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6  •  August 25, 2011   MetNews   TheMetropolitan

SUCCESS in College

Sign up 1 for the right classes.

Are they part of your degree or minor requirements? Do you need them to meet a prerequisite? Are they a general education requirement? Consult advisors, high school grades, test scores and requirements for degree to help you make educated choices.

SGA BRIEFS

SGA VOTES TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABILITY, NOT THEMSELVES Brad Roudebush wroudebu@mscd.edu The Student Government Assembly approved a resolution on Aug. 19 that will provide Metro students with free bike repairs while on campus. The SGA hopes the service will empower students to ride their bikes to campus, a goal that coincides with Metro’s commitment to promote a culture of sustainability on campus. “This program is offered by the SGA to real students for their fee dollars,” SGA Sen. Jeffery Washington said. “We understand that our budget comes from their fees.” A total of $4,640 is needed to purchase tool kits, bike stands, a compressor and cleaning and lube supplies. SGA President Jesse Altum is not convinced that this will be enough money to purchase the necessary supplies and staff the repair service full-time. “I’m supportive of the SGA getting more involved in student services, but I don’t think $4,600 will be enough.” Altum said. “I’ve been up to CU and seen their bike

repair shop and it’s like a little store.” Although Washington is hopeful that the repair service will be running sometime this fall, Altum is slightly less optimistic about the timetable. “I don’t see it being set up until the spring time, and even that’s a loft y goal.” The SGA also voted on, and rejected, a resolution which would allocate $1,000 to the SGA’s apparel budget to be used on the purchase of letter jackets. According to the resolution, drafted by SGA Vice President Tesa J. Johnson Ferrell Jones and Washington, the jackets would be used “for the purpose of brand recognition, advertising, and team cohesion.” Washington said that the jackets would promote the SGA and bring a certain amount of “prestige” to the job. However, other senators thought that the best means of promotion come from face-to-face networking. Sen. Jason Dirgo responded to the argument saying, “We have business cards to get our name out. How would [letter jackets] support our students?” The resolution failed 5-2.

2

Get to know your teachers. Read the syllabus,

know their office hours, expectations, teaching and testing style.

3Attend every class.

Religious holidays, death and two broken legs are the only acceptable excuses.

all relevant material before 4Read class. Take effective notes in 5class. Write down questions when you don’t understand.

Record only necessary information. After class, sort and retrieve the information from your notes.

6

Study, Study, Study. Plan two

hours of studying per week for each registered credit hour if you want an A, one and a half hours for a B, and one for a C.

7Use all resources available.

On campus tutoring, library, study groups, other students in class, and 24hr access online at Smarthinking.

8Get Involved.

Joining clubs and organizations keeps you connected, improving your focus in school and your community.

9Use time well.

Plan class, work, study, friends, family and leisure time to do well in school and maintain structure and harmony in your life.

10Be flexible.

Adjusting to the different demands of college takes time. Give yourself the opportunity to find what works best for you.

ATTENTION VETERANS The Army Reserve provides excellent opportunities: • Many of the same benefits as Active Duty • Start a new career • Continue your education For more information, contact your Army career counselor on campus in the Tivoli Student Union (720) 904-2175/ 904-2176


MetroSpective

TheMetropolitan

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August 18, 2011

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The Auraria Campus Bookstore, unlike other Auraria bookstores, directly reinvests its resources Campus Bookstore back into the campus. The Auraria Campus Books and more... Bookstore employs students, has a great Open 6 days per week return policy and the largest selection of M–Th 8–6, Fri 8–5, Sat 10–3 used books. We are conveniently located at the heart of campus in the Tivoli Student Union. Come check us out! www.aurariabooks.com


OMG!: A pig’s orgasm can last up to 30 minutes.

THE METROPOLITAN • MARCH 10, 2011 • NEWS • 7

Alumni Association may cover some costs << Continued from 3 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien also said that while events like the Masquerade Ball were not as successful as she had hoped, they do serve a purpose in connecting campus organizations to one another. In the future, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien hopes events like the Masquerade Ball and the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day dinner could be combined to provide a format for organizations to interact while saving costs. While the SGA spent more than in previous years for homecoming, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien wanted to put that number into context. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look at other schools, they drop like $80,000 on their homecoming,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien said. Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbor to the north, the University of Colorado at Boulder, spent $33,852 on its fall 2010 homecoming week. One of the major draws of CU Boulderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming week is the midweek concert according to Kaela Zihlman, CU Boulderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Government Director of Homecoming. The concert this year featured national recording artist RJD2 and was sold out of its 1,100 tickets. Zihlman said that the student government budget for homecoming varies year-to-year depending on which musical group they bring to campus. The year before she estimated the student government spent around $50,000. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien wanted to see Metro pull in a big name to perform at next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming. The Committee tried to bring in a comedian for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event but faced difficulties trying to book one. While attendance was sporadic for home-

