro has become one of the most requested captains in the area because of his love for fishing, patience and willingness to get the big one. His knowledge of the English language and open mind has allowed him to understand fully, the methods of fishing this area. Getting to those hot fishing spots is no problem in their Super Panga “Robert”, which is powered by a four stroke Honda 150 Hp outboard and equipped with the best fishing tackle and electronics available. It’s the personalized attention of its owner Felipe García Romero and Captain Pedro Mejia that insure a great day of fishing and keeps the anglers coming back for more. 624-130-0263 • www.sportfishingrobert.com sportfishingrobert@gmail.com

Hotel Los Pescadores is extremely service oriented. The clients comfort and desires are the number one priority at Hotel Los Pescadores. Making their guests vacation a memorable one is what makes this a special place. Owner Patricia Morrison has a deep love of fishing and the town of Los Barriles, which is why she built her hotel and made Los Barriles home. She says its the combined work experiences of her life that helped her open the hotel. Hotel Los Pescadores has 8 beautiful rooms, all of which have 2 queen beds, a/c, refrigerator and coffee maker. The hotel also has a cantina, restaurant and pool in the courtyard. The Hotel staff and fishing captains are all very attentive to clients, assisting with tours, fishing charters, or a relaxing day by the pool. www.fisheastcape.com From u.s. 011-521-624-121-8786 contact@fisheastcape.com

The best part of Hotel Los Pescadores pangas are the captains - Capitan Lavo and Capitan Andres. BOOK YOUR TRIP TODAY! Walking distances to North Beach for all you Wind & Kite Surfers

www.fisheastcape.com Los Barriles BCS Mexico

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

21


{Fishing Guide}

The

BAJA PENINSULA East Cape Tackle 

Name: Wes and Cindy Stair   Region: Baja Peninsula   Type: Boating and Fishing  Contact: (624) 141-0366, www.eastcapetackle. com, eastcapetackle@gmail.com About: Serving the East Cape of Baja California Sur since 1998, their goal is to provide customers with top-of-the-line quality equipment at reasonable prices. They can set you up with the gear you'll need to get the best advantage while out on the water. In Business: 11–20 years Staff: 1–5 people     

Solmar V

Name: Jose Luis Sanchez Region: Baja Peninsula   Type: Boating and Fishing     Contact: (866) 591-4906, jlsanchez@solmarv. com, www.solmarv.com About: One of the most luxurious live-aboard dive vessels in the world. Departing from Cabo San Lucas—well within range of the most exciting diving in the Sea of Cortez and Soccoro Islands. During the great white shark season, they depart from Ensenada. You will receive unmatched service and comfort! In Business: 11–20 years Staff: 6–10 people     

SOUTHERN BAJA  

Ocean Adventures Private Resort 

Region: Baja California Sur Type: Boating and Fishing Contact: (612) 125-9973, www. oceanadventuresprivateresort.com, aventurasdelmar@yahoo.ca About: Full-service mini-resort, catering to international travelers, with private boat charters and sportsfishing, and travel packages. In Business: 1–3 years Staff: 1–5 people   

Pedro's Pangas 

Region: Colonet / San Quintin / El Rosario Type: Fishing Contact: (888) 568-BAJA, www.pedrospangas. com, Pedros4U@aol.com About: Pedro's Pangas has been in San Quintin, Baja California, for 16 years. Pete Hillis, owner, with offices in Signal Hill, California, can be reached at (888) 568-BAJA or in San Quintin at 011-526-1616-56040.  In Business: 11–25 years Staff: 4–10 people    

EAST CAPE  

Hotel Los Pescadores

Name: Patricia Morrison Region: East Cape Type: Boating and Fishing Contact: (624) 121-8786, fisheastcape.com, contact@fisheastcape.com 22

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

big list: boating & Fishing About: Hotel Los Pescadores & Fishing Charters provides lodging and fishing charters in the East Cape Area. They have been chartering their super panga's for 4 years. The hotel opened last March. In Business: 1–3 years Staff: 1–5 people  

Region: San Felipe, BC Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: (686) 577-0342 About: Sportfishing Charters in San Felipe In Business: 1–3 years Staff: 1–5 people  

Name: Felipe Garcia Region: East Cape Type: Boating and Fishing Contact: (624) 130-0263, www. sportfishingrobert.com, sportfishingrobert@ gmail.com About: Sportfishing trips in a 26-foot super panga out of any place between el Cardonal to La Ribera. Captain Pedro with more than 25 years of experience in the business. All tackle and gear included in the package, ice and filleting service, too. In Business: 1–3 years Staff: 1–5 people  

 

Sportfishing Robert

ENSENADA  

Dann Manz

Name: Dann Manz  Region: Ensenada, BC Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: U.S. (772) 801-6266, info@ shallowhalibut.com, http://shallowhalibut.com/ About: Originally from upstate Michigan, where he made a lifelong career as a Fisheries Technician. His father, who was also a Fisheries Technician and Biologist taught Dann how to fish at the age of 5. He has been fishing for work or for pleasure almost every day since. In Business: 21+ years   Staff: 1–5 people      

Gordo's Sportfishing

Name: Isaac Ptacnik  Region: Ensenada Type: Boating and Fishing Contact: (646) 178-3515, www.gordos.8m. com, idptacnik@hotmail.com About: Live bait sportfishing. In Business: 21+ years    Staff: 11–20 people   

SAN FELIPE  

Azteca Sportfishing

Name: Alex Herrera Region: San Felipe, BC Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: aztecabaja@prodigy.net.mx, (686) 946-1028, www.aztecabajafishing.com About: Azteca at San Felipe, Baja, where your adventure begins. Fish with them and you'll be hooked! While still in the process of growth, San Felipe is still the best kept secret for many fishermen, but not for long! In Business: 1–3 years Staff: 1–5 people    

Pablo's Sportfishing Name: Pablo Nieblas

LA PAZ Captain Morgan Fishing Charters Sportfishing

Name: Dax Morgan Region:  La Paz, BCS    Type: Boating and Fishing     Contact: www.captainmorganfishingcharters. webs.com, Cell 044 (612) 140-3070, Ssmorgan5@aol.com  About: Family-oriented, they offer the simple camaraderie of a day on the Sea with your fishing buddies. Dax and his team have won or placed in several big-money sportfishing tournaments, including the 2008 VanWormer Dorado Shootout and the 2007 Los Cabos Tuna Jackpot. In Business: 1–3 years  Staff: 1–5 people     

Fishermen's Fleet

Name:  David Jones   Region: La Paz, BCS Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: (408) 884-3932 Vonage, fishermensfleet@hotmail.com, www. fishermensfleet.com About: 20 years of experience in panga fishing the La Paz area. Packages include airport transportation, drinks, vacuum packing, live bait, dinners and everything else that you need to enjoy some of the best light tackle big game fishing to be had in the world. In Business: 11–20 years Staff: 21–50 people  

Pistoleros Del Mar Adventures Name: Gonzalo Mata    Region: La Paz, BCS   Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: (612) 131-4563, gmata007@gmail. com, http://pistolerosdelmar.com/adventures/ About: Specializing in Freediving and Spearfishing trips in La Paz, they have the best rates in town. Many years of experience. In Business: 1–3 years    Staff: 1–5 people     

Tailhunter-International

Name: Jonathan Roldan  Region: La Paz, BCS Type: Boating and Fishing Contact: riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com, www.Tailhunter-International.com, U.S. (626) 638-3383, MX (612) 125-3311 About: Full-service outfitter and guide service with fleets in La Paz and Las Arenas/Muertos Bay in Baja California Sur. Jonathan and his wife, Jillene, also operate the FUBAR Cantina and TAILHUNTER Bar & Restaurant. Jonathan is the Baja Editor for Western Outdoor News and has won numerous awards. In Business: 11–20 years Staff: 21–50 people 

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

LOS BARRILES  

Hotel Buena Vista Beach Resort

Name: Hortencia Fischer or Carolina Inzunza Region: Los Barriles, BCS Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: info@hotelbuenavista.com, (800) 7523555, www.hotelbuenavista.com About: Located on the edge of the Sea of Cortez, 35 miles north of Los Cabos and 70 miles southeast of La Paz, they are one of the world’s premier sportfishing destinations. You can expect to catch marlin, enormous wahoo, tuna, yellowtail, sailfish, roosterfish and dorado. In Business: 21+ years Staff: 50+ people  

LOS CABOS  

Gordo Banks Panga

Name: Eric Brictson Region: San Jose del Cabo, BCS Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: ericgordobanks@yahoo.com, (624) 142-1147, www.gordobanks.com   About: Located in the new Puerto Los Cabos Marina, they specialize in personalized Sportfishing Charters. Their fleet consists of boats ranging from 22 to 32 feet. Targeting billfish, yellowfin tuna, dorado, wahoo, roosterfish, grouper, snapper and many other speices of gamefish. In Business: 11–20 years Staff: 6–10 people  

TODOS SANTOS   

Iguana de los Mangos

Name: Lee and Brenda Sherwood    Region: Todos Santos, BCS    Type: Boating and Fishing    Contact: (612) 119-7880, www.bajasurtodossantos.com, iguanabaja@ hotmail.com About: Private, luxurious casita located 2 kms north of Todos Santos, offering Panga fishing, whale watching and sightseeing from Punta Lobos, Todos Santos. In Business: 1–3 years    Staff: 1–5 people 

UPCOMING BAJA BIG LIST FEATURED INDUSTRIES • June – Health & Beauty Guide • July – Nightclubs & Nightlife Guide • August – Wine & Restaurant Guide If you are interested in any of our upcoming topics, or have a business in these industries and you would to be listed, please contact us: 877luvmex1@ gmail.com.


{Fishing Guide}

Boating If you have a fishing, cruising or fun-loving boat you’ve been hauling around to inland lakes and dams, you’ll love taking it to the Sea of Cortez. Baja California is one of the most idyllic aquatic nirvana experiences ever. You’ll enjoy the thrill of sporting with diving dolphins, sea lions and flying fish. The Sea of Cortez is a marine jewel just waiting to be explored and enjoyed, time and again.   Many are also unaware how easy it is to set sail to Baja California—by road. Just hitch your floating friend to your SUV or truck. Drive it across the border and down to the Sea of Cortez. Here’s how and what you’ll need to do.   Checklist for a Boat to Cross the Border: · Current boat registration · Trailer title · Valid passport (a U.S. Customs requirement beginning June 9, 2009)   Easy Does It · At the border, stay in the same lane · With a green light, it means the going is nice and steady

· With a red light, you may have to pull over; remove the boat’s cover; show both boat registration and trailer title. Baja Marinas Larger towns in Baja have more than one marina where you can launch from, dry dock and rent a slip by the day, weekend or year. Services include: · Flushing out the boat for about $5 · Washing the boat for a small fee Picturesque towns such as La Paz, Puerto Escondido, San Felipe and Santa Rosalia have marinas on the Sea of Cortez. Complete with slips, water, power, showers, fuel docks and boat launch.   Along the Pacific Ocean, Rosarito Beach, Ensenada and Cabo San Lucas also have marinas.   Splendid Itineraries 1. Cross the Sea of Cortez from San Felipe to Puerto Peñasco; either direction is 73 nautical miles. There are full-service marinas in both ports. A cruiser or sailboat takes 6–8 hours; a speedboat and flat seas, 2–3 hours.

2. From San Felipe, head south to explore the Sea of Cortez. 3. San Felipe to La Paz is a beautiful long sea journey through Bahia De Los Angeles, Santa Rosalia, Mulegé and Loreto. 4. If coasting down the Baja passage, leave from Ensenada or Rosarito Beach to glitzy Cabo San Lucas.

Returning home is just as easy (unless you're sailing). Be prepared to answer U.S. customs questions: · Who owns the boat? · How long have you owned the boat? · Did you sleep on the boat? · Where did you go in the boat?  

Developer Financing Homes from $154,500 usd Lots from $48,000 usd

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

23


{Dining Guide guide}

 

Chorizo Tacos This is a fast, easy and delicious breakfast. If you like spicy food, you're going to love this breakfast.   6 ounces chorizo sausage 8 (6-inch) corn tortillas 6 eggs 1/4 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese 1 dash hot pepper sauce (e.g., Tabasco), or to taste 1/2 cup salsa Crumble the sausage in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook and stir until evenly brown. Set aside. Heat one skillet over medium heat, and heat another skillet over high heat. The skillet over high heat is for warming tortillas. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, salt and pepper. Spray the medium-heat skillet with some cooking spray, and pour in the eggs. Cook and stir until almost firm. Add the sausage, and continue cooking and stirring until firm. Meanwhile, warm tortillas for about 45 seconds per side in the other skillet, so they are hot and crispy on the edges, but still pliable. Sprinkle a little shredded cheese onto each tortilla while it is still hot. Top with some of the scrambled eggs and sausage, then add hot pepper sauce and salsa to your liking.   Nutritional Information: Serving size: 2 tacos. Amount Per Serving: 537 Calories, 34.1g Total Fat, 381mg Cholesterol Soy (Soya) chorizo sausage has reduced fat and is available in many Mexican markets.

The Pavilion Restaurant The Pavilion Restaurant

20% OFF 20% OFF

Any lunch breakfast, lunch or dinner Any breakfast, or dinner expires 28-Feb-2010

expires 28-Feb-2010

Excluding shrimp or scallops dishes. Excluding shrimp or scallops dishes. Not valid with any other special. Items Not valid with any other special. Items onlyoff discounted off regular price. only discounted regular price.

cesar.quirarte@doradoranch.com.mx cesar.quirarte@doradoranch.com.mx San Felipe BC Mexico San Felipe BC Mexico

Now in TWO LOCATIONS

NEW SPOT!

At Playa de Oro next to Sand & Sea Market for PIZZA TAKE-OUT! Mar de Cortez & Chetumal for

Free Breakfast Sundays*

*with purchase of alcoholic beverage

MEXICO LIVING

PIZZA

PIZZA

MEXICO LIVING

Tortilla Soup DAILY Baked Ziti!

