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Metro United Way Community Impact Education Agenda

2011-2018

Presented to Metro United Way Board of Directors  |  February 24, 2011


Community Aspirations  2018

You are holding a copy of the Metro United Way Community Impact Education Agenda. This document spells out our aspirations, targets and strategies for engaging the community to improve kindergarten readiness and high school graduation rates. While I applaud our Community Impact staff who crafted this agenda, I want you to know that this plan was developed with input from donors, education experts in the field, representatives from many of our local agencies and partners, cross-functional teams, volunteers, community impact cabinet volunteers and our Board of Directors. In other words, these strategies were developed as a true collaborative effort with our agencies and key constituents. The needs expressed in these discussions have been expressed consistently over time. Whether in small groups or in large scale surveys, the community has told us that the issues they care the most about are: (1) support of basic needs, (2) the educational readiness of our children and (3) their success once in school. Like any long range undertaking, this agenda will be refined and reshaped as we learn more about what works. The agenda clearly articulates what we aspire to accomplish and how we plan to get there. I would also like to recognize our national partners who have helped to fund this work and make this plan possible. This includes the Forum for Youth Investment/ Ready by 21 and United Way Worldwide. I welcome any comments or suggestions you may have. I also invite you to become a part of this effort by giving, advocating and volunteering. For more information, please visit us at metrounitedway.org or call 502-583-2821. Sincerely,

Joe Tolan President and CEO Metro United Way


Table of Contents Community Aspirations 6 All Children Will Enter Kindergarten Ready to Learn 7 All Youth Will Complete High School on Time and Prepared for College, Work and Life 8 What do the stats tell us? 9 What does Metro United Way Promise? 11

Our Strategies 13 Preparing Children for School Readiness Strategy #1 13 Strategy #2 14 Preparing Youth for College Work and Life Strategy #1 15 Strategy #2 16 Strategy #3 18 Research 19


Community Aspirations  2018

Introduction Metro United Way has two long-term community aspirations. These represent our vision for the community we serve, and it is our goal that we achieve these community aspirations. That said, we do not intend or expect to do this alone. Therefore, Metro United Way will both work with and help to connect our agencies, community organizations, local government and the local business community in order to make these aspirations a reality. It is our commitment to this collaborative approach to making our community vision a reality that both determines and guides the strategies and tactics we implement.

“It is our goal that we achieve these community aspirations.” Page 6


Community Aspirations  2018

Community aspiration #1:

All Children Will Enter Kindergarten Ready to Learn Target:

77%of children

in the Metro United Way metropolitan community will annually enter kindergarten ready to learn by 2018. This means that each year, on average an additional 480 children will begin school prepared for success.

children ready for kindergarten by 2018

77%

Metro United Way’s Role in Fulfilling this Community Aspiration Metro United Way will have a focused approach to improve school readiness by: • Engaging in early childhood community initiatives at a regional level, that both identify best practices as well as address areas of improvement. • Leading MUW-funded child care centers to become centers of choice.

Metro United Way Metropolitan Community

• Educating and engaging parents in how to best support the developmental readiness of their children in order to prepare their children for kindergarten. • Funding initiatives that support readiness for kindergarten.

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Community Aspirations  2018

Community aspiration #2:

All Youth will Complete High School on Time Prepared for College, Work and Life. Target: In the Metro United Way service area,

Metro United Way’s Role in Fulfilling this Community Aspiration

will graduate from high school on time by 2018. This means that on average each year an additional 178 of our youths will graduate high school ready for college, work and life.

Metro United Way will implement a focused approach to prepare youth for college, work and life by: • Exercising a leadership role in creating a college-going culture utilizing the cradle-to- career framework.

87%of students

on-time high school graduation rate by 2018

87%

• Identifying specific ways MUW can support each county in its educational goals. • Leading MUW-funded providers of out-of- school-time (OST) programs in developing a common vision and shared approach to prepare youth for college, work and life. • Evaluating OST programs using consistent quality standards and indicators. • Integrating data systems that allow both in-school and out-of-school monitoring of key indicators for successful on-time graduation.

Metro United Way Metropolitan Community

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• Metro United Way, Metro Government and Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) will form an OST Coordinating Council to oversee the development of a comprehensive OST youth development system in Jefferson County.


