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No. 32 - www.mexicolivingguide.com

Baja News & Entertainment

Plus: ■ The Origins of New Year’s Resolutions Page 31

■ Assisted Living in Mexico Health & Beauty

■ Banking Basics in Baja Page 25

■ Hell No, I Won’t Go! People & Voices

January / enero 2010


SATURDAY MARCH 27th SAN FELIPE BAJA CALIFORNIA

DOORS OPEN AT 9AM

TICKETS

$20 IN ADVANCE or $25 AT THE DOOR US 877-LUVMEX1 or MEX 686-577-3143

11 BLUES BANDS

820 Band Agave Blues Alice Stuart Becki Sue & her Big Rockin’ Daddies Chet Cannon and The Committee

Gregg Wright Javier Batiz Michele Lundeen Ruta 69 Sean Carney with Phil Berkowitz Vatos Locos

40 Great Artists & 1 Incredible Day

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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Welcome to Baja

The Mexican states of Baja California, Baja California Sur and Sonora make up Northwest Mexico as covered by our guide. The region features an enormous diversity of landscapes like no place on earth—a land of quiet, colorful deserts, endless beaches, majestic mountains, forests, unexplained rock formations, brilliant clear skies, an average temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit and some of the most welcoming people in the world. Northwest Mexico is the destination of choice for retirees, investors, entrepreneurs, travelers and vacationers alike. The U.S. State Department says that more Americans retire in Mexico than any other place on the globe; 51 percent of all U.S. retirees who live outside of the U.S. live in Mexico. Mexico is economical; the dollar goes further here than it does in Europe, Canada and the most popular destinations of Asia. The people of Mexico are accustomed to Americans and vice versa. Mexico welcomes American retirees and tourists and is increasingly prepared to offer the foods, goods and services that Americans like and expect. Whether you’re looking to retire, invest, vacation or operate a business, Northwest Mexico is the place. We hope our guide helps you to enjoy Northwest Mexico to the fullest. Explore!

What can I bring into Mexico? As you approach the border, there are generally multiple lanes labeled “Nothing to Declare - Nada que Declarar” and “Declaration Lane - Carril de Declaración.”

Personal Items Allowed: • New or used such as clothes, shoes and toiletries in quantities that would be considered not for resale. • Two photographic or video cameras and charger. • Two cellular phones or walkie-talkies. • Laptop, notebook, etc. • Two sports equipment items. • Portable radio recorder and/or player, speakers and accessories. • Five laser discs, 10 DVDs, 30 CDs or cassette tapes. Five storage devices or memory cards. • Books and magazines in quantities that would be considered not for resale. • Five toys, video game console and video games. • Medicine for personal use, one blood pressure instrument, one glucose testing device. In the case of psychotropic drugs, make sure you bring the prescription. Note: Be careful not to bring a large quantity of your prescription medication. • One set of binoculars, one telescope. • Two cartons of cigarettes, 25 cigars or 200 grams of tobacco if you are of age (if bringing more than allowed, you must declare it and pay duties). • Up to three liters of liquor and six liters of wine (if bringing more than allowed, you must declare it and pay duties). • Strollers and baby walkers. • Two musical instruments and accessories. • Tent and equipment for camping. • Crutches, canes, walkers and wheelchairs for personal use. • Tool sets including hand drills, wire cutters, wrenches, screwdrivers, cables, etc. • Bedding sets including one sheet set, one towel set, a set of table linens. • Two dogs or cats and pet items. • Up to $10,000 in U.S. currency or equivalent in other currencies, foreign or national checks, and/or other monetary instruments.

Nothing to Declare Lane This lane is used when you are bringing, as a tourist (FMT) $75 or less. Your personal luggage and other merchandise up to the allowed exemption US$75 per person. The amount is cumulative per number of people in the vehicle. For example two people would have a $150 exemption. You must have receipts and invoices to qualify for the exemption.

Declaration Lane ($75–$1,000) If you are bringing more than US$75 worth of merchandise per person, but not more than US$1,000, you may declare it by driving into the customs facility through the declaration lane (carril de declaración). There you will be able to fill out the proper documents and pay any duty. Duty can be between 15 percent and 25 percent of the value of the merchandise.

WHAT DO I NEED? Passport. On June 1, 2009, the U.S. government implemented the full requirements of the land and sea phase of WHTI. The new rules require most U.S. citizens entering the United States at sea or land ports of entry to have a passport, passport card or other travel document approved by the Department of Homeland Security. Additional information can be found at: http://travel.state.gov/passport.

IMPORTANT NOTES: • Guns are illegal in Mexico. Do not attempt to cross the border with a gun and/or ammunition. You will be put in jail even if you were not aware of the Mexican law. • If you have more than $10,000 in U.S. currency or equivalent, or other monetary instruments, you must declare this with Mexican customs, otherwise it is a crime. • You must declare if you are bringing any animals, agricultural products or medicines for other than personal use. • Amounts over US$1,000 require the use of a Mexican customs broker. WHAT CAN I TAKE HOME? You can take home US$800 of duty-free merchandise per person, per month, including one liter of alcohol. Mexican arts and crafts, including handcrafted furniture, are duty-free and do not count toward the $800 limit. TOURIST VISA Tourists staying 72 hours or less within “the border zone” do not need a visa. Those traveling beyond the border zone or entering Mexico by air must pay a fee to obtain a tourist card, also known as an FMT, available from Mexican consulates, Mexican border crossing points, Mexican tourism offices, airports within the border zone and most airlines serving Mexico. The fee is generally included in the price of a plane ticket for travelers arriving by air. Please note that travelers not in possession of their FMT card at the point of exit from Mexico may face a fine from Mexican Immigration.

DRIVER LICENSE INSURANCE

15% OFF

Homeowners Insurance

Call or e-mail TODAY! Mail - YETMAIL 277 segurosalanis@prodigy.net.mx

686-577-2464 • FAX 686-577-2916

MILITARY CHECKPOINTS There are military checkpoints along the way to all the northwest border cities. These checkpoints serve the same purpose as the California and Arizona highway inspection stops you’ll encounter on the return north. The soldiers will be carrying weapons, but there is nothing to be concerned about, the soldiers are looking for drugs and guns. You’ll find them to be polite and friendly. They may ask to look inside your vehicle or RV. Checkpoints on both sides of the border were established based on an agreement between the United States and Mexico to fight the war on drugs.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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{Welcome to baja}}

Welcome to Baja

City Maps & Business Directory DIALING INSTRUCTIONS

BAJA CALIFORNIA La Bufadora

Mexico City: (011) 52-55, plus the 8-digit telephone number. Guadalajara: (011) 52-33, plus the 8-digit telephone number. Tijuana: (011) 52-664, plus the 7-digit telephone number. USA to MX Cell Phone: 011+52+1+Area Code+(Tel #) USA to MX Landline: 011+52+Area Code+(Tel #) MX to USA: 001+Area Code+(Tel #) MX Landline to MX Cell Phone: 045 or 044+Area Code+(Tel #)

Photo by Rebecca Sandy

MX Cell Phone to MX Landline: Area Code+(Tel #) DIALING 800 NUMBER: Some charges may apply when call 800 numbers internationally, please check with the telephone carrier. 800 DIALING to the USA From MX (dial 001+)

ROSARITO BEACH, BAJA CALIFORNIA

To Dial USA 800.................... dial 880

Playas de Rosarito, or Rosarito Beach as it is referred to in English, is a city in the Mexican state of Baja California. It is located between the Pacific Ocean and the coastal foothills, just 20 minutes south of the U.S. border in Tijuana and is a popular destination for tourists, snowbirds and expatriates from the United States. With 20 miles of white, sandy beaches with endless activities, Rosarito offers a large variety of places to stay and things to do, including incredible shopping in the Artisan shops with some of Mexico’s finest leather goods, furniture, wrought iron, pottery, marble and traditional Mexican crafts. You’ll find a culinary paradise of international cuisine from traditional Mexican, sensational

To Dial USA 866.................... dial 883 To Dial USA 877.................... dial 882 To Dial USA 888.................... dial 881 IMPORTANT NUMBERS: Emergency dial 132 free from any phone and Mexican cell phone carriers Red Cross................................... 066 Police Dept................................. 060 Fire dept...................................... 068 Electricity (emergency and nonemergency)................................ 071 Legal Assistance......................... 061

seafood and delicious steaks to American, Chinese, French and Italian specialties. Be sure to visit the well-known lobster village, Puerto Nuevo, just 15 minutes south of Rosarito—a tourist and culinary destination. Whether staying for vacation or life, you will enjoy Playas de Rosarito. ATM/GETTING CASH Banamex, Bancomer and Bital have 24-hour ATMs that accept most U.S. bank cards all along the Tijuana–Rosarito–Ensenada corridor. Only pesos are dispensed; you can get dollars from an HSBC ATM. Your account in the U.S. is charged that day’s rate of exchange. A service fee will also be deducted from your account.

Tourist Assistance....................... 078 Tourism Department.................... 078

Municipal/Municipal

Secretary of Tourism - BC

MAILING SERVICES . ............................................... 661-614-0513

Arturo Martínez Esquer (Facilitation and Tourist Assistance Sub Direction) amartineze@baja.gob.mx Secretary of Tourism - BCS.....612-24-0100

BUSINESS DIRECTORY A-Z

Satellite TV Installation Cisco-Sat...................................................... 661-616-0779

DENTIST Consultorio Dental......................................... 661-612-4204

STORAGE SERVICES Baja Public Storage....................................... 619-616-0779

DOG GROOMERS . ................... 661-100-6218 D’ Groomer Dog Grooming

utilities/empresas de servicios públicos CFE ................................. 612-143 0064 or 612-142 0237 TELMEX . ..................................................... 612-142 0001 CALIGAS....................................................... 612-142 0122

ICON Descriptions

- Pool/Spa

- Accept Credit Cards

- Pet Friendly

- Wi-Fi / Internet

- Serves Breakfast

- Kitchen/Restaurant

- Beer/Spirits

# - Map Number

4

Click On

Airport “Abellardo L. Rodriguez International Airport”................................... 661-6183-2418 Immigration.................................................. 661-612-7262

Elevators/Elevadores To The Top Elevators..................................... 661-614-1434 FINANCING/FINANCIAMIENTO Baja Lending Company........... ......................686-576-0653

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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REAL ESTATE SERVICES Baja Closing & Escrow Services.................... 760-494-7053


{{Welcome to baja}

The San Felipe Arches The monument at the entrance to San Felipe was built in 1980 to represent the commitment of the four states around the Sea of Cortez (Baja California Norte, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa, and Sonora) to promote tourism and the regions beauty and charm.

San Felipe, BAJA CALIFORNIA

ENSENADA, BAJA CALIFORNIA Ensenada is the third-largest city in the state of Baja California. About 70 miles south of the San Diego/Tijuana border, located in the Bahía de Todos Santos—an inlet of the Pacific Ocean—Ensenada is an important commercial and fishing port as well as a cruise ship stop. The city is backed by small mountain ranges, and due to its location on the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean latitude, the weather tends to be mild year round. Most of the shopping is at sea level, making it a great city for getting around on your own

energy. Ensenada is easy to navigate with all numbered streets running north and south, and celebrity-named streets running east and west. Ensenada has the accommodations to meet any level of comfort or amenities. Prices can range depending on the time of year from $30 to $250 plus. The best hotels are located to the north and south of town, along the beach, and are not within walking distance from downtown shopping and attractions; but taxi and shuttles are available in most locations.

San Felipe is a small fishing village, situated on the Sea of Cortez, 118 miles south of the U.S. border, which was historically dependent upon fishing; however, today tourism and real estate provide the economic base. Even as it grows into the next century with four-lane highways, it will remain a small fishing village in its heart and soul. Today, San Felipe is maturing into a sophisticated resort community with resorts, luxury condos, fine restaurants, sport fishing and world-class off-road adventures. The beaches extend north and south with over 50 miles of shoreline to explore, including 23-

Municipal/Municipal Civil Protection Unit....................................... 686-577-1433 Chamber of Commerce................................. 686-577-1104 Fire Dept/Ambulance..................................... 686-577-1182 Federal Preventive Police............................... 686-577-1045 Immigration Office......................................... 686-577-1083 Port Captain.................................................. 686-577-1577 State Judicial Police...................................... 686-577-1203 Tourism Department...................................... 686-577-1155

foot tides, exposing a kilometer or more of ocean floor—one of the largest tidal bores in the world. And directly behind San Felipe is Sierra San Pedro Martír, the tallest mountains in Baja. The desert terrain is vast and offers incredible trails and exploration for ATVs, dirt bikes and offroad vehicles. Just south of San Felipe are extensive sand dunes ideal for buggies and rails. The Valley of the Giants, the natural reserve of the thousand-year-old Cardon Cactus, has become a major attraction. In addition, San Felipe offers great bargain shopping for souvenirs, arts and much more.

BAKERY/PANADERÍA Panaderia Especial........................................ 686-577-1902 BANK/BANCO BBVA Bancomer............................................ 686-577-2224 Silvia Elizabeth Urbea, Preferred Customer’s Unit Ext. 13

Municipal/Municipal

Red Cross......................................................646-174-4585

Chamber of Commerce..................646-174-0994 or 646-172-3081 Civil Protection Unit.................................................... 646-176-1325 Consumers Protection Agency Office (PROFECO)..... 646-174-0313 Customs.................................................................... 646-174-0897 District Attorney......................................................... 646-176-4616 Immigration................................................................ 646-174-0164 Hunting and Fishing License..........646-176-3837 or 646-176-3937 U.S.A. Consulate 24 hr. line (001-619)...................... 646-692-2650

POLICE/POLICÍA Green Angels.................................................646-176-4675 Highway Police.................. 646-176-1311 or 646-176-3646 Municipal Police.............................................646-176-2722 Policia Ministerial...........................................646-176-3636 Policia Federal Caminos................................ 646-683-8040 Policia Federal Preventiva ..............................646-176-2579 Prefectura Naval.......................................... 469-0376/2948

ACCOUNTING/CONTABILIDAD CP E&A Accounting............................................ 686-577-0836

BUSINESS DIRECTORY A-Z

public transportation/el transporte público Terminal de Buses..........................................646-224-1041

Alterations/sastre San Felipe Seamstress (Vickie Silva)............. 686-175-5420

BEAUTY SALONS/SALONES DE BELLEZA Lilly Ana’s Day Spot...................................... 686-577-6253 Hair By Nancy.............................................. .686-113-3682

REAL ESTATE SERVICES Baja Closing & Escrow Services.....................760-494-7053

ARCHITECT/ARQUITECTO Rosa Lina Ramos Lazcano............................ 686-184-6172

BOOKSTORES El Cadallo Blanco.......................................... 613-116-5374

utilities/empresas de servicios públicos CFE ..................................612-143 0064 or 612-142 0237 TELMEX . ...................................................... 612-142 0001 CALIGAS........................................................ 612-142 0122

ARTIST/ARTISTA Andrena Joyce................E-mail: andrenajoyce@yahoo.com Melody Ashley............... E-mail: melodya2004@yahoo.com Robin Waters................................................ 686-115-0526

BUILDING MATERIALS/MATERIALES DE CONTRUCCIÓN Maderas de San Felipe.................................. 686-577-1515

Visitors information Convention & Visitors Bureau.........................646-178-2411 Tourist Information Center.. 646-178-2411 or 646-178-3675 Secretary of Tourism Office in Ensenada.........646-172-3022

ADULT CARE/ATENCION DE ADULTOS San Felipe Adult Living Facility....................... 686-576-0661

Aeropuerto/Airport Aeropuerto ...................................................646-273-1984 Art Gallery Garery Art & Stuff..........................................646-175-8859 ARTIST Alfonso Arambulua.........................................646-149-3866 MEDICAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS MÉDICOS ISSSTE .........................................................646-176-2230 IMSS ............................................................646-120-7771 Centro de Salud.............................................646-152-1371

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

BANDS/BANDAS Agave Blues.................................................. 686-184-9237 BARS/CLUBS The Beach Bar and Grill................................. 686-577-3144 The Green Door Bar (Los Algodones)............ 658-517-7347 Los Arcos - Happy Jackass........................... 686-577-2585

CATERING The Latin Garden........................................... 686-209-6369 CHOCOLATE/CHOCOLATE Baja Chocolate Lovers................................... 686-576-0348

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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{Welcome to baja}} CITY SERVICES/SERVICIOS DE LA CIUDAD District Attorney’s......................................... 686-577-1110 Mayors Office............................................... 686-577-1021 COMPUTER SERVICES CSI–Computer & Satellite Installation............. 686-577-2928 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT/MANEJO DE CONSTRUCCIÓN San Felipe Management Services.................. 686-576-0553 Sweitzer Construction Management ............. 686-577-0195 Perez Construction........................................ 686-576-0650 COUNSELING-THERAPY/CONSULTA TERAPÉUTICA Inner Connection........................................... 686-172-8851 DELI SunDance Deli.............................................. 686-576-0369 DENTIST/DENTISTA California Dental Spa..................................... 686-577-0708 Consultorio Dental Y de Ortodoncia .............. 686-577-6212 DEVELOPMENTS/FRACCIONAMIENTOS El Dorado Ranch........................................... 686-577-0015 Oasis de Cortez............................................ 760-208-1700 Playa de Oro................................................. 686-576-0223 Playa del Paraiso................................. 888-647-5292 x 704 San Rafael.................................................... 686-576-0223 DOCTORS/DOCTORES Dr. Victor Abasolo............. 686-577-1706 or 686-573-0174 ENTERTAINMENT/ENTRETENIMIENTO Name That Tune - Denny Flannigan................ 686-576-1683 The Singout Sisters & Chuey (Karaoke)......... 686-576-0047

PHARMACY/FARMACIA Botica “Sagrado Corazon”............................. 686-577-1294 Santa Fe Pharmacy ...................................... 686-576-0546

PRINTERS/IMPRESORAS Papeleria Copicentro..................................... 686-577-1402 The Print Supplier.......................................... 686-230-9933 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/ MANEJO DE PROPIEDADES Custom Vacation Homes............................... 928-277-6863 928-277-7559 & visit www.sanfelipevacations.com Redwagon Property Services........................ 686-576-0081 PUBLICATIONS/PUBLICACIONES Gringo Gazette.............................................. 686-111-3692 Mexico Living Magazine................................ 686-577-1377 San Felipe Newsletter.................................... 686-577-2898 REAL ESTATE AGENTS/ AGENTES DE BIENES RAÍCES Bill Maine...................................................... 686-231-4921 Jim Moore........................................MX Cell 686-184-9237 REAL ESTATE/BIENES RAÍCES Amor Property.............................................. 686-577-0611 Baja 24/7 Construction & Real Estate............ 686-577-6196

FINANCING/FINANCIAMIENTO Baja Lending Company........... ......................686-576-0653

RECREATION/RECREACIÓN Aerodynamic - Ultralight flights . ................... 686-116-2933

FILM DEVELOPMENT/IMPRESION DE FOTOS Fotografia Alvarez.......................................... 686-577-1144

SATELLITE TELEVISION & INTERNET/ TELEVISION SATELITALES Y INTERNET CSI - Computer & Satellite Installation........... 686-577-2928

GOLF/GOLF Las Caras de Mexico..................................... 686-576-0517 Graphic Design/Diseño Gráfico GreetScape................................................... 686-188-2393 HATS/sombreros Band It.......................................................... 686-123-5147 HOME BUILDERS/CONTRATISTAS Oscar Perez.................................................. 686-120-6506 Perez Construction........................................ 686-236-4927 San Felipe Home Builders.............................. 686-577-3176 IMPORT SERVICES/SE RVICIOS DE IMPORTACIÓN San Felipe Moving & Storage......................... 686-576-0432 Insurance Alani’s Mexican Insurance............................. 686-577-2464 INTERIOR DESIGN/DISEÑO INTERIOR Baja Nueva................................................... 686-211-4676 JEWELRY BajaTreasures............................................... 686-122-2668 Kitchen/Bath Cocina/Bano Concepto Casa ........................ 686-576-0731 LANDSCAPING/JARDINERÍA Versoleil........................................................ 686-576-0664 LIFEGUARD/SALVAVIDAS San Felipe Lifeguards.................................... 686-233-7730 Ask for Franscio MASSAGE/MASAJE Casey’s Place (Massage).............................. 686-577-1431 Meat Markets/Carnecerias Mercados Zsamaniegos Carnecerias (Z Market)............. 686-577-1676

