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GUIDE TO SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN


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„ Signs of activity: Ann Arbor’s busy downtown.

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metrotimes

2011 ANNUAL MANUAL 733 St. Antoine, Detroit, MI 48226 | 313-961-4060 | metrotimes.com

Chris Sexson, Publisher | W. Kim Heron, Editor EDITORIAL Managing Editor: Brian Smith • Design Director: Justin Rose • Project Editor: Michael Jackman • Proofreader: Dennis Shea • Editorial Interns: Ali Harb, Patrick Higgins, Michelle Anne Styczynski, Jeremy Winograd • Contributing Photographers: Rudy Pokorny, Victor Koose and Chris Hardy • Contributing Illustrator: Justin Rose (cover illustration) BUSINESS OPERATIONS Promotions Manager: Maria Stella • Business Manager: Bernadette Brown • IT Manager: Casey O’Neil RETAIL ADVERTISING: 313.961.4060 Retail Sales Manager: Jim Cohen • Major Account Executive: Dylan Bawulski • Account Executives: Brian Jobe, Danielle Elliot-Smith, Adam Cole, Rachelle Rotunda CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 313.962.5277 Classifieds Manager: Desiree Bourgeois • Account Executives: Giuliana Busalacchi, Ani Hagopian, Cheryl Williams PRODUCTION Production Manager: Rudolph Pokorny • Graphic Designers: Paul D. Knoll, Corby Winer CIRULATION Circulation Manager: Erica Grabski


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GREETINGS, and welcome to Metro Times’ second Annual Manual, our effort to create a sort of “owner’s manual” for southeastern Michigan. Why put out a guide to the area? Well, as we get used to saying, “Detroit is different.” Unlike the glittering coastal metropolises, our metroplex is rich with contrasts. It’s a place with the very best life has to off er, and grittier destinations where nightspots and art galleries lie out on the urban prairie. In fact, it’s no wonder our part of the state has drawn so many Hollywood shoots over the last several years: We have so many different backdrops, whether it’s natural beauty, upscale suburbs, multimilliondollar developments or atmospheric urban ruins. From Detroit’s riverfront parks to Ann Arbor’s bustling streets to the freeways and skyscrapers of Troy, the area sprawls over more than 1,200 square miles, encompasses four counties and more than 3 million people. In fact, it can be a little daunting sometimes. With so much ground to cover, it’s often not easy to know where to get, say, Filipino food or Japanese manga or imported vinyl. And some of the more interesting destinations are known only by word-of-mouth, including little-known music gatherings or do-it-yourself art galleries. Which is why we spent months doing serious research, hoping to compile a guide that showcases the very best of the area, from restaurants to clubs to five-star attractions. Yes, for plenty of people, “Detroit” is just a punch line. But whether you’re a new resident, a visitor or just a local yokel looking for the bigger picture, the more you learn about our region, the more it demands your grudging admiration. Sure, it’s not New York or Los Angeles. But, as one wag put it years ago, “Most cities get by on their good looks. Detroit has to work for a living.” Well, here’s to all that hard work paying off.


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ARTS „ A photo exhibit at Royal Oak’s Bean & Leaf Café attracts a crowd of art-lovers.

VISUAL ARTS THOUGH most people don’t think of art when they think of Detroit, given the enormous wealth the auto industry produced, Detroit has some of the finest collections of art in the country. And our rich history of automotive design, our radical ’60s Cass Corridor artists, and a new crop of trusty do-it-yourselfers make it an interesting arts destination. Chief among all art venues is the Detroit Institute of Arts, fresh off a $150 million facelift that attempted to make the museum less fusty and more approachable. Another collection of classic art in the area is the University of Michigan Museum of Art, or UMMA, fresh off its own $42 million expansion two years ago, more than doubling the space to display items from its collection of more than 18,000 works of art. If modern art is more to your taste, the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, opened in 2006, has several exhibits a year of the very best in contemporary art from around the world, sometimes also drawing on the art of Detroit. There’s also Work: Detroit, a University of Michigan project to explore the creative connection between the university, Detroit, and beyond. Or, if an artistic atmosphere is enough for you, the Scarab Club has been a headquarters for great artists throughout Detroit’s history, where the highest privilege for members has been to write their name up in its rafters. A slightly more out-of-the-way location for art is the scrappy little gallery formerly known as detroitcontemporary, the Contemporary Art Institute Detroit, whose mission is to foster the link between contemporary arts and society. There’s also the G. R. Nnamdi Gallery, which also has locations in Chicago and New York. For almost 30 years, the gallery has been internationally recognized as one of the most influential art galleries, with an emphasis on works by African-Americans. Another standby of the local art scene, Detroit Artists Market, specializes in local art made by local artists, with a long history. Established in 1932, the market organizes shows of local talent, and has a selection of creative gifts, especially around the holidays. More new art can be seen at Jef Bourgeau’s Museum of New Art, where Bourgeau and other artists exhibit new work. Or drop in at 323 East on a Saturday anytime after 4 p.m. and you’ll often find a DJ spinning funk, hip-hop or techno cuts in a room with walls and shelves full of art by Detroit artists. You can also cross the Detroit River into Canada and visit the Art Gallery of Windsor or ArtCite. Detroit’s classic art heritage is on view at Cranbrook, the famous school of art and design, home to some of the world’s most renowned designers and artists, a 315-acre campus dotted with gardens, landscaping and priceless architecture. More design heritage is on display at Pewabic Pottery, the east side ceramics plant that has churned out the evocative tile that graces so many Detroit landmarks, as well as other buildings around the world. An edgier destination is the Heidelberg Project, an east side