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST! one (1) alcoholic North Phone *with purchase ofIn-town Phonebeverage Best of

2008

Best of

2009

(686) 577-3168 (686) 577-4092 24

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


{Dining Guide guide}

Cooking Gourmet Cuisine in Mexican Wine with Steve Dryden Cooking with wine is an old tradition that is coming back into vogue with the arrival of the wine and food revolution. Mexico’s evolution in creating high quality wine is being complemented by various gourmet delights crafted by local culinary establishments and talented chefs in the region. There is something magical about pairing regional food and wine together, and here in Baja California we are blessed with an amazing diversity of fresh ingredients for cooking with easy access to our wine country “bottled treasures of delight.” And, it hasn’t taken a long time for top chefs to embrace matching gourmet delights with our premium wines. Creating delicious cuisine with wine as an added ingredient in the meal is relatively simple. The first rule is to avoid the so-called cooking wines and stick with regular table wines. One trick I’ve learned here in Baja from gourmet chefs is to add the wine you are planning to match with dinner into your entree. This gives the food a flavor that will obviously pair well with the wine. For example, I often open a bottle of premium wine, simmer the food with a cup of wine added, thus I’m left with four glasses to enjoy with the meal. In addition, I generally don’t use low quality wine for cooking because the bad flavors can ruin the flavors of the cuisine. Another basic rule is to match a wine that has the same body of flavor as the food; for example,

a delicate white fish or meat often pairs well with a light and elegant white wine. Although much is changing in the culinary and wine world, and many new concepts allow for more creativity, experimentation and rule breaking. Some are paring lobster with red wine and full-bodied steaks with white wines. But, when cooking with wine in the entree, I suggest a balanced match or you’ll overpower the food.   Talented chefs use wine in several ways to enhance the flavors in their culinary delights. Wine makes a great marinade, a good cooking liquid and adds flavoring in finished meals. Generally, wine amplifies and seasons the flavors and adds aroma to the cuisine. When preparing a meal for up to four people, adding a cup of wine is usually the perfect amount. Remember that as you cook down (reduce) the wine, you’ll lose most of the alcohol, but will gain concentrated flavors. The most effective method of cooking with wine is to let it simmer when added to slow-

cooked meals. Wine reduction for one-half to three-quarter cup of wine usually creates about two tablespoons of reduced wine with concentrated flavors. For ultimate flavor, wine should be reduced slowly over low heat.   The easiest wine-enhanced meal I create during the winter months is what I call “The Drunk Italian Chicken.” I clean a free-range chicken from Mogor Badan Ranch and place it on the bottom of a Crock-Pot, add fresh carrots, potatoes, onions, red tomato sauce, fresh mushrooms, garlic, sweet paprika, rosemary and onion salt. Then I add one or two cups of L.A. Cetto 2005 Nebbiolo and let it simmer for four to six hours. You might think the red wine would overpower the chicken, but it makes an awesome, full-flavored dish for cooler winter nights.   Steve Dryden is a wine, food and travel writer living in Mexico’s premier wine country where he guides individual and small group wine tours. He can be reached at sbdryden@hotmail.com.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

25


{Lodging Guide}

Hotel Los Pescadores

Sportfishing Utopia on the East Cape by Stockton Hill

Beach-side Vacation condo or house rentals

www.stayinloreto.com C ontaCt L ynn H amman 011-52-613-135-0791

lynnhamman@yahoo.com

Hotel Los Pescadores was built with fishing in mind. The East Cape of Baja on the Sea of Cortez is one of the most exciting places in the world to

26

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

fish. Hotel Los Pescadores is the ideal place to stay if you're goal is fishing and fun.  The hotel is located just north of Los Barriles, a charming pueblo that remains slow paced. A place that people can still get away, without the hassle of a big city resort. The East Cape and Los Barriles are famous for incredible fishing, kiteboarding and windsurfing, and offers an array of other outdoor activities. After a busy day enjoying the sport or sightseeing adventure of your choice, you will return to Hotel Los Pescadores and be able

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

to relax in their deluxe accomodations. At Hotel Los Pescadores all of their rooms have air conditioning and two queen beds. Amenities include complimentary WiFi internet connection, a refrigerator, coffee maker and a hair dryer by request. But that's not what makes this place so special—it's the hospitality. Hotel owner Patti, along with Sean and Gulliermo, go out of their way to make your stay at their hotel a memorable and highly enjoyable experience. When you first enter the hotel you immediately feel at home and relaxed. As you enter through the front doors of the hotel, it opens directly into the open-air hotel bar and restaurant. The bar is open fully to the landscaped property with swimming pool and courtyard. On the weekends, Hotel Los Pescadores is a popular place for locals and Los Barriles foreign residents. The hotel is north of the down town area and walking distance to the beach and some of the best kite and wind surfing in the world.  If fishing is your goal, this is the place. Hotel Los Pescadores offers you the opportunity to board one of their two 26-foot super pangas with their tournament winning Captains Lavo and Andreas.    Approximately two hours north of Cabo San Lucas and one hour north of the Los Cabos International Airport, Hotel Los Pescadores is situated in an ideal setting to truly enjoy the Baja experience.  Rates are affordable and service is excellent. They can assist you in setting up any activity you wish to do. After an exciting day on the East Cape they will make you feel right at home. Visit their cantina for a refreshing drink or relax by the pool. Visit www.fisheastcape.com to see their rates and availability. Be sure to look them up on TripAdvisor for testimonials from their past guests. 


{Health & Beauty}

Mexicans are Living 25 Percent Longer Than 40 Years Ago by Adrian Jimenez, Mexico City, The News

Mexico has created the conditions to notably boost the country’s collective health, the National Population Council (CONAPO) said Tuesday. This is reflected in longer life expectancy; between 1970 and 2010, people now live an average of 14.8 years longer, CONAPO said in a press release. Today, Mexicans live on average 75.4 years. Women live an average of 77.8 years, while men reach 73.1 years. According to the objectives of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals on Population and Development, by 2005 countries must have had a life expectancy greater than 70 years and increase this number to 75 years by 2015. 

All 31 states and the Federal District met the 2005 goal, while 24 states have already boosted life expectancy to 75 years. By 2015, all states will have achieved the UN goal, CONAPO said.  Demographic transitions have been accompanied by a shift in the type of most common illnesses. Diabetes and hypertension, before associated with industrialized countries, are now commonplace in Mexico, CONAPO said.  Still, however, some people in Mexico are prone to infectious diseases and premature deaths. In urban areas, environmental problems, stress, sedentarism, violence, and chronic or immune-system diseases, such as tuberculosis and HIV-AIDS, are more prevalent, CONAPO said. Between 1980 and 2005, infant mortality dropped 68 percent, from 52.6 deaths to 16.8 deaths for every 1,000 babies born. That figure has dropped further, to 14.2 deaths per 1,000, CONAPO said.

For all your disposal needs Permanent & Temporary Construction Waste Commercial & Residential Portable Toilets Septic Pumping

Residential Pick Up

3 & 6 Yard Commercial Containers

68 Gallon Containers for Residence & Business

Portable Toilets

Competitive Rates

Septic Pumping

686-121-1004 or 686-212-3599 South of Kilometer 187, San Felipe B.C.

COME SEE US TODAY! Mar Caribe Sur #1088-4 Across from ABC Bus Depot Visit us online or e-mail for more information

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

OPTICAL SERVICES

Licensed Optometrist Efrain Castellanos, OD, FCOVD Complete Eye Exams Vision Problem Evals Frames and Lenses Contacts

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

YOUR VISION SOLUTION

www.mexicolivingguide.com

27


Fishing} {fishign

Sportfishing vs. Tuna Pens and Illegal Gill Netting by Dann Manz

I want to address what I perceive as a serious problem in Baja. I live in northern Baja, near Ensenada, which used to be called the Yellowtail Capital of the World. Today, yellowtail are almost nonexistent in this area. White sea bass are also not visiting our area with any regularity. The question then becomes, “WHY?” To me, it is as plain as the nose on my face. Tuna pens (a floating round netted enclosure to hold and raise tuna) are having a huge impact on sportfishing in Baja. Today Baja has eight permitted tuna pen operations. They feed the tuna three times a day, six days a week. Sardines are their favorite food. This year 300 tons of tuna were raised, and 95 percent are sold to Japan at $9.50–$45 per pound, depending on the size of the fish. The larger the fish, the more it is worth per pound. So, in order the get the tuna to their highest value, they have to be fed huge quantities of food. In order to feed the tuna, the tuna companies own boats that scour the ocean looking for the proper food—sardines and anchovies. The problem is that is exactly why a yellowtail would want to come to Ensenada. They like sardines and anchovies, also. If they come to the store and the store is out, they go elsewhere, where the shopping is better. So, our sportfishing industry is suffering due to a few rich men who own these tuna pens. Sportfishing can represent a huge portion of the economy of a city like Ensenada.

Sportfishermen spend money in motels, marinas, restaurants, gas stations, grocery stores, etc. The decline in sportfishing is very apparent every weekend. The charter captains are also noticing a decline in reservations and fish. The other problem the tuna pens are causing is pollution. They will refute it, but, again, it is only common sense to see what is happening. When you crowd hundreds of large tuna in a confined space, and feed them large amounts of food, their excrements are also going to be in a confined space. That is pollution! Nitrogen in large doses to the ocean in a small area changes the environmental equilibrium of that ecosystem. Pelagic fish (fish that migrate seasonally) will avoid areas of pollution and look for bluer, cleaner water, where they can also find dinner. Another reason for the extinction of the sportfish is the illegal gill netting that is going on, at least in my area. I fish Ensenada Bay at least once or twice a week. I see all the buoys, pop bottles, corks, etc., that mark the illegal gill nets. I have witnessed the nets being pulled and set. Most of the time trolling becomes an obstacle course. I have lost dozens of expensive lures that get snagged in the poorly or unmarked nets. I know of only one licensed gill netter in our area. I know where his nets are, so I can pick out the illegal ones. I have witnessed small

boats running up on shore, before they get to the boat launch, and a guy will jump out with a burlap sack or two over his shoulders. He then climbs up the hill to meet up with a vehicle waiting for him, thus avoiding any possible run in with authorities. They are all blatant in their activities. It is done in the daytime or after dark. There is no enforcement that I have ever seen. I have been fishing here for four years and have never been stopped or asked for my fishing license (which I always have). I understand the economy is slow, but I don’t see how that gives

illegal gill netting the OK to continue. I also fish the local estuary. I have seen the same activities going on there that I see in the ocean. I have never seen any authorities in the estuary, nor do I think they care. Mexico has decided to turn their heads the other way when it comes to the ocean, the fish and the environment. I don’t understand why, as the Mexican government is losing huge amounts of money, with the reduction of sportfishing in the area.

www.theprintsupplier.com 1-800-576-0919

NO PRINTING COMPANY HAS BETTER QUALITY! NO PRINTING COMPANY HAS BETTER PRICES! NO PRINTING COMPANY CAN DO IT FASTER! For an even deeper discount on all items through May 2010. PROMO CODE: CGQFLFNGGK 28

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


0

Lun

6

18

0

Oceanografía Física

Mar

6

18

0

Mie

6

18

0

6

Jue

18

(31 51 N, 116 37 W)

0

Vie

6

18

0

Sab

6

1

150 75

18

PMS NMM BMI 559 -23

150 75

2

3

4

5

21 16

6

7

1233 1646 93 63

8

PMS NMM BMI

150 75

1341 1723 87 72

2355 143

9

746 0

15081814 87 80

045 128

10

851 9

1634 1956 92 85

155 113

11

958 15

1728 2227 100 80

12

332 103

1054 19

1800 109

13

2350 66

503 100

1138 22

1826 119

038 49

14

18 0 5

611 101

1214 25

150 75

1245 28

1911 141

150 16

16

745 105

1312 32

1934 152

223 0

17

826 106

1339 37

1959 163

256 -13

18

905 106

1406 41

2026 172

19

331 -23

945 1434 104 46

20

2057 179

15

408 -30

1029 1505 101 50

2131 182

PMS NMM

21

16 43

450 -32

1116 1542 97 55

150 75

2254 173

23

626 -24

1312 1719 93 67

2347 162

24

723 -17

1422 1832 97 72

049 147

25

824 -9

1528 2013 105 72

26

205 131

925 -1

1624 118

27

2201 62

22

334 119

1022 6

1712 133

2326 42

PMS NMM

28

16 0 8

502 111

1114 15

150 75

1200 24

1833 162

125 -1

30

724 109

1243 33

1911 174

213 -18

31

822 109

145 82

0 1219 1634 99 67

2253 162

621 -14

1308 1717 98 72

1949 182

258 -30

913 109

1403 48

Hora del Meridiano:

0 541 -24

1324 41

1002 1442 107 53

340 -36

2103 185

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

105 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

2330 149

2026 186

29

BMI

421 -36

1047 1519 105 58

2140 181

PMS NMM

501 -31

0

6

Mie

18

0

6

Jue

18

100 50

2

1133 1556 102 62

100 50

100 50

Dom 18

6

0

6

Lun

18

0

Mar

6

18

0

Mie

6

18

0

6

Jue

18

100 50

50

4

1413 42

2258 94

9

745 -3

5

2319 83

10

852 4

22 16

2311 71

11

1322 20

1944 85

16

0

6

7

1

400 200

1011 9

400

2

3

200

4

5

21 16

6

7

18

927 -16

1622 418

400

1001 19

1706 370

2305 121

9

435 264

1037 57

1757 325

2358 151

10

200

525 223

1118 97

1903 290

156 166

11

710 195

1223 135

2041 276

12

431 139

928 205

1536 141

8

13

2209 285

505 106

1048 245

1639 119

2255 303

14

18 0 5

529 74

1131 291

1724 95

246 4

842 61

1351 23

17 13231614 50 44

2235 112

23

400

1203 340

1802 72

2356 344

16

616 12

1232 386

1838 54

023 363

17

200

639 -14

1302 425

1912 42

050 379

18

704 -35

1331 453

1944 36

19

118 390

729 -49

1402 470

20

2016 36

146 394

15 757 -56

1434 475

2048 42

217 390

21

16 43

831 -56

1511 470

2000 94

314 -7

922 64

1420 26

2020 103

18

1628 48

659 -22

1438 49

2311 103

24

738 56

1234 26

1908 94

30

1122 12

1939 65

13

346 -17

1003 1448 64 29

19 747 -16

2354 90

25

2044 111

1946 56

842 -9

1710 58

422 -24

400

909 -48

1554 454

2207 72

23

334 351

956 -30

1646 430

2259 91

24

200

428 320

1050 -2

1747 404

005 104

25

547 293

1159 33

1858 382

130 101

26

729 290

1337 60

27

2016 372

902 319

1516 63

2127 376

28

16 0 8

410 36

1016 363

1625 54

400

1118 410

1724 45

2317 392

30

545 -24

1210 449

1818 38

003 397

31

200

623 -39

1255 478

408 0

313 349

914 -10

1607 438

2212 78

348 323

947 13

1644 404

045 399

659 -44

1336 494

Hora del Meridiano:

204

0

1905 33

734 -43

125 395

1415 496

2027 37

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

105 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

2247 96

1949 33

BMI

203 385

29 808 -37

1453 487

2103 47

238 370

841 -26

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

1045 1514 62 33

cms

0

Dom 18

6

0

6

Lun

18

0

6

Mar

18

0

6

Mie

227 -6

846 1320 59 34

1937 102

311 -19

31

942 1356 61 39

107 54

12571619 54 44

2224 103

637 -16

13371648 53 46

0

6

Jue

18

0

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

6

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

Dom 18

2

0

6

Lun

18

1530 467

3

2253 95

943 -1

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

2138 61

1205 1621 62 42

9

2301 108

628 2

1306 1637 56 49

10 1240 21

1858 101

16

136 5

737 82

2004 108

352 -26

1032 1427 61 43

2031 112

Hora del Meridiano:

90 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

0

Mar

6

18

1629 56

2333 96

724 13

1541 56

0

6

Mie

5

1

80 40

Sab

NMM

21

2

3

4

5

22 16

6

7

2143 88

8

607 32

PMS NMM BMI

2202 83

9

731 -9

2218 75

10

834 -2

2202 67

11

946 4

2039 61

12

1051 9

2008 58

13

440 32

1141 13

14

19 0 5

1955 59

258 25

736 1219 36 18

1946 62

15

1413 47

PMS NMM

0 235 14

80 40

829 1248 40 23

1939 67

16

243 3

914 1310 44 28

1941 74

17

302 -8

958 1330 46 33

1952 81

18

328 -18

10421350 48 39

2008 88

19

357 -26

11341405 49 44

20

2027 94

431 -31

1239 48

2048 97

21

17 43

508 -31

550 -28

40

22

2136 95

23

NMM

1044 8

1808 75

036 30

28

17 0 8

602 53

1142 17

1838 85

29

PMS

NMM

430 -29

1111 1456 60 44

2058 113

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

504 -28

1145 1523 58 43

2126 113

1220 1551 56 43

536 -25

2155 109

20 27 5 13

18

0

6

Jue

18

0

(22 53 N, 109 55 W) Vie

6

18

0

6

1

Sab

18

PMS

6

7

1122 1600 70 35

2231 120

8

PMS

NMM

850 21

1956 64

12

158 68

1025 24

1758 72

13

2357 50

457 65

1126 23

1815 81

036 35

14

19 0 5

613 70

1208 22

1836 91

15

PMS

NMM

1308 20

1921 112

205 -9

812 85

1334 21

1945 122

18

235 -21

846 87

1400 22

2011 130

19

307 -29

921 87

1426 24

20

2039 136

340 -34

958 83

1453 27

2110 138

21

17 43

415 -33

1036 1522 79 31

2143 135

22

PMS

NMM

1119 1554 73 36

23

2220 129

537 -19

1210 1632 67 42

24

2301 118

628 -8

1321 1726 65 50

25

2354 104

732 3

1457 1859 69 56

26

107 89

850 12

27

1611 78

2138 51

301 77

1004 17

1701 91

2316 35

28

17 0 8

501 75

1105 22

1742 104

29

PMS

NMM BMI

621 79

1154 25

1819 116

30

108 -1

720 83

1236 29

1856 127

31

152 -15

122 61 0

1125 1604 79 45

2223 126

531 -10

810 86

1203 1638 77 49

2255 116

1316 33

1932 134

232 -24

855 87

1352 35

2008 139

Hora del Meridiano:

90 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

310 -28

935 86

1426 37

2043 140

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

347 -28

1012 1459 84 39

2118 138

422 -24

1048 1532 82 42

2151 133

20 27 5 13

Ensenada, BC: May 22–23. 31st Annual La Misión Fiesta. Contact Mario Reyes, (664) 682-1697

639 -21

2202 89

24

737 -13

2229 79

25

842 -5

26

2247 66

943 4

27

1324 56

829 1201 43 33

1857 80

30

213 -3

9391237 49 42

1913 87

31

249 -16

88 44

0

0 545 -19

2137 95

621 -12

2202 88

1042 1306 54 50

1931 94

325 -24

1145 57

1954 98

Hora del Meridiano:

90 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

402 -28

1842 63

1035 13

1837 67

28

17 0 8

Loreto, BCS: Jun 24–26. 2nd Annual Tripui Fishing Tournament. Visit www.tripuisportsfishing.com or contact Bud Dees, bajabud1947@yahoo.com

PMS

La Paz, BCS: Sep 9–12. Gold Cup Fishing Tournament. http://lapazgoldcup.com/

239 658 1121 30 37 23

BMI

East Cape: April TBA. Annual Halibut Derby. (310) 827-4855

PMS

Los Cabos, BCS: May TBA. Rolex Invitational IGFA Offshore Championship Release Tournament. (866) LOS-CABOS

1846 73

29

NMM

2018 101

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

Bahía de los Angeles, BC: May 22–23. 17th Annual Guillermo’s Yellowtail Sportfishing Tournament in Bahía de los Angeles. Contact Guillermo Satellite, (200) 124-9104

Loreto, BCS: Jul 15–18. Fishing For The Mission. Contact Jaime, (613) 135-2138

BMI 144 13

40

PMS

NMM

0

80

2203 117

22

BMI 2111 98

0

80

1223 1555 53 41

BMI

640 -16

40

537 -28

Fishing Calendar

18

0

80

2135 118

BMI

019 16

PMS

558 -24

40

1132 1535 57 37

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

0

80

459 -27

Cabo San Lucas, B.C.S.

2119 2264 16

016 82

11

17

(26 01 N, 111 22 W) 6

PMS

BMI 659 76

457 -18

0

15

1739 2236 301 66 49 58

27

Oceanografía Física

4

0

18

1934 76

BMI

454 -28

60

Vie

1251 18

BMI

543 -10

120

6

711 51

NMM

17 43

CICESE

Loreto, B.C.S.

18

203 29

505 -21

20 27 5 13

CICESE

Oceanografía Física

1932 70

14

2108 116

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

MAYO 2010

1214 15

NMM

2226 384

0 500 1

PMS

107 20

22

302 75

201 549 42 47

19 0 5

20 056 74

26

0

0

2124 55

0 252 375

PMS

BMI

2328 323

0 552 42

8

2224 85

0 359 307

2233 103

NMM

2036 62

12

MAYO 2010

0 325 349

12561604 46 39

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

Sab

6

PMS

BMI

607 -21

18

18

BMI 801 57

0

Vie

Sab

0

100

6

6

1

BMI

137 11

(31 01 N, 114 49 W)

0

0

0

cms

cms

0

18

0

San Felipe, B.C.

CICESE

Oceanografía Física

Vie

6

0

2217 173

20 27 5 13

3

1552 42

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

MAYO 2010

(24 10 N, 110 21 W)

0

BMI

616 -26

BMI 619 109

18

616 -17

1754 148

0 031 20

Oceanografía Física

Mar

6

NMM

222 17

BMI 1210 1624 94 61

0

0

2210 180

0 535 -30

18

50

657 -10

BMI 702 103

Lun

6

100

1849 130

0 116 32

0

2313 158

0 649 -11

Dom 18

6

437 -28

2044 101

511 -25

20 27 5 13 http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

2111 99

T i d e Ca l en d ars

0

0

La Paz, B.C.S.

CICESE

MAYO 2010 cms

cms

Dom 18

6

Ensenada, B.C.

CICESE

MAYO 2010 0

Cabo San Lucas, BCS: May TBA. Yellowtail Shootout. A day trip from Cabo San Lucas. (818) 762-5873 Cabo San Lucas, BCS: May 21–23. 2010 International Governor’s Cup Tournament. Contact Oscar Armando Daccarett Habib, oscar@daccarett.net

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

29


{Home & Real estate Estate}

Pérez Construction: Quality, Service, Performance

Pérez Constr uction was founded by Lupe Pérez, General Contractor, and joined by Contract Manager, Jane Allen. Lupe Pérez is a long-time resident of San Felipe. He and his family have been building homes in Mexico for over 30 years. Lupe leads the team of talented artisans at Pérez Construction. Renowned for his authentic Mexican-style and the Pérez signature beamed, vaulted ceilings, he incorporates the contemporary finish so in demand by discriminating clients. Jane Allen relocated to San Felipe from Scottsdale, Arizona, in 2006, and joined Pérez Construction in 2007 in the position of Contract Manager. She is an integral part of contract negotiation and management of all administrative requirements of the project from start to finish, as well as the connection between everyone involved. The Pérez Construction team provides the following services: Jane Allen

30

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

• • • •

Architectural Services Contract Management Custom Home Construction Remodeling and Home Finishing Construction • Sea Walls and Retaining Walls • Swimming Pools with Stamped Concrete Decking • Perimeter Walls and Driveways • Patios and Roof Decks • Septic and Water Systems Installation • Custom Cabinets, Closets, Windows • Designer Wall Surfacing, Paint and Tile • Custom Fireplaces, Niches, Arches and Entertainment Centers • Outdoor Kitchens and Showers They pride themselves in quality workmanship, accessibility of Contractor to client, ongoing detailed construction reports, and timely project conclusion. Pérez Construction also supports the community efforts of the Rotary’s Silent Auction and the educational efforts of Las Amigas by sponsoring a student every year. The company was recently asked to donate labor to build-out a therapy room

for handicapped children in the new Food Bank location on Highway 5, just north of the arches. Having survived a challenging business environment over the past year, Pérez Construction is pleased to respond to the community in this way. The project will begin after the Easter holiday. To contact them, email bestinbaja@gmail.com. You will also find additional information and photos of construction projects, including interior photos, on their website, www.sanfelipehomesbyperez.com.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Construction Pé“Best rezinC onstruction PC Pérez Baja” * e*st*in* B * a ja ” “B El Dorado Ranch * *5*Star * * Contractor El Dorado Ranch 5 Star Contractor

Lupe Pérez, General Contractor Lupe Pérez, General Contractor 011.521.686.170.3979 011.521.686.170.3979

Jane Allen, Contract Manager Jane Allen, Contract Manager US: 480.600.2114 or MX: US: 480.600.2114 or MX: 011.521.686.236.4927 011.521.686.236.4927 www.sanfelipehomesbyperez.com

www.sanfelipehomesbyperez.com bestinbaja@gmail.com

bestinbaja@gmail.com


{Home & Real estate Estate}

SWEITZER CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COMPANY

Trump Sued Again Over Mexico Project

BJ Sweitzer Consultant Carlos Mora Contractor

Phone: 577-0195 USA: 011-52-686-577-0195

by Kevin Brass, International Property Journal

A lawsuit filed Monday by a group of buyers who lost their deposits in a Baja California resort charges Donald Trump and his executive children with fraud and negligence. The seven plaintiffs say they were “duped” into buying hotel-condo units in the Trump Ocean Resort, a 526-unit, twin-tower project planned for 17 coastal acres a short drive south of the Mexican border. When the project collapsed in 2009, dozens of buyers lost their deposits, totaling more than $32 million. Trump only licensed his name to the project’s developer, Los Angeles-based Irongate. In the wake of the project’s demise, Irongate said there was no money to return—the deposit money was used to fund early development in the project, which was allowed by its contracts, the company said. Several buyers have already sued the developer and Trump, alleging various misdeeds. But

Email: bejota10@aol.com

this suit focuses on the Trumps. The filing charges Trump and his children, Donald, Jr. and Ivanka, with misleading buyers into thinking they were more involved in the project. It cites a long line of typically bold Trump statements promoting the development, suggesting they were deeply involved in every aspect. The plaintiffs say they didn’t learn that the project was simply licensing the Trump name until the development collapsed.  “The Trump defendants falsely led plaintiffs to believe that they were financial backers of the project,” the suit claims. (Radar online has a copy of the lawsuit: http://www.radaronline.com/ exclusives/2010/03/trump-sued-10-millionover-never-built-condos) Buyers typically put down 30 percent deposits on units, which were priced between $300,000 and $3 million. In December 2006 the project announced 188 units worth $122 million were sold

on the first day, which was deemed a record for Mexico. “Trump Ocean Resort Baja will redefine the standard of premier property ownership and service excellence for all of Northern Mexico,” Trump said at the time. But the suit alleges that most of the talk was hype. The project didn’t even have the necessary permits and Trump was paid off on a commission basis, the suit charges. If nothing else, the case demonstrates the pitfalls of licensing your name and brand to a third party. The Trumps will certainly argue that they were simply doing their job, promoting the project for the developers, earning their licensing fees. Trump has already countered with a lawsuit against the developers, alleging they didn’t follow through on their contractual obligations. This article is reprinted with permission from Kevin Brass and the International Property Journal, www.internationalpropertyjournal.com. Move from ANYWHERE in the USA to ANYWHERE in Mexico!

Let our team of professionals handle everything for you

An Exclusive Gated 8 Unit Townhome Complex in San Felipe DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE

Starting at $159,900 US 760-208-1700

www.oasisdecortez.com

Computer & Satellite Installation Satellite Internet

Also Computers, Cell Phones, and DVD Rentals

Av. Mar de Cortez, Plaza San Felipe Visit us Online: www.csibaja.com

686-577-2928 shane@csibaja.com

A Z

From

to

MX (686) 576-0432 E-mail: sfelipe3@prodigy.net.mx

www.sanfelipesafestorage.com

Baja Lending Company www.SanFelipeHomeBuilder.com

Home Builders in San Felipe

Providing Quality, Integrity and Professionalism since 2005

San Felipe (686) 577-3176 San Diego (619) 920-2292

www.BajaLendingCo.com

• #1 Mortgage Broker on the Baja • Competitive interest rates • 6 major international financial institutions • Construction loans • Purchase money loans • Refinance loans

Baja Closing Services

• Protecting your real estate

transaction • From Contract, Closing, Fideicomiso, & Disbursements • Our 3rd party oversight insures that funds are disbursed correctly US 760-494-7053 MX 011-52-686-576-0653 CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mary@BajaLendingCo.com Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010 www.mexicolivingguide.com

31


Open House US$1,000,000

OPEN HOUSE PHOTO ADS Publish your real estate photo ad for ONLY $50. Simply email your copy and photo to sales@ mexicoliving.info and Mexico Living will contact you. If you have questions, please call 686-230-9933 in Mexico or 877-LUVMEX1 from the US.

A Modern Masterpiece with European Sophistication This dream house was built in San Felipe because of the climate, atmosphere, cost of living, and easy access to Southern California and Arizona. Although it is an unusual house for the San Felipe area because of its contemporary style, size, and amenities, the owner/ builders, Jack and Valentina Ragsdale, wanted these special features that contribute to a comfortable lifestyle. Valentina is a formally educated Russian designer; she brought design and construction experience to their design conversations that began five years before construction actually started. She uses a software program that displays all levels of detail including a virtual walk-through feature. They knew ahead of time that they had a 180-degree view of the Sea of Cortez, what the sun angles would be at any time of day or season (hence the wraparound veranda), where the electrical outlets and switches would be located, and what the view would be from any room in any direction. These drawings and artists’ renditions were an important asset because the workers could then see what the final objective would look like during the construction process.