BCS Photo

POSTAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS POSTALES Yet Mail......................................................... 686-577-1255 SunRunner Mail Center . ............................... 686-147-6752

REAL ESTATE SERVICES/ servicios DE BIENES RAÍCES Baja Closing & Escrow Services.................... 686-576-0653

GIFT BajaGlitz....................................................... 686-175-5420

San Ignacio

POLICE/POLICÍA Federal Preventive Police .............................. 686-577-1045 Police .......................................................... 686-577-1134

EVENT SERVICES/servicios acontecimiento Produciones Baja.......................................... 686-576-1683

FURNITURE/MUEBLERÍA Baja Nueva................................................... 686-187-7795

BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR

MaxivisionOptical = OpticaMaxivision........... 686-577-0320

Photo by Rachel Pack

church Mission San Felipe........................................ 686-577-0877

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS/ ORGANIZACIONES DE SERVICIO Club Las Amigas........................................... 686-202-0455 San Felipe Lions Club.................................... 686-212-3599 San Felipe Rotary.......................................... 686-576-0112 Solar BC Solar Cooking.......................................... 686-106-9693 SPECIALTY STORES Sea of Cortez Salt......................................... 686-209-0074 SPORT FISHING Azteca Sport Fishing and Tours..................... 686-577-0741 STORAGE/ALMACÉN San Felipe Moving & Storage......................... 686-576-0432 TATTOOING/TATUAJES Baja Ink Spot Tattoo & Body Piercing............. 686-577-0746 TIRE SHOP/lLANTERA Llantera Aguilar............................................. 686-192-8462 TRANSPORTATION/TRANSPORTACIÓN Airport.......................................................... 686-577-1368 Taxi Service.................................................. 686-577-1293 Bus Station .................................................. 686-577-1516 utilities/ empresas de servicios públicos Electric (CFE).................... 686-577-1060 or 686-577-5602 Estrella Azul (Water Dispensery).................... 686-577-1314 Propane Gas................................................. 686-577-2373 State Com. of Services Public....................... 686-556-1383 Telnor Phone Co............................................ 686-577-1000 Water Company............................................ 686-577-1022 VETERINARY/VETERINARIO ZAPP Animal Center...................................... 686-111-1143 WASTE MANAGEMENT/ MANEJO DE DESHECHO San Felipe Disposal....................................... 686-121-1004

MEDICAL SERVICES/SERVICIOS MÉDICOS Ambulance................................................... 686-577-0500 Health Center............................................... 686-577-1521 Red Cross..................................................... 686-577-1544 Dr. Victor Abasolo............. 686-577-1706 or 686-573-0174

Mulegé, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Mulegé is situated at the mouth of the Río Santa Rosalía (26°53´17˝N 111°58´53˝W), in the state of Baja California Sur, 38 miles south of Santa Rosalia, at the mouth of Bahía de Concepción. In 2005, the reported population was 3,317. Nestled between two hills in a lush tropic palm oasis divided by a shaded river that runs towards an estuary that flows to the sea, Mulegé is rich in history with lots of great sites to see, including the Misión Santa Rosalía de Mulegé, founded in 1705; the old state penitentiary, finished in 1907; and the Sierra de Guadalupe cave paintings. Outdoor activities abound, from mountain biking, scuba diving and kayaking to deep

MOVING Services San Felipe Moving & Storage......................... 686-576-0432

Municipal/Municipal

Optometrists/Opthamologists California Optical........................................... 686-577-0708

Health Center / Issste.................................... 615-153-0298 Judicial Police............................................... 615-153-0049 Mexican Red Cross.......................... 615-153-0280 / 30110

6

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

sea fishing. The cold northern current and the warm southern current come together to create an environment great for catching some of the 100 different species of fish in the Mulegé waters. By land, Mulegé is 650 miles south of the San Diego/Tijuana border crossing on Mexican Highway 1, and in 2010, via Highway 5 through San Felipe. By Air, Mulegé is served by three airstrips: Hotel Serenidad Airstrip (El Gallito), the Mulegé Municipal and Punta San Pedro. Regional flights are available at the Palo Verde Airport, and international flights are available at the Loreto Airport.

Municipal Delegation....................................615-15-3-0049 State Tourism................................................ 615-124-0199 Taxi Service.................................................. 615-153-0420 Traffic Department........................................ 615-153-0049


{{Welcome to baja}

Loreto, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur La Paz (“The Peace”) is the capital city of Baja California Sur located at 24.1405°N 110.3123°Wand is an important commercial center. Its surrounding municipality, which is the fourth-largest municipality in Mexico in geographical size, in 2005 reported a population of 219,596 living on 7,828.2 square miles of land. La Paz is typically dry and warm with averages of 75–77 degrees Fahrenheit, and 300 days or better of sunshine annually. Summer months are often in the 90’s and can be humid. The winter months can drop below 60, but stays mostly in the mid-60’s. During the summer the cooling Coromuel winds, a weather phenom-

enon unique to the La Paz area, blow from Bahia de La Paz keeping the temperature mild. By Air, La Paz is served by Manuel Márquez de León International Airport with flights to the U.S., Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey. Two ferry services operate from Pichilingue outside the city, connecting the Baja California peninsula to the mainland at Mazatlán and Topolobampo. By Road, La Paz is served mainly by two highways, Highway 1 that links the south of the state from Cabo San Lucas to the north of the peninsula until Tijuana, and Highway 19, which connects La Paz with the population of the South Pacific towns like Todo Santos and El Pescadero.

When in need of an ambulance, please call the Police number first (they will dispatch the call) and then the Fire Department number. Police number is 135-0035 or 135-0036. By following this procedure, you can be assured of being assisted.

Municipal/Municipal

Fire Department............................................ 613-135-1566 Immigration.................................................. 613-135-1266

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z) AIRPORT Loreto International Airport............................ 613-135-0565 Banks / Banco Bancomer..................................................... 613-135-0739 BUS Loreto Bus Terminal...................................... 613-135-0767

Medical Ambulance................................................... 613-135-1566 Hospital........................................................ 613-135-0039 ISSTE........................................................... 613-135-0730 Red Cross..................................................... 613-135-1111 TOURISM Loreto Tourism Office.....................................613-135-0411 Tours/adventures Baja Tropicales.............................................. 615-153-0320 Mulegé Sportfishing...................................... 615-153-0482 Cortez Explorers............................................ 615-153-0500

Holland America Cruise Ship 2010 Schedule

February 8 • 10 a.m. – 11 p.m. March 5 • 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. March 30 • 8 a.m. – 11 p.m. April 29 • 8 a.m. – 5 p.m

La Paz, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur Loreto, founded in 1697 by Jesuit missionaries, was the first Spanish settlement on the east coast of the Baja California peninsula. Loreto, situated on the Sea of Cortez, 26º00’46” N 111º20’36” W, served as the capital of the province of Las Californias from its founding until the capital was moved to Monterey on February 3, 1777. The 2005 census reported a population of 10,283. Today Loreto is a tourist resort, catering mostly to U.S. travelers, with daily flights from California arriving at Loreto International Airport. Many of the American tourists enjoy

fishing in “pangas” for “dorado” (Mahi-mahi or Dolphin Fish). Local restaurants will even prepare the daily catch of the tourists. Loreto has an excellent museum alongside the historic, but still active, parish. The Spanish Fathers found a steady spring of fresh water on this site. Loreto’s climate is hot and humid, with abundant sunshine (desert with some rainfalls in summer). The medium temperature is 76 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperatures are hot from June through October. These summer days have highs around 93 degrees Fahrenheit and high humidity.

Municipal/Municipal

Police City Police......................................................612-122-4692 Green Angels.................................................612-125-9677 Fed. Judicial Police.........................................612-125-2665 Highway Patrol....................612-12203-69 & 612-122-5735 State Jud. Police.................612-122-6610 & 612-122-1399

Fire Department.............................................612-122-0054 La Paz Tourism Office.....................................612-124-0278 Museum of Anthropology...............................612-122-0162 Port Captain...................................................612-122-0243

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z) FERRY SERVICE Baja Ferries....................................................612-125-7443 GOVERNMENT SEMATUR......................................................612-125-8899 Baja California Sur State Government.............612-124-0199 La Paz Post Office

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Medical Cruz Roja 065 or............................................612-122-1222 ISSSTE Hospital.............................................612-122-2789 IMSS Hospital................................................612-122-7377 Salvatierra Hospital..............612-122-1496 & 612-1221596 Real Estate services Omni Services...............................................612-123-4888

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

7


{Welcome to baja}}

Cabo San Lucas, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur

San Jose del Cabo, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR San José del Cabo is located in Baja California Sur and is the seat of the municipality of Los Cabos at the south end of the Baja California peninsula. In the 2005 census it had a population of 48,518. Together with neighboring Cabo San Lucas it forms a major tourist destination for travelers, particularly from North America. The two cities are served by Los Cabos International Airport. San José del Cabo offers you tranquility and old world charm, wonderful gift shops showcasing the art of Mexico, fabulous restaurants, fishing, golf, surfing and all the

nighttime entertainment you seek. Or you can just relax on one of our many pristine white sand beaches. For nature lovers, a beautiful protected estuary with a variety of fish, turtles, dolphins, exotic marine animals and over 100 species of birds is located on the southeast edge of the city. And the historic artist colony of Todos Santos is an easy one-hour drive to the north, along the scenic Pacific Ocean. Local residents take pride in restoring the town’s 18th century architecture and preserving its quiet, laid-back ambiance.

Cabo San Lucas (aka Los Cabos or San José del Cabo in Mexico, and Cabo in the U.S.) is at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula at 22.88°N 109.90°W, in the state of Baja California Sur. As of the 2005 census, the population was 56,811. It is the largest community in Los Cabos, and the secondlargest in Baja California Sur. The warmth of the waters, the beauty of its beaches, the abundance of fish, the raucous party atmosphere, a resort studded Tourist Corrider that stretcuhes between the twin towns of Cabo San Lucas and San José del Cabo in miles of pristine white beaches, and other qualities is quickly making Cabo San Lucas a highend vacation destination.

Municipal/Municipal Municipal/Municipal

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

Medical Red Cross......................................................624-143-3300 Emergencies..................................................624-144-3434 Hospital.........................................................624-143-7777 Cape Air and Land First Response Ambulance .....................................................................624-143-5900 Centro Medico Cabo San Lucas.....................624-143-9727

DENTISTS Cabo Cosmetic DentaL................................624-143-0520

Police Police Cabo San Lucas...................................624-143-0057

Fire Department............................................ 624-143-9000 United States Consular Agency Emergency 24hrs.............. 619-692-2154 or 624-143-3566

8

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

Ambulance........................ 066-624-142-0316 (Red Cross) Consumer Affairs (Profeco) La Paz 01........... 612-122-8088 Fire Dept............................................ 068 or 624-142-2466 Taxis......624-142-0580 or 624-142-0105 or 624-142-0401

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z) Police State Police....................................................624-143-0296 Highway Patrol...............................................624-143-3977 Federal Police.................................................624-143-1210 Medical Alcoholics Anonymous...................................624-147-5516

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Cabo San Lucas has the largest Marlin tournament in the world. In the winter, pods of whales can be observed in the ocean bearing their calves in the warm waters. Served by the Los Cabos International Airport for general aviation flights and air taxi service, the town is also a popular port of call for many cruise ships. Exclusive hotels and gated residential communities attract the rich and famous in this wondrous region known as “The Corridor.” Considered some of Latin America’s top resorts, many of these properties have become havens to Hollywood stars, Fortune 500 CEOs and even the U.S. president during the 2002 Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC).

Ambulances...................................................624-143-4020 Social Security Hospital..................................624-143-1548 Health Center.................................................624-143-0102 Red Cross......................................................624-143-3300 City Chamber of Commerce..................................624-143-0437 Family Protection...........................................624-143-0586 Gas Leaks......................................................624-143-1292 Marine Harbor Master................................................624-143-4771 Police Federal Highway Police..................................624-146-0573 Municipal Police.............................................624-142-0361 Police San Jose del Cabo...............................624-142-0361 Traffic Police..................................................624-142-3748


{{Welcome to baja}

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ONE FREE/GR ATIS PLEASE TAKE September / septiembre

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1723. This mission contains the statue of the Virgin of Pilar, which is the focus of the town’s main festival in October. More recently, there has been an increase in tourist activity and a boom in real estate development. Handicraft shops, art galleries, upscale restaurants, boutique hotels and restored colonial buildings have contributed to the gentrification and redevelopment of the town. There are many beautiful beaches within a 30-minute drive. Playa Las Palmas and Playa Los Cerritos are great beaches for swimming and shell collecting, and Los Cerritos attracts surfers from around the world.

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Art Galleries Galeria La Poza...........................................612-145-0400 Charles Stewart Gallery/Studio....................612-145-0265 Colores de Mexico......................................612-145-0106 Ezra Katz Gallery.........................................612-137-3473 Galeria Arturo.............................................612-145-0773 Galeria de Kathleen Gambogi.......................612-145-0460 Michael Cope..............................................612-145-0500 Galeria Logan..............................................612-145-0151 Galeria N. E. Hayles.....................................612-145-0183 Galeria On-ce Photography..........................612-145-0550 Galeria Wall.................................................612-145-0527 Contemporary Mexican art..........................612-145-0215 La Polilla................................................01-331-255-7965

2009

RE INVE ST • RETI K • PLAY • LIVE • WOR

The mission Nuestra Señora del Pilar de Todos Santos La Paz was founded by father Jaime Bravo in

BUSINESS DIRECTORY (A-Z)

/ diciembre

rtainmen

■ Mexic o: Next Pow Gold’s Player erhouse

No. 30

Named “Pueblo Mágico” in 2006, is a small coastal town at the foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna Mountains, on the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula, about an hour’s drive north of Cabo San Lucas and an hour south from La Paz. Located at 23°26´56˝N 110°13´32˝W, Todos Santos is very near the Tropic of Cancer in the municipality of La Paz. The population was 4,078 at the census of 2005. During the 19th century Todos Santos thrived as the Baja sugarcane capital. Now the rich farmlands have been reworked and the town prospers from an abundance of avocado, vegetable and chili farming, papaya and mango orchards, fishing and ranching.

Hospital........................................................ 612-145-0095 Mayor........................................................... 612-145-0365 Post Office.................................................... 612-145-0330 State Police................................................... 612-145-0198

ide.com

Ensenada Eating tacos Baja Country Club in Mexico El Rey Sol Hotel slEEping around El Rey Sol Restaurant in Baja & Sonora CasaMar Restaurant Happy Pharmacy Steven Dryden - contact Hotel St. Isabel The Main Tourism office (by the Pemex)

Todos Santos, BAJA CALIFORNIA Sur

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San Ignacio Rice & Beans Resturant Ignacio Springs B&B Mulege Hotel Serenidad Hotel Hacienda Loreto Coco Cabanas Hotel Tipui Silver Shop La Daminana Loreto Islas Tiburon Rentals Rentals Loreto Gecko Curios Dali's Alexander Real Estate Mita Gourmet El Dorado Motel Juice Guy Augie's Mission Hotel Oasis Hotel Desert Inn Trailer Park Rivia del Mar La Paz Omni Service Hacinda del Sol Las Gaviotas Resort

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PDO Beach Bar Pemex Day Night Pemex North Rancho Otro Riviera Liquors San Felipe Liquors Santa Fe Pharmacy Sundance Sunrunner YetMail

EE E FR E ON K TA

Rosarito Beach D’Groomer Dog Groomer La Bamba 50’s Diner Magañas Restaurant To the Top Elevators / Click-On Mail Bobby’s Baja By the Sea R.B. Hotel Coffee Shop Baja Open House Baja Mart Whale’s Tail Deli Medio Camino Restaurant InCare Casa El Jardín Baja Medix Consultorio Dental Rosarito-Ensenada Alternative Healthcare

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San Jose Del Cabo: Angel´s Touch Dental

Wendy Faith, artist in glass..........................612-145-0255 Shopping Cactus Arte Mexicano.................................612-145-0771 Casa Juanita...............................................612-140-0069 La Canada del Diablo Muebles Rusticos......612-140-0069 Curios Tony.................................................612-145-0356 El Perico Azul..............................................612-145-0538 Fenix de Todos Santos.................................612-145-0808 Galeria Santa Fe..........................................612-145-0301 Mangos......................................................612-145-0451 Manos Mexicanas.......................................612-145-0538 Regalos Diana-Dos Glorias..........................612-145-0324 Uguet Tiles and Marble................................612-127-2776 Hotel California Emporium...........................612-145-0525 Real Estate King Y Asociados........................................624-151-5840 Amerimex...................................................612-145-0050 Maya Roca.................................................612-145-0464 Milagro Real Estate.....................................612-145-0219 Moniely Real Estate.....................................612-145-0540 Pescadero Properties..................................612-145-0756 Ricardo Amigo Real Estate .........................612-145-0551

BAJA BUSINESS DIRECTORY ASSISTANCE BAJA EVENT TICKET SALES BAJA ACCOMMODATION BOOKINGS REVIEWS & RECOMMENDATIONS

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A Service of Mexico Living MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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Best of Baja

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People & Voices

’S R O T LE I D E NG A

“The beginning of the New Year

often makes us nostalgic and we

reminisce about the years past.

Guide to Pacific Baja & The Sea of Cortez

Publisher/Editor John Pack john@mexicoliving.info Publisher Rachel Pack rachel@mexicoliving.info

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on the floor with laughter in “Centavo’s Two Cents: Before the Parade Passes By.” Remember 2000 . . . the year people were saying the world would come to an end . . . our computers would stop working . . . or whatever other rumors were going around at that time? In “Hell No, I Won’t Go!” La Huerita will share her memories of that year, and you’ll definitely laugh as she realizes her youthful preconceptions of “aging” were just myths and you’re just never too old to live the Good Life. Oh, and let’s not forget about “The Best of Baja.” It was an extremely close race yet again this year. Find out who you, the readers, determined to be the “Best of 2009.” After reading the contents of this issue, you’ll probably get the same subliminal message that I did: You can either sit in the house and think about the weight that crept up over the holidays or you can get out and experience all that Baja has to offer! Now that the New Year is upon us, Mexico Living is literally bursting at the seams with new ideas and stories, and high hopes for the coming year. Our contributors are taking the field with a renewed sense of vision and passion for what we do . . . and what you want to know about The Good Life in Baja. So, grab yourself a cup of coffee, sit back, start reading and enjoy!

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Find it OnLine

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Subscribe and start receiving your personal copy of Mexico Living Weekly every Monday morning. Our weekly newsletter contains exclusive articles, current events, coupons and discounts to your favorite establishments and destinations, and much more.

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Need something to do? Never miss an event or special occasion. Visit and get the up-to-the-minute scoop on what’s happening in your area. P.S. As always, I’m interested in hearing from you, what you think of Mexico Living and any ideas or comments you may have to improve YOUR GUIDE TO THE GOOD LIFE. So, send your suggestions and comments to editor@ mexicoliving.info.