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neighborhood turned into a fanciful art environment by Tyree Guyton. In a similar vein, drop in for a gander at Hamtramck Disneyland, a “back-yard theme park” that’s the brainchild of Hamtramck homeowner Dmytro Szylak, a Ukrainian immigrant in his 80s who’s put up scores of whimsical whirligigs in his back yard to keep busy after retiring from General Motors. Or check out what’s happening at the UFO Factory, a three-person outfit whose M.O. is simply, “to do cool stuff.” For a night that combines art and craft-brewed beer, drop in on a Wednesday night at Motor City Brewing Works for its “This Week in Art” series, showcasing smaller, more affordable works by talented Detroit artists. Or find out about special summer shows by the Lot, a traveling outdoor art space. There’s usually a fun and approachable art show at Hamtramck’s Public Pool gallery. You might also call for information about exhibitions at Popps Packing, a new home-galleryworkspace run by husband-andwife artists Graem Whyte and Faina Lerman. And, to combine art and food, find out what’s cookin’ (on the walls) at Cass Cafe, which has rotating exhibits of inventive local art on the walls (and for sale).

PERFORMANCE WHEN IT COMES TO the stage, shows don’t get any grander (nor do the theaters) than the big national touring companies that sweep through our grand 1920s palaces, such as the Fisher Theatre or the Gem Theatre, or the several spaces at Detroit Masonic Temple. For real local professional theater, one outstanding example is the Detroit Repertory Theatre. The “Rep” has carved out a niche in a disinvested west side neighborhood, staging awardwinning plays, including many Michigan premieres, in the theater it has built from scratch in very daunting conditions. Another place for local professional theater is Ann Arbor’s premier theatrical effort, Performance Network, which brings professional stagings of contemporary theater to that city. Almost outstate, the Purple Rose Theatre Company puts on a few shows a year of high quality, funded by Michigan’s gift to Hollywood, Jeff Daniels. For grand stagings of classics by local talent, check out Meadow Brook Theatre, a nonprofi t theater that manages showpiece set design. But if it’s laughs you’re after, the Ringwald Theatre, which opened in 2007, brings over-

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the-top farcical theater with a gay bent to their small stage, although they’ll run a few straight drama productions a year as well. And Planet Ant Theatre has brought a mix of serious drama, experimental works, all-out improv and more to the stage in its more than 10 years of existence. The Magenta Giraffe Theatre Company has been staging plays at the 1515 Broadway space in downtown Detroit since 2010. Another recent entry, Go Comedy! Improv Theatre, opened in 2008, has live, improvisational comedy most nights. More laughs are on tap on the west side at the Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase or Joey’s Comedy Club. But the oldest and best-known comedy club is Mark Ridley’s Comedy Castle, with a record of 30 years of stand-up comedy.

CINEMA DETROITERS have always loved the movies, and there’s no cinema where they mix it up more than at the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Detroit Film Theatre, melding foreign picks, indie favorites, thought-riling docs and retrospectives of classic directors with restored prints. One of the only private moviehouses that comes close to this sort of range would be the Main Art Theatre, especially notable for its creative midnight screenings of such faves as The Big Lebowski in the summer. Other theaters with indie tendencies are the Birmingham 8 and the Birmingham Palladium 12, first-run theaters where every screening is $5 before 6 p.m., seven days a week. Those are major destinations for artistic, creative cinema — at least when the Ann Arbor Film Festival (aafilmfest.org) isn’t on. Once a month, the cinephiles at the Redford Theatre show old favorites, sometimes with the accompaniment of their originalinstallation 1928 Barton pipe organ. And a relative newcomer is the Cass Corridor’s Burton Theatre, an old school repurposed as a moviehouse, with a program of old faves and instant classics. Of course, the Motor City has its share of drive-in theaters, including the Compuware Arena Drive-In Theatres, with several screens in the summer and access to CJ’s brewing company inside. But we also have the world’s largest drive-in theater, the FordWyoming, now in its sixth decade in business, and still showing films on its original 1951 concrete tower, even in the wintertime.


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ART DESTINATIONS 5E Gallery 2661 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 5egallery.org 16 Hands Gallery 216 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1110; 16handsgallery.com 323 East 323 E. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248246-9544; 323east.com 4731 Gallery 4731 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-894-4731 555 Gallery 3041 W. Vernor Highway, Detroit; 888-495-2787; 555arts.org Anton Art Center 125 Macomb Place, Mount Clemens; 586-469-8666; theartcenter.org Artcite 109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca Art Gallery of Windsor 401 Riverside Dr. W., Windsor; 519-977-0013; artgalleryofwindsor.com The Arts League of Michigan 311 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-965-8430; artsleague.com Biegas Gallery 35 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-961-0634; biegas.com Biddle Gallery 2840 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-281-4779 Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center 1516 S. Cranbrook, Birmingham; 248-6440866; bbartcenter.org Cave Gallery at the Russell Industrial Center, 1604 Clay St., Detroit; cavedetroit.com Cass Cafe 4620 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-8311400; casscafe.com Center Gallery at the College for Creative Studies, 301 Frederick Douglass St., Detroit; 313-664-7800; collegeforcreativestudies.edu Clay Gallery 335 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-662-7927; claygallery.org College for Creative Studies Gallery 201 E. Kirby St., Detroit; 1-800-952-2787 Contemporary Art Institute Detroit 5141 Rosa Parks Blvd., Detroit; 313-899-2243; thecaid.org Cranbrook 39221 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3000; cranbrook.edu David Klein Gallery 163 Townsend St., Birmingham; dkgallery.com Dell Pryor Gallery 4201 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-833-6990; dellpryorgalleries.com Detroit Artists Market 4719 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-832-8540; detroitartistsmarket.org Detroit Institute of Arts 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org; $8 adults, $6 seniors, $4 children Downriver Council for the Arts 81 Chestnut, Wyandotte; 734-720-0671; downriverarts.org Elaine L. Jacob Gallery 480 W. Hancock St., Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.