San Felipe, Baja California This beautiful 2 Master Suite home is located in the gated community of El Dorado Ranch in San Felipe, Baja California. Front and back tiled patios offer sea and mountain views. The rooftop deck is perfect for stargazing and relaxing. Includes great room, garage and billiard table. Home is fully furnished, ready to move in TODAY! Reduced to US$180,000. Contact Bill Maine at (686) 231-4921; from the US (619) 203-5129; email: billmaine@gmail.com.

She also brought to the table a vast knowledge of European finishes and concepts that she used when designing and building upscale housing in Russia; features such as French Ceiling systems and Venetian Plaster finishes that are not well known or used in this part of the world. La Paz, Baja California Sur This stylish home must be seen to be appreciated! Located in El Comitan roughly 15 Km north of La Paz. Has a large, bright living/ dining area and an open kitchen with state-ofthe art appliances. Master bed and bath are located on the main floor with a covered patio to the pool area. A separate stairwell takes you to the terrace with a guest bedroom, bath and outstanding views. Approximately 1,700 sq. ft., fully furnished, professionally landscaped with an automatic irrigation system. PRICED TO SELL at US$340,900. Contact Alexander at 011 52 (613) 104-3625 or alexander@loretorealty.com.

Los Barriles, Baja California Sur Ensenada de Palmas, Buenos Aires, Los Barriles, has lots, in a new community, nestled between the Sierra Madre Mountains and the Beautiful Sea of Cortez with views to the north and the south. Lots range from 800 M2 to 1,500 M2, so you can build your dream home. Lots are near the town of Los Barriles. Prices from US$40,000 to $100,000. Lots are also available in other communities. Cell: (624) 355-5782, Nextel 72*698805*3, ask for Jorge Ortiz, or email jorgeortiz_medrano@hotmail.com. 32

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

It became necessary for Jack and Valentina to finish the final 20 percent of the house by themselves, so two years of dawn-to-dusk hard work were required to accomplish the final product. The above ground building is 5,600 sq. ft. comprised of a 2,600-sq. ft. wraparound veranda, 2,400 sq. ft. of air-conditioned living space and a 600 sq. ft. interior patio. The subterranean area includes parking/ storage for 3 to 4 vehicles, a separate laundry/pantry room, workshop space with 30 feet of workbench, a separate bedroom and bath for household help, and several large storage spaces. Special features of the house include: • 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms including 2 master suites, and a guest bedroom • Open plan design with uncluttered 825-sq. ft. kitchen/dining/living area • Travertine tile throughout except for master suites with laminate flooring • Kitchen cabinets by Pedini, stainless steel appliances by Miele, Fisher-Paykel, and Electrolux • All rooms have either a patio or a veranda entrance • Three-station dumbwaiter, pantry storage area in the basement, kitchen and rooftop entertainment area • Built-in utilities for rooftop kitchen and entertainment area • Retractable awning in central patio • Swim-jet pool with sheer descent waterfall and granite waterwall • Wraparound veranda provides shade on windows year round • Entertainment-oriented flow-through design combines the central patio, dining/buffet area and exterior seating area. The design easily accommodates over 50 guests. The fenced lot is slightly over 1 acre and could easily accommodate a separate building for a guest house or an additional pool house.

San Felipe, Baja California One can truly appreciate the beauty and peace of Baja in this gorgeous, 2,100 sq. ft. home. It comes completely furnished, has a separate two-bedroom casita, and the amenities are too extensive to list them all; upgraded furniture and appliances, ceiling fans, entertainment center, 109-inch Projection DLP Home Theatre and many, many more. The outdoor living area is over 9,000 sq. ft., including pool, spa, shower, kitchen, and lots of privacy. This million dollar property is PRICED TO SELL at only US$479,000! Owner Motivated! To start living your dream, contact Bill Maine at (686) 231-4921; from the US (619) 203-5129; email: billmaine@gmail.com.

Kitchen at night.

For more information, contact El Dorado Ranch at (800) 4042599 ext 4062 or email email@ sanfelipebaja.com. Please refer to VDS 7200-027-13. This property is located in the community of Vista del Sol.

WWW.MEXICOLIVINGGUIDE.COM/OPENHOUSE CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

San Jose del Cabo, Baja California This lot features a 98ft of waterfront with commanding harbour views. Situated ideally in the center of the 900 acre harbour facing the feature boutique hotel with its European French, Italian and Old Mexico flavour. Postcard perfect.10,584.57 sq. ft. of land with the ability to build a footprint of over 5,000 sq. ft. home. Phase one discount price $752,225.10 with financing available. Additional discounts for cash.Ask for Margaret Hedges Tel: 250-754-0690 (vonage) or Cell: 044-624-1919303 Email: jimmarghedges@gmail.com.www. caboriviera.ca


CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

33


San Felipe, Baja California

34

San Felipe malecón (boardwalk) at dusk.

Just 125 miles south of the international border is a virtual paradise on Earth. If you take Mexico’s Federal Highway 5, you will end up in San Felipe, right along the Sea of Cortez. Founded in 1916, San Felipe began as a fishing port and now attracts tourists and retirees from all around the world. The natural beauty, unique arid landscape and endless outdoor opportunities for fun make San Felipe a must-see destination. One trip and it is easy to see why so many people return to make San Felipe their home, adding to the population of roughly 25,000. The beaches of San Felipe are amongst the most pristine and natural in the world. The clean, smooth sand and the fact that San Felipe is the second sunniest place on Earth make it perfect for anyone who enjoys lounging on the beach, beach combing for one-of-a-kind sea treasures, or swimming in the warm waters. You can camp or sleep on the beaches for the ultimate beach bum experience or romantic night away from ordinary. When the tide is low, the northern beaches can extend nearly half a mile out, opening up the possibilities of finding more unique beach treasures. It can also provide entertainment, because nearly every weekend someone in their shining new 4-wheel drive will bury themselves to the axle, many taken as another sacrifice to the sea. 

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

The desert dunes and valleys can give visitors more than just a great photo opportunity. Off-road racing in the San Felipe area is also unlike any other area in the world and plays host to world-renowned races that attract many racing enthusiasts. You can rent ATVs or dune buggies, or you can go on a guided tour. If you are a beginner, rental companies provide instruction and lessons before you head out into the dunes. Rental companies are available throughout downtown San Felipe. Fishing is so ingrained in the culture and history of San Felipe that many regard this town as the home of the fish taco and just about anything made with the San Felipe blue shrimp that is exclusive to the area. There are a few charter fishing companies in the area that cater to both the experts and the novice. If you fish off the shores of San Felipe, you can expect to catch sierra, corvina, grouper, sea bass and a few other species. The bay of San Felipe contains an artificial reef, which makes finding the fish a littler easier. Many of the local charter companies can take you for 4–8 hours of fishing. As San Felipe has grown, so have the amenities in this coastal town. Exclusive resorts and luxury retirement homes, along with small beach villas, have led to a burgeoning area north of town with many competing restaurants, grocers and bars.

The downtown area features galleries, craft shops, clothing stores, pottery and jewelry stores; which all make for an eclectic shopping experience. There is also an active nightlife for locals and tourists alike. The San Felipe area has that rare combination of sophisticated amenities and natural wonders galore. It is a very active community with many annual festivals and events including the annual Shrimp Festival in November, Blues & Arts Fiesta in March, Cominata Contra Cancer Walk in March, SCORE San Felipe 250 in March, Mexico Living Home Show in October, and a swap meet every weekend, October through May. 

San Felipe Road Trips

Valle de los Gigantes 30°52'56.64”N ~ 114°45'31.28”W Valle de los Gigantes, or Valley of the Giants is home to the largest cardones cacti in the world. The shadows alone cast by these larger-than-life plants can extend as long as a few football fields. This natural wonder draws many photographers and naturalists all year long. The natural reserve of the thousand-yearold Cardon Cactus has become a major attraction after the transport of one of these giant specimens to Seville, Spain, for Seville Expo '92. Local enviromentalists are lobbying

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Image provided by Parkstrong, http://www.parkstrong.com/

D E S T I N  A T I O N S 

31°01º39ºN ~ 114°50º07ºW

for the protection of the valley in the form of a Nature Reserve. Located 15 Km south of downtown San Felipe, just south of campo Punta Estrella, Valle de los Gigantes is a must-see site. The Rob's Ranch Waterfalls 30°51'238”N ~ W115°14'.137 There are several waters falls in the mountains above San Felipe, but a favorite is what many refer to as Rob's Ranch. The ranch is not much more than an old cattle shoot next to an area for parking. The falls are approx. 300 yards up stream of this point.  Spring time is the best time to visit the area when wild purple and yellow  flowers blanet the desert floor and all the desert and mountain flora is blossoming and beautiful.   Don't expect water during the summer months.  The stream that provides the falls, also provides water to several ranchos in the valley. The pipes used to carry the water are visible beside the stream and road.  The falls are 25.2 miles southwest of San Felipe.  From the top of Saltito Rd. (El Dorado Ranch) turn West (right), travel 8.7 miles to the cows hide fork in the road, stay on the left fork towards Valle Chico (small sign), continue travel 6.7 miles, turn right onto dirt road and continue 9.8 miles to Rob's Ranch. 


Bahia San Luis Gonzaga

Valle de Gigante by edgarinn

Las Caras de Mexico 18-hole Championship Golf Course, at La Ventana del Mar in El Dorado Ranch San Felipe Baja California.

Puertecitos 30°20'44.23”N ~ 114°38'24.71”W Just 90 kilometers south of San Felipe is the little town of Puertecitos. Settled in 1949, this little fishing village hasn't changed much. The road to Puertecitos is paved, and is a beautiful coastal drive. By the time you've reach Puertecitos the landscape becomes nearly void of any vegetation.  uertecitos has a few establishments, basic supplies for sale, a small airstrip, a machine shop and only a handful of families who live there full time. Those who do call it home are always helpful and gracious to the occasional traveler. The Cowpatty Cantina is a must when you visit Puertecitos. The funky little cantina is a local hangout and a favorite watering hole for travelers. It's on the highway as you enter town. Many tourists find the natural hot springs of Puertecitos to be its top draw. These springs are so intensely boiling hot, you must wait for high tide to roll in

to cool the waters down enough to soak without burning. Many find soaking a necessity after the journey there, especially if you plan to continue the rough and tumble drive further south to Gonzaga Bay. Gonzaga Bay 29°47'48.42”N ~ 114°24'3.99”W Bahia San Luis Gonzaga, or better known as Gonzaga Bay, is one of the most beautiful and pristine destinations in Baja. Just a 100 miles south of San Felipe, Gonzaga Bay has remained a remote and isolated place. The road from San Felipe to Puertecitos was finished being paved in 2009 and, as of this writing, the road has continued 18 miles south of Puertecitios, leaving only 30 rough and bumpy miles of dirt road to Gonzaga Bay.  Gonzaga Bay is a dream destination for many. In addition to the breathtaking beauty of the area, the bay also includes over 70 oceanfront homes,

San Felipe Lighthouse

an airstrip for the planes of owners and guests, Alfonsina's restaurant and hotel, Rancho Grande market, and a Pemex. The raw beauty and remoteness of these two settlements cannot be replicated or even described. It is basically as far from civilization as most people ever care to venture, but worth the trip for the natural beauty alone and its “you have to see it to believe it” factor.

San Felipe Lodging

RV Park Kiki's RV Park on the Beach......... 686-577-2021 Private Rentals Casey’s Place............................ 686-577-1431 Rancho del Sol............................ 686-231-4921 Redwagon Property Services...... 686-576-0081 Sandollar Condotels.................... 686-123-7688 Motels/Hotels La Hacienda de la Langosta roja.. 686-577-0483

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

San Felipe Dining

American Los Arcos................................... 686-577-2585 Blowin’ Smoke............................ 686-576-0710 Roadrunner cafe......................... 686-227-7668 The Beach Bar & Grill.................. 686-577-3144 Mexican The Beach Bar and Grill............... 686-577-3144 Rosita restaurant......................... 686-577-1903 Pizza Fatboy’s...................................... 686-577-4092 Los Arcos - Happy Jackass......... 686-577-2585 Rabbit Pizza Delivery................... 686-577-0987 Sand Rail Pizza........................... 686-576-0441 Steak & Seafood Baja Mar & Taco Factory............. 686-577-2648 Los Arcos................................. . 686-577-2585 Fine Dining The Sweet Spot........................... 686-209-6369 Pavilion Restaurant...................... 686-577-0022 Juanitos (el Colorado)................. 686-133-6500

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

35


{DESTINATION DIRECTORY} Welcome to Baja – City Maps & Business Directory BAJA CALIFORNIA

ROSARITO BEACH, BAJA CALIFORNIA

Playas de Rosarito, or Rosarito Beach as it is referred to in English, is a city in the Mexican state of Baja California. It is located between the Pacific Ocean and the coastal foothills, just 20 minutes south of the U.S. border in Tijuana and is a popular destination for tourists, snowbirds and expatriates from the United States. With 20 miles of white, sandy beaches with endless activities, Rosarito offers a large variety of places to stay and things to do, including incredible shopping in the Artisan shops with some of Mexico’s finest leather goods, furniture, wrought iron, pottery, marble and traditional Mexican crafts. You’ll find a culinary paradise of international cuisine from traditional Mexican, sensational seafood and delicious steaks to American, Chinese, French and Italian specialties. Be sure to visit the well-known lobster village, Puerto Nuevo, just 15 minutes south of Rosarito— a tourist and culinary destination. Whether staying for vacation or life, you will enjoy Playas de Rosarito. ATM/GETTING CASH Banamex, Bancomer and Bital have 24-hour ATMs that accept most U.S. bank cards all along the Tijuana–Rosarito–Ensenada corridor. Only pesos are dispensed; you can get dollars from an HSBC ATM. Your account in the U.S. is charged that day’s rate of exchange. A service fee will also be deducted from your account.

Municipal/Municipal

Airport “Abelardo L Rodriguez International Airport”..................................... 664-607-8200 Immigration.................................................. 661-612-7262

Ensenada, BAJA CALIFORNIA Ensenada is the third-largest city in the state of Baja California. About 70 miles south of the San Diego/Tijuana border, located in the Bahía de Todos Santos—an inlet of the Pacific Ocean—Ensenada is an important commercial and fishing port as well as a cruise ship stop. The city is backed by small mountain ranges, and due to its location on the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean latitude, the weather tends to be mild year round. Most of the shopping is at sea level, making it a great city for getting around on your own

energy. Ensenada is easy to navigate with all numbered streets running north and south, and celebrity-named streets running east and west. Ensenada has the accommodations to meet any level of comfort or amenities. Prices can range depending on the time of year from $30 to $250 plus. The best hotels are located to the north and south of town, along the beach, and are not within walking distance from downtown shopping and attractions; but taxi and shuttles are available in most locations.