Mexico City, DF: (558) 421-4027 Website: www.mexicolivingguide.com Email: info@mexicoliving.info

Regional Sales Manager Lisa Shannon, lisa@mexicoliving.info Regional Sales Associates – Baja California Norte Bill Maine, Associate Publisher, bill@mexicoliving.info Kris Clark, Marketing Associate, bajamexicoliving@gmail.com Eloy Miron, Marketing Associate, eloymiron@gmail.com Regional Sales Associates – Baja California Sur Rachel Pack, Publisher, rachel@mexicoliving.info Sean Harrington, Marketing Associate, seanmexliving@gmail.com

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

30

p. Fishing

Calendar

U.S. Toll-free: (800) 395-9019 Ex.3 San Diego, CA: (619) 550-2730 San Felipe, BC: (686) 230-9933

Published by John Benjamin Pack

Editor, Brenda Judy, editor@mexicoliving.info

25

p. Business

High Hopes

As we flip the page on our calendar, we find ourselves at the start of a new year. I don’t know about you, but I’m sure glad 2009 is behind us. Other than a wonderful Thanksgiving and Christmas with family, 2009 just was not my year! And, it definitely wasn’t one of the best years for Mexico . . . or for many other countries as well. So, alas, the hectic holiday season is over and, hopefully, the swine flu, falling economy, Hurricane Jimena, and the issue of “safety in Mexico” will become fading, distant memories as 2010 awaits us with open arms. My wish for all of you is that this New Year is one filled with peace, prosperity, health, love and much laughter! We may not be able to do much about the rest, but to start 2010 off with a “bang,” we can at least help you with the “laughter” part. The beginning of the New Year often makes us nostalgic and we reminisce about the years past. And, just like most people, we tend to focus on the good memories . . . the ones that make us laugh. So, take a look back in time with Tom Gatch as he reminisces about one of his many adventurous, hilarious fishing trips in “Baja Bacalao: A Tale of the Lively Lingcod.” Join Penny Nask as she reminisces about her experiences with parades in Mexico. She’ll have you rolling

MEXICO LIVING

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p. Food

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

877-LUVMEX1

Your one-stop Baja 411 resource for finding people, products and services in your area.

Mexico Living is a guide committed to promoting Northwest Mexico to the limits of our abilities and to provide a valuable resource to visitors and residents, while showing that Northwest Mexico is a great place not only to visit and play, but also to live and work—a place to call home.

Distribution Regional, Carlos Durán San Felipe, Bill Maine, San Felipe

Mexico Mailing Address Mexico Living / Yet Mail, Etc. Ave. Mar de Cortez #1049, San Felipe, BC 21850

Writers Steve Dryden, Carlos Durán, Benjamin Eugene, Steven Forman, Tom Gatch, Rosie Glover, Bob Ham, Lynn Hamman, Stockton Hill, La Huerita, Lucy E. Jackson, Anita Kaltenbaugh, David Mandich, Penny Nask, John Pack, Rachel Pack, Rita Pizarro, Lynn Prince, Lisa Shannon, June Snow, Christa Thomas, Cai Tierra and Robin Waters.

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Production Layout, Carolyn Sheltraw, info@csheltraw.com

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. All contributors and advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the accuracy of their statements and claims. All readers assume responsibility for actions or decisions they might make as a result of reading this publication. We reserve the right to refuse any advertising.


OP-ED

S o . . . W h a t d o Yo u R E A L L Y T h i n k ?

What I Really Think!!!

The opinions are not necessarily the opinions of the publisher or editor. Opinions are published to allow you, the reader, to decide.

submitted by Joseph Wachter, Loreto

Regarding the opinion submitted by Darrell M.S., California, titled “The Helpless Helpless,” which appeared on page 5 of your November edition: Who is this guy? Where in California is he? How much real time could he have spent in Mexico? Obviously he does not even know his own U.S. area. I’m an extensive world traveler in addition to having lived (always in good neighborhoods) some 50 years in LA, 10 years in Nebraska, 2 years in Connecticut, 10 years in San Diego north county and 3 years in Loreto, Mexico. I think I have a good grasp on U.S. “crime” and the risks of crime here, and I believe it to be less than in the U.S. by far.

We are plugged into the Loreto community and have three or four regular and immediate sources of community info, witness the bulletins on Jimena. In regards to items 1 and 3 of Darrell’s opinion: “Honest” info in the U.S. is not available to any great degree, break-ins and rape is seldom reported. I was the victim of three break-ins (police did nothing) and one shooting in an attempted rape of a tenant in LA. In SD county I was the victim of three breakins and my teenage stepdaughter had two tires slashed on her car by a man who followed her home because he did not like her bumper sticker (the police did nothing on any of these). Reference item 2: Is Mr. Helpless suggesting that we all pack guns? Please grow

Mailbag October Edition #1

Your new format is great! The October edition was absolutely fabulous; probably one of my favorite editions. It was loaded with tons of info, but two of my favorites were the “Medical Tourism” and “Mexicare” articles. I found “Broken Trust” especially interesting. I sent a copy to my brother-in-law, a U.S. doctor, who claims that the failure of the U.S. medical system is because of the illegal aliens who freeload

up cowboy! And regarding item number 4: Property ownership is not a problem, as you know, in Baja and is even easier on the mainland. Crime cover-ups are often universal for the sake of property values, politics and tourism, and much more prevalent in the U.S. where managed news is an industry in itself. The remedy is a continual educational process, and white Americans carry a lot of prejudice and anger and ignorance. Powerful ingredients for fear. Helpless has no clue but makes my point. My Mexican wife, Josephina (would you believe), of one year from the LA type city of Monterrey, has so far refused to go to the U.S. with me to meet my family

on Americans! Thanks again for a great publication. —Mary J., Ensenada Mary, of course I think every edition is great, but the October 2009 edition is one of my favorites as well. Thank you so much for the feedback and kind words.

October Edition #2

I just finished reading the October edition of Mexico Living from cover to cover. You kept my interest from

Question: Do I need a Mexican Will?

because of her perception of the crime rate there. Don’t give up. Now, onto other things. I have been espousing legalizing drugs and prostitution in the U.S. for eeeeeeever. The U.S. needs to understand that the drug wars of today are like the booze wars in the U.S. of prohibition, and the U.S. is the market for those drugs. Limiting smoking is catching on. I have no real problem with responsible smokers if I don’t have to suffer from their smoke and the butts they think they can throw anywhere. NOW, if we can ban chewing gum, the second most destructive and disgusting habit . . .

your Editor’s Angle all the way to the classified ads. This month’s articles on Medical Tourism were well written and very interesting and, should the need arise, could be very helpful. Thank you for yet another excellent edition. —Gary Slavin, Florida Gary, thank you so much for letting us know that we managed to keep your interest from cover to cover. I’ll be sure to pass along the kudos to our writers.

Correction to November Edition

It seems that we got a little carried away with our zeros in the article “Got Mail,” page 17, of the November edition. Under the Frequently Asked Questions, the cost to send a general delivery letter should have read “4 or 5 pesos (40 to 50 cents)”; not 400 or 500 pesos.

Us Send a k c b d ee F As always, we’re interested in your HONEST feedback. So, send your opinions and comments to editor@ mexicoliving.info. Letters may be edited for length and content. Make sure to visit us online or pick up a copy of next month’s edition to find out what others REALLY THINK!

Sunrunner

Mail Center

New owners: • Internet Ron & Susie Stephens • Copy Same Great Service • Fax Same Great Price US Mailing Address • Shipping • Forwarding Get a U.S. Expert Answer: Kristy Deegan, San Felipe Management Services: KM 178.5, Mailing • Stamps Plaza Paraiso, and very lengthy process and the final decision The answer is YES. e r Mail Center Address San Felipe • Envelopes There is no right of survivorship in Mexico. may not be what you had wished. Many people think that if they have a fideicomiso, If you are married and one spouse dies, the ers: New owners: Wifi •• Free Internet MENS children can disinherit the other spouse and and their heir is listed on the document, they do T-Shirts ens Stephens take possession of the property. Therefore, both not need a will. The fideicomiso only covers the ••• Copy Copy& Fax Ron & Susie Shipping Tanks ice Same Great Service land, not the home, contents, vehicles, jewelry, spouses should have a will. • Forwarding • Fax etc. AND since there is no right of survivorship, If you have a will or trust in the United States, ice Same Great Price • Stamps LADIES it is not valid in Mexico. In order to pass your these items do not automatically go to the partner ess US Mailing •• Envelopes Shipping T-Shirts Address Choose property and belongings easily to your loved or desired party. It seems that there is always a “new” process to complete to live worry free in Mexico. The Mexican Will is the hot one for now. Do I need a Mexican Will to protect my personal assets in Mexico?

r Sunrunner

To be confident that your possessions will be ones, you must have a Mexican will. If you count on the U.S. trust or will, you will have to have protected and passed on per your wishes, you 5, it officially translated, legal documents prepared must have a Mexican will. so, and go through a court process. This is a costly

pe

Tanks from several Cards •• Greeting Forwarding 3/4 Sleeve colors • US Mail Service KM 178.5, • Stamps A v a i l a bKM l e 178.5, a t S uPlaza n r u nParaiso ner 6• 8Envelopes 6 - 5 7 6 - 0 3Plaza76San8Paraiso, 0Felipe 6 - 1 4 7San - 6Felipe, 7 5 2Baja

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MENS

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{News}}

Border Crossing Update

NEW BRIEFS

by Bob Ham

Top Stories, Local Updates and Mexican News in English

SEND NEWS TO NEWS@MEXICOLIVING.INFO

The United States government has spent only 2 percent of the more than $1 billion it has pledged to help Mexico win its battle against drug traffickers, according to a government study released Thursday. Despite vows by the Bush administration, and now the Obama administration, to help President Felipe Calderón of Mexico in his three-year-long assault against drug cartels, actual spending totaled only about $24 million by the end of September.

Photo by ilkie

Mexico Still Waiting for U.S. Aid, Report Says

Calexico Crossing Info Mexico

In early November the Customs and Border Protection Service (CBP) quietly introduced a new pilot program aimed at reducing wait times to cross into the United States. On Sundays, when the commercial port of entry at Calexico East is closed, they are diverting traffic in the easternmost righthand lane into three of the commercial port lanes. Their press release says that they will be doing this

Two years ago, the United States announced a $1.4 billion, multiyear aid package for Mexico and Central America, a huge increase over previous spending, but the delivery of the money has been bogged down by burdensome contracting rules and other delays, the agency found.

Drone Aircraft will be Used to Nab Illegal Immigrants on CaliforniaMexico Border Predator drones, the unmanned aircraft used by the U.S. military in the Iraq and Afghanistan war zones, will soon be employed to track illegal immigrants on the Mexico-California border. The drone, which was unveiled last month, will be operated out of the Antelope Valley by the military contractor General Atomics. The drones will fly above the border region with advancing electronic tracking equipment looking for illegal immigrants crossing into California. According to the San Diego-based company, the drones will transmit information to U.S. 12

will push to have the CBP continue to keep the lanes open after the holidays. CBP reports that this is resulting in wait times at the Calexico East port decreasing 40 percent from the same weekends last year. They are also reporting shorter wait times at the downtown port as border crosses start using the east port instead of the downtown port when they hear reports of the shorter lines. We have also been informed that CBP now has all of the equipment necessary to create a SENTRI lane at the Calexico East port. The equipment will be installed during January, and we can expect the lane to open sometime during the first quarter of 2010. The Mexicans still have to build an access that will allow SENTRI pass holders to access the new lane, which will be the westernmost left-hand lane at the existing port. We certainly appreciate the efforts of CBP to continue to work towards shortening the wait times to cross into the United States without compromising their mission of maintaining maximum security.

Cuba Gooding Sr. Named Goodwill Ambassador and Receives Rosarito Key

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, questioned about the slow spending when she visited Mexico City in July, acknowledged that “our long process of approval was cumbersome and challenging for the Mexican government” and vowed to “see what we can do to cut that time.”

by Ron Raposa

Photo by Laura Wong.

Mexico and the United States first agreed to increase American antidrug aid during meetings in March 2007 between President George W. Bush and Mr. Calderón in the city of Mérida. The so-called Mérida Initiative resulting from the meeting represented the largest foreign aid package in the Western Hemisphere since Plan Colombia, a multibillion-dollar effort initiated in 2000 to combat drug cartels and end the insurgency in that country.

at least through the holidays and then will assess whether to continue. For now it will be in place through January 3, 2010. The addition of the 3 new lanes means that there are now 11 northbound lanes at the new port where there used to be only 8. The new lanes will be open from approximately 9 a.m. every Sunday until the lines subside enough to allow them to close. Traffic in the right lane will be allowed to spread out into the 3 new lanes just after crossing the bridge over the canal. The business community in Calexico has been pushing for these changes for some time, and they

Cuba Gooding Sr. with Rosarito Mayor Hugo Torres at a meeting the week prior to the concert.

Noted singer Cuba Gooding Sr. was presented a key to Rosarito and named a goodwill ambassador for the city by Mayor Hugo Torres at a weekend concert there.

“I am humbled by this, it means a lot to me,” said Gooding, who is best known for his 1972 super hit “Everybody Plays The Fool” as lead singer of the Main Ingredient. He also is the father of well-known actor Cuba Gooding Jr. Mr. Gooding, who has a vacation home in Rosarito, said he is troubled because some in the U.S. have gotten the impression that Rosarito is unsafe because of the government’s crackdown on drug cartels and wanted to help correct that impression. He told the mayor that he and his family would work to spread the word in the United States that Rosarito is a safe, wonderful, warm and welcoming place. “We’re going to get Mexicans and Americans loving each other,” he said. Mayor Torres said the presentation was being made to Mr. Gooding “because of the great work

you are doing and because we love you.” The effort to have Mr. Gooding named goodwill ambassador was organized by Baja Times editor Laura Wong and other Rosarito residents, including members of the city’s large expatriate community. As well as helping promote Rosarito in the U.S. and the world, Mr. Gooding said he also would bring other well-known ‘70s groups including the Temptations for concerts in the city. Mr. Gooding still tours several months a year. Mayor Torres made the presentation to Mr. Gooding during a dinner concert at Reuben’s Palm Grill, in the Cantamar area of the city. A full house of about 100 people enthusiastically watched the concert by Mr. Gooding, who was accompanied by the two backup singers of the Main Ingredient, a four-piece band and an emcee.

Food Bank San Felipe Food Bank San Felipe was established in February 2009, its sole mission: to feed San Felipe’s hungry. Last month, the Food Bank fed over 400! Unfortunately, last week, we had to deny food to someone who asked for food. We just don’t have enough to go around. We are trying to do our best to help hungry people and that really hurt us. Right now the Food Bank could feed 800 families, if only we had enough resources. I am asking one and all to consider going with us when we deliver food to those families to see for

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

yourself the impact our service makes on the lives of these individuals. You’ll live an experience you will not soon forget! Collection locations are located in every area of San Felipe and the list can be found in our monthly advertisement. We are seeking to get our mobile soup kitchen in operation soon, as well as starting auctions in town to raise money to purchase food for the families and to help cover the expense of running the mobile operation. We are still trying to establish an advisory board to

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guide and help the Food Bank with ideas and structure so we can continue to serve those who desperately need our help. This is not a seasonal problem in San Felipe; these families need food every week, every month, every year. Without assistance from people like you, who are taking the time to read this article, these families will continue to go hungry. Please help. Contact Mark La Pointe for more information at (686) 576-0176. If you don’t get an answer, please leave a message.


Rotary Sends Supplies to Two Baja Schools The Modesto Bee reports students at two schools in Mexico received 400 dictionaries and a truckload of other supplies courtesy of the Modesto East Rotary Club. The Rotary Club sent three members in mid-November to Los Barriles, near the southern tip of Baja California. The Spanish-language dictionaries were given to students in third through ninth grades. Fifth- and sixth-graders received items that included paper, scissors, tape, dry-erase supplies, rulers, globes, pencils

and markers. The items were part of a literacy project. Delivering the goods were club president Don Kemplen, international chairwoman Martha Robles and member-at-large Mark Baptista. More donations are planned, including Spanish dictionaries for incoming third- and seventh-graders and Spanish-to-English dictionaries for middle school students learning English.

Mexican Deportees Increase in 2009 An average of 1,719 undocumented Mexicans were deported each day by the U.S. government in the first 10 months of 2009, reports La Opinión. This figure comes from migration statistics from the Ministry of Interior’s most recent reports, and represents an increase of 7.3 percent over the same period in 2008. Baja California received the highest number of deportees, with 206,039. The statistics only considered Mexicans detained by U.S. immigration authorities and who adhered to the Voluntary Repatriation Program, part of the Memorandum of Understanding on the Safe, Orderly, Dignified and Humane Repatriation of Mexican Nationals, signed by the U.S. and Mexico in February 2004.

Photo by Shirley Bassett.

Around Town in Loreto with Lynn Hamman

Oscar Cortes, Miguel Angel Benitez and Eric Cortes outside of Del Borracho.

On November 14 Hammer Hits made their debut at Del Borracho. Cousins Eric and Oscar Cortes (both 14 years old) and Miguel Angel Benitez (22 years old) wooed the crowd with their heavy metal music. It was hard to believe they just started their

group. After playing several songs, fathers of Eric and Oscar took over with their band Hijos de Sanchez . . . Jesus Cortes (drums), Roger Cortes (guitar), Bruce Rodger (harmonica) and Mark Tyler (guitar). There was barely enough room on the dance floor to shake

¿Qué Pasa San Felipe?

Photo courtesy of motofoto.cc

Harley Davidson Run

Hard to believe the New Year is here! To recap some November 14 events, the Mexico Living Home Show was held at The Pavilion at La Ventana del Mar and was a great success. Thanks to vendors and workers, everyone who worked so hard to make the event a good one. The Rodeo came to San Felipe, too! How amazing was THAT?!

Yet another event, the Lions’ Club Turkey Trot Poker Walk . . . same day . . . had a fantastic turnout. The traditional Spaghetti Dinner, courtesy of Cliff at Los Arcos, and the music of Agave Blues made the event complete. Baja Java, also on November 14, hosted a Wine Tasting Opera Dinner. Other November haps included the opening of the new Road Runner Café, formerly known as

your bootie. And it doesn’t stop there . . . you can hear them perform at different functions and places throughout Loreto. BUT, it’s always nice to hear “Dos Gordos” with Jaime Gonzalez and Bruce Rodger (yes, Bruce does spread himself around). They perform whenever and wherever they can but usually at Stroker’s Reef Bar. Another bar/restaurant just opened on the Malecon. Marino has a great view of the marina, which makes one think that is where the name came from, but no . . . it’s the owner’s name. It’s located next to KoKo Chang Restaurant. Loreto was rockin’ on New Year’s Eve. La Mision Hotel jumped in the ring to offer dining, cocktails and dancing to bring in 2010. A beautiful setting with an area to accommodate 200 people. Those who imbibed too much for driving spent the night. Others decided to barhop, and brought in the New Year at Stroker’s Reef, Mike’s Bar, Oasis Hotel and Augie’s Bar & Grill.

Java Jitters BC Bistro, north of town near San Felipe Storage, operated by the Klevers. Great American food! Be sure to check them out. The Baja 1000 came through our desert on November 21, bringing many spectators into our little town. The dunes were all abuzz out on the race course with campers, traveling vendors and race fans. A rather cool, unannounced event happened in town on November 29. There was a Harley Davidson Motorcycle Run to our very own Malecon from all over the U.S. and Mexico. Bikes lined the malecon street and beer was aplenty! Although not a holiday shared by our Mexican neighbors, American celebrations of Thanksgiving could be seen all over town. Friends gathered in places like Fandangos, The Beach Bar at PDO, Langosta Roja. We all have so much to be thankful for, living in this wonderful town and having such wonderful people to call our neighbors and friends. May your New Year bring you much joy and happiness.

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{{News} authorities on human smuggles as well drug smuggling. Such drones are already used on the border of Texas and Arizona.

12 Arrested After Discovery of a Tunnel from Mexico into San Diego Mexican authorities discovered a large crossborder tunnel today and arrested more than a dozen men inside the passageway that extended about 860 feet into San Diego, U.S. authorities said. The tunnel, which was not complete, featured lighting, electrical and ventilation systems, and an elevator to move materials and workers to depths reaching 100 feet, authorities said. They estimate it was under construction for about two years in a warehouse district just west of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry. Mexican authorities in Tijuana were acting on information provided by the San Diego Tunnel Task Force, which includes agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Drug Enforcement Administration. It was the latest in a series of tunnel discoveries in recent weeks under the California-Mexico border. The passageways are used by Mexican organized crime groups to ferry drugs into the U.S.