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edu/jacob_gallery.php Ellen Kayrod Gallery 4750 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-1300; hannan.org Forum Gallery at Cranbrook 39221 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills; 248645-3300 G. R. Nnamdi Gallery 52 E. Forest St., Detroit; 313-831-8700; grnnamdi.com Hamtramck Disneyland in alley behind 12087 Klinger St., Hamtramck The Heidelberg Project 3680 Heidelberg St. Detroit; 313-974-6894; heidelberg.org Hill Gallery 407 W. Brown St., Birmingham; 248-540-9288; hillgallery.com Johanson Charles Gallery 1345 Division St., Detroit; 313-483-1158 The Josephine Ford Sculpture Garden 201 E. Kirby St., Detroit; collegeforcreativestudies.edu JRainey 1440 Gratiot Ave., Detroit; 313433-5022; jraineygallery.com Ladybug Gallery 1250 Hubbard St., Detroit; 313-899-2243; thecaid.org Lawrence Street Gallery 22620 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-5440394; lawrencestreetgallery.com Lemberg Gallery 23241 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-591-6623; lemberggallery.com The Lot thelotdetroit.blogspot.com Meadowbrook Art Center 41200 10 Mile Rd., Novi; 248-477-6620; Meadowbrookartcenter.com Motawi Tileworks 170 Enterprise Dr., Ann Arbor; 734-213-0017; motawi.com Motor City Brewing Works Wednesday nights at 470 W. Canfield St., Detroit; 313-832-2700; motorcitybeer.com Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit 4454 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-8326622; mocadetroit.org Museum of New Art gallery at 7 N. Saginaw St., Pontiac; museum at 327 W. Second St., Rochester; detroitmona.com Neal Davis Gallery 314 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; nealdavisgallery.com Northville Art House 215 W. Cady St., Northville; 248-344-0497; northvillearts.org Northville Gallery 123 E. Main St., Northville; 248-465-9630 Oakland University Art Gallery 208 Wilson Hall, Rochester; 248-370-3005; Oakland.edu/ouag Paint Creek Center for the Arts 407 Pine St., Rochester; 248-651-4110; pccart.org Pewabic Pottery 10125 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-822-0954; pewabic.com Pioneer Building 2679 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1943; thepioneerbuilding.com Polish Art Center 9539 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-874-2242 Popps Packing 12138 St. Aubin St., Hamtramck; 313-283-5501; poppspacking.blogspot.com

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G R O . F L O G T H WW.MIDNIG

FU TURE R E T T E B A Y TO THE FAIRWAROIT ’S YOUNG ADULTS FOR DET

N O H T A BOWL -R TO BENEFIT

FUNDRAITSEGOLF PROGRAM MIDNIGH

3 8 4 0 3 6 8 3 1 3 CH 26, 2011

AR SAT URDAY, DMEA DLINE: MARCH 12 ION REGIST RATNOON TO REGISTER 12 G 1 PM B OWLTIN LOR MI Y A , S E TAYLOR LAN

The Burton Theatre 3420 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-473-9238 AS THE CHAINS continue to build ever-grander multiplexes in fartherflung corners of the suburbs, the prospects of a new cinema option downtown seemed highly unlikely at best. Apparently no one told the maverick crew of one-time Landmark employees who converted a portion of the former Burton International School into Detroit’s newest must-visit cultural attraction. They came charging out of the gate with an audacious and sometimes controversial programming slate that highlighted everything from foreign gems (Spirit of the Beehive) to exploitation classics (Dolemite). Even more incredible was the ambitious weeklong independent film festival that showcased dozens of local talents and brought in big guns such as zombie maestro George A. Romero. All of this in a semi-desolate section of the Cass Corridor that had been left for dead. The rebirth of cool starts right here.

SSATURDAY, ATURDAY, M MARCH ARCH 226,6, 22011 011 REGISTER 1122 NNOON OON TTO OR EGISTER 1 PPM M BBOWLING OWLING

313-863-0483


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Public Pool 3309 Caniff St., Hamtramck; publicpoolhamtramck@gmail.com Rivers Edge Gallery 3024 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-246-9880; artattheedge.com Robert Kidd Gallery 107 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-642-3909; robertkiddgallery.com Russell Industrial Center 1600 Clay St., Detroit; 313-872-4000; ricdetroit.org The Scarab Club 217 Farnsworth St., Detroit; 313-831-1250; scarabclub.org Susanne Hilberry Gallery 700 Livernois St., Ferndale; 248-541-4700; susannehilberrygallery.com Swords Into PlowShares Peace Center & Gallery 33 E. Adams St., Detroit; 313-9637575; swordsintoplowsharesdetroit.com Tangent Gallery 715 E. Milwaukee St., Detroit; 313-873-2955; tangentgallery.com The UFO Factory 1345 Division St., Detroit; 313-483-1158; ufofactory.com University of Michigan Museum of Art 525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-763UMMA; umma.umich.edu; $5 suggested donation WCCCD Brown and Juanita C. Ford Gallery at Wayne County Community College. 1001 W. Fort St., Detroit; 313-496-2634 Work: Detroit 3663 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-593-0940 WSG Gallery 306 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-2287; wsg-art.com