DINING

MEDICAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS MÉDICOS ISSSTE .........................................................646-176-2230 IMSS ............................................................646-120-7771 Centro de Salud.............................................646-152-1371

DINING

American Food .............................................. 661-100-2560 La Bamba

LODGING

RV Park/Parque de RV Popotla RV Park (See ad on page 26).......... 661-612-1501

BUSINESS DIRECTORY A-Z

DENTIST Consultorio Dental......................................... 661-612-4204 DOG GROOMERS D’ Groomer Dog Grooming (See ad on page 14) . . 661-100-6218 Elevators/Elevadores Baja Lifts to To The To (See ad on page 30)... 661-614-1434 FINANCING/FINANCIAMIENTO Baja Lending Company......................................686-576-0653 JEWELRY Baja Pearls Jewelry (See ad on page 34).....646-178-8734 MAILING SERVICES Click On (See ad on page 7)........................ 661-614-0513 Medical/Médico Baja Medix (See ad on page 27).................. 661-612-5850 REAL ESTATE SERVICES Baja Closing & Escrow Services.................... 760-494-7053 Satellite TV Installation Cisco-Sat...................................................... 661-616-0779 STORAGE SERVICES Baja Public Storage....................................... 619-616-0779 utilities/empresas de servicios públicos CFE ................................. 612-143 0064 or 612-142 0237 TELMEX . ..................................................... 612-142 0001 CALIGAS....................................................... 612-142 0122

36

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

Mexican Magana’s...................................................... 646-155-0586 Steak & Seafood El Rey Sol (See ad on page 26)................... 646-178-1601

LODGING

Hotel Posada El Rel Sol (See ad on page 26).........646-178-1601 Posada Don Diego (See ad on page 23)........616-166-2181

BUSINESS DIRECTORY A-Z

Aeropuerto/Airport Aeropuerto ...................................................646-273-1984 Art Gallery Garery Art & Stuff..........................................646-175-8859 ARTIST Alfonso Arambulua.........................................646-149-3866 DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT/MANEJO DE FRACCIONAMIENTOS Baja Mar Country Club (See ad on page 23) ..1-800-434-2252 FINANCING/FINANCIAMIENTO Baja Lending Company (See ad on page 18 & 31)..............................686-576-0653 FISHING Dann Manz (See ad on page 28) HEALTH SPA La Fonda........................................................646-155-0394 JEWELRY Baja Pearls Jewelry (See ad on page 34).....646-178-8734

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MUSIC/MUSICA Pharmacy Regia & House of Music................646-174-0557 Professional Services PSN Mexico Professional Services.................646-178-8280 Legal/Immigration Assist FM3/FM2/FMT Import documentation www.psnmexico.com POLICE/POLICÍA Policia Ministerial...........................................646-176-3636 Policia Federal Caminos................................ 646-683-8040 Policia Federal Preventiva ..............................646-176-2579 Prefectura Naval.......................................... 469-0376/2948 public transportation/el transporte público Terminal de Buses..........................................646-224-1041 REAL ESTATE AGENTS/AGENTES DE BIENES RAÍCES Nicolas Santos (Rosarito)...............................619-917-5695 REAL ESTATE SERVICES Baja Closing & Escrow Services.....................760-494-7053 RENTALS Popotla Rv Village (See ad on page 26).......... 661-612-1501 utilities/empresas de servicios públicos CFE ..................................612-143 0064 or 612-142 0237 TELMEX . ...................................................... 612-142 0001 CALIGAS........................................................ 612-142 0122 Winery Baja Wine Tours (See ad on page 17)...........646-118-9801


{DESTINATION DIRECTORY} BARS/CLUBS The Beach Bar and Grill................................. 686-577-3144 Fandangos.................................................... 686-477-0060 The Green Door Bar (Los Algodones) (See ad on page 24)............................... 658-517-7347 Los Arcos - Happy Jackass (See ad on page 25)............................... 686-577-2585 BEAUTY SALONS/SALONES DE BELLEZA Lilly Ana’s Day Spot...................................... 686-577-6253 Hair By Nancy.............................................. .686-113-3682 BUILDING MATERIALS/MATERIALES DE CONTRUCCIÓN Maderas de San Felipe (See ad on page 31).... 686-577-1515 CATERING The Sweet Spot (See ad on page 24)............ 686-209-6369 Baja Jimmy’s Catering (See ad on page 24)..... 686-139-7373 CHOCOLATE/CHOCOLATE Baja Chocolate Lovers (See ad on page 25)...686-576-0348 church Mission San Felipe (See ad on page 4)....... 686-577-0877 CITY SERVICES/SERVICIOS DE LA CIUDAD District Attorney’s......................................... 686-577-1110 Mayors Office............................................... 686-577-1021 COMPUTER SERVICES CSI–Computer & Satellite Installation (See ad on page 31)................................. 686-577-2928 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT/MANEJO DE CONSTRUCCIÓN Sweitzer Construction Management (See ad on page 31). ................................. 686-577-0195 Perez Construction (See ad on page 30). .... 686-576-0650

San Felipe, BAJA CALIFORNIA San Felipe is a small fishing village, situated on the Sea of Cortez, 118 miles south of the U.S. border, which was historically dependent upon fishing; however, today tourism and real estate provide the economic base. Even as it grows into the next century with four-lane highways, it will remain a small fishing village in its heart and soul. Today, San Felipe is maturing into a sophisticated resort community with resorts, luxury condos, fine restaurants, sport fishing and world-class off-road adventures. The beaches extend north and south with over 50 miles of shoreline to explore, including 23-

foot tides, exposing a kilometer or more of ocean floor—one of the largest tidal bores in the world. And directly behind San Felipe is Sierra San Pedro Martír, the tallest mountains in Baja. The desert terrain is vast and offers incredible trails and exploration for ATVs, dirt bikes and off-road vehicles. Just south of San Felipe are extensive sand dunes ideal for buggies and rails. The Valley of the Giants, the natural reserve of the thousand-year-old Cardon Cactus, has become a major attraction. In addition, San Felipe offers great bargain shopping for souvenirs, arts and much more.

Civil Protection Unit....................................... 686-577-1433 Chamber of Commerce................................. 686-577-1104 Fire Dept/Ambulance..................................... 686-577-1182 Federal Preventive Police............................... 686-577-1045 Immigration Office......................................... 686-577-1083 Port Captain.................................................. 686-577-1577 State Judicial Police...................................... 686-577-1203 Tourism Department...................................... 686-577-1155

Rentals Casey’s Place............................................... 686-577-1431 VIP Earth Events........................................... 686-231-4921 Redwagon Property Services........................ 686-576-0081 Sandollar Condotels...................................... 686-123-7688 Su Casa Elegante.......................................... 686-577-0745 Motels/Hotels La Hacienda de la Langosta Roja (See ad on page 26)................................ 686-577-0483 Olympia Motel (Los Algodones)..................... 658-517-7347

DINING

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

Municipal/Municipal

American Los Arcos - Happy Jackass (See ad on page 25)................................ 686-577-2585 Blowin’ Smoke BBQ.......................................686-576-0710 Road Runner Cafe (See ad on page 25).........686-227-7668 The Beach Bar & Grill.....................................686-577-3144 Catering Baja Jimmy’s Catering (See ad on page 24)..... 686-139-7373 Mexican The Beach Bar and Grill................................. 686-577-3144 Rosita Restaurant . ....................................... 686-577-1903 Pizza Fatboy’s (See ad on page 24)...................... 686-577-4092 Los Arcos - Happy Jackass (See ad on page 25)................................ 686-577-2585 Rabbit Pizza Delivery..................................... 686-577-0987 Sand Rail Pizza............................................. 686-576-0441 Steak & Seafood Baja Mar & Taco Factory (See ad on page 25)... 686-577-2648 Los Arcos..................................................... 686-577-2585 Fine Dining The Sweet Spot (See ad on page 24)........... 686-209-6369 2-Highway 5 KM 183, San Felipe, BC Pavilion Restaurant (See ad on page 24)..... 686-577-0022 Juanitos (El Colorado)................................... 686-133-6500

COUNSELING-THERAPY/CONSULTA TERAPÉUTICA Inner Connection........................................... 686-172-8851 DELI SunDance Deli (See ad on page 24)............ 686-576-0369 DENTIST/DENTISTA California Dental Spa (See ad on page 27)...686-577-0708 Consultorio Dental Y de Ortodoncia (See ad on page 27). .................................686-577-6212

ENTERTAINMENT/ENTRETENIMIENTO Name That Tune - Denny Flannigan................ 686-576-1683 The Singout Sisters & Chuey (Karaoke)......... 686-576-0047 EVENT SERVICES/servicios acontecimiento Produciones Baja.......................................... 686-576-1683 FINANCING/FINANCIAMIENTO Baja Lending Company (See ad on page 18 & 31). . ......................686-576-0653 FILM DEVELOPMENT/IMPRESION DE FOTOS Fotografia Alvarez.......................................... 686-577-1144

ARCHITECT/ARQUITECTO Rosa Lina Ramos Lazcano............................ 686-184-6172

Graphic Design/Diseño Gráfico GreetScape................................................... 686-188-2393

ARTIST/ARTISTA Andrena Joyce................E-mail: andrenajoyce@yahoo.com Robin Waters................................................ 686-115-0526

HATS/sombreros Band It (See ad on page 4).......................... 686-123-5147

RV Park/Parque de RV Club de Pesca............................................... 686-577-1180

LODGING

BANK/BANCO BBVA Bancomer............................................ 686-577-2224 Silvia Elizabeth Urbea, Preferred Customer’s Unit Ext. 13

Kiki's RV Park on the Beach (See ad on page 26)................................ 686-577-2021

BANDS/BANDAS Agave Blues.................................................. 686-184-9237

MOVING Services San Felipe Moving & Storage (See ad on page 31)................................. 686-576-0432 Optometrists/Opthamologists California Optical (See ad on page 27)........ 686-577-0708 PHARMACY/FARMACIA Botica “Sagrado Corazon” (See ad on page 27)......................................686-577-1294 Santa Fe Pharmacy (See ad on page 27) ....686-576-0546 POLICE/POLICÍA Federal Preventive Police .............................. 686-577-1045 Police .......................................................... 686-577-1134 POSTAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS POSTALES Yet Mail (See ad on page 7). ........................... 686-577-1255 SunRunner Mail Center (See ad on page 7).... 686-147-6752 PRINTERS/IMPRESORAS Papeleria Copicentro..................................... 686-577-1402 The Print Supplier (See ad on page 28)....... 686-230-9933 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/MANEJO DE PROPIEDADES Custom Vacation Homes............................... 928-277-6863 ............ 928-277-7559 & visit www.sanfelipevacations.com Redwagon Property Services........................ 686-576-0081 PUBLICATIONS/PUBLICACIONES Gringo Gazette (See ad on page 4).............. 686-111-3692 Mexico Living Magazine................................ 686-577-1377

REAL ESTATE SERVICES/servicios DE BIENES RAÍCES Baja Closing & Escrow Services (See ad on page 18 & 31). ....................... 686-576-0653

GOLF/GOLF Las Caras de Mexico..................................... 686-576-0517

BAKERY/PANADERÍA Panaderia Especial........................................ 686-577-1902

MEDICAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS MÉDICOS Ambulance................................................... 686-577-0500 Health Center............................................... 686-577-1521 Red Cross..................................................... 686-577-1544 Dr. Victor Abasolo............. 686-577-1706 or 686-573-0174

DOCTORS/DOCTORES Dr. Victor Abasolo............. 686-577-1706 or 686-573-0174

ADULT CARE/ATENCION DE ADULTOS San Felipe Adult Living Facility....................... 686-576-0661

Auto Rental CA Baja Rent-A-Car (See ad on page 19).... 619-470-7368

MASSAGE/MASAJE Casey’s Place (Massage) (See ad on page 14)...686-577-1431

REAL ESTATE AGENTS/AGENTES DE BIENES RAÍCES Bill Maine...................................................... 686-231-4921

ACCOUNTING/CONTABILIDAD CP E&A Accounting (See ad on page 26)......... 686-577-0836

Attorneys/Abogados J. Lucio Sosa S. (Mexicali)............................ 686-905-0420

LANDSCAPING/JARDINERÍA Versoleil (See ad on page 19). .................... 686-576-0664

DEVELOPMENTS/FRACCIONAMIENTOS El Dorado Ranch........................................... 686-577-0015 Oasis de Cortez (See ad on page 31). ......... 760-208-1700 Playa de Oro................................................. 686-576-0223 Playa del Paraiso................................. 888-647-5292 x 704 San Rafael.................................................... 686-576-0223

FISHING Pablo's Sport Fishing (English Spoken) (See ad on page 28)................................. 686-117-6974 Azteca Sport Fishing and Tours (See ad on page 21)................................. 686-577-0741

ART GALLERIES SF Gift & Crafters Guild (See ad on page 10).....686-175-5420

INTERIOR DESIGN/DISEÑO INTERIOR San Felipe Interior Design (See ad on page 10)................. 686-577-3176

HOME BUILDERS/CONTRATISTAS Oscar Parra................................................... 686-120-6506 Perez Construction (See ad on page 30). .... 686-236-4927 San Felipe Home Builders (See ad on page 31 & 44). ....................... 686-577-3176 Home Improvements Baja Home Improvement (See ad on page 30)................................. 686-222-4507 IMPORT SERVICES/SE RVICIOS DE IMPORTACIÓN San Felipe Moving & Storage (See ad on page 31)................................ 686-576-0432 Insurance Alani’s Mexican Insurance....................................686-577-2464

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

REAL ESTATE/BIENES RAÍCES Baja 24/7 Construction & Real Estate (See ad on page 31)................................. 686-577-6196

RECREATION/RECREACIÓN Aerodynamic - Ultralight flights . ................... 686-116-2933 SATELLITE TELEVISION & INTERNET/ TELEVISION SATELITALES Y INTERNET CSI - Computer & Satellite Installation (See ad on page 31)................................. 686-577-2928 SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS/ ORGANIZACIONES DE SERVICIO Club Las Amigas........................................... 686-202-0455 San Felipe Lions Club (See ad on page 16).....686-212-3599 San Felipe Rotary (See ad on page 7 & 14)....686-576-0112 Solar BC Solar Cooking (See ad on page 25)........ 686-106-9693 SPECIALTY STORES Sea of Cortez Salt (See ad on page 24)....... 686-209-0074 STORAGE/ALMACÉN San Felipe Moving & Storage (See ad on page 31)..686-576-0432 TATTOOING/TATUAJES Baja Ink Spot Tattoo & Body Piercing............. 686-577-0746 TRANSPORTATION/TRANSPORTACIÓN Airport.......................................................... 686-577-1368 Taxi Service.................................................. 686-577-1293 Bus Station .................................................. 686-577-1516 utilities/empresas de servicios públicos Electric (CFE).................... 686-577-1060 or 686-577-5602 Estrella Azul (Water Dispensery).................... 686-577-1314 Propane Gas................................................. 686-577-2373 State Com. of Services Public....................... 686-556-1383 Telnor Phone Co............................................ 686-577-1000 Water Company............................................ 686-577-1022 VETERINARY/VETERINARIO ZAPP Animal Center...................................... 686-111-1143 WASTE MANAGEMENT/MANEJO DE DESHECHO San Felipe Disposal (See ad on page 27).... 686-121-1004