Marriott International Inked a Deal That Could Triple Their Presence in Mexico Two years in the works, the deal gives Pulso Hotelero of Mexico exclusive rights to develop 36 mid-priced Fairfield Inn hotels in Mexico over the next 10 years. Marriott and Pulso CEO Salomon Kamkhaji signed the contract at Marriott headquarters before a crowd of about 200 employees. A room at a typical Fairfield Inn costs around $90, though rates vary by market. The price includes a complimentary hot breakfast. Don’t expect the Fairfield Inns to pop up in Mexico overnight. The contract calls for the development of two hotels per year for the first two years, and then four per year afterward. The first Fairfield Inn to be built under the contract will be a 120-room hotel at the entrance to the resort town of Cabo San Lucas, and the a second is a 139-room hotel in Guadalajara, Mexico’s second-largest city. Marriott currently has 17 hotels in Mexico: 7 Marriott Hotels, 6 Courtyards, 2 JW Marriotts, 1 Ritz-Carlton, and a lone Fairfield Inn.

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{calendar}} Send your calendar events to calendar@mexicoliving.info. Please tell them you found their event in Mexico Living.

IMPORTANT DATES Jan. 1: New Year’s Day Jan. 1: Super Bowl Sunday (U.S.) Jan. 2: Groundhog Day (U.S.) Jan. 17: Feast Day of San Antonio de Abad (Mexico). A Mexican religious holiday during which the Catholic Church allows animals to enter the church for blessing. Jan. 18: Martin Luther King Day (U.S.) Feb. 5: Constitution Day Banks are closed (MX) Feb. 10–16: Carnival (MX). A Latin American equivalent of Mardi Gras. Feb. 14: Valentines Day/Dia de San Valentin (U.S.) Feb. 14: Friendship Day/Día de Amistad (MX) Feb. 15: National Flag Day (Canada)

LOCAL EVENTS Feb. 16:WEEKLY Presidents Day (U.S.)

See theFeast Community Calendar onde Feb. 17: Day of San Antonio www.mexicolivingguide.com for a Abad (MX). A Mexican religious holiday weekly schedule eventsChurch for each city. during which the of Catholic which allows animals to enter the church for their blessing. Feb. 24: Mexican Flag Day Feb. 25: Ash Wednesday/Miercoles de Ceniza

El Dorado Ranch Full Moon Mixer by Darryl Silva

Are you ever looking for something simple and yet extra special to do? Something fun and tasty you can share with your significant other, family and friends? Jorge and the El Dorado Ranch Activity Staff host what is known as The Full Moon Mixer. They have now even brought in a professional hotdog chef. He is armed with a great mobile kitchen ready to serve up the most delicious wieners available anywhere. He has all the fixin’s too! Great grilled mushrooms, onions and the best spicy hot peppers in Baja. All of this right here on our own El Dorado Beach! The cost? Well, that’s not bad either. How does free sound? Just bring your El Dorado HOA I.D, something to drink, a side dish and a comfy chair. Now how simple is that? One of the reasons many of us came to this magical place called San Felipe was to live a better yet simpler life. A life that was less demanding on yourself and on your family. The El Dorado Ranch Full Moon Mixer fits that bill perfectly. But the main event is still yet to come. When Mr. Luna does finally make his appearance it is truly awe inspiring! You look over at your neighbors, and your extended San Felipe family. You give thanks for such a moment. Suddenly you realize that there are people somewhere in the world studying travel brochures with this or similar magical views highlighted as a place they could someday visit. A place such as this is on their bucket list. And you and I are blessed enough to live here. To live this dream! Not so long ago, and yet a lifetime ago, my mother and father told me about the “Man in the Moon.” You know the story. I’m sure the stories you were told as a child were similar to mine. Now when I stand on our beautiful beach with a little moisture in my eye, grandkids by my side and

tell them about the man in the moon I come to realize what the term “full circle” really means. Is this not what “real life” is all about. When my grandkids grow up and perhaps stand on this very beach looking at this very moon they will remember these times long after the Disneyland and Magic Mountain trips are long forgotten. Not that there is anything wrong with those vacation venues, but in those amusement parks they get to share you with thousands of other people that they don’t know, that don’t know them and will likely never see again. It’s not the great food. Nor is it the beach with all our friends and family that makes it special. And quite honestly it’s not even all about the moon. It’s the knowing and the recognition of how special and how blessed we are to live in this place. This place we call home. A special place called San Felipe.

LOCAL WEEKLY EVENTS See the Community Calendar on www. mexicolivingguide.com for a weekly schedule of events for each city.

ROSARITO BEACH Jan. 2: United Society of Baja California (USBC) general Meeting at the Rosarito Beach Hotel. 10 a.m. EVERYONE WELCOME! Contact Paul Weeks (661) 612-2186. Jan. 21: Portofino Restaurant Pairing Dinner. $38, 7 p.m. at the Hotel Festival Plaza. Reservations required. U.S. (800) 453-8606 Feb. 18: Portofino Restaurant Pairing Dinner. $38, 7 p.m. at the Hotel Festival Plaza. Reservations required. U.S. (800) 453-8606

ENSENADA Jan–Mar: Guided Whale Watching Tours Feb. 10–16: Carnival. The biggist party of the year in Ensenada. 14

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January 17th

3-6PM Join us at the Casa de Fe Orphanage Construction Site for an afternoon of Cowboy-style FUN!

Visit our website or call for information 686-577-3176 www.casadefe.org

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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ZAPP Animal Center Providing Solutions for San Felipe by Steven “Dogman” Forman

The ZAPP Animal Center opened on Monday, December 14, only five days late. Thanks to San Felipe Home Builders for their meticulous attention to detail, and their crews of workers for getting us up and running. It is an extremely gratifying feeling to finally be able to provide solutions for any problem related to dogs and cats in town. ZAPP has an Indigent Animal Surgery Fund, which will be supported by revenue from our on-site boarding and grooming services. Just the other day, I was approached by a resident of San Felipe. She was concerned about a group of animals, including three steers, two dogs, some chickens and a pony left abandoned in the Ejido. We were immediately able to address the situation, bought some hay, sent some dog food, and were even prepared to rescue this group and bring them to our new site; but after nearly two weeks of being AWOL, the owner’s son finally showed up with food for the brood. We will keep an eye on them in the future to make sure they are taken care of. We’re now able to respond to calls from concerned San Felipians regarding animals in need of rescue. Our open door policy prevents us from rejecting any “at-risk” dogs or cats. ZAPP has over seven acres, staffed by an awesome group of people, who I swear have animal DNA running through their veins. Please join us at the Pavillion in La Ventana del Mar, January 25, for the third appearance of Ms. Tootie and the “girls” in an ‘80s revival entitled “DISCO DECADENCE.” This show will raise funds specifically for a much needed “caterie” at ZAPP Center, which we will start building right away. Call us at (686) 111-1143 or visit www.sfzapp. com.

SAN FELIPE Jan. 17: Cowboy Ho-Down at the Casa de Fe Orphanage at the construction site. 4–7 p.m. Contact Jeri (686) 120-2369 Jan. 19: Taste of San Felipe presented by The Rotary Club of San Felipe 1–3:30 p.m. $15 or 200 pesos. Contact T. Smith at 576-0484, ttsmith@ netzero.net. Jan. 25: Disco Decadence Presented by ZAPP. Miss Tootie and the Divas from San Diego’s LIPS. Contact Steven Forman, bajaanimalrescue@yahoo.com Jan. 31: Art Expo - Champagne and Art. No Admission Charge. Enjoy 12 local artists displaying mosaics, paintings, jewelry, sculptures and more, and stay for the Champagne Brunch. (686) 115-0526 or digitaldesignbyRobin@gmail.com. Feb. 5: La Constitucion Aniversario de San Felipe - 85 years Feb. 10–16: Carnaval San Felipe. Parades and events, lot of Fun! Feb TBA: VIII Festival de la Paella Mar. 12–14: Baja 250 San Felipe

LA PAZ Jan–Mar: Whale Watching Season. Different tours are available at La Paz Bay. Jan. 15: Tequilas Monthly Pool Tournament. More info, call 01152 (612) 121-5217 or email Tequilas@ Bajalife.com. Jan. 17: Historic Building Tour in San Antonio. Sponsored by the East Cape Arts Association. March: The 4th Festival Pax International Festival of Art and Culture Features Africa. For more information, email paxcultura@hotmail.com.

LOS CABO Every Thursday Night: San José del Cabo Art Walk along Obregon Street behind the church, sipping wine and viewing fine art. 5–9 p.m. Jan. 10–15: Puerto Los Cabos World Pro-Am. www.golftournamenttours.com Feb. 28: Becas Ball. Annual benefit dinner-dance and raffle to raise funds for scholarships for Cabo San Lucas’s students in need.

TODOS SANTOS Jan. 2: 5K Walk/Run for Health. Proceeds support the Chino Medical Program. info@palapasociety.org Jan. 30–Feb. 6: Annual ART FESTIVAL. This block long plaza in front of the cathedral was transformed into Baja’s largest outdoor art gallery. Feb. 27: 16th Annual Todos Santos Historic Home Tour. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Proceeds endow various programs and The Palapa Center. info@palapasociety.org Mar. 1–14: 6th Annual Film Festival (Cine de Todos Santos). azulgv07@ hotmail.com

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{Best of}}

Best of 2009 This has been a tough year for Baja and Sonora, but we’re making a strong comeback. Mexico Living has spread the word from the border to the cape that not only is Baja and Sonora still one of the safest and best places to live, work and play, but we have the best of the best. Each year beginning in September we ask our readers to give us their choices for the best from each of the communities we cover, to find all the best Baja and Sonora has to offer—from upstarts to hangouts, bars to bakers, fishing to fine art. Each year our readers

battle it out for their favorites, and after counting thousands of votes, we have the results. Here’s the way it works: Each category is broken down by the city. To be included in the results, the nominees need to have at least five votes; we make no suggestions, and voters can not see other votes, so the winners are completely selected by the readers. The top 15 category winners with the most votes overall are featured. Congratulations to all the winners for being the best at what they do.

Architect

M. Dean Jones Architecture and Planning San Jose del Cabo Dean Jones has an award-winning architectural firm. He designs custom homes, thoughtful renovations and planned communities. The firm works with their clients to give them environments that express their needs, while creating interest through the sculptural use of form and materials. For over 30 years the firm’s efforts have been to create designs that are earth friendly, incorporating passive heating and cooling whenever possible. The firm’s designs use recycled materials and incorporate the principles of harmony, balance and the positive flow of energy. By integrating the interior spaces with the exterior site amenities, the firm’s designs enrich their client’s lives.

Architect Winners

Roberto Moreno, Rosarito Beach Sylvia St. Clair, MAR Architect, Todos Santos

Rosaline Ramos Lazcano, San Felipe Arq. Arturo Canseco, San Carlos

Bar

Augie’s Bar & Bait, Loreto

from behind and handing you a cold one e the bait is either smiling her e aus hotspot for nt bec ine p, em sho t pre bai e ón in Loreto, this is the This ain’t your averag lec Ma the on d ate Loc . g place; a Mexican a side of wisabi n, it’s a warm and welcomin the bar or it’s ser ved with era vet or in virg ie’s Aug ether you’re an e happy hangout with new friends, and a genuin the gringo community. Wh and nds frie old of is n atio ebr is a daily cel a.m.–10 p.m. daily, and it version of Cheers. Augie’s nt food and drinks from 9 elle exc ve ser to n ope They’re great food and good times. k well. at friends, and eat and drin gre ke ma to ce pla the per fect

Bar WinnersRosarito Beach Beach Bobby’s by the Sea, Fandangos, San Felipe

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

The Whale’s Tail, Ensenada asco Thirsty Parrot, Puerto Peñ

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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Art Gallery Baja Nueva, San Felipe

Baja Nueva is San Felipe’s premiere furniture, home decorating and gift store that is a “must visit” when in San Felipe. Located on Mar de Cortez in the Plazita, it is chock full of exciting and colorful items for the home. Original artwork, glass vases and plates, heirloom boxes, wall clocks, candles and holders, decorator shadow boxes and authentic local Indian pottery is just a small amount of the eye candy that keeps you looking from place to place in this wonderfully colorful and well laid out store.

Art Gallery Winners

CEARTE, Ensenada Artesanias La Antigua California, La Paz Jill Logan Galería, Todos Santos Pez Gordo Gallery, San Jose del Cabo Galeria La Grande, Cabo San Lucas

BakerRyosarito Beach

Pie Shop, Diego’s Deli & lipe pecial, San Fe Panaderia Es Paz Pan D’Les, La

Bartender

Nicholas, Bahia Cantilles, Rosarito Beac h Cuco (Pete’s Camp), San Felipe Louie (Al Capones), Puer to Peñasco


{{Best of}

Breakfast

CheapRosEaraitotsBeach

l, Mongolin Gril e ido, San Felip Ej in Jaunito’s to re , Lo El Super Burro La Paz o, ej Vi o Ranch

Mamas Royal Cafe, Cabo San Lucas Mama’s Royal Cafe is said to have the “best breakfast in the whole country” and one of the oldest Gringo restaurants in Cabo San Lucas. If you’re looking for a big breakfast like your mom would make at home, this is the place. Mama’s Royal Cafe has it all, from fruit plates to more omelets than you can imagine and all the traditional Mexican dishes, along with a full bar to kick your morning. If you’re a fan of breakfast, there is no better place, possibly in the whole country!

Breakfast Winners La Bamba, Rosarito Beach Gorilla’s Grill, La Paz

Juanito’s in Ejido, San Felipe La Maria Bistro, Puerto Peñasco

Restaurant Sagitario, Loreto

Dentist

Coffeehouse

Cha Cha’s, Rosarito Beach Baja Java, San Felipe Cafe de Lolita, Loreto Guiseppi’s, Puerto Peñasc o Barracuda Bob’s, San Car los

Contruction Ma

nager

BJ Sweitzer Cons truction, San Fe lipe Loreto Inspectio ns, Loreto NewTek Constru ction Services, La Paz Cabo Tech Cons tructores, Cabo San Lucas

Development Club Marena, Rosarito Beach

Dr. Melina California, San Felipe Dr. Melina California Fierros Zatarain, or Melina, as her friends and patients refer to her, is a dentist and the owner of California Dental Spa on Mar Caribe Sur, across from the ABC terminal in San Felipe. California Dental Spa’s services include everything your mouth could need. When you enter the California Dental Spa, the atmosphere and warm greeting immediately make you feel at ease. The word has spread so rapidly that in just one year California Dental Spa has fast become the most popular dental clinic in the region.

Dentist Winners

Dr. Ochoa Medina, Rosarito Beach Angels Touch Dental Clinic, San Jose del Cabo Cabo Cosmetic Dental, Cabo San Lucas Dr. Lbarra, Puerto Peñasco Dr. Jorge Caesar de Castillo, La Paz

Baja real estate has now reached a new level in style and exclusivity. A prestigeous yet affordable lifestyle awaits you in Club Marena. This is a superb beachfront condominium with spectacular, panoramic ocean views and lush grounds in the most exclusive Baja real estate development in the region. Built to exacting American standards, with exceptional workmanship, these oceanfront homes offer modern day conveniences in a romantic setting, which is why our readers voted it as Baja’s Best Development.

Development Winners Playa de Oro, San Felipe Bella Sirena, Puerto Peñasco

Bobby’s by the Sea, Ensenada

Entertainment Denny Flannigan, San Felipe

Denny “Moondogg” Flannigan has appeared onstage and in concert with over 250 major acts including the Doobie Brothers, the Beach Boys, Chicago, Earth Wind and Fire, The BeeGee’s, Tommy James and the Shondells, B.B. King, and many more. He has performed in every state in the continental U.S. The first song written by Denny in 1964, “You’ll Come Back,” became an instantaneous number one hit

Entertainment Winners

Deja-Vu, Cabo San Lucas

for five weeks running on Colorado’s giant, KIMN Radio. Denny was a writer, comedian and musician on many television shows including The Midnight Special, ABC’s In Concert, The John Byner Comedy Hour, David Frost’s Madhouse 90, The Merv Griffin Show and a host of others. Denny currently resides in San Felipe and enjoys performing and living “La Vida Loca” en Mexico.

Mark Mulligan, San Carlos

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{Best of}}

Happy Hour

Fishing

Jolly Mon Bar, San Felipe

Minerva’s Baja Tackle, Cabo San Lucas Minerva’s Baja Tackle is a Cabo fishing legend. Minerva’s started back in the days when Cabo was just a sleepy fishing village with dirt roads and a couple of hotels. Now, fishing is what Cabo San Lucas is famous for and they’re proud to say that they have played a big part in not only starting the sport fishing industry in Cabo San Lucas, but also in preserving the resource by promoting conservation and responsible fisheries management. Minerva’s Baja Tackle has over 32 years of experience fishing Los Cabos and are ready to provide you with the ultimate fishing vacation.

Fishing Winners

Azteca Sportfishing, San Felipe The Baja Big Fish Company, Loreto

Augie’s Bar & Bait, Loreto Baja Cantina, Cabo San Lucas Al Capones Pizza, Puerto Peñasco

Home Builder

Landscaping

Versoleil, San Felipe , La Paz La Paz Landscaping n Jose del Cabo Sa s, bo Ca Vivero Los

San Felipe Home Builders, San Felipe Zoe Custom Home Builders, Cabo San Lucas Baraka en Todos, Todos Santos

Home Furnishings The Cabo Furniture Company San Jose del Cabo

The Cabo Furniture Company provides top-notch customer service throughout the execution of all phases of the design process. Each of their dedicated and passionate staff strive to create unique interiors based on client’s individual needs at the best prices. Their suppliers have proven track records delivering quality products for over 12 years. Listening to their clients, this results in a home environment that is beautiful and functional by incorporating their lifestyle into their residence. Their integrity is based on their desire to deliver what they promise.

Home Furnishings Winners Baja Nueva, San Felipe Mueblería San Diego, La Paz Casa Bonita, San Carlos

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Happy Hour Winners

Sergios Sportfishing, Ensenada Pancho Villa, Puerto Peñasco

Haircuir,t/RoSsaaritloo nBeach

Douglas Day Ha a, San Felipe Lilyanna’s Estetic La Paz Berenice Pozo,

Jolly Mon Bar, located in Plaza Paraiso (KM 178.5) has something for everyone EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK! It’s San Felipe’s hot new sports bar north of town. Every Friday they serve free champagne to the ladies and sushi for all! A new neighborhood bar San Felipe locals call home. The San Rail Pizza has moved in with their complete pizza menu—whole or by the slice— plus hot dogs, and on weekends tacos. This is a fun place to be.

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

Liquor Store

Marcado del Mar, Rosarito Beach Rivera Liquor , San Felipe Cactus Liquor , Loreto Cabo Duty Fr ee, Cabo San Lucas

Lodging

Poco Cielo, Rosarito Beach Poco Cielo, loosely translated, means “little heaven.” This small, private hotel has nine intimate guest rooms, an on-site restaurant and cantina, and the most friendly staff on the coast. Located halfway between Rosarito and Ensenada in the La Misión area, on the coastline of beautiful Baja California, Mexico, guests will find themselves relaxed and at home within minutes. Adding to your entertainment are their themed rooms dressed in high quality bed and bath linens, one-of-a-kind furnishings intertwined in a setting of inviting styles, rich textures and vibrant colors to make your visit distinctly memorable. Their restaurant prepares and serves authentic Mexican and American Cuisines and the bounty of our local fishers. Enjoy the ambiance of their beachfront terraces while the ocean provides a naturally tranquil backdrop to your meal.