Community Aspirations  2018

Why do we have these Community Aspirations? What do the stats tell us? We Focus on Kindergarten Readiness because: • There are no consistent, ongoing early childhood developmental screenings of preschoolers completed county-wide in any of the seven counties in our metropolitan service area. • Most people, including parents and caregivers, are unaware of what readiness for kindergarten means and how to be proactive in making sure their children are prepared. • In Kentucky and Indiana, state-mandated minimum standards of compliance for child care centers exist. Quality rating systems exist to promote best practices in both states, but they are not required to be utilized by child care centers. • Metro United Way child care providers do not have sufficient opportunity to share best practices or the concerns they face.

Nationally, up to

46% of children

are not ready to succeed when they enter kindergarten. In 2009 there were

14,608

four-year-olds in our MUW region. Based on the national average this would mean

6,720 four-year-olds will not be ready for success when they enter kindergarten.

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Community Aspirations  2018

Why do we have these Community Aspirations? What do the stats tell us? We Focus on Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life because: • Nationally, at least 1 in 5 students drop out of school. In urban areas, nearly 50% of students drop out. • There has not been a uniform calculation of graduation rates in Kentucky or Indiana, although Indiana just selected a system and Kentucky is close to doing so. Until this point, each school system has reported its own graduation rate. The graduation rates in our regional community range from a low of 71% in Jefferson County to a high of 95% in Oldham County. The regional graduation rate, accounting for population, is 77%.

Graduation Rates Nationally: drop out of school

1out of 5 In Urban Areas:

1

out of

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2

drop out of school

• Research shows that quality OST programs contribute to improvement in key indicators of on-time graduation, such as attendance at school, engagement in learning, test scores and grades. These benefits increase with the duration and frequency of participation, and high-need youth show the greatest improvements. • The Child Trends Study of August 2010, reported the Every Child Every Promise survey, found that teenagers who indicated they were involved in high-quality OST programs were more likely than their uninvolved peers to not engage in risky behavior (81% vs. 66%) and were more likely to report doing well in school (28% vs. 10%). Similarly, the parents of these young people were more likely to report that their children were more socially adept than their peers who did not participate in high-quality OST programs (26% vs. 12%). • According to the 2006 Fight Crime: Invest in Kids report, the rates of juvenile crime soar between 3:00 and 6:00 p.m., the hours when school is out but parents are presumably not yet home from work. During these hours, children are also far more likely to be in a car accident, become the victim of a crime, or smoke, drink, and use alcohol or drugs than at any other time of the day or night. • There is currently no systematic approach to OST programming in Jefferson County.


Community Aspirations  2018

What does Metro United Way Promise? What will Success Mean? Kindergarten Readiness Metro United Way promises to: • Organize and coordinate efforts for our current Metro United Way supported child care professionals by sharing best practices and communicating lessons learned.

• Advocate for universal pre-kindergarten screenings, universal pre-kindergarten and affordable child care. • Utilize local data to create a baseline for long-term improvement in performance measures.

• Engage 3,000 parents/caregivers in their child’s developmental progress by helping them access appropriate services in their community.

Success Means: • Selected pre-kindergarten readiness instruments are used uniformly across the community. • A common process for assessing quality of child care centers is used consistently by MUW-funded agencies. • Parents are actively engaged in supporting the developmental readiness of their children and have access to the resources necessary for ensuring that they arrive at kindergarten ready to learn. • Best practices are shared and adopted by MUW- funded child care centers in order to become centers of choice for the community.

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Community Aspirations  2018

What does Metro United Way Promise? What will Success Mean? Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life Metro United Way promises to:

Success Means:

• Participate in regional community efforts to create a college-going culture from cradle to career for our children and youth.

• Metro United Way is supporting the education goals in MUW’s seven-county service area.

• Develop and implement individualized approaches and interventions aligned with our regional community’s education needs. We will lead efforts to coordinate an OST system in Jefferson County. • Lead and coordinate the efforts for our current MUW- funded OST programs. • Use common quality standards and indicators to evaluate the effectiveness of OST programs. • Coordinate an integrated data system to monitor key indicators for successful on-time graduation and the early identification of potential drop-outs in need of targeted interventions.

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• OST program providers in Jefferson County form a common vision and shared approach to increase Jefferson County’s high school graduation rates. • MUW-funded OST agencies have a common vision and shared approach to prepare youth for college, work and life. • MUW-funded OST agencies use a common quality assessment process to identify strengths as well as improvement opportunities. • A comprehensive data system (KidTrax) is integrated within our community’s OST programs and monitors key indicators for successful on-time graduation as well as identifying students who may become potential drop-outs and need targeted interventions.