STAGE Andiamo Novi Theatre 42705 Grand River Ave., Novi; 248-348-3838; andiamoitalia.com Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase 314 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-996-9080 The Biddle Hall 3239 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-282-5230; thebiddlehall.com Blackbird Theatre 325 Braun Ct., Ann Arbor; 734-332-3848; blackbirdtheatre.org The Box Theatre 90 Macomb Place, Second Floor, Mt. Clemens; 586-954-2677 Detroit Masonic Temple 500 Temple St., Detroit; 313-471-6611 Detroit Repertory Theatre 13103 Woodrow Wilson St., Detroit; 313-8681347; detroitreptheatre.com Dreamland Theater 26 N. Washington St., Ypsilanti; 734-657-2337; dreamlandtheater.com Encore Musical Theatre 3126 Broad St., Ste. A, Dexter; 734-268-6200; theencoretheatre.org The Fisher Theatre 3011 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1000 Ford Community & Performing Arts Center 15801 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-943-2350 The Gem Theatre 333 Madison Ave., Detroit; 313-963-9800; gemtheatre.com Go Comedy! Improv Theatre 261 E. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-327-0575;

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gocomedy.net Hilberry Theatre 4743 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com Joey’s Comedy Club 36071 Plymouth Rd., Livonia; 734-261-0555 Magenta Giraffe Theatre Co. at 1515 Broadway 1515 Broadway, Detroit; 313408-7269; magentagiraffe.org Mark Ridley’s Comedy Castle 310 S. Troy St., Royal Oak; 248-542-9900; www. comedycastle.com Marquis Theatre 135 E. Main St., Northville; 248-349-8110; northvillemarquistheatre.com Matrix Theatre 2730 Bagley St., Detroit; 313-967-0999; matrixtheatre.org Meadow Brook Theatre 207 Wilson Hall, Oakland University, Rochester; 248-377-3300 Michigan Theater 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-668-8397; michtheater.org Mosaic Youth Theatre 610 Antoinette St., Detroit; 313-872-6910; mosaicdetroit.org Performance Network 120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; performancenetwork.org Planet Ant Theatre 2357 Caniff St., Hamtramck; 313-365-4948; planetant.com Plowshares Theatre Company 311 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-506-2858; plowshares.org PuppetART Theatre 25 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-961-7777; puppetart.org Purple Rose Theatre Company 137 Park St., Chelsea; 734-433-7673; purplerosetheatre.org The Ringwald Theatre 22742 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-545-5545; whowantscaketheatre.com Stagecrafters 415 S. Lafayette Ave., Royal Oak; 248-541-6430; stagecrafters.org Tipping Point Theatre 361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointtheatre.com

SCREEN Birmingham 8 211 S. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-644-FILM; uptownbirmingham8.com Birmingham Palladium 12 250 N. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-644FILM; uptownpalladium12.com Burton Theatre 3420 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-473-9238; burtontheatre.com Compuware Arena Drive-In Theatres 14900 N. Beck Rd., Plymouth; 734-4536400 Detroit Film Theatre 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-3237; dia.org Ford-Wyoming Drive-In 10400 Ford Rd., Dearborn; 313-846-6910 Main Art Theatre 118 N. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-263-2111; landmarktheatres.com Redford Theatre 17360 Lahser Rd., Detroit; 313-537-2560


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Treasury of Polish Heritage

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Store Hours: Mon. Tues.Wed. 9:30am-5pm Thurs. Fri. Sat. 9:30am-6pm Sunday 11am-3pm

9539 Jos. Campau * Hamtramck, MI 48212 (313) 874-2242 * 1-800-619-9771 www.polartcenter.com


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„ Fireworks display over the Detroit River draws thousands to the riverfront.

ALTHOUGH there’s much to see and do in the area, no attractions are newer (or more heavily advertised) than our three casinos, all located in or around downtown Detroit. They are the MGM Grand, the Motor City Casino and the Greektown Casino. Gaming aside, nothing quite matches the excitement of sports. Detroit is a huge sports town, with all four major sports represented. It’s not only a major point of pride, it’s part of downtown Detroit’s redevelopment strategy. In the last 10 years, we’ve constructed two new stadiums right downtown in a bid to spur redevelopment in our disinvested urban core. The newest, Ford Field, opened in 2002, seats as many as 70,000 spectators and cost an estimated $430 million. Just a few years older, Comerica Park, opened in 2000, is the home of the Detroit Tigers. The Detroit Pistons play at the last of the big suburban venues, the Palace of Auburn Hills. Finished in 1988, the Palace has the largest capacity of any NBA venue. Last but not least is Joe Louis Area, which hosts the Detroit Red Wings, though the rumor mill says we’re to get a new one in its stead somewhere near downtown Detroit. Of course, there’s more than sports at these locations, with concerts, commercial shows and other events taking over from time to time. And, from the more out-there end of the sports spectrum, there are the Detroit Derby Girls, with such teams as the D-Funk Allstars, the Devil’s Night Dames, the Detroit Pistoffs and the Pistol Whippers. They play at the Cobo Arena. Our strong sense of local history also has its proud institutions, including the Detroit Historical Museum, with changing exhibits on Detroit history, as well as the Streets of Old Detroit in the lower level. The metro area is dotted with smaller museums telling the stories of the Detroit area’s many communities, from Algonac to Ypsilanti, as the Historical Society of Michigan (hsmichigan.org) can attest. We have no shortage of showplaces for our automotive heritage, and chief among them is the Henry Ford, which encompasses the mammoth Henry Ford Museum (with its monumental collection of planes, trains, engines and, of course, automobiles) and 90-acre Greenfi eld Village (for which Ford moved historic buildings into a preconceived “town” of his own making), as well as an IMAX theater, the Ford historical collection and tours of the nearby Ford plant. Also out this way is the Automotive Hall of Fame, which draws nearly 30,000 visitors a year with its collection that recognizes “outstanding achievement in the automotive and related industries.” There’s also G.M. World, where you’ll find everything from amazing concept cars to newer models, ranging from the ’50s to today, as well as the Walter P. Chrysler Museum, documenting the cars, people and contributions “of Chrysler and its forebears to the development of the automobile.” Our rich ethnic heritage is on proud display at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, the world’s largest AfricanAmerican historical museum, opened in 1997, with rotating exhibits of art and artifacts devoted to African-American history. Quite another contribution of black America is showcased at the Motown Museum, the house that Berry Gordy built. When Motown moved to Los Angeles, in the early 1970s, the house emblazoned with the words “Hitsville