Lodging Winners

El Rey Sol Posada, Ensenada Hotel Luna, Loreto El Delfin Blanco, San Jose del Cabo

El Cortez Hotel, San Felipe Hacienda Del Sol, La Paz Los Milagros Hotel, Cabo San Lucas

Mail Service

Click-On, Rosarito Beach Sunr unner, San Felipe Mail Boxes Etc., Cabo San Lucas Mail Boxes Etc., San Jose del Cabo

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Grocery Market/ Felipe Hipon, San reto Dali’s Deli, Lo z Pa CCC, La San Lucas Costso, Cabo


{{Best of}

Nightclub

New Business

Cabo Wabo, Cabo San Lucas

Sex City, Puerto Peñasco

One of the wildest and craziest, most renowned places to party (and eat) in Cabo San Lucas is Sammy Hagar’s Cabo Wabo. The menu includes Sammy’s Drunken Shrimp, peppercorn crusted beef and many kinds of fresh seafood of the day. Nightly entertainment is provided by live bands and DJs (Sammy plays when he is in town). Look for the lighthouse jutting from atop the building, but don’t be surprised if it is too packed to get in.

Lilian Vega proves that romance blossoms in tough economic times. It bears mentioning that there are some businesses that are doing so well that it’s time to open a second location. What business is that? Why, romance, of course! It makes sense that when fewer folks are able to go out on the town to wine and dine, there are some who will find ways to make staying home more fun than not. About a year ago, the lovely Lily Vega opened the first Sex City store in the strip mall (pun intended) across from SuperLey. Just this week, Lily cut the ribbon on her second location, located on the corner of Luis Encinas and Calle 13.

Nightclub Winners Rosa & Rita, Rosarito Beach La Iguana, Todos Santos

Jolly Mon Bar, San Felipe Elixir, Puerto Peñasco

ent Real EstateoAg Beach

New Business Winners

Mongolian Grill, Rosarito Beach Red - Food, Wine and Martini Bar, San Jose del Cabo Jacks Bar & Grill, Cabo San Lucas

Pizza

Restaurant

Fatboy’s Pizza, San Felipe 1697, LoretoToscana, La Paz IL Giardino Pizzeria Trattoria, Todos Sant os Mamma Mia Pizza & Pasta, Cabo San Lucas Al Capones Pizzeria, Puer to Peñasco

The Mongolian Grill has fast become Rosarito’s favorite restaurant, having only been open a year it has already earned itself the “The Best Restaurant in Rosarito” title by our readers. If you enjoy good food, that’s healthy and affordable, you’ll love this place. They have several lunch items under $5 including Teriyaki Bowls, Korean Tacos, California Sushi rolls, large Asian Chicken Salads and, of course, the Mongolian BBQ (under $7). You will become addicted to a healthy way of eating. They are only two miles south of the Rosarito Beach Hotel, which is about 5–10 minutes from Diego’s.

Whales Tail Pub & Grill, Ensenada Baja Jimmy’s, San Felipe Afrodita Grill, Mulegé Loreto Islas, Loreto Tailhunter Fubar Cantina, La Paz Tequila’s Sunrise Bar & Grill, Todos Santos Manuel’s Creative Cuisine, San Jose del Cabo Felix’s, Cabo San Lucas Al Capones Pizza, Puerto Peñasco

Real Estate Broker

Baja Real Estate Group, Rosarito Beac h Amor Property, San Felipe Alexander Real Estate & Investments, Loreto Omni Real Estate Services, La Paz Leagan Realty, Puer to Peñasco

Sweets & Desserts

The Mongolian Grill, Rosarito Beach

Restaurant Winners

Larry French, Rosarit Bill Maine, San Felipe Eduardo Ramirez, La Paz o Bill Bar vitski, Puerto Peñasc

La Bamba, Rosarito Beach

In Rosarito, you can find the very best American classic dishes being served at La Bamba on Popotla Blvd., just two turnarounds south of the AM-PM. Look for the checkered wall and signage, and prepare yourself for some great homemade treats not available anywhere else in Baja. Your hosts, William and Susan, are always on hand, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The décor, reminiscent of ‘50s diners, provides the mood for the experience, in addition to the music background ranging from Elvis to Dean Martin and more. The menu is an array of dishes ranging from hamburgers to corned beef hash. Oh, did I mention that everything is homemade, from scratch! As you slip into the plush tuck-and-roll booths, the daily specials are before you on a your placemat, which change daily. And the desserts, to die for, as there are cakes, pies, muffins, cheesecakes and even sugarless pies for those of us curbing our sugar intake.

Sweets & Desserts Winners WiFi Location

Baja Chocolate Lovers, San Felipe Tio Lupe’s, Cabo San Lucas

Tre Galline Restaurant, Todos Santos

Fandango Bar, San Felipe Hangout Cafe, Cabo San Lucas Cafelix, Todos Santos

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

2D

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Laguna Ojo de Liebre

Bahia San Rafael

Son

BAHIA TORTUGAS Bahia Tortugas

Guerrero Negro

GD

Villa Jesus Maria

a

Bahia de Sebastian Vizcaino

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(Rocky Point)

Carborca

Lukeville, AZ Sonoyta

Puerto Penasco

8

Bahia de Los Angeles

wy

lH

sta

Co a

Bahia San Luis Gonzaga

Ba al C ja

Puerto de Santo Domingo

Bahia Santa Rosalillita

Bahia Maria

Bahia Blanco

El Rosario

Puertecitos

San Felipe

Ne w

Gulfo de Santa Clara

Los Algodones

Yuma

i n r ifo

PUNTA FALSA Lighthouse PUNTA EUGENIA

Bahia Rosario

GD

San Quintin

GD

Colonia Vicente Guerrero

Colonet GD

GD

Ensenada

Bahia Colonet

Bahia Todos Santos

GD

GD

Rosarito Beach Mexicali

Tijuana Tecate

ora GU L F FO C

San Carlos Guaymas

Hermosillo

Santa Ana

Nogales

Tucson, AZ


Ba

GD

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GD

Cabo San Lucas

GD

La Paz

Todos Santos

Santa Rita

GD

San Jose del Cabo

Bahia las Palmas

GD

GD

Bahia Muertos

Bahia la Ventana

Peninsula BAJA CALIFORNIA

Bahia Almejas

CIUDAD GDCONSTITUCION

o

Bahia de la Paz

Loreto

Bahia San Basilio

Bahia San Nicolas

Bahia de Concepcion

GD Ciudad Insurgentes

La Purisma

Bahia Santa Maria Bahia Magdalena

Bahia de Ballenas

GD

El Coyote

Mulegé

Bahia Santa Ines

Santa Rosalia

n r o f ali C ja ur S ia

Purple area represents the region covered in Mexico Living.

PACIFIC OCEAN

Bahia de Ballenas

PUNTA ABREOJOS

San Ignacio

GD

C

BAHIA ASUNCION Bahia Asuncion PUNTA PRIETA Bahia San Hipolito LA BOCANA

G

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IF L A IA N R a e S ( z) e t or fC

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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{People & voices}}

Centavo’s Two Cents

Hell No, I Won’t Go!

Before the Parade Passes By

by La Huerita

by Penny Nask Who doesn’t love a parade? In America we are festooned with them during every season and for every reason. Chairs are positioned in the streets for the best view. We can do this for hours because we must see every opulent float or colossal helium filled balloon of our beloved animated characters. It has been my fortune to see many parades across the U.S. . . . most of which were celebrating some historical event in our cultural heritage. You say parade and I am there, in every weather condition. In Mexico parades are also a symbol of something significant . . . or they are at least a creation of potential tourism. For instance, if you are having a shrimp festival in town, it is usually accompanied by a parade. Recently I received a phone call to attend a parade given by the Pre-K and Kindergarten classes of Jardin De Ninos Tom Neveau school in San Felipe. They were celebrating and later reenacting the history of their Mexican Revolution. I would go, of course, but I had some reservations about time frames and location. This was because a year ago the Christmas Parade in San Felipe was never given a time or location. Just a date . . . Really! Proving this parade flexibility, one time Vanice and I were having a leisurely lunch on the Malecon and a parade of lovely children came by unexpectedly. They were in the costumes of their

Centavo aka Pamela Esther Nask (“Penny”) Co-owner of Simpatico Arts, she is a writer and an art historian, whose luck in these fields has given her an early retirement. She attributes “laughter” as the best possible stimulus for life. pennynask@yahoo.com favorite book character. We jumped out of our chairs, ran to the street and started applauding for all the spectators that weren’t there. The 2008 Christmas Parade? After driving around in our overly decorated VW convertible, looking for road barriers or policemen, we finally gave up looking for the parade and drove through the streets on our own. We were dressed as elves. Later we saw the bona fide San Felipe Christmas Light Parade in agonizing segments as it chose its own way throughout our miniature town. We never found out where or when it began or where it ended. Not to be deterred, we felt our presence at the Mexican Revolution Parade was essential. There was no one around our “staked out” curb position. After awhile this concerned us until our friend ran down the street and told us that the parade had been moved to another location. Why not? I guess there is a valuable lesson in this somewhere. It could be that we still don’t understand the ways of Mexico and their parades. As I am again disappointed in the number of spectators watching this delightful parade, my partner reminds me of the parents taking pictures, and the children who are learning about and respecting their history. “A parade, after all, is really about the people in them,” she says, hoping to rein in my lofty parade radar. It was easy to do this. After all, we were living in this miraculous town experiencing surprise at every turn! Who knows? There could be a parade tomorrow!

I remember calculating, back in my early teens, how old I would be when the year 2000 rolled around and thinking, horrified, “OMG, what can you DO when you’re that old?” Never mind how old that was. Suffice it to say that when the big 2000 finally rolled around I laughed at my youthful preconception. There was little I wanted to do that my “advanced” age prevented. Now here we are at 2010. These days I’m not laughing as hard but there’s still a giggle in the old girl. Though not all of my parts are working as well as they used to, I can still do pretty much anything I WANT to do and I’m assured by friends that nothing is actually beyond me. For instance, the folks at Kayak Rocky Point are adamant that I’ll never be too old to learn to kayak and have invited me to give it a try. I think that might be something I’d enjoy, at least in the calm waters of the estuaries, so one of these days I’m going to hold them to that. Maybe after I finish this sandwich and wake up from my siesta . . . Likewise, Mark at Rocky Point Boat Trips is always talking about the wonders of scuba diving in the waters of the upper Sea of Cortez, and lots of acquaintances have great fishing stories to share, so I’ve given some thought to diving and learning to fish. Ah, but I’m claustrophobic and get seasick, and fish flopping around on the end of a hook kind of freak me out. Guess I’ll pass, though my waving arm is still good to go for seeing them

Thank You ROTARY!





                           22

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

(686) 122-2668

(686) 175-5420

         

Silver and Bone-carved Jewelry Creations

Unique Glitz Clothing and Accessories

      

off on their adventures and I’m perfectly willing to help eat those fish once they’ve been properly cleaned. I can still do that. Exploring the great Pinacate Biosphere with CEDO? Love it. Can I do it in a golf cart? Golfing at any of the area’s swell golf courses? I don’t golf, but it’s pleasant to walk along with those who do—at least for nine holes or so, after which my feet automatically head for the nearest chair and refreshments. My feet have a mind of their own. I’m starting to see a pattern here. Some people are the physically active type, others are the kick back in a hammock with a good book type. I’m one of the latter, and all of my old parts are perfectly capable of doing that. Give me a good beach to stroll, tidepools to explore, a dark night for star-gazing, carne asada with friends, laughter and good times in a welcoming community, and something to write about and I’m a happy camper. And when the time eventually comes for shuffling off my mortal coil, they’ll have to drag me off the beaches kicking and screaming (in true Baby Boomer form), “Hell no, I won’t go!” You’re never too old to love life!

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The Rotary Club of San Felipe Meets every Monday 8 AM at the Barefoot Bar El Cortez Hotel

For Information call 686-576-8974


{{People & Voices} John & Rachel Pack

by John Pack

Photo by Gene Jensen

Rachel Pack, Brenda Judy, John Pack and Steve Judy at the end of the paved road, south of Puertecitos, Baja.

south of Ensenada widened, highway 19 from La Paz to Todos Santos, to Cabo San Lucas all being widened and improved, and many others. What does it all mean? The obvious answer is the government realized that a good highway system means more tourism and more money. It also means more development, more building, more of everything—almost. It will, however, mean less of the Baja I remember as a kid. Less of what I fell in love with, and, oh yes, certainly less tire repair.

beautiful. It was about that time that I felt guilty again. Damnit, why can’t I hate that beautiful road? Once I was off the road and bolts in my car started rattling, I remembered. Progress is coming and whether we like it or not, it will be here. So, if you are like me and love the wildness of it, the rough edges and lack of polish, I highly suggest you fill your tank, check the spare, load the boat and get out there and experience the magic of Baja . . . as it is today..

Photo by Rachel Pack

Stretch of Baja Highway 1 heading south.

Photo by Rachel Pack

Baja is a special place. The draw and appeal is personal and influences people in so many different ways, some find it inspires them to spread their artist wings and some become adventurers and explorers. However, it is not for everyone, and that’s okay with me. The fact the Baja is still wild in many parts is attractive to me, but some people come, leave and never return, without ever having been touched by the Baja magic. I’m okay that it’s rough around the edges and lacks the polish of our northern neighbors. It was the lack of rules, regiment, even paved roads that I loved so much and drew me back year after year, and still pulls me from one place to another in search of Baja utopia . . . but, how long will it last? Baja is being upgraded. I love it and hate it all the same; I love being able to drive past San Felipe and continue south on a paved highway, but then I begin feeling selfish when I realize that the ease of getting there will open it up to those that would never have considered traveling any distance on rocky washboard roads. Over the last couple of years, we’ve watched the road from the checkpoint to San Felipe turn into a four lane, the road from El Golfo to Peñasco paved, the road

I sometimes feel hypocritical. I want so much to share my passion for Baja that Rachel and I promote concerts, home expos and anything we can to promote this amazing place. I want people to feel what I feel, to love it the way I do. But, I can never get past the feeling that I’m doing something wrong; I’m contributing to the demise of my love . . . Baja. Last month, Rachel and I decided to take Highway 5 south from San Felipe instead of up around Ensenada then south. The road is affectionately known as the “San Felipe Trail” by those that have taken it, and for years it was not much more than just that, a trail. We were both aware of the road conditions, and have taken it to Gonzaga Bay, both south from San Felipe and north from Highway 1. But over the last year, Road sign marking the entrance to an much work has been artists home, done and we wanted north of to find out how much Puertecitos, for ourselves. What we Baja. found was amazing. From Puertecitos south, they had paved 15 miles of the nicest, widest road I’d seen in Baja, and another five to eight was graded. It made it all the way around the mountains and they were on the home stretch to Gonzaga—it was smooth and

After marrying John & Rachel traveled the United States full time producing live events, until moving to San Felipe Baja to slow down. That only lasted a couple of months. Since then they’ve dedicated themselves to sharing life in Mexico with the world. They have fallen in love with so many of you that they want you to join them as they explore the wonders of Mexico living.

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{Cooking Baja Style}}

Please help us feed San Felipe’s Hungry DROP-OFF LOCATIONS

Watch this ad for upcoming Food Bank Activities!

CALL 686-576-0176

Sunrunner Mail Center Lupita Solar Bldg Wash Tub Baja 24/7 (La Plazita) Fotograficos Alvarez Lolita (by Glorietta) El Capitan Restaurant Botica Sagrado Corazon LillyAna’s Unisex Salon Blowin’ Smoke BarBQ Amor Property Alanis Insurance

Top 10 Mexican Taco Recipes by Chelsi Woolz

Tacos—a celebrated authentic Mexican food served by street vendors and casual dining establishments alike—are easy to make at home. They can be made with a variety of meats and can be seasoned according to personal preference. The following are 10 top Mexican recipes that are sure to please.

10. Ground Beef Taco It consists of browned ground beef seasoned with cumin, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder and salt. The beef is scooped into premade corn flour taco shells, such as those sold by Old El Paso. The seasoned beef is topped with diced onions, tomatoes and shredded Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese. 9. Chicken Taco There are several Mexican recipes that can be used to make this taco. A common one involves sautéing shredded chicken with butter, onions and green chilli sauce. The hot mixture is laid on a soft flour tortilla laced with shredded cheese. 8. Double Layer Tacos An improved version of the ground beef taco. The only difference is that a soft flour tortilla is covered in hot refried beans and shredded cheese and then wrapped around the premade taco shell. 7. Spicy Chicken Taco A variation of the common chicken taco; it is fortified with extra spiciness via the addition of jalapeño or serrano chili peppers. 6. Turkey Taco It might be a stretch to call this authentic Mexican food, but no one will complain once they taste it. The ground turkey is seasoned with cumin, paprika, garlic powder and dried oregano. 5. Carne Asada Taco This delicious preparation is a bit more time consuming and requires marinating skirt steak in lime juice, black pepper and garlic salt before the cooking takes place. The zesty steak is pan fried, sliced and placed in flour tortillas. The taco is topped with onions and tomatoes and then finished off with lime juice and cilantro. 4. Fish Taco White fish, such as cod or halibut, is mixed with spices, lemon juice and a little oil before beContinued on page 38.

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


{{Business & Money}

Banking Basics in Baja by Benjamin Eugene

Banking is convenient and easy in Mexico. There is a universal ATM network spread out across the country and rarely will you have to

search far for one of them (unless you are in rural Mexico). There are five major banks in Mexico: Bancomer (owned by BBVA in Spain), Banamex (owned by CitiBank Group of USA), Banco Santander (partially owned by Bank of America), HSBC (owned by The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation), and Banorte, which is currently the only major bank in Mexico not owned by any foreign group. In addition, all major credit cards are accepted in the larger department stores,

Baja Lending Company www.BajaLendingCo.com

Mexico’s New Finance Minister Eyes Bank Competition

• #1 Mortgage Broker on the Baja • Competitive interest rates • 6 major international financial

by Benjamin Eugene

Mexico’s new finance minister called for more competition between banks in December, saying they would play a key role in the country’s economic recovery from a deep recession. Ernesto Cordero, who is replacing Agustin Carstens as finance minister, said he would also strengthen government-backed development banks, which increased lending and helped maintain market liquidity during the global credit crisis. “We need to advance the country’s financial agenda, have a more competitive banking industry that is very well regulated and that remains solid,” said Cordero, who was previously Mexico’s social development minister. President Felipe Calderón nominated Carstens for a six-year term at the central bank’s helm,

grocery stores and organizations, while only cash is accepted in the small mom-and-pop stores known as tiendas. In order to open a bank account in Mexico, you must be able to provide the following: an FM2 or an FM3 visa, your passport, proof of residency (a CFE or water bill with your address on it), and two references.

showing current Gov. Guillermo Ortiz the door. The central bank and the government in the past have pushed for more competition in Mexico’s financial industry, which is dominated by Citigroup (C.N) and Spain’s BBVA (BBVA.MC). The government is currently authorizing banks to partner with retail outlets like supermarkets and convenience stores in a bid to make financial services easier to come by in rural regions. This year, the central bank set new limits on the kinds of fees banks can charge customers. Mexico’s banks reduced lending late in 2008 and in the first half of 2009 as investors around the world became more conservative. In recent months, overall lending has increased slightly although consumer credit is still shrinking. According to Guillermo Babatz, the head of National Bank and Securities Commission, next year, Mexican bank lending will likely increase by 15 percent, with faster growth in commercial loans and slower expansion of consumer credit.

institutions • Construction loans • Purchase money loans • Refinance loans

Baja Closing Services

• Protecting your real estate

transaction • From Contract, Closing, Fideicomiso, & Disbursements • Our 3rd party oversight insures that funds are disbursed correctly US 760-494-7053 MX 011-52-686-576-0653

Mary@BajaLendingCo.com

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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{Restaurant Guide}} Rosarito Beach

American Food La Bamba .............................................. 661-100-2560

ENSENADA

Hussong’s Cantina to Open in Las Vegas The Bar that Built a Town Opens at The Shoppes at Mandalay Place

Mexican Magana’s...................................................... 646-155-0586 Steak & Seafood El Rey Sol..................................................... 646-178-1601

Ensenada's World Famous Hussong’s Cantina as seen from the street in 1908. Photographer unknown.