Our  Strategies

preparing children for school success Strategy #1 Regional Focus: Mobilize the metropolitan community in support of kindergarten readiness.

Tactics: • Advocating for public policies that support kindergarten readiness primarily through our efforts with Kentucky Youth Advocates and United Way of Kentucky. • Implementing the use of Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) and related resources in specific sections of the Regional community who wish to partner with MUW to identify kindergarten readiness as the part of the education pipeline on which they wish to focus. • Engaging trusted neighborhood leaders in high-need neighborhoods in order to give parents and caregivers the support they need to become more invested in their children’s developmental progress through the ASQ and related materials. • Fund initiatives that support kindergarten readiness.

Deliverables: • MUW will identify 350 advocates and educate them on public policy efforts supporting early childhood and ways to take action. • The Ages and Stages Questionnaire is adopted and implemented by statewide partners in Kentucky.

• Three high-need neighborhoods in our Regional community receive targeted supports (i.e. trusted neighborhood leader approach) to help parents and caregivers prepare children for kindergarten based on the numbers of preschoolers in those neighborhoods. • The state of early childhood readiness is collected and reported through the collection and analysis of multiple data sources.

SuccessES in year one: • A common school readiness definition is adopted and recognized statewide (Kentucky). • 3,000 parents and caregivers in the Regional community utilize resources to prepare children for kindergarten. • Residents of three targeted neighborhoods utilize selected developmental readiness tools in their community.

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Our  Strategies

preparing children for school success Strategy # 2 MUW Funded Agencies:

Collaboratively identify quality standards and achieve consistent high-quality early child care and education in all Metro United Way funded child care centers.

Tactics: • Work with all MUW-funded child care centers to create a shared vision as well as shared goals and metrics so that their participating children will be prepared to succeed by kindergarten. • Expand the family coaching and teacher training model identified as best practices through the “Bridges to Tomorrow” project if funding is available. • Implement quality rating systems and/or environmental rating scales by contracting with certified experts to identify strengths and address quality improvement opportunities in these early childhood education programs.

Deliverables: • MUW-funded child care centers have a shared vision, as well as shared goals and metrics, and use a consistent screening tool in support of preparing all children for kindergarten. • Profile data and baseline readiness data on all children in MUW-funded child care centers is compiled. • Family coaching and/or the “Bridges to Tomorrow” teacher training model is expanded to at least three additional agencies dependent on funding.

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• Quality rating systems and/or environmental rating scales are used to identify strengths and address quality improvement opportunities in our early childhood education programs. • With MUW assistance, child care centers will develop action plans for addressing quality improvement opportunities. • Each MUW-funded child care center will engage in one activity or event that promotes a “college-going culture” (e.g. posters in halls that say “College Class of 2019,” etc.).

SuccessES in year one: • Vision, goals and metrics are created for MUW- funded child care centers. • MUW-funded child care center baseline data is collected, analyzed and used to support improvements. • All MUW-funded child care centers implement a common quality rating system and/or environmental rating scale. • Funding of child care centers will incorporate data from the quality assessments and progress on related action plans beginning in summer 2012.


Our  Strategies

Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life Strategy # 1 Regional Focus:

Utilize the cradle-to-career framework to mobilize the community in addressing educational attainment priorities.

Tactics:

SuccessES in year one:

• Identify MUW’s role in helping each county in our service area attain their educational priorities.

• 350 advocates understand MUW’s education public policy priorities and know how to support them by contacting legislators, writing letters to the editor, holding conversations with friends, etc.

• Provide leadership and support to “55,000 Degrees” in creating a college-going culture throughout the Regional community. • Advocate for public policies that support on-time high school graduation in partnership with Kentucky Youth Advocates and United Way of Kentucky.

• Each of the seven counties in our metropolitan service area has a specific plan supporting their education attainment goals that identifies the role of MUW in helping them attain those goals.

• Fund initiatives for children and youth that support their readiness for college, work and life.

Deliverables: • Tools and resources are developed or identified in collaboration with community partners on ways to encourage a college-going culture. • MUW will annually identify 350 advocates and educate them about public policy efforts supporting youth graduating high school on time prepared for college, work and life and how to take action.