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U.S.A.” could now be converted into a museum, or a “living family scrapbook” if you will. And, in a region where almost one out of every 10 people claims some Middle Eastern heritage, we have the country’s first Arab American Museum, which aims to tell the story of Arab-American history and culture, and Arabic gift s to America, which range from calculus to Kasey Kasem. And the defining 20th century narrative of the Jewish community, the Holocaust, is on view at the Holocaust Memorial Center, which includes the collection that constituted the country’s first holocaust museum, and also houses the Museum of European Jewish Heritage. Wherever you are, fresh air is just a short drive away. Even in Detroit, it’s always 10 degrees cooler on a slow drive through Belle Isle Park, aboard the Detroit Princess (detroitprincess.com) or Diamond Jack (diamondjack. com), or on a stroll along the Detroit RiverWalk, including a state park within the city limits. The park is accessible by the Dequindre Cut, a rails-to-trails project that’s turned a subsurface rail line into a smooth, lighted bike path between Gratiot Avenue and Atwater Street. If you’d rather leave the city far behind, the Huron-Clinton Metroparks authority operates 13 parks comprising almost 24,000 acres roughly in a greenbelt around metro Detroit. Or take a trip to the Detroit Zoo, which sprawls over 125 acres and draws more than 1 million visitors annually. And if it’s stunning architecture you’re after, downtown Detroit’s stock of pre-Depression skyscrapers are standouts. Including the Stott Building and the grander Guardian Building, a 1929 art deco masterpiece, with exterior tiles in gaudy Native

American-influenced tones, and an awesome interior mezzanine that has the city’s most impressive setting and a small café. Old rubs shoulders with the new, with the 430-foot-tall beaux-arts Cadillac Tower, with its cornices and parapets, just down the street from the gleaming arcologylike towers of the Renaissance Center (or “RenCen”), whose central tower has been the tallest building in Michigan since 1977. In Midtown’s Cultural Center, the magnificent Detroit Institute of Arts, with its incredible Detroit Industry mural by Diego Rivera, is an artistic treasure itself. Across the street, the Detroit Public Library’s Main Branch, even without its 5 million items, is worth perusing, with its modernist wings framing an early Italian Renaissance core, with 60-foothigh facades in white marble and a roof finished with ornamental terra cotta. And that’s just the buildings that are occupied, as even fading structures, such as Detroit’s long-vacant Michigan Central Station, built in 1913, can still turn heads. If you’re trying to amuse the kids, the area brims with attractions to fire tots’ imaginations. The Detroit Science Center shows off the wonders of science and technology with live science demonstrations and handson laboratories. Or hit what was dubbed one of the country’s “100 Most Unusual Museums”: Marvin’s Marvelous Museum is hobbyist Marvin Yagoda’s specialty arcade, with everything from 40 gliding airplanes on the ceiling to ancient fans — and the newest arcade games for those seeking the latest gaming innovations. The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum gives even toddlers an opportunity to learn about the world.

Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum 220 E. Ann St., Ann Arbor; 734-995-KIDS; aahom.org; $9 Arab American Museum 13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-624-0220; arabamericanmuseum.org; $6, $3 students, seniors, children The Automotive Hall of Fame 21400 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-2404000; automotivehalloffame.org; $8 Belle Isle Park across MacArthur Bridge at the foot of West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Cadillac Tower 65 Cadillac Square, Detroit Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History 315 E. Warren Ave., Detroit; 313-494-5800; maah-detroit.org; $8, $5 seniors, children Cobo Arena 301 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; cobocenter.com Comerica Park 2100 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-962-4000; tigers.mlb.com

Dequindre Cut between Atwater and Gratiot, roughly west of St. Aubin Street, Detroit; detroitriverfront.org/dequindre Detroit Historical Museum 5401 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-1805; detroithistorical.org; $6, $4 seniors, children, students Detroit Institute of Arts 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org; $8 adults, $6 seniors, $4 ages 6-17 Detroit Public Library’s Main Branch 5201 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-1000 Detroit RiverWalk along the Detroit River between the MacArthur Bridge and Joe Louis Arena, Detroit; detroitriverfront.org Detroit Science Center 5020 John R St., Detroit; 313-577-8400; detroitsciencecenter.org; $14 adult, $12 seniors, children Detroit Zoo 8450 W. 10 Mile Rd., Royal Oak; 248-398-0900; detroitzoo.org; $12 adults, $10 seniors, active military w/ID,


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$8 children Ford Field 2000 Brush St., Detroit; 313965-7824; detroitlions.com Gerald Ford Library 1000 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-205-0555; ford.utexas.edu G.M. World 100 Renaissance Center, Detroit; 313-667-7151 Greektown Casino 532 Monroe St., Detroit; 313-963-3357; greektowncasino.com Guardian Building 500 Griswold St., Detroit The Henry Ford 20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-271-1621; hfmgv.org Holocaust Memorial Center 28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248553-2400; holocaustcenter.org Huron-Clinton Metroparks 800-477-2757; metroparks.com Joe Louis Area 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 313-983-6606; olympiaentertainment.com Marvin’s Marvelous Mechanical Museum 31005 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-626-5020; marvin3m.com Masonic Temple 500 Temple St., Detroit; 313-