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

37


{DESTINATION DIRECTORY} BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR San Ignacio

BCS Photo

Loreto, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Loreto, founded in 1697 by Jesuit missionaries, was the first Spanish settlement on the east coast of the Baja California peninsula. Loreto, situated on the Sea of Cortez, 26º00’46” N 111º20’36” W, served as the capital of the province of Las Californias from its founding until the capital was moved to Monterey on February 3, 1777. The 2005 census reported a population of 10,283. Today Loreto is a tourist resort, catering mostly to U.S. travelers, with daily flights from California arriving at Loreto International Airport. Many of the American

Mulegé, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Mulegé is situated at the mouth of the Río Santa Rosalía (26°53´17˝N 111°58´53˝W), in the state of Baja California Sur, 38 miles south of Santa Rosalia, at the mouth of Bahía de Concepción. In 2005, the reported population was 3,317. Nestled between two hills in a lush tropic palm oasis divided by a shaded river that runs towards an estuary that flows to the sea, Mulegé is rich in history with lots of great sites to see, including the Misión Santa Rosalía de Mulegé, founded in 1705; the old state penitentiary, finished in 1907; and the Sierra de Guadalupe cave paintings. Outdoor activities abound, from mountain biking, scuba diving and kayaking to deep

sea fishing. The cold northern current and the warm southern current come together to create an environment great for catching some of the 100 different species of fish in the Mulegé waters. By land, Mulegé is 650 miles south of the San Diego/Tijuana border crossing on Mexican Highway 1, and in 2010, via Highway 5 through San Felipe. By Air, Mulegé is served by three airstrips: Hotel Serenidad Airstrip (El Gallito), the Mulegé Municipal and Punta San Pedro. Regional flights are available at the Palo Verde Airport, and international flights are available at the Loreto Airport.

Municipal/Municipal

LODGING

Health Center / Issste.................................... 615-153-0298 Judicial Police............................................... 615-153-0049 Mexican Red Cross.......................... 615-153-0280 / 30110 Municipal Delegation....................................615-15-3-0049 State Tourism................................................ 615-124-0199 Taxi Service.................................................. 615-153-0420 Traffic Department........................................ 615-153-0049

RV Oasis Rio Baja...............................................615-153-0425 Villa Maria Isabel RV Park...............................615-153-0246 Hotel Hotel Serenidad..............................................615-153-0530 Mulegé Hotel..................................................615-153-0090

38

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

tourists enjoy fishing in “pangas” for “dorado” (Mahi-mahi or Dolphin Fish). Local restaurants will even prepare the daily catch of the tourists. Loreto has an excellent museum alongside the historic, but still active, parish. The Spanish Fathers found a steady spring of fresh water on this site. Loreto’s climate is hot and humid, with abundant sunshine (desert with some rainfalls in summer). The medium temperature is 76 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperatures are hot from June through October. These summer days have highs around 93 degrees Fahrenheit and high humidity.

When in need of an ambulance, please call the Police number first (they will dispatch the call) and then the Fire Department number. Police number is 135-0035 or 135-0036. By following this procedure, you can be assured of being assisted.

Municipal/Municipal

Fire Department............................................ 613-135-1566 Immigration.................................................. 613-135-1266

DINING

Breakfast Cafe Sagitario................................................613-135-0718 Mexican 1697............................................................. 613-135-2538 Seafood Augie’s Bar & Bait Shop................................ 613-135-1224 NEW Loreto Islas (See ad on page 25)........ 613-135-2341

LODGING RV Park/Parque de RV Rivera del Mar............................................... 613-135-0718 Motel Motel El Dorado.....................................686-613-135-1500 Hotel Hotel Coco Cabana........................................613-135-1729 La Damiana Inn..............................................613-135-0356 Las Cabanas de Loreto...................................613-135-1105 Tripui Hotel.....................................................613-133-0818 Rentals Coco-cabanas.............................................. 613-135-1729 El Tiburon Casitas................................. US (805) 748-4566 Hamman’s Vacaciones (See ad on page 26)................................. 613-135-0791 Rentals Loreto (See ad on page 26)............ 613-135-2505 Stay in Loreto............................................... 613-135-0791

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

AIRPORT Loreto International Airport............................ 613-135-0565 Banks / Banco Bancomer..................................................... 613-135-0739 BOOKSTORES El Cadallo Blanco (See ad on page 4). ........ 613-116-5374

BUS Loreto Bus Terminal...................................... 613-135-0767 Deli Dalí, Gourmet Store........................................613-135-2477 Stock up your boat or house with the best products; meats, dairies all types of groceries and fresh baguettes. Benito Juarez s/n, Col. Centro, Loreto BCS dali_loreto@prodigy.net.mx HOME DECÓR Gecko's Curios (See ad on page 10)............ 613-135-2505 Medical Ambulance................................................... 613-135-1566 Hospital........................................................ 613-135-0039 ISSTE........................................................... 613-135-0730 Red Cross..................................................... 613-135-1111 REAL ESTATE Alexander Real Estate....................................... 613-135-0212 TOURISM Loreto Tourism Office.....................................613-135-0411


{DESTINATION DIRECTORY} Al va

ro O

on

Mi

gu

el

M

lgo

io

eL eo

Co leg

Ju ni to Be

da

ez d

n

Jo

se

Av . Ig

Ma

ria

na

GD

cio

nt os

Mo

rel o

Za

Sa

Os

Hi

ar qu

M

ar ez

ilit ar

.M

br eg

sP av on

rag

oz a

De

go

ca

lia

rV er du

do

Av e.

Ra fa el

Pe d

Ag u

ra jo

st in

Ol

ac

Ra

ul

he a

A.

Ca r

ril

lo

go

nta Pu s

for Ca li

la

ojo

de

re Ab

ino

m Ca

nia

Radio Antenna

Municipal/Municipal

Fire Department.............................................612-122-0054 La Paz Tourism Office.....................................612-124-0278 Museum of Anthropology...............................612-122-0162 Port Captain...................................................612-122-0243

DINING

Cafe Capri......................................................624-123-3737 Gorilla’s Grill1................................................612-128-8095

LODGING

Hotels La Concha Beach Resort . .............................612-121-6344 Los Arcos .....................................................612-122-2744 Marina Hotel .................................................612-121-6254 Mediterrane ..................................................612-125-1195 Seven Crown Hotel .......................................612-128-7787

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

FERRY SERVICE Baja Ferries....................................................612-125-7443

ja

Named “Pueblo Mágico” in 2006, Todos Santos is a small coastal town at the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains, on the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula, about an hour’s drive north of Cabo San Lucas and an hour south from La Paz. Located at 23°26´56˝N 110°13´32˝W, Todos Santos is very near the Tropic of Cancer in the municipality of La Paz. The population was 4,078 at the census of 2005. During the 19th century Todos Santos thrived as the Baja sugarcane capital. Now the rich farmlands have been reworked and the town prospers from an abundance of avocado, vegetable and chili farming, papaya and mango orchards, fishing and ranching.

The mission Nuestra Señora del Pilar de La Paz was founded by father Jaime Bravo in 1723. This mission contains the statue of the Virgin of Pilar, which is the focus of the town’s main festival in October. More recently, there has been an increase in tourist activity and a boom in real estate development. Handicraft shops, art galleries, upscale restaurants, boutique hotels and restored colonial buildings have contributed to the gentrification and redevelopment of the town. There are many beautiful beaches within a 30-minute drive. Playa Las Palmas and Playa Los Cerritos are great beaches for swimming and shell collecting, and Los Cerritos attracts surfers from around the world.

Municipal/Municipal

Home Decor Ricky Ricardo’s Home Furnishings.................612-145-0379

Todos Santos

LA PAZ DOWNTOWN La Paz, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur La Paz (“The Peace”) is the capital city of Baja California Sur located at 24.1405°N 110.3123°Wand is an important commercial center. Its surrounding municipality, which is the fourth-largest municipality in Mexico in geographical size, in 2005 reported a population of 219,596 living on 7,828.2 square miles of land. La Paz is typically dry and warm with averages of 75–77 degrees Fahrenheit, and 300 days or better of sunshine annually. Summer months are often in the 90’s and can be humid. The winter months can drop below 60, but stays mostly in the mid-60’s. During the summer the cooling Coromuel winds, a weather phenomenon unique

Ba

za Po

Todos Santos, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur

to the La Paz area, blow from Bahia de La Paz keeping the temperature mild. By Air, La Paz is served by Manuel Márquez de León International Airport with flights to the U.S., Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Two ferry services operate from Pichilingue outside the city, connecting the Baja California peninsula to the mainland at Mazatlán and Topolobampo. By Road, La Paz is served mainly by two highways, Highway 1 that links the south of the state from Cabo San Lucas to the north of the peninsula until Tijuana, and Highway 19, which connects La Paz with the population of the South Pacific towns like Todo Santos and El Pescadero.

GOVERNMENT SEMATUR......................................................612-125-8899 Baja California Sur State Government.............612-124-0199 La Paz Post Office Home Decor Ricky Ricardo’s Home Furnishings.................612-145-0379 Police City Police......................................................612-122-4692 Green Angels.................................................612-125-9677 Fed. Judicial Police.........................................612-125-2665 Highway Patrol....................612-12203-69 & 612-122-5735 State Jud. Police.................612-122-6610 & 612-122-1399 Medical Cruz Roja 065 or............................................612-122-1222 ISSSTE Hospital.............................................612-122-2789 IMSS Hospital................................................612-122-7377 Salvatierra Hospital..............612-122-1496 & 612-1221596 Real Estate services Omni Services...............................................612-123-4888

Hospital........................................................ 612-145-0095 Mayor........................................................... 612-145-0365 Post Office.................................................... 612-145-0330 State Police................................................... 612-145-0198

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

Art Galleries Contemporary Mexican Art.............................612-145-0215 Charles Stewart Gallery/Studio.......................612-145-0265 Colores de Mexico.........................................612-145-0106 Ezra Katz Gallery............................................612-137-3473 Galeria Arturo................................................612-145-0773 Galeria de Kathleen Gambogi..........................612-145-0460 Galeria La Poza..............................................612-145-0400 Galeria N. E. Hayles........................................612-145-0183 Galeria On-ce Photography.............................612-145-0550 Galeria Wall....................................................612-145-0527 Jill Logan Galerîa (See ad on page 10)........612-145-0151 La Polilla...................................................01-331-255-7965 Michael Cope.................................................612-145-0500 Wendy Faith, artist in glass.............................612-145-0255

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Shopping Cactus Arte Mexicano....................................612-145-0771 Casa Juanita..................................................612-140-0069 La Canada del Diablo Muebles Rusticos.........612-140-0069 Curios Tony....................................................612-145-0356 El Perico Azul.................................................612-145-0538 Fenix de Todos Santos....................................612-145-0808 Galeria Santa Fe.............................................612-145-0301 Mangos.........................................................612-145-0451 Manos Mexicanas..........................................612-145-0538 Regalos Diana-Dos Glorias.............................612-145-0324 Uguet Tiles and Marble...................................612-127-2776 Hotel California Emporium..............................612-145-0525 Real Estate King Y Asociados...........................................624-151-5840 Amerimex......................................................612-145-0050 Maya Roca....................................................612-145-0464 Milagro Real Estate........................................612-145-0219 Moniely Real Estate........................................612-145-0540 Pescadero Properties.....................................612-145-0756 Ricardo Amigo Real Estate ............................612-145-0551

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

39


PG

unta <-- P

{DESTINATION DIRECTORY} Pesc a

dero

San Jose del Cabo

Ave. Centenario

au

ric

io

Ca st

ro

20 de Noviembre

s s Barrile Calle Lo

Pa s

eo

bo S

>

a To C

LOS Barriles, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Los Barriles is a quaint little town 45 minutes north of the San Jose Del Cabo Airport and 65 miles south of the La Paz Airport, and only a 90-minute drive from the hustle and bustle of Cabo San Lucas. The consistent winds and beautiful, white sandy beaches make Los Barriles a hot spot for water and wind enthusiasts from late November until early March. One of the top Wind Surfing and Kite Boarding destinations

in the world, Los Barriles offers postcardperfect beaches and a couple of small, well maintained hotels ready to serve the needs of Baja travelers. In addition to wind and water sports, Los Barriles is considered the Bill Fishing capital of the world. During the summer months the area offers exceptional fishing for Marlin, Sailfish, Dorado, Tuna and Wahoo.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

Jewelry Copper River Designs (See ad on page 10).. 624-159-4780

FISHING Hotel Los Pescadores (See ad on page 21)....... 624-121-8786 Hotel Hotel Los Pescadores (See ad on page 40)....... 624-121-8786

RV Park Paraiso del Mar RV Park (See ad on page 26).................................. 624-355-5782 Salon Naty Salon (See ad on page 40)................... 624-141-0346

cas an Lu

de

Lo s

Ca b

os

www.fisheastcape.com Los Barriles BCS Mexico

40

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

lez Co ns

eco

Misiones

Mayan Resort Golf Course Paseo Malecon San Jose

Sea of Cortez

San Jose del Cabo, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR San José del Cabo is located in Baja California Sur and is the seat of the municipality of Los Cabos at the south end of the Baja California peninsula. In the 2005 census it had a population of 48,518. Together with neighboring Cabo San Lucas it forms a major tourist destination for travelers, particularly from North America. The two cities are served by Los Cabos International Airport. San José del Cabo offers you tranquility and old world charm, wonderful gift shops showcasing the art of Mexico, fabulous restaurants, fishing, golf, surfing and all the

Municipal/Municipal

Fire Department............................................ 624-143-9000 United States Consular Agency Emergency 24hrs.............. 619-692-2154 or 624-143-3566

DINING

Walking distances to North Beach for all you Wind & Kite Surfers

Gonza

Blvd . Ant onio

Paseo de Las

-Cabo se del San Jo

DOWNTOWN LOS BARRILES B.C.S.