coming, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien believes there is a desire for such events on campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think students here do want some of that traditional college experience, or at least the availability of itâ&#x20AC;Śstudents do have a lot of pride in this school,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien said. The SGA might be getting some of their final bill covered by the Alumni Association. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien at press time was waiting for the Alumni Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final tally of their expenses. Since the Alumni Association did not spend their total budget of $10,000, there is a chance that some of the unspent money will end up going to the SGA to help cover their expenses. In the past, SGA and the Alumni Association did not work together to help plan Homecoming Week. This year was the first time that the SGA had participated heavily in the planning and execution of the event with the Alumni Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were impressed by the commitment of the students to make things happen. We learned a lot and are excited to build on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success to make next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming even more special. Homecoming should be and will be a tradition of note at Metro,â&#x20AC;? said Mark Jastorff, director of Alumni Relations for Metro. While members of the Homecoming Committee were pleased with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events, planning has already begun on next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping to come back in five years and the parade is bigger and the socialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are bigger and the bonfire is bigger,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien said.

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Did You Know? Coors Field is the fourth oldest ballpark in the National League

THE METROPOLITAN • MARCH 17, 2011 • SPORTS • 17

Club football set to blitz $85,000 budget Team hopes to recruit outside sponsors to help tackle expected costs By Ben Bruskin bbruskin@mscd.edu The formation of Metro’s club football team will bring a new look to the sports landscape on campus, along with a need for an estimated $85,000 total budget. The formation of a football team also brings the possibility of shrinking budgets for Metro’s other club teams, as all of the teams are competing for the same money from the club sports department. “Absolutely that will happen,” Jon Supsic, club sports director said. “It’s a new system than in previous years. But the top team usually gets 15 to 20 percent of the overall budget.” While the overall budget of the club sports department was not available at the time of print, Supsic estimates the top team receives about $1,500-$1,800 from his office. With 60 players on the team and a possible 110 total on the roster come fall, $1,800 would be well short of reaching the goal in which players pay nothing. “Right now, players are paying about $400, [for equipment],” Football Club President Ted Reynolds said. “We don’t want them to have to pay anything. We are not charging club dues like most clubs, just equipment.” Players must buy their shoulder pads and helmets through Metro, whereas other equip-

ment like cleats and gloves can be purchased anywhere. The equipment purchased through Metro was supplied by Denver Athletic, and sold to the players at a reduced cost. The amount of money each club receives from the club sports department varies based upon several factors, including community service involvement, how competitive the clubs are, and how much money the clubs themselves have raised. After the club points are tallied, the money is doled out based on accumulated points. However, even though the football team has more expenditures than other club teams; the points system forces them to earn the money just like all of the other clubs. “[The team] was just established,” Supsic said. “They are on the bottom, they have to prove themselves [to receive the money.]” Since club football formed in October 2010, the team has already spent about $15,000, money donated by outside sponsors. Reynolds, said he,believes they will need an estimated $60,000 more between now and the end of their season in the fall. As of March 8, the club’s account had $600 in it. To help bolster the budget, the team plans to hold fundraisers and partner with various sponsors, Reynolds said. “Sponsors are still trickling in,” he said. “The hope is that more will come when they see our program’s success. “Myself and a group of five other people are extremely dedicated,” Reynolds said. “We are hard workers. We just have to start small and build up.”