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832-7100; themasonic.com MGM Grand 1777 Third St., Detroit; 877888-2121; mgmgranddetroit.com Michigan Central Station 2198 Michigan Ave., Detroit MotorCity Casino Hotel 2901 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 866-782-9622; motorcitycasino.com The Motown Museum 2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-875-2264; motownmuseum. com; $10, $8 seniors, children Museum of European Jewish Heritage 28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400 The Palace of Auburn Hills 6 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-3712059; palacenet.com Renaissance Center Jefferson Avenue between Randolph and Beaubien streets, Detroit; gmrencen.com Stott Building 1148-1154 Griswold, Detroit Walter P. Chrysler Museum 1 Chrysler Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-944-0001; chryslerheritage.com; $8

ANNUAL FESTIVALS Sometimes, the festivities take over public areas for a day or three. Don’t let ’em slip by. Here are some of the major ones for 2011. Motown Winter Blast Feb. 11-13; Detroit; winterblast.com Metro Times Blowout March 3-5; Hamtramck Festifools April 3; Ann Arbor; festifools.org MI Earth Day Fest April; Rochester; miearthday.com Downtown Hoedown May 13-15; Detroit; wycd.radio.com Movement Memorial Day weekend; Detroit; paxahau.com Dearborn Arab International Festival June; Dearborn; americanarab.com Jazzin’ on Jefferson June; Detroit; jazzinonjefferson.org Detroit River Days June; Detroit; detroitriverdays.com Motor City Pride June 5; Ferndale; facebook.com/motorcitypride Red Bull Air Race June 5-6; Windsor Clay, Glass, and Metal Festival June 11-12; Royal Oak; royaloakchamber. com/clay_glass.htm Ann Arbor Summer Festival June 17-July 10; Ann Arbor; annarborsummerfestival.org New Center Park Opening Concert July; Detroit; newcenterpark.com Stars & Stripes Festival July; Mount Clemens; funfestinc.com/new/stars Concert of Colors July; Detroit; concertofcolors.com Michigan Elvisfest July 8-9; Ypsilanti: mielvisfest.org APBA Gold Cup July 8-10; Detroit; gold-cup.com Wyandotte Street Art Fair July 13-16; Wyandotte; wyandotte.net Ann Arbor Art Fairs July 20-23; Ann Arbor; artfair.org Michigan Summer Beer Festival July 22-23; Ypsilanti; michiganbrewersguild.businesscatalyst.com African World Festival August; Detroit; africanworldfestival.com People’s Arts Festival August; Detroit Renaissance Festival August-October; Holly; michrenfest.com Michigan Roots Jamboree Aug. 5-6; Ypsilanti; rootsjamboree.com Ypsilanti Heritage Festival Aug. 19-21; Ypsilanti; ypsilantiheritagefestival.com The Woodward Dream Cruise Aug. 20; woodwarddreamcruise.com DIY Street Fair September; Ferndale; diystreetfair.com Detroit International Jazz Festival Sept. 2-5; Detroit; detroitjazzfest.com Arts, Beats & Eats Sept. 2-5; Royal Oak; artsbeatseats.com Hamtramck Labor Day Festival Sept. 3-5; Hamtramck; hamtownfest.com Dally in the Alley Sept. 10; Detroit; dallyinthealley.com Noel Night Dec. 3; Detroit; detroitmidtown.com


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So Much More!

Classic Movies &

COMING ATTRACTIONS... Feb 25 & 26

March 11 & 12

March 25 & 26

DINING „ Diners dig in and wash it down with craft brews at Lily’s Seafood in Royal Oak.

ANN ARBOR p April 8 & 9

April 29 & 30

Tarzan Double Feature FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.REDFORDTHEATRE.COM OR CALL 313-537-2560

17360 LAHSER RD.

NE Corner of Lahser/Grand River goodtimes@redfordtheatre.com

Free Parking Available Live Music 1/2 Hour Before Showtime

Afternoon Delight 251 E. Liberty St.; 734665-7513; afternoondelightcafe.com; $: Open every day until 3 p.m., serving creative breakfast and lunch plates to an often out-the-door crowd. Anthony’s Gourmet Pizza 621 S. Main St.; 734-971-3555; anthonysgourmet.com; $$: The closest to Chicago-style deep dish in Ann Arbor, also serving Sicilian and “gourmet” deep dish. Aut Bar 315 Braun Court; 734-9943677; autbar.com; $$: Gay-friendly restaurant-bar. Serves popular weekend brunch Saturdays (11 a.m.- 2 p.m.) and Sundays (10 a.m.-3 p.m.) Open at 4 p.m. weekdays. Arbor Brewing Company 114 E. Washington St.; 734-213-1393; arborbrewing.com; $: Award-winning brewpub’s drinkable house brews complement a menu of pub food. Ashley’s Restaurant and Pub 338 S. State St.; 734-996-9191; ashleys.com; $$: Upscale but casual, with dozens of beers on tap, a massive menu of bottled beer, and single-malt scotches and small-batch bourbons. B.D.’s Mongolian Barbeque 200 S. Main St.; 734-913-0999; $: Open kitchen, with a massive grill in the center of the dining room, whipping up an endless array of meat, vegetables and spices. Bell’s Diner 2167 W. Stadium Blvd.; 734995-0226; $: Bell’s seems to be a normal American diner, but its kitchen also excels at producing Korean dishes, giving you a choice of bacon or bulgogi. Black Pearl 302 S. Main St.; 734-222-0400; blackpearlonmain.com; $$$: Seafood and martini bar aims for hip comfort, well-suited for socializing, entertaining. Lounge after 9 p.m. Blue Nile 221 E. Washington St.; 734-9984746; bluenilemi.com; $$: Family-owned and operated, you get the unusual treat of sponging up your meal with bits of bread called injera. Blue Tractor 207 E. Washington St.; 734222-4095; bluetractor.net; $$: Menu aims for a down-home feel, but the beers are contemporary craft. Quirky interior. Very good word-of-mouth. Brown Jug 1204 S. University Dr.; 734-7613355; brownjug-annarbor.com; $: In the heart of U-M’s campus since 1938, with walls festooned with Wolverine history and football memorabilia. Have nachos and cheese sticks or Greek sausage and calamari. Cafe Felix 204 S. Main St.; 734-662-8650; cafefelix.com; $$: The tradition of a