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Our  Strategies

Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life Strategy #2 Jefferson County Focus:

Lead the Jefferson County community in developing a comprehensive plan for the Out-of-School Time (OST) youth development system

Tactics: • Lead the OST Coordinating Council members (JCPS, Metro Government and Metro United Way) in developing a comprehensive plan for OST programs. • Through the Coordinating Council, adopt and support the implementation of quality standards across all OST programs in our regional community. • Through the Coordinating Council, promote the development and implementation of high-quality training and professional growth opportunities for youth development staff. • Through the Coordinating Council, support the creation and use of directory of services that connect youth and parents to programs that help youth attain their education goals. • Through the Coordinating Council and the KidTrax Project Manager, ensure the expansion and use of the KidTrax data system that connects JCPS and OST program providers. (This system has been available but not functioning to its fullest potential.)

• Through the Coordinating Council and the KidTrax Project Manager, ensure the collection and analysis of KidTrax data on key indicators for successful high school graduation and the early identification of potential drop-outs.

Deliverables: • Memorandums of agreement for the OST Coordinating Council members (MUW, Metro Government, and JCPS) are complete. • An OST system implementation plan to develop this coordinated approach to OST programming is complete. • Quality standards and indicators for OST programs are adopted and in use in the ongoing evaluation of all OST programs. • Professional development opportunities are expanded for OST staff. • An online directory of OST programs is available to parents, caregivers and youth. • A KidTrax Project Manager is hired using Ready By 21 grant funds.

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Our  Strategies

Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life Strategy #2 Jefferson County Focus:

Lead the Jefferson County community in developing a comprehensive plan for the Out-of-School Time (OST) youth development system

SuccessES in year one: • The OST Coordinating Council oversees the implementation of the OST system plan. • Jefferson County OST agencies adopt a common set of quality standards and indicators and become aware that the results of quality assessments supporting these standards will become part of funding decisions by MUW, Metro Government and JCPS. • A new position, KidTrax Project Manager, funded by a Ready By 21 grant to the city of Louisville, is filled and appropriate targets for KidTrax implementation are established by the Coordinating Council.

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Our  Strategies

Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life Strategy #3 MUW Agency Focus:

Lead Metro United Way agencies providing OST programs in working together to improve quality so that participating youth are prepared for college, work and life.

Tactics:

SuccessES in year one:

• Convene all MUW-funded OST program directors to develop a shared vision, goals and metrics for all youth participating in OST programs so that they graduate high school ready for college, work and life.

• Vision, goals and metrics are created for MUW- funded OST providers.

• Utilize a common OST program quality assessment process to identify best practices and quality improvement opportunities. • Collect and analyze data on MUW’s funded OST programs in order to coordinate action on key indicators supporting on-time high school graduation.

Deliverables: • Baseline OST data is collected and analyzed to develop the metrics for OST program performance. • MUW-funded OST providers have a common vision and shared approach supporting high school graduation and readiness for college, work and life. • A common process for assessing OST program quality is identified and used by all MUW-funded OST programs.

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• An OST quality assessment process involving common standards and indicators is complete, and agencies are preparing to be evaluated using this tool in 2012. • OST baseline data is collected, analyzed and used to support improvements in OST programs.


Research

preparing children for school success

Preparing Youth for College, Work and Life

Ingredients for Quality Child Care

The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives from High School Dropouts

Ingredients for Quality Child Care By Marlys Ann Boschee, Ed. D. Geralyn M. Jacobs, Ed.D. for the National Network for Child Care http://www.nncc.org/choose.quality.care/ingredients.html

Study Sees Gains in Good Child Care By Shirley S. Wang for the Wall Street Journal http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703 950804575242711624011240.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_ MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsTop

Research on Quality Child Care for Infants and Toddlers From the Florida State University Center for Prevention and Intervention Policy http://www.cpeip.fsu.edu/resourceFiles/resourceFile_81.pdf

By John M. Bridgeland, John J. DiIulio, Jr., and Karen Burke Morison. A report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation http://www.civicenterprises.net/pdfs/ thesilentepidemic3-06.pdf

How Out-of-School Time Program Quality is Related to Adolescent Outcomes By Kristen Anderson Moore, Ph.D. and Katherine Hamilton, M.A. for Child Trends http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_ Trends-2010_08_02_RB_OSTProgramQuality.pdf

Making the Case: A 2009 Fact Sheet on Children and Youth in Out-of-School Time From the National Institute for Out-of-School Time at the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College http://www.niost.org/pdf/factsheet2009.pdf

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Metro United Way 334 East Broadway Louisville KY 40202 (502) 583-2821 metrounitedway.org

For more information contact Melody Buhl, Administrative Assistant Educational Initiatives (502) 292-6200


Metro United Way Community Impact Education Agenda