Blitz Paintball, an already active sponsor of the team, is considering a paintball tournament fundraiser for the club. The Marine Officers are also sponsoring the team, and they are looking into a boot-camp-style fundraiser as well, Reynolds said. The team has other non-traditional fundraising ideas. Events such as a trampoline dodge ball tournament, a March Madness pool and a youth summer camp will be looked into, as the team tries to raise money and cut costs for the 60 players who are already on the team. Reynolds would also like to give a financial break to students on campus who want to support their new football team. Contrary to the advice he received, Reynolds decided not to charge students an admission fee to the games. Non-students will be charged $5 for admission, but students and children under 5 will be able to get in for free. “Students should be able to support their team without paying for it,” Reynolds said. Reynolds said he wants the club team to be as close to an NCAA experience as possible. “Once this really gets going, it’s not going to be a small program,” Reynolds said. “We want to build the guys as student athletes. We want the players to be ambassadors and represent the program in a high manner.” To help instill ambassadorship into the program, the team is attempting to organize a charity game in the fall. The proceeds will go to breast cancer research, and the team hopes to play an NCAA Division I team to help bolster awareness about the game and increase the

proceeds that will come from it. “It’s a lot of hard work but I’m extremely passionate,” Reynolds said. “No matter what I do I love doing it, no matter how much time it takes.” Reynolds said he and his staff are ready to put in time and see their ideas take shape. “We envision the success we can have,” he said. “If you build it, they will come.”

Football Schedule April 2, 3 p.m Blue/White @ Denver West Game April 9, 6 p.m. Broomfield @ Hinkley H.S. Dawgs April 16, 6 p.m. @ Hinkley H.S. April 23, 6 p.m. @ Hinkley H.S. April 30, 6 p.m. @ Hinkley H.S.

Denver Titans

Mile High Grizzlies Colorado Springs Flames

Apply now to be the 2011–2012 Student Literary and Arts Magazine

Metrosphere Editor Paid position–starts fall 2011 Responsibilities: • Soliciting student work • Managing content, design & magazine production Qualifications: • Art, English, journalism or tech comm major or minor • Metro State student • 6 or more credit hours • GPA 3.0 or higher • Computer layout, design and/or publication experience preferred For more information: 303-556-2507

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Submit by April 11, 2011: • Résumé with cover letter • Transcript or CAPP report • Two letters of recommendation • Work samples Drop off at: Board of Student Media, Tivoli 313 Attn: Shaun Schafer Mail to: Campus Box 57 P.O. Box 173362


THE METROPOLITAN â&#x20AC;˘ APRIL 7, 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ NEWS â&#x20AC;˘ 7

We need a news leader.

2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2012 Editor Wanted for The Metropolitan This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the editorial content of the weekly student-run newspaper. Duties include managing the student editorial staff, assigning stories, editing copy and working with the production manager on the physical makeup of the newspaper. This position will begin May 9, 2011.

QualiĂ&#x20AC;cations: â&#x20AC;˘ Applicants must be a journalism or English major or minor and enrolled for at least 6 credit hours at Metro State. â&#x20AC;˘ Applicants must have and maintain a GPA of 3.0. â&#x20AC;˘ Journalism experience is a major consideration in the selection process.

Interested Applicants Must Submit: â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

RĂŠsumĂŠ with cover letter Most recent grade report or official transcript Two letters of recommendation Samples of work

Please Submit the Above Materials to: Metro State Board of Student Media c/o Shaun Schafer, Tivoli 313 Or mail to: P.O. Box 173362, Campus Box 57 Denver, CO 80217-3362

http://themet.metrostudentmedia.com/

The application deadline is April 11, 2011.

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THE METROPOLITAN • APRIL 21, 2011 • 19

LASSIFIED Classified Info

COLLEGE EDITOR WANTED for the 2011–2012 NIGHT

Phone: 303-556-2507 Fax: 303-556-3421 Location: Tivoli #313 Advertising via Email: student-media-advertising@mscd.edu Classified ads are 15¢ per word for students currently enrolled at Metro State. To receive this rate, a current Metro State student ID must be shown at time of placement. For all others, the cost is 30¢ per word. The maximum length for classified ads is 50 words. Pre-payment is required. Cash, check, VISA and MasterCard are accepted. Classified ads may be placed via fax, email or in person. The deadline for placing all classified ads is 3 p.m. Thursday for the following week. For information about other advertising opportunities, call 303-556-2507 or go to http://themet.metrostudentmedia.com for current information.