SAN FELIPE American Los Arcos..................................................... 686-577-2585 Baja Jimmys................................................. 686-139-7373 Blowin’ Smoke BBQ ......................................686-576-0710 Road Runner Cafe..........................................686-227-7668 The Beach Bar & Grill.....................................686-577-3144 Burgers Chilis & Burgers............................................ 686-577-6196 Mexican The Beach Bar and Grill................................. 686-577-3144 Rosita Restaurant . ....................................... 686-577-1903 Pizza Fatboy’s........................................................ 686-577-4092 Los Arcos - Happy Jackass........................... 686-577-2585 Rabbit Pizza Delivery..................................... 686-577-0987 Sand Rail Pizza............................................. 686-576-0441 Steak & Seafood Los Arcos..................................................... 686-577-2585 Fine Dining The Latin Garden........................................... 686-209-6369 2-Highway 5 KM 183, San Felipe, BC Pavilion Restaurant ....................................... 686-577-0022

LORETO Bar & Seafood Augie’s Bar & Bait Shop................................ 613-135-1224 Breakfast Cafe Sagitario................................................613-135-0718 Mexican 1697............................................................. 613-135-2538 Seafood Augie’s Bar & Bait Shop................................ 613-135-1224

Ensenada, Mexico, landmark Hussong’s Cantina is bringing an approachable menu and buoyant Baja atmosphere to Las Vegas when it opens this January at The Shoppes at Mandalay Place located between Mandalay Bay and Luxor on the Las Vegas Strip. Whether it’s the authentic Baja cuisine, the chance to experience the

unusually strong original margarita or sing along to the rock ‘n’ roll mariachi band, Hussong’s Cantina will appeal to every kind of crowd. “Hussong’s Cantina is a well-known rite of passage for Southern Californians,” said Scott Frost, President of Titan Nightlife Group, Inc., the developer behind the venue. “The authenticity

and the vibe of the original Hussong’s will be a large component of our Vegas outpost. Our plan is to serve great food and throw the best party every night.” Located 50 miles south of Tijuana, Mexico, the iconic bar opened in 1892. The Baja spot is the originator of the margarita and even served the likes of Marilyn Monroe. Today, it remains a destination for everyone from Ensenada locals to surfers from California, and is considered a social hub of the Baja 1000 off-road race. It’s been said that if you haven’t been to Hussong’s Cantina, you haven’t been to Mexico. The 3,700-square-foot Vegas restaurant will savor all the charms of the original, right down to the facade, exterior signage and a replica of the rustic green and red bar. The food at Hussong’s Cantina will introduce Las Vegas locals and tourists alike to authentic Baja street fare along with signature cocktails and an impressive selection of tequila and Mexican beer. Hussong’s Cantina will be open from 11 a.m. until 2 a.m., seven days a week. Reservations can be made by calling (702) 553-0123.

The Pavilion Restaurant

20% off

Any breakfast, lunch or dinner expires 31-Dec-2009

Excluding shrimp or scallops dishes. Not valid with any other special. Items only discounted off regular price. Contact cesar.quirarte@doradoranch.com.mx

LA PAZ Cafe Capri......................................................624-123-3737 Gorilla’s Grill1................................................612-128-8095

CABO SAN LUCAS American Applebee’s.....................................................624-172-6472 Asian Baan Thai Pan Asian Restaurant and Bar........624-142-3344 Burgers & More Baja Brewing Company..................................624-146-9995 Cactus Jack's Bar and Grill.............................624-142-5601 Die Trying Cafe..............................................624-142-5657 Coffee & Baked Correcaminos Cafe........................................624-142-3510 International Local Eight Restaurant...................................624-142-6655 Havana Supper Club.......................................624-142-2603 Italian & Pizza Buon Appetito................................................624-142 4040 La Dolce Italian Restaurant.............................624-142-6621 Mexican Don Emiliano Restaurant................................624-142-0266 Casianos Restaurant...................................... 624 142 5928 Brisa Beach Club and Restaurant......................624-142-244 Habanero's Restaurant...................................624-142-2626 Jazmin Restaurant..........................................624-142-1760 Seafood La Panga Antigua Restaurant and Bar.............624-142-4041 Steak La Bodega Steak and Wine House..................624-142-6619

Rosarito’s 2009 Best Bakery Winner Closes

SAN JOSE DEL CABO Mexican Panchos........................................................624-143-2891 Ay... Chihuahua..............................................624-143-3280 Baja Cantina...................................................624-143-0225 Margaritaville.................................................624-143-7401 Mi Casa.........................................................624-143-1933 Restaurant Pancho’s & Tequila Bar.................624-143-2891 Seafood La Golondrina................................................624-143-0542 Lorenzillo’s....................................................624-105-0212 The Blue Turtle...............................................624-143-1118 Villa Serena....................................................624-145-8244 International Peacocks.......................................................624-143-1858

26

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

After only a year of being in business, Diego’s Deli & Pie Shop in beautiful downtown Rosarito Beach closes its doors at the same time it wins the 2009 Mexico Living “Best Of” readers poll. Known for their fresh baked pies and hot, and cold subs that were health conscious and delicious, they will definitely be missed. MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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Great Breakfast in La Paz at Gorilla’s Grill Jr.

{{Restaurant Guide}

by Benjamin Eugene

Gorilla’s Grill Jr. in El Centenario, a small seaside town located in the municipality of La Paz, approximately 15 km north of La Paz, serves up an incredible breakfast from all the traditional local cuisine to great Americana dishes unique to the region. The dining are is outside in a fully enclosed lush garden sanctuary complete with singing birds. The service is excellent from the moment they open the door to their garden. The restaurant was once a home that was turned into a restau-

rant. The inside dining area was once a living room and it too is decorated nicely with traditional Mexican wares and the windows looking in to the space are covered in metal art of tropical birds and plants in bright colors. The menu has everything you could want for breakfast, from buttermilk biscuits and real white country gravy with sausage to nearly two full pages of two- and three-egg omeletes. Whether you fancy Huevos Rancheros to start your day or a hearty “Country Desayuno” with two of everything, including real sausage and crisp bacon, they have something to satisfy your appetite. The omeletes cover the gamet from their Vegetariana to the meat lovers. On our first visit we loved it so much, we brought friends back for breakfast the next morning. Gorilla’s Grill offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. In addition to great breakfast, they offer burgers, baguettes, pastas, salads, seafood and beef cuts of the highest quality. They also have full catering services for your special events. Gorilla’s Grill is your best choice in La Paz

to taste great food and the ideal place for your family reunions, baby showers, birthdays, and small business meetings. Visit them at either of their two locations; downtown at Avenida Revolucion e/Legaspy y M. Marquez de Leon. Col. Centro, La Paz, or El Centenario on Highway 1 at km 14. Be sure to let the owners David and Fifi know you heard about them in Mexico Living. Buen provecho!

Now in TWO LOCATIONS

NEW SPOT!

At Playa de Oro next to Sand & Sea Market for PIZZA TAKE-OUT!

Where it feels like Home! Loreto’s best Happy Hour

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Augie’s Bar & Bait Shop!

Free Breakfast Sundays* Tortilla Soup DAILY

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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27


{Lodging Guide }} ENSENADA Hotel Posada El Rel Sol...........................................646-178-1601

Stay at a Budget Hotel in Cabo San Lucas by Jason King

SAN FELIPE RV Park/Parque de RV Club de Pesca............................................... 686-577-1180 Kiki's RV Park on the Beach........................... 686-577-2021 Rentals Casey’s Place............................................... 686-577-1431 MySanFelipeVacation.com............................. 686-109-0579 Rancho del Sol.............................................. 686-231-4921 Redwagon Property Services........................ 686-576-0081 Sandollar Condotels...................................... 686-123-7688 Su Casa Elegante.......................................... 686-577-0745 Motels/Hotels La Hacienda de la Langosta Roja................... 686-577-0483 Olympia Motel (Los Algodones)..................... 658-517-7347

MULEGÉ RV Oasis Rio Baja...............................................615-153-0425 Villa Maria Isabel RV Park...............................615-153-0246 Hotel Hotel Serenidad..............................................615-153-0530 Mulegé Hotel..................................................615-153-0090

LORETO RV Park/Parque de RV Rivera del Mar............................................... 613-135-0718 Rentals Coco-cabanas.............................................. 613-135-1729 El Tiburon Casitas....................................US 805-748-4566 Hamman’s Vacaciones.......................................613135079 Motel Motel El Dorado.....................................686-613-135-1500 Hotel Hotel Coco Cabana........................................613-135-1729 La Damiana Inn..............................................613-135-0356 La Daminanas................................................613-135-0356 Tripui Hotel.....................................................613-133-0818 Rentals Coco-cabanas...............................................613-135-1729 El Tiburon Casitas..................................US (805) 748-4566 Hamman’s Vacaciones...................................613-135-0791

You will save your hard-earned money on your Los Cabos vacation with a budget Cabo San Lucas hotel. Although these hotels are inexpensive to stay in, they won’t let you down with their service. They are some of the best rated Cabo San Lucas hotels according to Trip Advisor. You’ll not only save you money on your accommodations, but you’ll save dollars on your travel expenses as well. These Baja Peninsula hotels are right in the middle of downtown Cabo, so you’re next door to the Cabo nightlife. It’s easy to go for a night out at one of the trendy nightspots in downtown Cabo, and be just a couple of minutes walk from

your bed. Without needing cab fare, you get more of your money to fritter away on the things you relish the most. Siesta Suites is a budget hotel, and they get a ton of good reviews. At $75 a night, it is a great value for your money, and seven nights will cost you less than one night at a Los Cabos resort. You won’t get the luxury of a resort, so if that’s what you want, the Siesta Suites may not be for you. If you just want somewhere to sleep, receptive hotel staff and your meals, then Siesta Suites should be on your short list. Los Milagros is rated the number one hotel in Cabo at Trip Advisor at the moment, and it is

one of the most inexpensive. At around $85 a night, it’s good value. You’re welcomed by friendly hotel staff, and the manageress, Sandra, gets a ton of good feedback from visitors because she goes out of her way to help her clientele. If you need information on where to eat and Cabo nightlife, Sandra is more than thrilled to help you. Sandra is possibly one of the reasons this Cabo San Lucas hotel is rated number one. If you prefer to stay at a bigger hotel, then the Hotel Mar De Cortez is probably what you‘re looking for. You have a larger selection of rooms with 90 of them to decide upon. If you prefer meeting more people during your vacation, you will feel in your element with Hotel Mar De Cortez. The pool area is larger as well, which is more satisfying if you like to sunbathe during the day. Again, you’re in the middle of downtown Cabo, and you’re a stone’s throw away from the Cabo hotspots. If you enjoy a night at Cabo Wabo, you won’t have far to walk back to your bed. Another Cabo hotel that is inexpensive and gets many good reviews is The Bungalows Hotel. This hotel is a bit more expensive than your usual budget hotel, but at roughly $135 a night, it is nowhere near the price of a larger hotel or resort. The Bungalows is also the number two rated Cabo hotel according to Trip Advisor. It regularly gets rave reviews, and the hotel staff are said to be some of the most receptive in Cabo San Lucas.

LA PAZ Hotels La Concha Beach Resort . .............................612-121-6344 Los Arcos .....................................................612-122-2744 Marina Hotel .................................................612-121-6254 Mediterrane ..................................................612-125-1195 Seven Crown Hotel .......................................612-128-7787

SMALL RV PARK WITH

BIG SPACES

CABO SAN LUCAS Hotel Baja Vacations.............................................. 877-462-2226 Barcelo Hotels and Resort...........................(624) 146-7500 Cabo Surf Hote............................................. 624-142-2666 Desire Resort & Spa..................................... 624-142-9300 Posada Chabela............................................ 624-172-6495 Posada Real Best Western........................... 624-142 - 0155 Suites Las Palmas......................................... 624-142-2131

SAN JOSE DEL CABO Hotel Bahia Hotel.......................................... .........624-143-1888 Best Western Cabo Las Flores Hotel............ 624-143-6199 Casa Pablito......................................... .........624-143-1971 Hotel and Plaza Los Arcos ........................... 624-143-0702 Mar de Cortez Hotel............................. .........624-143-0032 Siesta Suites Hotel............................... .........624-143-2773

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

FOR PERMANENT LIVING

11 Miles North of Town in a very quiet community. Only 9 Permanent spacious RV lots. Close to the BEACH!

Amenities available to all guests: • Solar Heated Pool • Shady Palapa • BBQ

http://www.haciendad-sol.com/earl/ La Paz, Baja California Sur Mexico TEL: 011-52-612-123-5440 & haciendadelsol1@gmail.com

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1


{{Lodging Guide }

San Felipe’s Premiere Vacation Stay

Come vacation at San Felipe’s premiere resort, El Dorado Ranch. A rare paradise awaits you where you will find everything from 10,000-foot mountains to empty white sandy beaches lining the spectacular Sea of Cortez. El Dorado Ranch is a recreational haven with an unlimited array of leisure, fun and activity. You may spend your day walking along miles of beautiful beach without seeing another person, taking a dip in their outdoor heated swimming pool or playing a round of golf on their championship golf course. Or, you may simply want to read a book while sipping tropical drinks and gently swaying in a palm covered hammock on the beach. El Dorado Ranch offers a variety of accommodations; you can choose from their hundreds of rental homes, hotels or select from their beautiful

Mexican Recliners

beachfront condos offering exceptional comfort with not only spectacular ocean and/or garden views, but easy beach and golf course access. Each unit has been designed to maximize views of the ocean, golf course or gardens, and has either a private patio with immediate access to the swimming pool and beach or a private deck providing outstanding panoramic views of the waterfront and gardens. The condos were constructed to U.S. standards and the interior design provides for luxurious living with natural finish oak cabinetry, food preparation island, pantry, laundry room, central air conditioning, Internet access, satellite television and more. Call El Dorado Ranch in San Felipe, Baja California, toll-free at 1-877-629-2852.

submitted by Bruce Harmer, Rosarito Beach

Beach-side Vacation condo or house rentals

www.stayinloreto.com C ontaCt L ynn H amman 011-52-613-135-0791

lynnhamman@yahoo.com

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29


{Fishing}}

Baja Bacalao A Tale of the Lively Lingcod by Tom Gatch

Toothy, tenacious and tasty is a perfect description of the lingcod. Contrary to popular belief, this fish is neither a “ling” nor a “cod,” but actually a large member of the Greenling Family that is found between Punta San Carlos in Baja California, and Kodiak Island, Alaska. They are not abundant south of California’s Point Conception except in a few localities, one of those being within the crisp waters of the Japanese current that cuts along the Pacific Coast of northern Baja California. I’ll always remember the impromptu trip to Ensenada’s Bahia de Todos Santos that I took with an old fishing buddy over a quarter of a century ago. He was trying out his new19foot Lonestar skiff, and we had both been itching to get our lines wet in Baja for several months prior to the purchase. In those days, good nautical facilities around Ensenada were few and far between, so we ended up paying a few dollars to launch at a commercial ramp located in the middle of the industrial port district. Once out on the water, our thoughts turned to acquiring bait and we noticed a sportfisher from Gordo’s Landing pulling away from a small platform that was manned by a lone attendant. We approached the concession and greeted the gentleman with friendly demeanors and broad smiles, only to be abruptly rebuffed when he refused our offer of a ten-dollar bill in exchange for some live anchovies with a brusque, “¡No! Estos son sólo para barcos comerciales!” He only sold bait to commercial boats. We had never bargained on a major glitch of this nature, but before there was a chance

Charter Sailing The Sea of Cortez from La Paz in a

Macgregor 26x or Herreshoff H28FG

http://www.sailing-baja.com

More info email

info@hacienda-sol.com 001-52-612-123-5440

30

Capt. Kelly Catian of K&M Sportfishing in Bahia San f a fat ling Quintin shows of cod weighing almost 20 pounds.

to try and strike some sort of bargain, two local sportfishing boats loaded with passengers simultaneously descended upon the small netted podium. The attendant was obviously out gunned, so we quickly took advantage of the opportunity to do him a favor by jumping from our tethered craft and helping him transport net after net of the flailing baitfish to the crews waiting onboard. After the second boat was baited up and had pulled away, I turned to him and extended my hand covered with fish scales holding ten dollars. “Por favor, amigo,” I offered simply. “Okay, gringo,” he said in broken English with a knowing grin. “You guys earn your bait.” He quickly palmed the crumpled bill, stuck it into the pocket of his tattered Levis and then promptly filled our small tank with as many live anchovies as it could safely handle. We were finally on our way. The only question remaining was “on our way” to where? This was my first time out in a boat in that region that wasn’t being guided by a professional skipper or pangero, and it was years before the development of the kind of sophisticated fish-finding electronics that we enjoy these days. The only obvious objective was to try and find some sort of cover or structure that might hold fish. We headed a few miles out toward Todos Santos Islands and then turned south. It wasn’t long before we were in sight of the myriad of guanocovered pinnacles that intermittently thrust up from the surface between the islands and the tip of the Punta Banda peninsula. The closer we got, the more we could tell that there was a lot going on; the surface was exploding with activity as seagulls and pelicans

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

dove down from above. We quickly slid up to the edge of the melee and began lobbing fly-lined baits toward the action. WHAM! We both hooked up immediately. Our excitement waned, however, as we brought a couple of frenzied mackerel back to the rail. “Jeeeeez! It’s a friggin’ mac-attack!” my buddy proclaimed in disgust. I was likewise disappointed, but was also happy that the “skunk” was taken off the boat on our first stop. After a few more mackerel, we casually decided to clip on a few ounces of weight and see what was on the bottom, which turned out to be a wise choice. Not only were both of our anchovies inhaled by something hungry within seconds of reaching the bottom, but these fish were obviously much bigger than the pound and a half mackerel that we had been catching. After a spirited fight, we cranked up a couple of long, vicious, blue-green monsters from the turquoise depths. “LINGCOD!” we exclaimed joyfully, practically in unison. As the day progressed, my friend and I continued to catch lings between four to eight pounds until we were practically ashamed of ourselves. With a cooler full of fresh lingcod, we headed happily back to port. Later that evening, a successful fishing trip turned into unadulterated delight at the dinner table as we enjoyed a magnificent meal of mild, flaky fish fillets that had been baked in lemon butter and garlic with a pinch of dried tarragon. Somehow, the boneless fillets of those big, nasty lingcod had been magically transformed into one of the tastiest fish dinners that we had eaten for a long time. Lingcod (Ophiodon elongates) occur most abundantly at depths ranging around 350 feet,

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

but will often go into even deeper water; a few having been caught as deep as 2,700 feet. Spawning occurs in January and February where the female lays 150,000–500,000 eggs then leaves immediately; the male then takes up the role of guardian. Adult lingcod prey on a variety of fish and have been known to be cannibalistic. Young lingcod feed primarily on shrimp and other small crustaceans until they are big enough to ambush live fish. Nearly all of these fish reach maturity by four years of age, when they usually measure 26 inches or more. Lingcod are easily caught on conventional bottom rigs using anchovies, cut squid or chunks of mackerel. Live bait is generally more successful than dead bait, and dead bait is often more effective than metal jigs. Having said that, it is a known fact that some of the largest lingcod ever taken have ended up being caught on large, chromeplated jigs once referred to as “bottom bouncers.” More recently designed, jointed “Action Lures” can sometimes be even more effective in this application. One suggestion when using these types of lures to pursue lingcod is to tip the large hook at the terminal end with a whole, small squid and then drop the rig all the way to the bottom. Rapidly reel up 10 to 12 cranks, disengage the reel and drop the jig to the bottom again. Repeat this process several times as you drift along over deep, rocky structure. By the time the Baja sun slowly sinks past the horizon, you just might be rewarded with a final, jarring strike, a fervent battle . . . and a delicious dinner!