Valerio

res

Blv d. M

a Paz

Mija

<-- L

PG

American Applebee’s.....................................................624-172-6472 Asian Baan Thai Pan Asian Restaurant and Bar........624-142-3344 Burgers & More Baja Brewing Company..................................624-146-9995 Cactus Jack's Bar and Grill.............................624-142-5601 Die Trying Cafe..............................................624-142-5657 Coffee & Baked Correcaminos Cafe........................................624-142-3510 International Local Eight Restaurant...................................624-142-6655 Havana Supper Club.......................................624-142-2603 Italian & Pizza Buon Appetito................................................624-142 4040 La Dolce Italian Restaurant.............................624-142-6621 Mexican Don Emiliano Restaurant................................624-142-0266 Casianos Restaurant...................................... 624 142 5928 Brisa Beach Club and Restaurant......................624-142-244 Habanero's Restaurant...................................624-142-2626 Jazmin Restaurant..........................................624-142-1760 Seafood La Panga Antigua Restaurant and Bar.............624-142-4041 Steak La Bodega Steak and Wine House..................624-142-6619

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

nighttime entertainment you seek. Or you can just relax on one of our many pristine white sand beaches. For nature lovers, a beautiful protected estuary with a variety of fish, turtles, dolphins, exotic marine animals and over 100 species of birds is located on the southeast edge of the city. And the historic artist colony of Todos Santos is an easy one-hour drive to the north, along the scenic Pacific Ocean. Local residents take pride in restoring the town’s 18th century architecture and preserving its quiet, laid-back ambiance.

LODGING

Hotel Baja Vacations.............................................. 877-462-2226 Barcelo Hotels and Resort...........................(624) 146-7500 Cabo Surf Hote............................................. 624-142-2666 Desire Resort & Spa..................................... 624-142-9300 Hotel Las Pescadores.................................... 624-121-8786 Posada Chabela............................................ 624-172-6495 Posada Real Best Western........................... 624-142 - 0155 Suites Las Palmas......................................... 624-142-2131

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

DENTISTS Cabo Cosmetic DentaL...................................624-143-0520 Golf/Marina to Real Estate/Bienes Raíces Cao Riviera – Margaret Hedges (See ad on page 33)..................................624-191-9303 Medical Red Cross......................................................624-143-3300 Emergencies..................................................624-144-3434 Hospital.........................................................624-143-7777 Cape Air and Land First Response Ambulance.... 624-143-5900 Centro Medico Cabo San Lucas.....................624-143-9727 Nursey Jungle Cactus (See ad on page 4)................ 624-122-0324 Police Police Cabo San Lucas...................................624-143-0057 Treament & Recovery Rehab in Mexico................................... +52 818-331-0911


ATM

ATM Plaza Bonita

ATM Casa de la Cultura

No. 34

March /

No. 31

- www.mex

icolivinggu

ide.com

December

na ar i B lv d. M

en as

Fashion San ■ Baja Tijuana to Cabods the

(under construction) Plaza Nautica

ATM

o Cab

co n ale M

Blv d. M

as Luc

ari na

San

Cabo San Lucas, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Cabo Maritime Center

Cabo San Lucas (aka Los Cabos or San José del Cabo in Mexico, and Cabo in the U.S.) is at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula at 22.88°N 109.90°W, in the state of Baja California Sur. As of the 2005 census, the population was 56,811. It is the largest community in Los Cabos, and the secondlargest in Baja California Sur. The warmth of the waters, the beauty of its beaches, the abundance of fish, the raucous party atmosphere, a resort studded Tourist Corrider that stretcuhes between the twin towns of Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo in miles of pristine white beaches, and other qualities is quickly making Cabo San Lucas a highend vacation destination.

Cabo San Lucas has the largest Marlin tournament in the world. In the winter, pods of whales can be observed in the ocean bearing their calves in the warm waters. Served by the Los Cabos International Airport for general aviation flights and air taxi service, the town is also a popular port of call for many cruise ships. Exclusive hotels and gated residential communities attract the rich and famous in this wondrous region known as “The Corridor.” Considered some of Latin America’s top resorts, many of these properties have become havens to Hollywood stars, Fortune 500 CEOs and even the U.S. president during the 2002 Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC).

Municipal/Municipal

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

Ambulance........................ 066-624-142-0316 (Red Cross) Consumer Affairs (Profeco) La Paz 01........... 612-122-8088 Fire Dept............................................ 068 or 624-142-2466 Taxis......624-142-0580 or 624-142-0105 or 624-142-0401

City Chamber of Commerce..................................624-143-0437 Family Protection...........................................624-143-0586 Gas Leaks......................................................624-143-1292

DINING

FISHING Charter Solmar V (See ad on page 28)......................866-591-4906

LODGING

February / febrero

om

January

s & Ente

t

Christm as in B aja

ingguide.c

Baja New

rtainmen

■ Holid ay Tradit ions ■ Unique Gift Ide as ■ Shoppi ng in Ba ja ■

2010 No. 32 - www .mexicoliv

/ enero

2010

rtainmen

t

Plus:

Plus:

Just ■ Foul Play or. . . a Runaway Disappearance The Mysterious of Karen Wright

■ La Bufadora “must-see”

An absolute just wonder of the world— of Ensenada 20 miles south

Condor ■ Return of theon, North

Close to extincti flying bird America’s largest returns to Mexico

■ The Origins of Ne Year’s Resoluti w Page 31 ons ■ Assis ted Liv ing in Me Health & Beauty xico ■ Bank ing Basic Page 25 s in Ba ja ■ Hell No, I Wo People & Voices n’t Go!

Carnava1l0

20

4th Anniversary Edition

Get the Guide At:

Plaza Villa de Mexico

Hotel Tesoro Los Cabos

Hotel Bahia Hotel.......................................... .........624-143-1888 Best Western Cabo Las Flores Hotel............ 624-143-6199 Casa Pablito......................................... .........624-143-1971 Hotel and Plaza Los Arcos ........................... 624-143-0702 Mar de Cortez Hotel............................. .........624-143-0032 Siesta Suites Hotel............................... .........624-143-2773

2009

The passing fishing legend

Plaza de la Danza

Mexican Panchos........................................................624-143-2891 Ay... Chihuahua..............................................624-143-3280 Baja Cantina...................................................624-143-0225 Margaritaville.................................................624-143-7401 Mi Casa.........................................................624-143-1933 Restaurant Pancho’s & Tequila Bar.................624-143-2891 Seafood La Golondrina................................................624-143-0542 Lorenzillo’s....................................................624-105-0212 The Blue Turtle...............................................624-143-1118 Villa Serena....................................................624-145-8244 International Peacocks.......................................................624-143-1858

Plus: mous This veno t delicacy a gourme

/ diciembre

ng Tony Reyes ■ Rememberi of a Baja

ATM

ATM

& Art

Saltwater ■ Baja’s Scorpion fish offers

ter Playgr ounds of Pacific Ba Sea of Cor ja & the tez

Plaza del Sol

Cabo Wabo

h Music

Throug

s & Ente

From ■ Mexicico transcen Safe? Lucas, Baja l market that Mexo: Gold’s al xt Are You Ne iona the U.S. internat nd ■ New reports reve r thanPow or safe orro Isla Player erhouse on is as safe o’s Socdivin g spots ■ Mexic adise best One of the Into Par ■ & Garden Earth! profiles Snorkelin r Home g in en business the You rn Gard Un derwa ■ Tu Home and

na

ago Hild

ATM

g Lives

ATM

Blvd. Mari

ue l

Mig

ro rre ue

Hotel Mar de Cortez

iggest Baja’s Bstival— e F s e u Bl Changin

ide.com – No. 33

www.mexicolivinggu

marzo 2010

Baja New

Musuem

Customs Office (Aduana)

e.com –

olivingguid

eG nt ce V in ATM

Boat Ramp

www.mexic

L. C árd

o Nin

es ero

{DESTINATION DIRECTORY}

EE E FR E ON K TA

sH

ATM

Marine Harbor Master................................................624-143-4771 Medical Alcoholics Anonymous...................................624-147-5516 Ambulances...................................................624-143-4020 Social Security Hospital..................................624-143-1548 Health Center.................................................624-143-0102 Red Cross......................................................624-143-3300 Police Federal Highway Police..................................624-146-0573 Municipal Police.............................................624-142-0361 Police San Jose del Cabo...............................624-142-0361 Traffic Police..................................................624-142-3748 State Police....................................................624-143-0296 Highway Patrol...............................................624-143-3977 Federal Police.................................................624-143-1210 Real Estate Cabo Riviera - Margaret Hedges (See ad on page 37).................................624-191-9303 Treament & Recovery Rehab in Mexico................................ MX 01-800-724-0911

Rosarito Beach, BC D'Groomer Dog Groomer La Bamba 50's Diner Magañas Restaurant To the Top Elevators / Click-On Mail Bobby's Baja By the Sea R.B. Hotel Coffee Shop Baja Open House Baja Mart Whale's Tail Deli Medio Camino Restaurant InCare Casa El Jardín Baja Medix Consultorio Dental Rosarito-Ensenada Alternative Healthcare Ensenada, BC Baja Country Club El Rey Sol Hotel El Rey Sol Restaurant CasaMar Restaurant Happy Pharmacy Steven Dryden - contact Hotel St. Isabel The Main Tourism office (by the Pemex) San Felipe, BC Amor Property Bar Miramar Botica Sagrado Corazon Casey’s Place Charley @ 7-11 South CSI El Pelicano Fandangos FatBoys Los Arcos Happy Jackass LillyAna’s PDO Beach Bar Rancho Otro San Felipe Liquors Santa Fe Pharmacy Sea of Cortez Salt Sundance Sunrunner YetMail Mulege, BCS Mely's Restaurant Hotel Mulegé Las Terrazas Hotel Lavamatica Mulegé Carlos' Internet Los Equipales Restaurant Rice & Beans & More Restaurant Las Casitas Bar/ Restaurant/Hotel Asadero Danny's Internet Minita

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

El Patron Bar & Restaurant Pancho Villa's Bar & Restaurant Saul's La Tienda El Mesquite Bar Scott's El Candil Bar & Restaurant restaurante economica el pelotero La Palapa Restaurant Tienda Vista Azul Restaurant Bar Del Cortez Mini Market Gùera Carmelita's Restaurant (24 hour restaurant on Hwy 1 south of Mulegé=great food) Ana's Restaurant/Bar (la playa Santispac) Bertha's Restaurant & Bar (la play el Burro) La Tienda Bart's La Jungla-Jungle Jim's Tecate Six Orilu Express Restaurante el Jalisco Loreto, BCS Coco Cabanas Hotel Tipui Silver Shop La Daminana Loreto Islas Tiburon Rentals Rentals Loreto Dali's Gourmet Market Alexander Real Estate Mita Gourmet 1697 Restaurante El Dorado Motel El Cañaveral Bar - Juice Guy Augie's BAr & Bait Shop Mission Hotel Oasis Hotel Desert Inn Del Borracho Rivia del Mar Rv Park La Paz, BCS Hacinda del Sol Land's End Realty OMNI Services Kettle Corn Tailhunters Los Gaviotas Hotel Rancho Viejo Tequilas Toscano Pizza Gourmet Corey Tours Gorilla's Grill Baja Challenge Rickey Ricardos

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

Los Barriles, BCS Baja Beach Invenstments Home and Land of Baja Gisela Talamantes Saenz, LLM Attorney at Law C & G Builders Bahia Real Estate Baja Properties Paraiso del Mar RV Park Coldwell Banker Hotel Los Pescadores Tia Pablo's Grill & Tienda Galeria de LunaSea San Jose del Cabo, BCS Angel´s Touch Dental Coldwell Banker Blue MedicalNet Land's End Realty Habenero's Grill Pasquales Pizzaria Mi Enselada Dental Cabo Center La Fonda Restaurant Die Trying Cabo Tequila Boutique Dream Home Real Estate Century 21 Shooter Bar Cabo Riveria Baja Properties Cabo Coffee Villa Valentina Cynthia's Restaurant Cabo San Lucas, BCS Happy Endings Bar Wild Canyon Adventures Cabo Cosmetic Dental Cape Realty Restaurant Mi Casa Doc wine bar Mama's Roal Cafe Hotel Mar de Cortez Pancho's Restaurant Todos Santos, BCS AmeriMex Realty Las Fuentes Bar & Grill A.Paraiso Realty Coldwell Banker Vacation Rentals Centro Cultural Jill Logan Gallery Zen Garden Restaurant Il Giardino Pizzaria Museo de Barrio Galeria de Hayles Miguels Restaurant Bodega Lizzarga Marcado Rickey Ricardo's Gallery Cabo Linda Real Estate Hotel California

www.mexicolivingguide.com

41


Spanish 101

Contrary to popular belief, it’s not that easy to learn Spanish just by living in Mexico. If you want to communicate with locals and enhance your language skills, you have to make an effort.

The easiest way to learn is to start with little chunks at a time. To assist you, each month we will provide just a few nouns, verbs, conjunctions, phrases, road signs, etc. In addition, the Pronunciation Guide for vowels and consonants will be available in each issue.

PRONUNCIATION

Vowels a - like a in father e - like e in ten i - like ee in see o - like o in rose u - like oo in shoot; silent following q or g, except when written with an umlaut (ü)  ai, ay - like y in try au - like ow in cow ei, ey - like ay in day ie - like ye in yellow oi, oy - like oy in boy Consonants b - b and v are the same; at the beginning of a word or after m or n, like an English b without a strong puff of breath; otherwise intermediate between an English b and an English v. c - before a, o, u, and any consonant but h, like k in kitten; before e or i, like s in sit.   cc - like cc in accept d - at the beginning of a word or after n or l, like English d without strong puff of breath; otherwise, like a softer th in this.  g - when followed by e or i, like h in hit; otherwise like g in gold.  h - silent j - like h in hot; ll - like y in yes q - like k in kite, followed by ue or ui (u is silent) r - at the beginning of a word or before a pause at the end of a word, like rr; otherwise like dd in ladder. rr - with a pronounced trill ü - like ny in canyon v - same as b x - like English x; in words derived from Native American languages, sometimes pronounced like h in hit (Mexico) y - standing alone, like Spanish i; otherwise like Spanish ll z - in Latin America, like s in sit 

42

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

As well as practicing the words and phrases every day, be sure to get out and talk to locals. Talking with natives . . . in Spanish! . . . will assist you with proper pronunciation and tone, and enhance your listening and speaking skills. If you practice the information given in each edition every day, you’ll see a dramatic improvement in your Spanish skills in no time. ¡Hasta luego!

ADJECTIVES

VERBS

ese - a, that  este - a, this  grande - large, great, big  lo - the (+ neuter)  más - more 

Regular verb conjugations: Present (when it is happening now)

PERSON I - (+o) yo you (friend/child) - (+s) tú he, she, you - (+ )   él, ella, usted  we - (+mos)     nosotros, nosotras they, you all - (+n) ellos, ellas, ustedes    comer - to eat cerrar - to close dar - to give

ADVERBS

aquí - here así - like that bien - well  casi - almost, nearly cómo - how?