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Paid position–starts Fall 2011 Responsibilities:

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Qualifications: • Art, English, journalism or tech comm major or minor • Metro State student • 6 or more credit hours • GPA 3.0 or higher • Computer layout, design and/or publication experience preferred

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3825 Tennyson • (303) 447-1633

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Submit by April 25, 2011: • • • •

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Résumé with cover letter Transcript or CAPP report Two letters of recommendation Work samples

Drop off at: Board of Student Media, Tivoli 313 Attn: Shaun Schafer

Mail to: Campus Box 57 P.O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362

Planned Parenthood is offering $10 STD testing & $10 HIV testing on April 26 & April 29th For more information visit www.pprm.org

Interviews will be conducted May 2, 2011 For more information: http://metrostudentmedia.com

Call 303-556-2507 or stop by Metro Student Media, Tivoli 313

Great experience, Great people

Join MetReport! Metro State’s student-run television news broadcast

We are looking for Metro State students to be: • Editors • Producers • Reporters • Directors • Social Media Producers • Motion Graphic Designers To apply, please attend our Open Auditions: Friday, April 29 • 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Media Center, Studio A (Behind Auraria Library) Professional attire is requested, no experience required For more information, please email metreport@gmail.com or call the Metro State Office of Student Media at 303-556-2507. 4600 Hale Parkway, Suite 490 Denver, CO 80220

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10 • METROSPECTIVE • MARCH 17, 2011 • THE METROPOLITAN

U.S. Thai Café peppers in some paradise Story and Photo by Ian Gassman igassman@mscd.edu Thai food is addictive — just like any other drug. Since my first bite, I’ve been hooked. Some days I even find myself wandering into a small restaurant called U.S. Thai Café, hoping to procure another forkful of pad thai or steaming hot curry. During my last visit, I tried to nonchalantly chat with the waitress, but my shaking hands and shifting eyes indicated I needed another fix. She quickly scribbled down my order and pushed a glass of water my way. I waited and prepared to fall once more into the mouth-watering void. Despite the fact that U.S. Thai Café thrives off of repeat customers, it isn’t a drug den. Located in Edgewater at 5228 W. 25th Ave., this restaurant is simply one of the best Thai spots in town. While there are numerous reviews to support that claim, the hardworking chef, Aung Kyaw, proves it every day. Born in Myanmar and raised in Thailand, Kyaw has spent plenty of time around Thai cuisine. Not only is he a master of balancing the components found in every traditional

dish, he also cooks with fresh, quality ingredients and brings textures to life. From the amount of spice to the crunch of a carrot, Kyaw has the entire spectrum covered. The chef ’s pad thai features succulent shrimp and small strips of chicken on a bed of rice noodles, complimented by an aromatic peanut sauce and a wedge of lime. However, no amount of earthy peanut sauce or tart citrus can extinguish the red chili flakes burning underneath the unassuming noodles. Not to be outdone, the paneng curry is flush with smoldering, complex flavors. The paneng’s gravy-like broth uses a subtle mixture of basil, peanut and sweet coconut milk to invite the senses inside. A few seconds later, it scolds them for not taking their shoes off with a scalding afterburn of appetizing heat. The best part is the broth makes the meat nice and tender. Admittedly, I’m a wimp when it comes to spicy foods. The curry made me sweat at a mere “mild plus” classification. Of course, anyone can choose how much heat they’d like by asking for a “mild” dash of spice all

the way up to a “hot” helping. Take heed, because “hot” translates to, “Please refill my water, for the love of God!” Though this fiery essence draws patrons deeper down the path of spice-addled addiction, at least it’s quick and inexpensive. Most of the curries are $8.15, the noodle plates run $7.95, and two crispy, Thai-style egg rolls are just $3.50. And because Kyaw is so efficient, almost all of the dishes come out in less than 15 minute Like the outdoor kitchens that populate the streets of Bangkok, U.S. Thai Café takes price into consideration and has an authentic and efficient chef on its side.

U.S. Thai Café Traditional Thai food 5228 West 25th Avenue (303) 233-3345

U.S. Thai Cafe’s panang curry with jasmine rice.

THE THE

ETROPOLITAN METROPOLITAN

Stay current with us 24 hours a day The Metropolitan Online has everything from our printed version plus: • Exclusive Online Content • Reader Commentary • Blogs & Multimedia Content Check out our website for the latest on Metro State and local events. Log in now at: http://themet.metrostudentmedia.com/

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Did You Know: There is 147,573,952,589,676,412,928 different ways to fill out your bracket if you include the play in games

THE METROPOLITAN • MARCH 17, 2011 • SPORTS • 21

We give our advice for March Madness East: North Carolina

East: Ohio State

The Buckeyes are an experienced disciplined team. They have a balanced attack and don’t turn the ball over.

The team struggled early in the ACC tournament. Look for Freshman Harrison Barnes to have a huge part of their run.