{{cover story}

The Origins of New Year’s Resolutions

“Cheers to a new year and another chance for us to get it right.” –Oprah Winfrey Edgard Sterling, San Felipe, Del Desierto Communications

Casey Hamlin, San Felipe, Casey’s Place

Feliz Navidad y Muy Prospero Año 2010, Que sus mas grandes deseos se vean hechos una realidad.

First of all I wish you all a prosperous 2010 . . . To help others more . . .

Shane Brown, San Felipe, Computer & Satellite Installation

We all know that New Year is a time of celebration, a time to join with family and friends to say goodbye to the problems of the past and welcome the fortunes that the future holds. But have you ever wondered why January 1 marks the beginning of the year? Have you ever thought about why we celebrate in the way that we do? New Year’s Traditions and Superstitions There are a number of superstitious traditions that began many years ago that have lost their meaning in present day. Typically these traditions were enacted to influence the luck one would have in the coming year. For example, the New Year’s Eve parties that we all know and love began due to the belief that what one did on the first day of the year could affect their luck. This is why parties go past midnight and into the new year and it also explains why they involve lots of family and friends. When the clock strikes midnight it’s common for us to kiss our loved ones and make lots of noise to celebrate the beginning of a new year. While most of us just do this without really thinking about it, there is a superstitious reason behind this. Traditionally, people kissed each other to ensure that the relationship lasted for the rest of the year and they made a lot of noise as they believed it would scare the evil spirits away. History of New Year’s Day The origins of New Year’s celebrations date back thousands of years. In around 2000BC the Babylonians celebrated the new year over an 11-day period. This period did not begin

on January 1 as we would expect, it actually started with the first new moon after the first day of spring (also known as the Vernal Equinox). It was not until 153BC that January was declared as the beginning of the year by the Romans. The month was named after Janus the mythical god of beginnings. The calendar year became much more like that used in present day in 46BC when Julius Caesar established the Julian Calendar. After consultation with an astronomer he matched the calendar year with the movement of the sun and marked January 1 as the start of the new year. New Year’s Resolutions The popular tradition of making new year’s resolutions also has origins in Ancient Babylon and Rome. The Babylonians would typically return farm equipment that they had borrowed during the year, while in Caesar’s time Janus became the symbol for resolutions because he had two faces that could look to the past and into the future. Today we make New Year’s Resolutions to try to improve some aspect of ourselves in the coming year. Popular resolutions include quitting smoking, losing weight and getting out of debt. Whatever the resolutions, they’re a personal commitment to one’s self and something most of us do; what is your resolution? Mexico Living asked some of our advertisers to share their resolutions with you.

Offer more variety of products and services—more options for our new and existing customers, so they can find everything to fit their specific needs! Oh, and lose five pounds working out at Squatt’s Gym!

Vickie Rama, San Felipe, Baja Treasures Be more creative, believe in myself more. Enjoy more of what I have. Life is short, no matter how many years we have, there is never enough time to use up what has been given us.

Steven Forman, San Felipe, Zapp Animal Center

Patty Bell, San Felipe, Baja 24/7 My New Year’s Resolution is to find the perfect properties for each of my clients. I will work hard to stay informed of all market conditions. I will represent San Felipe with a warm smile and honesty.

Rachel Pack, La Paz, Mexico Living To do things (personal and business) in a timely manner. To be happy wherever we are. To meet new people and share stories. To be a better listener.

Our Resolution at Zapp Animal Center is for all stray and indigent animals in San Felipe to be safe and sound at our new facility where they’re out of jeopardy once and for all.

Kathy Hill/Hector Ramirez, Loreto, Gecko’s Curios/Rentals Loreto We resolve to eat a BIT less, exercise a BIT more, to be more patient with our family, and to spend more time wandering around the great outback; but above all, to focus more on the miracle of living in the Baja!

Happy New Year! CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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31


{Health & Beauty}}

To The Top Elevators

Marty & Jackie Alameda

To The Top Elevators is one business in Baja that is on the rise. Since it began eight years ago, this elevator business has grown and expanded in ways they never could really foresee. To The Top Elevators is considered by most as a “ground breaker” in the elevator industry for their ability to see a market that was essentially untapped in the Baja area. That untapped market is elevators for residential usage. Overly expensive commercial elevator companies were the only option in the elevator business until To The Top Elevators revolutionized the field and provided a much more affordable and safe option for home and business owners alike. The larger commercial elevator companies typically only offered hydraulic elevators. This

Chair Glide

was not a very viable option for the home owner wishing to install an elevator for residential use. Aside from elevators for use in homes, they also offer wheel chair lifts, stairway lifts, dumbwaiters, and chair and cargo lifts. Aside from home use, To The Top Elevators also provides these sought after products to restaurants and private offices. Private hospitals and doctor’s offices have found a need for the wheel chair lifts for patients. Grocery warehouses and maquilladors have found the cargo lifts available through To The Top Elevators to be helpful also. Aside from venturing out into different markets such as lifts and dumbwaiters, To The Top Elevators is also expanding into lower rise commercial services such as condo buildings that go up to six floors. They use elevators that are hydraulic and counter weight that are manufactured by ThyssenKrupp, Otis, Savaris, Waupaca and limited use commercial elevators. To The Top Elevators is a full service company that takes care of all aspects of owning one of their products. They not only sell and import the elevators, but also provide installation and maintenance service, too. They meet with potential clients to discuss which of their products will best suit their needs and boast a high rate of satisfaction. In fact, To The Top Elevators takes

Home with installed elevator below the famous 75-foot “Rosarito Jesus”

great pride in the lack of maintenance and product service issues they have to attend to once a client invests in their products. To The Top Elevators has offices located on Carr. Tij-Ens KM 44.1 Loc #1, between Puerto Nuevo and Gran Baja Resort Hotel Rosarito, BC, approximately 12 miles south of Rosarito on the free road.

California Dental Spa & California Optical ONE CONVENIENT LOCATION!

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The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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(686) 577-0708


Assisted Living in Mexico An Affordable Alternative to the High Costs of the U.S.

{{Health & Beauty}

by Laurence Harmon

As millions of baby boomers reach retirement age and U.S. health care costs soar, Mexican nursing home managers expect more American seniors to head south in coming years. After Jean Douglas turned 70, she realized she couldn’t take care of herself anymore. Her knees were giving out, and winters in Bandon, Oregon, were getting harder to bear alone. Douglas was shocked by the high cost and impersonal care at assisted living facilities near her home. After searching the Internet for other options, she joined a small but steadily growing number of Americans who are moving across the border to nursing homes in Mexico, where the sun is bright and the living is cheap. For $1,300 a month—a quarter of what an average nursing home costs in Oregon—Douglas gets a studio apartment, three meals a day, laundry and cleaning service, and 24-hour care from an attentive staff, many of whom speak English. She wakes up every morning next to a glimmering mountain lake, and the average annual high temperature is a toasty 79 degrees. “It is paradise,” says Douglas, 74. “If you need help living or coping, this is the place to be. I don’t know that there is such a thing back (in the USA), and certainly not for this amount of money.” An estimated 40,000 to 80,000 American retirees already live in Mexico, says David Warner, a University of Texas public affairs professor who has studied the phenomenon, however, there is no reliable data on how many are living in nursing homes. “You can barely afford to live in the United States anymore,” said Harry Kislevitz, 78, of New York City. A stroke victim, he moved to a convalescent

home in Mexico two years ago and credits the staff with helping him recover his speech and ability to walk. “Here you see the birds, you smell the air, and it’s delicious,” Kislevitz said. “You feel like living.” Many expatriates are Americans or Europeans who retired here years ago and are now becoming more frail. Others are not quite ready for a nursing home but are exploring options such as in-home health care services, which can provide Mexican nurses at a fraction of U.S. prices. Retirement homes are relatively new in Mexico, where the aging seniors usually live with family. There is little government regulation. Some places have suddenly gone bankrupt, forcing American residents to move. Some Mexican homes have rough edges, such as peeling paint or frayed sofas, that would turn off many Americans. “I don’t think they’re for everyone,” said Thomas Kessler, whose mother suffers from manic depression and lives at a home. “But basically, they’ve kept our family finances from falling off a cliff.” Residents such as Richard Slater say they are happy in Mexico. Slater came to Mexico four years ago and now lives in his own cottage, surrounded by purple bougainvillea and pomegranate trees. He has plenty of room for his two dogs and has a little patio that he shares with three other American residents. He gets 24-hour nursing care and three meals a day, cooked in a homey kitchen and served in a sun-washed dining room. His cottage has a living room, bedroom, kitchenette, bathroom and a walk-in closet. For this Slater pays $550 a month, less than onetenth of the going rate back home in Las Vegas. For another $140 a year, he gets full medical coverage

from the Mexican government, including all his medicine and insulin for diabetes. “This would all cost me a fortune in the United States,” said Slater, a 65-year-old retired headwaiter. Like many retirees, Slater has satellite television, so he doesn’t miss any American news or programs. When he wants to see a movie or go shopping downtown, the taxi ride is only $2 or $3. For medical care, Slater relies on the Mexican Social Security Institute, or IMSS, which runs clinics and hospitals nationwide and allows foreigners to enroll in its program even if they never worked in Mexico or paid taxes to support the system. He recently had gallbladder surgery in an IMSS hospital, and he paid nothing. Many of the nursing home employees speak English, and so does Slater’s doctor. Since many nursing homes are run out of private homes, regulation by state health departments is often spotty and Mexican officials may inspect them only once a year, unlike U.S. inspectors, who may visit a home several times a year. The U.S. Embassy said it had no record of complaints against Mexican nursing homes. Mexican entrepreneurs are doing their best to prepare for a tide of Americans. In Ensenada, the Residencia Lourdes opened in 2003, offering care for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia. In other American enclaves, in-home health care services have sprung up to serve the retirees. In Rosarito, just south of the U.S. border, INCARE provides nursing aides to retirees starting at $8.33 an hour, less than half the cost of the same service in nearby San Diego. Developers of independent living facilities for seniors are also beginning to look to Mexico. A Spanish-U.S. venture is building Sensara Vallarta, a 250-unit condominium complex aimed at Americans age 50 and older in the Pacific Coast resort of Puerto Vallarta. And in the northern city of Monterrey, El Legado is marketing itself as a “home resort” for seniors. Academics and government officials are beginning to take notice. In March, the University of Texas at Austin held a forum for developers, hospital officials, insurance companies and policymakers to discuss health care for retirees in Mexico. “With the right facilities in place, Mexico could give (American retirees) a better quality of life at a better price than they could find in the United States,” says Flavio Olivieri, a member of Tijuana’s Economic Development Council, which is seeking

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

funding from Mexico’s federal government to build more retirement homes, including senior apartments. “We think this could be a very good business as these baby boomers reach retirement age,” he says. Mexico’s proximity to the USA, low labor costs and warm climate make it attractive, although quality of care can vary between facilities, so do some due diligence.

Massage Therapy FULL HOUR - ONLY $35

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MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

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33


{Home & Real estate}}

San Felipe Home Builders

An Exclusive Gated 8 Unit Townhome Complex in San Felipe DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE

Starting at $159,900 US 760-208-1700

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Beautiful Custom Home by San Felipe Home Builders

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Since its inception in 2005, San Felipe Home Builders has been creating custom homes in the San Felipe area that incorporate American quality and style with traditional Mexican flare. The ability to bring an American dream home to life in the ideal picturesque setting of San Felipe is just one thing that makes San Felipe Home Builders stand out from their competitors. San Felipe Home Builders has over 20 employees

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

and realized early on that hiring quality builders to do the work rather than contracting it out has saved them time and money in the long run. This gives them complete control over the finished product and gives them the ability to see to it that the work gets done right the first time. San Felipe Home Builders adhere to U.S. standards for materials to ensure top quality and safety. When it comes to popular designs and

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

products for baths and kitchens, there is a definite market for the American styles that San Felipe Home Builders are able to import. Aside from importing the best materials for the job, San Felipe Home Builders also makes a point of working with their clients for a truly customized finished home. They are also upfront with the client about the realities of the options they may envision for the finished home. If the client really wants a certain look or


{{Home & Real estate} material that will Bill and Carol Spradlin, Owners not live up to its of San Felipe Home Builders expectations once done, San Felipe Home Builders will truthfully advise that client about potential repercussions and also give them advice on what may work out better in the long run. Originally coming to the area to semi-retire and help out with projects for their church, the owners of San Felipe Home Builders have a personal mission that has made them an integral part of the San Felipe community. They have three orphanages in the works that will house up to 12 girls each. These quality built homes for orphans will eventually be run by married couples who will work to instill a sense of family and purpose for the children who live there. Since 2006, San Felipe Home Builders has worked diligently and with the local government and community to make these orphanages a reality. Since the changes in the American economy have rippled through the global market, business

SWEITZER CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COMPANY BJ Sweitzer Consultant

For all your disposal needs Permanent & Temporary Construction Waste Commercial & Residential Portable Toilets Septic Pumping

Residential Pick Up

3 & 6 Yard Commercial

Carlos Mora Contractor

Phone: 577-0195 USA: 011-52-686-577-0195 Email: bejota10@aol.com

Containers

has slowed a bit, but San Felipe Home Builders has kept afloat and knows that the American dollar currently goes farther in San Felipe than in the past. This makes now an excellent time to invest and build in the area. San Felipe Home Builders have moved north from downtown but can be easily contacted through their website www.sanfelipehomebuilder. com or by calling Bill at (619) 920-2292 or Carol at (619) 200-6456.

68 Gallon Containers for Residence & Business

Portable Toilets

Competitive Rates

Septic Pumping

686-121-1004 or 686-212-3599 South of Kilometer 187, San Felipe B.C.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

35


{Home & Real estate}}

Construction Pé“Best rezinC onstruction PC Pérez Baja” Computer & Satellite Installation

CALL jim moore (686) 184-9237 cell in mexico (619) 209-8486 from the u.s.

E-Mail: sfvillagerealty@yahoo.com.mx

Omni  Services

Your Mexico Real Estate  Specialists In La Paz, Mexico

Baja Mexico Real Estate! La Paz Mexico Real Estate! Your Buyer’s Broker!

omni@osmx.com (612)123-4888 

Satellite Internet

Also Computers, Cell Phones, and DVD Rentals

Av. Mar de Cortez, Plaza San Felipe Visit us Online: www.csibaja.com

686-577-2928 shane@csibaja.com

www.osmx.com

www.SanFelipeHomeBuilder.com

Home Builders in San Felipe

Providing Quality, Integrity and Professionalism since 2005

San Felipe (686) 577-3176 San Diego (619) 920-2292

36

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

* e*st*in* B * a ja ” “B El Dorado Ranch * *5*Star * * Contractor El Dorado Ranch 5 Star Contractor

Lupe Pérez, General Contractor Lupe Pérez, General Contractor 011.521.686.170.3979 011.521.686.170.3979

Jane Allen, Contract Manager Jane Allen, Contract Manager US: 480.600.2114 or MX: US: 480.600.2114 or MX: 011.521.686.236.4927 011.521.686.236.4927 www.sanfelipehomesbyperez.com

www.sanfelipehomesbyperez.com bestinbaja@gmail.com

bestinbaja@gmail.com


OPEN HOUSE PHOTO ADS Publish your real estate photo ad for ONLY $50. Simply email your copy and photo to sales@ mexicoliving.info and Mexico Living will contact you. If you have questions, please call 686-230-9933 in Mexico or 877-LUVMEX1 from the US.

San Felipe, Baja California This beautiful 2 Master Suite home is located in the gated community of El Dorado Ranch in San Felipe, Baja California. Front and back tiled patios offer sea and mountain views. The rooftop deck is perfect for stargazing and relaxing. Includes great room, garage and billiard table. Home is fully furnished, ready to move in TODAY! Offered at $209k Bill Maine 686-231-4921 or 619-203-5129.

La Paz, Baja California Sur Beachfront, Single Story, Modern Home with SaltWater Pool & Income- Producing Guesthouse for Sale in La Paz! Mexican Modern Design, plus American Materials, Green Construction HighEnd Furnishings Equal Luxury and Style. Are you a discerning individualist? Do you want to vacation or retire in comfort and style on the beach with all of the amenities of the old country, while living a life of ease in paradise? Do you want your little piece of paradise to pay its way? The “HoneyMoon Hut” guesthouse has solid pre-paid bookings. Main house can be rented as well. See video http://bit.ly/L9E2Q $725,000 Omni Services 52 (612) 123 4888 omni@ osmx.com.

Open House US$178,000 Excellent Views and Comfort at El Dorado Ranch, San Felipe Designed with serenity and comfort in mind, this home is perfect for a couple, large family or group of buyers. Built in 2003, this 1,850 square-foot home has three bedrooms and three baths, a central great room, fireplace, kitchen, laundry hookups, vaulted finished wood ceilings throughout and an attached 1.5 car garage. You can enjoy your own private area while still being able to entertain a large group without sharing a bed or bathroom with the rest of the crowd. From the terrace, above the garage, you will feel like you’re in seventh heaven as you enjoy the quiet, peaceful, relaxing, aweinspring 360-degree view of the mountains Front Courtyard and the beautiful Sea of Cortez. The property has a custom stucco block wall around the side and rear yards with a dividing wall in the rear separating the sides with unique wrought iron gates at each entrance. There is established low-maintenance landscaping in planters with over 2,500 square feet of brick patio all around the home. Two bedrooms have sliding glass doors, which open onto a patio with a tile counter, gas, and space for a BBQ with light and electricity. The master bedroom and great Beautifully landscaped side entrance room open onto the covered flagstone patio with a great view of the Sea of Cortez. There are heat/cool mini splits in two bedrooms and the great room, with cool only in one bedroom. The home had an insulation coating applied two years ago, which has reduced the cooling in the summer by $150 a month. Located in El Dorado Ranch and centrally located within walking distance to the new community center with pools and tennis courts, 24-hour patrolled security and a new 24-hour health center less than a quarter of a mile away. Sold furnished, this home is a steal at only $178,000! If you’re interested in touring the home, contact Bill or Carol Spradlin at (686) 577-3176 from Mexico, (619) 920-2292 from the U.S., or email bill@sanfelipehomebuilder.com. Back of house, which faces the Sea of Cortez.

WWW.MEXICOLIVINGGUIDE.COM/OPENHOUSE CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

La Paz, Baja California Sur This stylish home must be seen to be appreciated! Located in El Comitan roughly 15 Km north of La Paz. Has a large, bright living/ dining area and an open kitchen with state-ofthe art appliances. Master bed and bath are located on the main floor with a covered patio to the pool area. A separate stairwell takes you to the terrace with a guest bedroom, bath and outstanding views. Approximately 1,700 sq. ft., fully furnished, professionally landscaped with an automatic irrigation system. PRICED TO SELL at US$340,900. Contact Alexander at 011 52 (613) 104-3625 or alexander@loretorealty.com.

San Felipe, Baja California Casa de Llantas FOR SALE by Owner. Contact andrenajoyce@yahoo.com, (686) 210-4598. Artist designed, custom-built tire home in the Ejido. Two master suites, two baths, spacious open floorplan, tiled, fenced and landscaped, garage. Furnished and ready to move in. Owner will carry with substantial down. You must see this unique home! $149,000

San Felipe, Baja California One can truly appreciate the beauty and peace of Baja in this gorgeous, 2,100 sq. ft. home. It comes completely furnished, has a separate two-bedroom casita, and the amenities are too extensive to list them all; upgraded furniture and appliances, ceiling fans, entertainment center, 109-inch Projection DLP Home Theatre and many, many more. The outdoor living area is over 9,000 sq. ft., including pool, spa, shower, kitchen, and lots of privacy. This million dollar property is PRICED TO SELL at only US$499,000! To start living your dream, contact Bill Maine at (619) 203-5129; from the U.S. (760) 688-6238; or VIPearthEVents@gmail.com.