European café holds true to form, with a prime wine assortment, coffee drinks and delicious food. Cafe Zola 112 W. Washington St.; 734-7692020; cafezola.com; $$$: Comfortable setting with great foood. Wine list is thoughtful, a bit pricey one, contains some obscure bottles in the high 20s to the middle 30s. Carson’s American Bistro 2000 Commonwealth Blvd.; 888-456-3463; $$$: Good, solid American fare such as steaks and chops, but with gluten-free options too. Casey’s Tavern 304 Depot St.; 734-6656775; caseys-tavern.com; $$: Thick burgers with a slew of topping choices are Casey’s signature. Closed Sundays. The Chop House 322 S. Main St.; 888-4563463; thechophouserestaurant.com; $$: Luxurious, comfortable and elegant, serving prime beef, fine grain-fed protein and premium wines. Dominick’s 812 Monroe St.; 734-662-5414; $$: Nestled in a quiet neighborhood, with ample outdoor seating. Delightful, cafeteria-style afternoon spot. The Earle 121 W. Washington St.; 734-9940211; theearle.com; $$$: Candlelit tables; imaginative kitchen; live jazz; elegant wine bar; 30-page wine list. Earthen Jar 311 S. Fifth Ave.; 734-3279464; earthenjar.com; $: Catering to vegetarian tastes, their “mostly vegan buffet” is mostly Indian-influenced. Fleetwood Diner 300 S. Ashley St.; 734995-5502; $: The only 24-hour diner in downtown Ann Arbor. Frita Batidos 117 W. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-2882; fritabatidos.com; $: Chef Eve Aronoff ’s new casual restaurant serves Cuban-style fare: a burger made from spicy chorizo and tropical milkshakes. Gandy Dancer 401 Depot St.; 734-7690592; $$$: Popular restaurants offers a daily menu of fresh fish, seafood, steaks, and pastas in a historic brick and granite structure. Sunday brunch. Gourmet Garden 2255 W. Stadium Blvd.; 734-668-8389; gourmetgardenmi.com; $$: Start with a steamed vegetable dumpling, move on to the cold smoked duck, then try the scallops with garlic sauce. Grange Kitchen & Bar 118 W. Liberty St.; 734-995-2107; grangekitchenandbar.com; $$: Offers food sourced from more than a dozen local farms, creameries and orchards. Gratzi 326 S. Main St.; 734-663-6387; gratzirestaurant.com; $$$: Crowdpleasing bastion of (mostly) northern Italian cuisine. Gluten-free options. Grizzly Peak Brewing Co. 120 W.


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Washington St.; 734-741-7325; grizzlypeak.net; $$: Restrained hunting lodge feel gives way to good food and award-winning beer on tap. Heidelberg Restaurant 215 N. Main St.; 734-663-7758; $$: Boasts a genuine rathskeller complete with German wheat beers and lagers. Jamaican Jerk Pit 314 S. Thayer St., Ann Arbor; 734-585-5278; irierestaurant.com; $$: Serving jerk chicken, jerk pork and various other Caribbean fare. Jerusalem Garden 307 S. Fifth Ave.; 734-995-5060; jerusalemgarden.net; $: Jerusalem Garden covers the basics for less than $5 or $6: falafel with baba ghanouj and hummus options, shawarma, kebabs; brick garden patio. Jolly Pumpkin Cafe and Brewery 311 S. Main St.; 734-913-2730; jollypumpkin. com; $$: Pub-like in atmosphere, with food that’s a bit more up-to-date and Belgian ales that outclass the real thing in international competition. La Dolce Vita 322 S. Main St.; 734-6699977; $: Located inside the Chop House restaurant. Offers fine after-dinner pleasures, including chocolaty cakes, fruity tortes and more. Logan 115 W. Washington St.; 734-3272312; logan-restaurant.com; $$$: Eclectic fare emphasizes Asia and the Caribbean. Melange Bistro Wine Bar 314 S. Main St.; 734-222-0202; $$: Unique dining experience, casual, sophisticated subterranean bistro. Closed Sundays. Old Town Tavern 122 W. Liberty St.; 734-6629291; oldtownaa.com; $$: A tavern since 1867, with a reliable menu and window tables excellent for people-watching. Palio 347 S. Main St.; 734-930-6156; paliorestaurant.com; $$$: Italian fare in a convivial setting, with pastas, lasagnas and chicken, veal and fish. Pizza Bob’s 814 S. State St.; 734-665-4517; pizzabobs.net; $: Lunch, dinner, takeout and delivery. Prickly Pear Southwest Café 328 S. Main St.; 734-930-0047; pricklypearcafe.com; $$: Southwestern dining; lively and casual atmosphere. Real Seafood Company 341 S. Main St.; 888-456-3463; realseafoodcorestaurant. com $$$: Comfortable, casual and sporting a great seafood menu, this “unchain” does it all, fresh pastas to a raw bar. Red Hawk 316 S. State St.; 734-994-4004; redhawkannarbor.com; $: A nice stop for a hot sandwich or a glass of uptown brew. The burgers are 7-ounce wonders, with a dozen-plus toppings. Seva 314 E. Liberty St.; 734-662-1111; sevarestaurant.com; $$: Eclectic dishes change weekly and range the globe, converting traditional meat-based fare into vegetarian or vegan. Full bar. Sweetwater’s Cafe 123 W. Washington St., Ann Arbor, 734-769-2331; 407 N. Fifth Ave.;734-622-0084; 3393 Plymouth Rd.;734-327-6330; $$: Three clean-lined, wood-floored, pricey-baked-goodstocked locations. Vinology 110 S. Main St.; 734-222-9841; vinowinebars.net; $$$: Ann Arbor wine shop aims to educate.Flights of wine are paired with delicate small plates. Weber’s Restaurant 3050 Jackson Rd.; 734-665-3636; www.webersinn.com/ restaurant; $$: Fitted inside this deluxe, full-service hotel, this restaurant hosts a Sunday brunch. Zingerman’s Delicatessen 422 Detroit St.; 734-663-3354; zingermanscommunity. com; $$: The bedrock of the Zingerman’s kingdom, which includes Zingerman’s Next Door (422 Detroit St.; 734-6635282; $$) and Zingerman’s Roadhouse