Mark Babish Sports Editor

Who’s Cinderella? St. John’s National Champion

Duke

Southeast: Pittsburgh

An overrated No. 2 seed + a No. 3 seed missing a player + a No. 4 seed ripe for upset in the first round = Final Four for Panthers.

Matt Hollinshead Who’s Cinderella?

Southwest: Notre Dame

National Champion

This team was fighting for a possible No. 1 seed last week. The Irish will come out and win, or give Irishmen another reason to drink.

Features Writer

Who’s Cinderella? Northern Colorado National Champion

Kansas

I love watching this squad play. Despite the loss of Brandon Davies, BYU still has a great cast including, Jimmer Fredette.

West: Duke

It’s hard not to put Duke in the Final Four. With a great coach and a great team, they should give Kansas a handful.

Southwest: Kansas

I will still put my money on Kansas despite last year’s abrupt end. They are my favorite team and I will root for them always.

The Aztecs are experienced, athletic and balanced this year. For them to go far they need to be able to score both inside and out.

Southwest: Kansas

The Morris brothers have been dominant all year. But turnovers could be a potential problem for the Jayhawks.

San Diego State

East: Ohio State

I’ll go out on a line and say the Buckeyes hit a buzzer-beater against North Carolina to squeak into the Final Four.

I expect my least favorite team, Ohio State, to choke in the regional semifinals and lose to the Wildcats.

Southeast: BYU

West: San Diego State

Belmont

East: Kentucky

Christin Mitchell

Their weak on the defensive end, but their offense can make up for it. Look for the Panthers to breeze into the Final Four.

Sports Writer

West: Duke

This team is good, but I am betting that freshman Kyrie Irving returns to help the team win back-to-back titles.

Southeast: Pittsburgh

Daniel Laverty

Southeast: Pittsburgh

The Panthers enjoy the softest bracket in the tournament this year and coast into the Final Four.

Sports Writer

Who’s Cinderella? UC Santa Barbara National Champion

Kansas

West: Texas

Texas keeps their dancin’ shoes on by stunning Duke and topping Connecticut to advance.

Southwest: Kansas

The Morris brothers. Need I say more?

We need a news leader.

2011–2012 Editor Wanted for The Metropolitan This is a paid position. The editor is responsible for the editorial content of the weekly student-run newspaper. Duties include managing the student editorial staff, assigning stories, editing copy and working with the production manager on the physical makeup of the newspaper. This position will begin May 9, 2011.

Qualications:

• Applicants must be a journalism or English major or minor and enrolled for at least 6 credit hours at Metro State. • Applicants must have and maintain a GPA of 3.0. • Journalism experience is a major consideration in the selection process.

Interested Applicants Must Submit: • • • •

Résumé with cover letter Most recent grade report or official transcript Two letters of recommendation Samples of work

Please Submit the Above Materials to: Metro State Board of Student Media c/o Shaun Schafer, Tivoli 313 Or mail to: P.O. Box 173362, Campus Box 57 Denver, CO 80217-3362

http://themet.metrostudentmedia.com/

The application deadline is April 11, 2011.


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e e r F About Us Metro Student Media produces The Metropolitan weekly newspaper, the Met Report weekly broadcast, Met Radio streaming daily, the Metrosphere annual literature and art magazine, and the Student Handbook. Exciting jobs are available in a multimedia environment where you can connect with professional experience without leaving campus. Get in touch with the latest news and events. Come see what we do, what we’re about, and share your thoughts on how you can get connected. Call 303-556-2507 for additional information.

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DID YOU KNOW: The longest drawing in the world, “Clinic Plus Gateway 2008,” measured 22,294 feet and 10 inches.

4 • NEWS • MARCH 3, 2011 • THE METROPOLITAN

Time might be up for Tivoli Taco Bell Lease set to expire; committee invites other parties to apply By Cody Lemon clemon2@mscd.edu The Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board has assembled the Food Vendor Committee to possibly replace Taco Bell in the Tivoli and organize more outdoor vendors at Auraria. The committee and the Auraria Higher Education Center are focusing on solidifying a lease agreement for the spots in the Tivoli that Taco Bell and Wok and Roll currently occupy. Taco Bell’s lease is up this summer, and Wok and Roll’s ends the summer of 2012. “For me, the top priority is looking at the two vendors in the food court, (Taco Bell and Wok and Roll) and then exploring new spaces outdoors for new food and drink vendors,” said Jonathan Raabe, University of Colorado at Denver SACAB representative and Food Vendor Committee Chairman. First SACAB has to decide