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

37


FREE CLASSIFIED ADS All ads must be placed online at www.mexicolivingforum.com. All Ads Must be posted by the last Friday of each month. All ads must be specific, no generic ads, All ads must contain contact

info and price. Mexico Living reserves the right to edit all ads for length, or to refuse any ads. We will not print ads submitted with ALL CAPS.

FREE CLASSIFIED ads can now be submitted via email, classified@mexicoliving.info.

3 drawers on 1 side and a door with 2 shelves on the other. I paid $550 each. I would like to get $300 each. They are heavy. Call me to see them or to get pictures sent. (686) 171-6898

All ads must be 60 words or less and contain phone number, city and price.

San Felipe: L-Shaped desk that was custom made in San Felipe. It is perfect for an office. Call me to see them or to get pictures sent. (686) 171-6898. I can make a deal on all 3 desks and I even have matching bookshelves.

Announcements Tickets ON SALE NOW for the 2010 International Blues & Arts Fiesta! Visit www.bluesandarts.com or CALL 1-877-LUV-MEX1. 2010 International Blues and Arts Fiesta is an adventure not to miss in Mexico. On Saturday, March 27, in San Felipe, Baja California, the Lions Club will again host a rip roarin’ day of blues and arts! Mark it on your calendar. Start making plans because this fourth annual event will be the best yet. You can expect stellar bands and fabulous artists showin’ their stuff. Check this weekly for more information and book yourself into a San Felipe Motel soon. General addmission tickets are $20 and provide open access to the event throughout the day. This is going to be the biggest event to date, don’t miss out on a celebration of art and music. This is a fundraising event for the San Felipe Baja California Lions Club.

Items for Sale San Felipe: 2 beautiful oversized rustic style desks custom made in San Felipe. They have glass tops and

San Felipe: Barely used 8 hp Honda four stroke outboard and 10-foot zodiac. New over 3K, asking 1.5K obo. Contact Ron Cartwright at Campo San Antonio km 43 (San Felipe) or Jacobsen at torstenjacobsen@sbcglobal.net.

Loreto: A Fishreman’s Spot located in a quiet residential area of Nopolo. This well constructed home features a bright open kitchen and living area with covered patios to the front and back of the second floor. The main floor has a large double door garage with laundry facilities and a freezer room. A guest bed/ bath is located to the rear with a private covered patio. Priced to sell. Contact Alexander at 011 52 (613) 1043625 or alexander@loretorealty.com. La Paz: A luxury residential community overlooks the bay of La Paz. Lot sizes vary from about 600 M2 to 2,200 M2. Prices start at US$100 per M2,

depending on the location of the lot. Lot financing is available up to 10 years at 10 percent with a $10,000 deposit, and when the CC&R’s are ready, you have to bring the deposit up to 30 percent. For further information, contact omni@osmx.com.

ing cooked in a pan. The sauce can be made from sour cream and cilantro. The cooked fish mixture is bedded in cabbage and tomatoes within corn tortillas. The sauce and lime juice is spread on top.

Todo Santos: Real de Santa Ana offers three styles of homes in a private community with all the amenities of a much larger development. 3- and 4-bedroom, 3-bath homes, 1,200 to 1,800 square feet, single level living. 3 distinct styles of Hacienda Style Living. For further information, contact omni@ osmx.com.

3. Beef Steak Soft Taco Made with chuck or shoulder steak, this taco is all about the beef. An overnight marinade in Italian dressing, cilantro and chili pepper gives it its kick.

Rentals

Real Estate

San Felipe: Long-term rental wanted in San Felipe; well-built 3BR or 4BR home. Principals only please. Call Bill from Mexico at (686) 577-6228, or from the U.S. at (408) 868-4992. Loreto: Watch the sunrise over Isla Carmen and The Sea of Cortez from this 2-bedroom, 1-bath, 2nd story waterfront condo. Features include a large terraza and covered porch overlooking the Malecon and water, gas barbeque, in-house laundry with washer, dryer, sink and freezer, TV, VCR, DVD, Air Cond and Gated parking. Rental Price $125. Priced to sell. For further information contact Alexander at 011 52 (613) 1043625 or email alexander@loretorealty.com.

Across 1: Root beer alternative 5: Grocery shopper’s reference 9: Arm bone 13: Sesame starter? 14: Tool used for making holes 15: Tide type 16: ‘Bunnies’ under the bed 17: Magazine with an AfricanAmerican audience 18: Sleeveless outer garment 19: Helper 21: Fatigued, in a way 22: Wild pigs 23: Give the slip to 24: Dialects of a region 27: Belt beepers 29: Haut ___ (high society) 30: Rough projections 32: Sis or bro 34: Piece of strategy 35: Humans 36: Quaker’s address 37: Absorb, with ‘up’ 38: Marriage announcement 39: Hose hue 40: Races with hand-offs 42: Fiddle 43: Fixes 44: Insignificant sort 46: Flimflams 48: Coordination centers 52: Earring spot 38

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

“Top 10 Mexican Taco Recipes” continued from page 24.

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

2. Grilled Salmon Taco A fresh and original taco dish making use of black beans, Mexican corn, carrots and red onions. The salmon is rubbed with olive oil and spices and then promptly grilled. Can be garnished with lime and cilantro. 1. Grilled Shrimp Taco Mexican recipes along the coast of Baja abound, but the best involve a rich garlic butter preparation and plenty of shredded cabbage and lime. The result is one of the tastiest taco recipes from Mexico.

53: About a drop 54: Any day now 55: Just 56: These can be checkered 57: Drink to excess 58: Tournament advantages 59: Thin-bladed tools 60: Hearty meal Down 1: Pas de deux conclusion 2: Important work 3: Minus 4: Disease-fighting protein 5: Lung-related 6: 1990 Best Actor Jeremy 7: On cloud nine 8: ‘Don’t give up!’ 9: Remove from the crate 10: Management skill 11: Back of the neck 12: Mocked by imitating 14: Obsolete VCRs 20: Unspecified amount 21: Runs for one’s life? 23: Vies for the break, in billiards 24: Mischief-makers 25: Sorrow 26: Unsuitable for surgery 27: Bosom buddies 28: Prolonged attack 30: Jailbirds

31: Turn tail 33: Ballpark beverage 35: Simon ___ 36: Teapot dwellers? 38: Bellhop’s burdens 39: Insulting remark 41: English gobs 42: Comes down hard 44: On pins and needles 45: Court orders 46: Neatnik’s nemesis 47: Rabbit fur 48: ‘I’m history!’ 49: Rioter’s illegal take 50: Run gracefully 51: Freshly 53: Speed meas.


Dom 18

6

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18

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6

Oceanografía Física

Mar

18

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18

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6

18

(31 51 N, 116 37 W)

0

Vie

6

1

150 75

18

0

Sab

6

2

18

PMS NMM

0

BMI 210 53

150 75

3

4

5

6

7

831 210

1546 -50

2213 120

8

2 40

303 50

919 203

1628 -44

9

PMS NMM BMI

150 75

1007 187

1709 -31

2342 133

10

501 49

1059 163

1750 -13

031 139

11

612 51

1157 135

1832 7

124 144

12

740 50

1310 107

1918 29

221 148

13

925 41

1456 88

2011 48

14

321 152

23 12

1058 24

1700 2121 83 63

422 157

15

1204 7

150 75

1927 2337 97 71

17

604 170

1332 -17

2004 024 103 69

18

646 175

1406 -23

2035 102 106 65

19

721 179

1437 -25

2103 136 108 61

20

754 180

1505 -25

2129 209 109 58

16

21

824 178

1532 -21

2154 111

22

241 56

PMS NMM

853 173

1557 -16

150 75

1621 -8

2244 115

24

350 55

951 151

1644 2

2312 118

25

2041 72

430 56

1023 136

1708 13

2343 122

26

519 58

1058 118

1732 25

020 125

27

622 59

1144 99

1757 37

104 129

23

PMS NMM

2 54

28

756 57

1300 79

1825 50

29

159 134

956 44

PMS NMM BMI

150 75

1118 24

1805 75

409 153

1210 2

1857 2222 86 74

509 168

31

145 82

0 910 196

1556 -40

603 184

1930 2332 96 68

1330 -35

Hora del Meridiano:

0 302 25

1252 -18

652 198

1407 -47

2032 116

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

120 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

2216 146

2000 029 106 57

BMI

121 45

739 207

1444 -52

2105 127

211 33

825 206

Mar

18

0

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6

18

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18

1521 -50

100 50

100 50

100 50

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6

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100 50

4

5

1002 116

1736 -16

008 76

10

507 39

1041 99

1803 -2

6

038 79

11

609 40

1119 79

1823 14

7

2126005 66 61

17

608 100

1430 -17

2133 055 68 56

18

1

400 200

0

2

729 1157 40 57

1826 28

154 85

13

651 106

1458 -22

2144 129 68 49

19

400

3

4

200

5

6

7

754 -22

1331 413

1946 -119

216 523

8

2 40

838 -34

1417 416

1007 35

400

922 -34

1507 405

2121 -87

347 476

10

1007 -22

1601 380

2210 -39

11

200

433 427

1053 -1

1703 349

2304 25

12

522 369

1143 26

1816 318

014 93

13

618 312

1259 51

1950 302

9

14

210 138

23 12

736 269

1452 56

2140 316

15

358 139

912 254

1604 39

1636 -12

2258 68

24

400

1028 264

1656 18

2344 389

17

557 88

1121 286

1736 -3

020 419

18

200

631 63

1158 309

1809 -21

049 440

19

658 41

1229 330

1836 -37

115 452

20

723 25

1256 346

1900 -47

21

138 455

16 745 14

1322 356

1924 -51

200 448

22

806 7

1347 359

355 33

941 96

1650 -6

2310 71

25

430 32

1007 86

1701 2

2326 74

26

726 109

1523 -25

2201 159 67 44

400

829 4

1412 355

2012 -34

241 420

24

852 5

1438 345

2038 -14

25

200

259 400

918 11

1506 330

2105 15

26

318 377

947 22

1541 309

2134 53

27

342 347

1019 38

1630 284

2208 99

1259 12

349 90

1325 -5

2143 62

508 100

107 54 0 928 118

2 54

28

1059 58

1742 261

29

2254 151

454 271

1155 78

1634 -23

2248 84

400

629 233

1352 84

2139 291

420 166

908 238

1551 49

2243 346

31

512 117

408

200

0 200 548

820 -87

1409 474

1645 0

2327 405

552 64

1115 329

Hora del Meridiano:

204

0

1021 277

Nivel de Referencia:

2024 -135

1730 -49

005 461

628 11

1201 382

1815 -94

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

120 W.G. BMI

043 509

705 -35

1244 429

1858 -128

121 540

743 -69

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

Dom 18

6

15

756 112

1545 -24

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

Dom 18

0

6

Lun

18

0

6

0

3

18

0

Mie

6

18

0

6

Jue

18

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

1327 462

PMS

120

NMM

60

BMI

0

946 142

Lun

6

18

0

1359 -21

512 33

2119 020 66 57

1034 74

1711 10

2346 78

601 33

1101 61

1715 18

013 81

28

615 111

1433 -33

2128 117 69 48

Hora del Meridiano:

105 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

1638 -23

2307 103

429 31

1030 124

1714 -7

6

1

80 40

Sab

6

2

Mar

528 35

1118 102

18

0

1748 10

6

712 120

238 52

80 40

3

4

5

6

7

809 104

1615 -39

011 57

8

3 40

849 98

80 40

925 87

1722 -16

10

106 433 55 45

954 72

1745 -1

11

127 57

554 1015 42 56

1751 13

12

143 60

7541021 37 40

1647 23

156 64

13

2350 59

1421 17

9

14

224 69

1354 6

323 73

15

1938 2342 76 58

17

0 441 77

80 40

1352 -13

17

545 83

1409 -20

18

2303 59

630 88

1432 -25

19

2255 044 57 56

708 92

1456 -27

2304118 55 52

20

740 93

1520 -26

21

2312147 53 48

22

809 93

1543 -23

2321 216 51 45

836 90

1606 -18

23

953 30

3 54

0 245 41

80 40

901 84

1625 -12

24

2319 317 50 38

925 76

1639 -4

25

2322 354 52 36

948 67

1647 4

26

2330 55

439 34

1006 56

1648 11

2340 59

27

545 1021 33 43

1626 16

28

2323 58

2358 63

905 30

1522 17

29

024 66

23 18

558 124

1320 -9

2000 026 82 52

18 906 131

1549 -15

2204 98

24

80 40

1319 -4

226 73

31

1323 -19

420 78

88 44

0

0 302 29

909 84

1614 -25

2315 56

1346 -33

2230 58

549 85

Hora del Meridiano: Nivel de Referencia:

1415 -43

2212036 57 53

105 W.G. BMI

652 92

1447 -48

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

2227 128 56 45

744 95

1519 -46

30

2243 216 55 37

828 93

23 29 7 15

056 83

23 18

935 30

1452 27

30

PMS NMM

803 126

1539 -40

2205 76

250 27

848 125

1608 -34

2228 80

Mie

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Jue

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18

(22 53 N, 109 55 W)

0

Vie

6

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18

0

Sab

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PMS

819 160

1523 -41

2149 98

249 31

8

3 40

902 155

1601 -35

2227 101

9

PMS NMM

641 39

1215 79

1821 28

131 104

13

833 40

1355 1854 60 44

238 104

14

1053 29

1745 2004 58 57

355 108

15

1205 14

19122230 68 62

16

0 12

PMS NMM

640 132

1348 -17

2020 102 86 45

19

715 138

1414 -23

2040 90

134 39

20

746 141

1440 -26

2102 93

204 34

21

814 141

1504 -25

2123 95

232 31

22

840 138

1527 -21

2143 97

23

PMS

3 54

NMM

328 28

931 122

1609 -7

2226 99

25

359 29

957 111

1628 2

2250 99

26

433 32

1023 97

1646 13

2319 99

27

516 37

1051 81

1704 24

2354 98

28

619 42

1125 64

1717 35

045 96

29

23 18

904 13401633 42 46 45

30

PMS NMM BMI

1141 24

347 103

1219 4

19302230 67 62

31

505 116

122 61 0 856 148

0

PMS

200

NMM

100

BMI

0

1534 -40

2152 114

1252 -15

1936 2346 76 53

601 130

1957 034 84 40

1324 -31

Hora del Meridiano:

105 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

649 144

1357 -43

2022 93

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

120 26

733 153

1430 -49

2050 101

203 14

815 155

1502 -48

2120 109

23 29 7 15

Dom 18

6

0

Lun

6

18

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6

Angeles, B.C. CICESE Bahía de los (28 57 N, 113 33 W)

Oceanografía Física

Mar

18

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1549 -38

0

Sab

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PMS NMM

3

200

NMM

100

BMI

0

4

5

6

7

747 25

1257 162

1920 -85

216 252

8

2 40

831 18

1349 162

2007 -70

9

PMS NMM BMI

258 240

915 13

1442 157

2054 -45

10

PMS

200

NMM

100

BMI

0

339 221

1003 10

1539 149

2145 -12

11

419 198

1054 9

1646 139

2242 25

12

501 173

1151 9

1814 133

2355 60

13

551 147

1256 9

2016 140

14

145 83

23 12

702 125

1409 6

2156 160

15

403 84

840 113

1523 -0

2259 181

16

PMS NMM BMI

2322 50

525 72

957 112

1624 -10

2344 197

17

PMS

200

NMM

100

BMI

0

608 1049 63 116

1709 -19

020 206

18

637 1124 56 122

1744 -28

047 211

19

700 52

1152 130

1812 -35

719 47

110 213

20

1218 138

1838 -40

131 215

21

739 41

1245 145

1904 -41

152 214

22

801 34

1316 150

1932 -37

23

PMS

2 54

NMM BMI

215 210

826 28

1349 151

2001 -26

24

PMS

200

NMM

100

BMI

0

239 202

854 25

1424 147

25

2030 -8

303 189

923 26

1459 140

26

2059 14

325 173

953 27

1537 130

2128 37

27

343 158

1027 28

1624 121

2200 62

28

401 144

1110 27

29

1742 114

2255 85

22 18

425 131

1212 23

2003 122

30

PMS NMM BMI

103 511 102 117

200

18

BMI

PMS

2301 55

Vie

6

1 134 256

1400 9

0 107 70

1702 26

BMI

1346 -5

16

0 12

NMM

23 29 7 15

1651 -30

0 040 331 55 48

PMS

1116 30

3 54

708 1127 33 46

2144 204 72 37

1507 -39

7

037 104

12

ENERO 2010

18

0 151 55

2245 66

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

(26 01 N, 111 22 W) 0

1621 -18

BMI 1248 1

248 5

18

23

29

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

6

2350 104

0

Vie

849 109

Cabo San Lucas, B.C.S.

Oceanografía Física

5

11

206 97

60

6

2232 255 66 36

22

CICESE

4

10

1942 -144

120

0

1604 -22

BMI

Loreto, B.C.S.

Oceanografía Física

Mar

PMS

BMI

337 30

cms

cms

6

16 823 111

202 35

23 29 7 14

CICESE

ENERO 2010

1329 3

NMM

2215 227 67 39

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

0

412 90

NMM

300 29

0 103 196

PMS

1941 256

30

22 18

0

505 115

23

411 311

1249 18

0 12

21

27

2247 62

31

1948 -47

0 221 436

PMS

BMI

2256 353

0 510 116

2338 73

9

256 87

2034 -114

0 301 510

1706 -28

NMM

14

20

ENERO 2010

18

0 133 517

921 128

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

Sab

6

2308 323 72 42

BMI 915 103

210 85

(31 01 N, 114 49 W) 18

1633 -35

BMI 1401 -9

334 20

Vie

838 135

8

1239 1441 37 36

3 40

111 82

12

0

6

PMS

0

50

0

18

BMI

San Felipe, B.C.

Mie

6

Sab

6

2

0

cms

cms

0

0

0

100

CICESE

Oceanografía Física

18

0

2140 137

23 29 7 14

Vie

6

1

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

ENERO 2010

0

BMI

324 34

0 302 142

6

NMM

1536 1906 69 62

30

22 18

0

237 45

517 95

BMI 922 163

18

(24 10 N, 110 21 W)

0

2219 113

0 314 55

Lun

6

50

413 40

BMI 1252 -7

0

100

1832 2235 90 70

0 517 163

Dom 18

6

Oceanografía Física

2257 126

0 359 48

0

La Paz, B.C.S.

CICESE

ENERO 2010 cms

cms

0

Ensenada, B.C.

CICESE

ENERO 2010

1328 12

2145 147

31

345 724 96 107

1447 -8

2237 178

454 914 77 114

204

100

102

0

0 156 249

807 -16

http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

1348 185

1959 -70

1555 -34

2320 208

536 1023 55 130

1653 -60

Hora del Meridiano:

120 W.G.

Nivel de Referencia:

BMI

001 232

614 33

1120 148

1743 -81

1er Cuarto: Luna LLena: 3er Cuarto: Luna Nueva:

041 248

652 13

1211 166

1830 -91

120 254

730 -4

1300 179

1915 -87

23 29 7 14 http://oceanografia.cicese.mx/predmar MAR V0.9 2010 J.I. González

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

www.mexicolivingguide.com

39


MEXICO LIVING

Guide Pacific Baja & The Sea of Cortez PO Boxto 9019-460 Calexico, CA 92232

A

Voted Best Real Estate Broker 2007 & 2008

mor Property Real Estate

San Felipe

FEATURED HOME Gated Community - MUST SEE!

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www.AmorProperty.com 40

The Monthly Guide to Pacific Baja & the Sea of Cortez

MEXICO LIVING – January 2010

CALL US 1-877-LUVMEX1

Edition 32 - January 2010  

Best of 2009, The Origins of New Year's Resolutions, Assisted Living in Mexico, Banking Basics in Baja, Hell No, I Won't Go, Baja News, Ente...

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