CONJUNCTIONS

mas - but, however ni - not even, neither, nor o - or  pero - but, yet, except porque - because 

comer - to eat “ER” como

vivir - to live         “IR” vivo

hablas

comes

vives

habla    

come

vive

hablamos

comemos   

vivimos

hablan

comen   

viven

comprar - to buy  creer - to believe, think deber - should, ought to; to ow

COMMON PHRASES

NOUNS

día - day   fin - end forma - form, shape, way gente - people  vida - life  

PREPOSITIONS

de - of, from desde - from, since  en - in entre - between, among excepto - except (for)   

PRONOUNS

Hablar - to talk “AR” hablo - I talk; I am talking

ella / ellas - she / them  ello - it éste -a, this one esto - this la - [3rd person f. dir. obj. pron.] 

Good-bye. Adiós. Sorry!/Excuse me! Lo siento! Do you speak English? ¿Habla usted inglés? I don't speak (much) Spanish. No hablo mucho español.

Could you speak more slowly? ¿Podría hablar más despacio, por favor? Could you repeat that? ¿Podría repetírmelo, por favor?

ROAD SIGNS

ENTRADA - Entrance ENTRADA Y SALIDA DE CAMIONES - Trucks Entering and Exiting ENTRONQUE PROXIMO - Intersection Near ENTRONQUE PELIGROSO - Dangerous Intersection ESTA CARRETERA NO ES DE ALTA VELOCIDAD - This is not a high speed road ESTACIONAMIENTO SOLO PARA EMERGENCIAS - Emergency Parking Only ESTE CAMINO NO ES DE ALTA VELOCIDAD - Not a High-Speed Road EVITE ACCIDENTES - Avoid Accidents EVITE LA INSTALLACION DE TOPES - Avoid the Installation of Speed Bumps FELIZ VIAJE REBASE CON PRECAUCION - Have a Good Trip Pass with Caution

CRUCE DE PEATONES - Pedestrian Crossing CUANDO TOME NO MANEJE - When You Drink Don’t Drive CUIDADO CON EL TREN - Careful Rail Road Crossing CURVA PELIGROSO - Dangerous Curve DESPACIO - Slow DESVIACION A 500 MTS - Detour in 500 Meters                DISMINUYA SU VELOCIDAD - Slow Down DISMINUYA SU VELOCIDAD - Reduce Your Speed Toll Booth in 1Km ELIJA SU CARRIL OPORTUNAMENTE - Select Your Lane At Earliest Opportunity EN B.C.S ES OBLIGATORIO - In Baja California South Seatbelts Are Mandatory EL CINTURON DE SEGURIDAD - The Safety Belt

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


FREE CLASSIFIED ADS

All ads must be placed online at bajareport@gmail.com. All Ads Must be posted by the last Friday of each month. All ads must be specific, no generic ads, All ads must be 60 words or less ANNOUNCEMENTS ROSARITO BEACH: Free Spay/Neuter Clinic (SCAAT) Km 31.5, 2nd Sunday of each month, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call Karen Patonai (661) 613-0737 or email karenpatonai@yahoo.com SAN FELIPE: At a drawing at San Felipe Animal Rescue’s St Patrick’s Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner at Pavilion Restaurant, Don Heller was the winner of the raffle for a mosaic created by Barbara Peacock. I’ve been unable to track him down and give him his prize. I’m just trying to find some way to let him know he’s a winner.     SAN FELIPE: ZAPP Animal Center is open, and fully operational 24/7 no matter what you’ve heard. Since December 14, when we officially opened for intake, we have never been closed. There are two veterinarians working every day of the week onsite; Martine Bermejo, our kennel manager is working full time as always, as is Carolanne Burns, our clinic manager, and we have three full-time cleaners, and pooper scoopers. Donations needed www.sfz.app.com   LORETO: The Optimist Club of Loreto is looking for new members. Contact Jupiter Jones at (613) 135-0143 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE ROSARITO BEACH: Nicely furnished oceanfront, 3 level townhouse, 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, family room with a 2-car attached garage. Security System. US$465,000. Laura Miller, (619) 888-6171  SAN FELIPE: Playa de Oro Repossed lots. Their loss your gain! Developer selling at balances owed: Block 7, Lot 18 - $29,900; Block 11, Lot 2 - $29,900; Block 15, Lot 22 - $33,900; Block 16, Lot 9 - $35,900; Block 17, Lot 23 - $37,500. www.playadeoro.com  Contact Gio at ReMax (686) 577-0447 or  (760) 482-8681 LORETO: US$120,000 / 2br - Exciting Sports Fishing Casita, Loreto/Puerto Escondido, BCS, Tripui Resort (www.tripuihotel. com.mx) #B-07/8 in La Mano de Dios, the heart of worldclass big game sportfishing, cruising, sailing, off-roading and all kinds of recreation, security, solitude, serenity and all the comforts of home. Contact Joe at AmigoJoe2@yahoo.com for details, directions and extensive pictures.   LA PAZ: For sale quality turf in La Paz, BCS! $90 pesos per meter - special for the climate of Baja, for more information, contact Sandra Barroso at (612) 139-1841 or  sandra@sodfather.com

and contain contact info and price. Mexico Living reserves the right to edit all ads for length, or to refuse any ads. We will not print ads submitted with ALL CAPS.

RENTALS ENSENADA: Summer Special - Moonlight Casa - Discounted Rates $175/night or $1,050/week, 6–8 people. Beautiful «OldWorld» style beachfront home, 2,100 sq.ft, completely newly furnished, 2 fireplaces, 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA. Located on «the» sixmile, white sandy beach in Ensenada, 50 ft. from the water, with great swimming, horseback riding, kayaking, fishing, etc. Email Denice Cruz dcruz@cruz-international.com ENSENADA: Beach House, Newly Remolded 3 BR 2 BA. Bright and Airy on “The” six-mile long white sandy Beach, pets OK. $650– $800 monthly. Contact Denice Cruz, (646) 174-7770 or dcruz@ cruz-international.com, or visit www.cruz-international.com ENSENADA: On the sand 30 feet from the water. 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, beautifully decorated. $150 a night, see pictures for Moonlight Casa D-10 www.ensenadarealestate.com. Contact Denice Cruz, (646) 174-7770 or dcruz@cruz-international.com SAN FELIPE: Spend the winter in beautiful San Felipe, Baja, 120 miles from the border. Large, private beachfront lot for rent in residential community. Campo Ocotillos, 5 miles north of town. Ideal for RV, steps from the sand, with covered patio and complete hook-ups. Available for a minimum of 3 months. Contact Ellis McConnohie, (360) 460-1698 or ellisrita@yahoo.com San Felipe: Commercial space for rent. Plaza Playa de Oro. 2 spaces 24’ x 36’, 1 space 24’ x 60’, 4 offices with reception area. City water, DSL available, city electricity. 2 storage units 12’ x 24’ with roll-up garage door. Located seaside of Highway 5, just 6 1/2 miles north of San Felipe. U.S. (888) 433-5471 or 011 52 (686) 576-0223; locally, call 576-0223. San Felipe: Commercial space for rent. Playa San Rafael: 1 office space 24’ x 30’. Located seaside of Highway 5, just 6 1/2 miles north of San Felipe. U.S. (888) 433-5471 or 011 52 (686) 576-0223; locally, call 576-0223. SERVICES LORETO: House Sitting, a very nice lady by the name of Helen Davis is new to Loreto and looking to house sit. Anyone interested can reach her at 044-613-105-2900 or helon2wheels@ gmail.com LORETO: Electrician, Oscar Javier Navarrete Rodriguez is a licensed electrician looking for work. He was working for Loreto Bay but most recently with Fonatur. His expertise covers commercial as well as residential. Contact number is 044-613113-1219 or 135-2447. Oscar speaks a little English and his rates are very reasonable. He is very thorough and dependable—he shows up on time!

LORETO: Thai Yoga Massage is done fully clothed. It balances the body energetically, inducing a calm mental state. Your choice of a gentle massage or deeper tissue. Whole body massage 1hr 15min. - $500 pesos, or back, neck, legs - 30 min. - $200 pesos. Call Karen Shiels of Luz de Montana Yoga, (613) 110-2116 ksonedaisy@gmail.com LOS CABOS: Tax Preparation, Tax Me Less has been preparing U.S. tax returns for expatriates in Mexico for over 20 years. Contact Don D. Nelson for more information, (949) 481-4094, (624) 131-5228, or ustax@hotmail.com FOR SALE SAN FELIPE: 25 KW Guardian LP Gas Generator. Industrial strength. Water-cooled. Only 335 hours new. Retails for $14K. Asking $7,200. Contact Jeremy at Baja Battery. (686) 1709030 or jblinkovit@yahoo.com. SAN FELIPE: Scooter, Silver, Kymco People 50c, 2 stroke with buddy seat, DOT helmet, Versa-Haul carrier and ramp. Only 7 miles on odometer. CA pink slip available. $1,000. (686) 1728851 SAN FELIPE: 30-ft. Bayliner AVANTI Loaded with all the goodies. Come and get it, take it home. Trailer and boat located in San Felipe, BC, Mexico. Registered and titled. $45,000 OBO. billmaine@gmail.com, U.S. (619) 203-5129, MX (686) 2314921 LORETO: 1998 Golf Cart in excellent condition with new battery and battery charger. Good 6-ply tires. Great town transportation vehicle. A MUST SEE, US$3,100. Call Charlie in Loreto, (613) 135-0862 LORETO: 1964 Volkswagon Bug. Excellent paint, new tires, new engine, storage rack on top, High clearance, go anywhere any road vehicle. Truly a must see, US$3,500. Call Charlie in Loreto, (613) 135-0862 LA PAZ: Bakery Pan D’Les is Gluten Free. Please find us in downtown La Paz for a complete line of gluten-free pastas, cookies, crackers and bread mixes. Madero street at Ocampo, (612) 119-8392 LOS BARRILES: 2010 Pull Behind 27-foot Lance Camper, slide-out, new/used less than 6 months, $20,000, in Los Barriles, contact Bonnie and Steve Herter, Stevehherter@gmail. com TODOS SANTOS: Wheat Grass Juicer - Electric Miracle Wheat Grass Juicer model MJ550. Have all attachments. Works great. I paid US$150 new. Selling for US$70. (612) 178-0070 or

Across 1: Vegan’s staple 5: Pond organism 9: Logic circuit element 12: World War II partnership 13: Swindle 15: Hi-fi description 16: Observes 18: Egg, classically 19: Undivided 20: Crimsons 21: Order from the menu 23: Runs out of gas 24: Woodland deity 25: Neatened 28: Ornate wall hanging 32: Roman date 33: Miles per hour, e.g. 34: Group of three 35: Spirited air 36: Rowed the boat 37: Sty cry 38: Pooch in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ 39: Fivesome on a five 40: Narrow margin of victory 41: Spruces (up) 43: Dissertations 45: Vintners’ vessels 46: ‘___ is Your Life’ 47: Skiing style 50: Ankle-knee connector 51: ‘___ appÈtit!’

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

email Karla Freeman, carloskarlafreeman@gmail.com  HELP WANTED REPORTERS WANTED: Mexico Living’s Baja California is looking for community reporters. If you’re interested and would like to get paid for your writing, email us at mexicoliving@gmail. com. ROSARITO BEACH - SALES ASSOCIATES: Mexico Living’s Baja California is looking to expand our sales team and are looking for a few self-motivated, go getters. We are looking to expand the Ensenada, Rosarito Beach and Cabo San Lucas markets. If you’re interested and would like to make a living in Baja meeting new people, email us atmexicoliving@gmail.com  ENSENADA - SALES ASSOCIATES: Mexico Living’s Baja California is looking to expand our sales team and are looking for a few self-motivated, go getters. We are looking to expand the Ensenada, Rosarito Beach and Cabo San Lucas markets. If you’re interested and would like to make a living in Baja meeting new people, email us atmexicoliving@gmail.com CABO SAN LUCAS - SALES ASSOCIATES: Mexico Living’s Baja California is looking to expand our sales team and are looking for a few self-motivated, go getters. We are looking to expand the Ensenada, Rosarito Beach and Cabo San Lucas markets. If you’re interested and would like to make a living in Baja meeting new people, email us atmexicoliving@gmail.com   ENSENADA DISTRIBUTION: Mexico Living is looking for someone to distribute in the Ensenada area. Must have reliable car and know the area. If you’re interested and would like to make a living in Baja meeting new people, email us at mexicoliving@ gmail.com. WANTED SAN FELIPE: Donations of dog and cat food, towels, blankets, newspapers, and money are needed for the ZAPP’s Center. Contact Steven Forman ZAPP Animal Center - Zero Additional Pupulation Project www.sfzapp.com, U.S. (707) 320-4969 or MX (686) 577-2708 BAJA: A Camper Trailer needed - Does anyone have a Camper Trailer sitting around not being used. If you would be willing to donate one to a poor farmer/artist, I will be truly grateful. I have no money to purchase one right now; I would be willing to trade web design, graphic design, illustration work, lessons in fine art or any of the above computer skills. Contact David annointingyou@yahoo.com ir 612 149-8787 SAN FELIPE - Live in House keeper. Lodging for service. Call 686-140-8059

54: Dawn and on 55: Range of skills in a particular occupation 58: Fuddy-duddy 59: Epithets 60: Whence linseed oil and linen 61: Birth certificate notation 62: Neck line? 63: Had an opinion Down 1: Folded food 2: Whom the yoke’s on? 3: Set of related records 4: Employ 5: Was a yes-man 6: Washing machine units 7: Chutzpah 8: Historical period 9: De ___ (from the beginning) 10: Responsibility 11: Heavy book 14: Got away 15: Gems with a silvery play of color 17: Soft cheese 22: Tint 23: Deceitfully altering, as facts 24: Clotho, et al. 25: Jousting bouts 26: ‘Put two and two together,’ for one 27: Where Old Man River makes his deposits

Mexico Living’s Baja California – April 2010

28: Garden covers, maybe 29: Chamber pieces 30: Dishwasher cycle 31: They join the team 33: Claude of ‘The Invisible Man’ 36: Tools for canned goods 42: Merlot cask 43: Parchment? 44: Solving aid 46: ‘Ta-da!’ 47: Band boxes? 48: Old wives’ tales and such 49: ___ fixe (restaurant charging option) 50: Incite 51: Liver product 52: Spoken 53: Barber’s call 56: Yuletide worker 57: Not right

www.mexicolivingguide.com

43


MEXICO LIVING Guide Pacific Baja & The Sea of Cortez PO Boxto 9019-460 Calexico, CA 92232

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

April 2010 – Mexico Living’s Baja California

44


Edition 36 - May 2010