Yolanda Hanks serves a customer during the lunch rush March 1 at the Taco Bell in the Tivoli. Taco Bell’s lease is up this summer and must reapply to keep its space. Photo by Javid Rezvani • jrezvani@mscd.edu whether it is going to bid for the spots or extend the contracts for one or both vendors. The committee will make its recommendations, but SACAB will ultimately make the final

accommodate their selection. SACAB will send out a request for proposals to which interested parties and the two existing vendors may apply.

decision, Raabe said. According to AHEC Finance and Programs Director Dave Caldwell, if students particularly want a specific vendor, SACAB and AHEC will try to

“It’s up to our students,” Caldwell said. “This Food Vendor Committee will receive all of the proposals. They will evaluate them, they will score, them and they will rank them.” The leading vendors will have a chance to officially present themselves to SACAB. The committee will then decide which business they wish to negotiate a contract with. The committee is also looking to improve Auraria’s outdoor vendor selection, Raabe said. The committee took a walk through the campus Feb. 25 looking for possible locations for future vendors. Auraria currently has only two outdoor vendors. “I would love to see miniature cafés outside where you have one or two carts set up next to each other and they maintain [an area of] chairs and tables outdoors,” Raabe said. “We can create these little zones to where, if you’re outside on a nice day, you can stop by, sit down and have some food.” The committee will have its next meeting March 4. Taco Bell is going through the first step of the leasing process and will present its introduction at the meeting, Raabe said.

SHOULD TACO BELL STAY OR GO: Take our poll online at themet.metrostudentmedia.com/news

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About Us Metro Student Media produces The Metropolitan weekly newspaper, the Met Report weekly broadcast, Met Radio streaming daily, the Metrosphere annual literature and art magazine, and the Student Handbook. Exciting jobs are available in a multimedia environment where you can connect with professional experience without leaving campus. Get in touch with the latest news and events. Come see what we do, what we’re about, and share your thoughts on how you can get connected.

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THE METROPOLITAN • MARCH 17, 2011 • 23

LASSIFIED Classified Info

Tax Services

Phone: 303-556-2507 Fax: 303-556-3421 Location: Tivoli #313 Advertising via Email: student-media-advertising@mscd.edu

Do you need help preparing your taxes for the FAFSA? Please contact Metro Accounting Student, Lance Sheely. lsheely@mscd.edu or call 720-934-0321 3/17

Classified ads are 15¢ per word for students currently enrolled at Metro State. To receive this rate, a current Metro State student ID must be shown at time of placement. For all others, the cost is 30¢ per word. The maximum length for classified ads is 50 words. Pre-payment is required. Cash, check, VISA and MasterCard are accepted. Classified ads may be placed via fax, email or in person. The deadline for placing all classified ads is 3 p.m. Thursday for the following week. For information about other advertising opportunities, call 303-556-2507 or go to http://themet.metrostudentmedia.com for current information.

& INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF

COLLEGE NIGHT

TUESDAY, MARCH 29 AT 7:30 PM PLEASE VISIT WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND ENTER THE CODE THEMETW525 TO DOWNLOAD YOUR COMPLIMENTARY PASSES.

$1 Drafts! $1 Games! $1 Shoes!

Wednesdays at 8pm

EACH PASS ADMITS TWO. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. MUST BE 17 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER TO RECEIVE PASS. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.

ELITCH LANES

3825 Tennyson • (303) 447-1633

THIS FILM IS RATED R. RESTRICTED. Under 17 Requires Accompanying Parent Or Adult Guardian. Please note: Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee you a seat at the theatre. Seating is on a first come, first served basis, except for members of the reviewing press. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. No admittance once screening has begun. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket, and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Fox Searchlight, Metropolitan and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, recipient is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors, their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATERS FRIDAY APRIL 1

CHECK OUT THE SOUND OF METRO 4600 Hale Parkway, Suite 490 Denver, CO 80220

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Planned Parenthood provides affordable & confidential health services including STD testing & treatment.

music talk * news live performances sports

Call 1.800.230.PLAN for the health center nearest you.

www.pprm.org

http://metradio metr t d http://metradio.metrostudentmedia.com

http://metrostudentmedia.com

Best of 2011: Metro State Student Media Creative Team  

Browse through notable campaigns created by the creative team at Metro State Student Media. Call 303-556-2507 to inquire about our freelance...

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