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(2501 Jackson Ave.; 734-663-3663; $$$).

AUBURN HILLS B.D.’s Mongolian Barbeque 3325 University Dr.; 248-364-4200; gomongo.com; $: The “natural-born grillers” of this mixyour-own-stir-fry place have made it a neighborhood classic. Lelli’s 885 N. Opdyke Rd.; 248-373-4440; lellisrestaurant.com; $$$: An Italian dining since 1939, famous for its filet mignon with “zip” sauce. O’Brien’s Maryland Crabhouse 621 S. Opdyke Rd.; 248-332-7744; obrienscrabhouse.com; $$: Where spiced crabs are served six to eight in an order, shelled on papered tables. Rainforest Cafe 4310 Baldwin Rd.; 248-333-0280; rainforestcafe.com; $$:Children like the show: Elephants roar, butterflies flap their wings, and there’s lightning and thunder every 20 minutes. Expect waits on weeknights. Rangoli Indian Cuisine 3055 E. Walton Blvd.; 248-377-3800; detroitrangoli.com; $$: Entrées come in small copper bowls. Lunch buffet is just $8.45. Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar & Grill 4698 Baldwin Rd.; 248-454-8629; countrybarmi.com; $$: The food is nothing to sniff at, with Asian grilled salmon and chimichurri tenderloin grilled medallions on the menu.

BELLEVILLE Bayou Grill 404 Main St., Belleville; 734697-2300; bayougrill.net; $$: Carefree environment features New Orleans-style dishes. Professional staff and good food. Johnny’s Bar on the Lake 146 High St.; 734-699-1777; $$: Remodeled grander than ever after a recent fire. The bar wraps around the patio and offers an amazing view of Belleville Lake. Dos Pesos Mexican Restaurant 11800 Belleville Rd.; 734-697-5777; $$: Since 1989, Dos Pesos has served meaty, American-friendly Mexican fare.

BERKLEY Amici’s Pizza and Living Room 3249 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-544-4100; amicispizza. com; $$: Pizza crust made with bran, biodegradable dishes, soy candles, gluten-free beer, organic vodkas. Open daily at 4 p.m. Bagger Dave’s 2972 Coolidge Hwy.; 248543-3283; baggerdaves.com; $$: Good bar food, affordable bottled beer and wine, and woodsy interior. See website for locations in Ann Arbor, Brighton and Novi. The Berkley Front 3087 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-547-3331; $: Patrons can choose to enjoy the great beer selection downstairs or experience the lounge upstairs; call for live music scjedi;e. Berkley Bistro & Cafe 1999 Coolidge Rd.; 248-691-4333; $$: On Sundays, long past noon, customers are asking for coffee refills as they mop up the last of their four-egg omelets. Blarney Stone Pub 27253 Woodward Ave.; 248-541-1881; $: The Blarney Stone’s everyday menu is all-American pub grub, with familiar deep-fat fried items, “pizza dip,” and a five-slider plate. Plenty of beers either on tap or bottled. Hogger’s 2959 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-5482400; eatathoggers.com; $$: Good food, fresh ingredients, affordable lunch specials. Orders to go. Margarita’s Mexican Restaurant 27861 Woodward Ave.; 248-547-5050; $$: Margarita’s serves Mexican cuisine that’s heavy on veggies. Mr. Kabob 3372 Coolidge Hwy.; 248-545-

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4000; $: Inside a Sunoco station at 12 Mile and Coolidge, restaurant-quality cuisine; 14 entrées average $7 for lunch and $10 for dinner. Mazza Indian Cuisine 3354 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-541-2119; mazzaindiancuisine.com; $$: In the heart of Berkley, Mazza serves contemporary Indian cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. O’Mara’s Irish Restaurant 2555 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-399-6750; omaras.net; $$: Traditional Irish fare, such as succulent shepherd’s pie, as well as good renditions of American food. Panini Press 28983 Woodward Ave.; 248547-7377; thepaninipress.com; $: Small, mostly takeout place with eight small tables and free Wi-Fi.

BEVERLY HILLS Beverly Hills Grill 31471 Southfield Rd.; 248-642-2355; beverlyhillsgrill.com; $$: Unpretentious exterior and complex, superlative food. Brady’s Tavern 31231 Southfield Rd., Beverly Hills; 248-642-6422; bradystavern.com; $$: A stomach-filling, thirst-quenching menu and daily lunch and dinner specials.

BIRMINGHAM Big Rock Chophouse 245 S. Eton St.; 248-647-7774; bigrockchophouse.com; $$$: Oozes northern lodge appeal, with a variety of dining rooms, an outdoor patio, skillfully crafted menus, and its own brew house. Brooklyn Pizza 111 Henrietta St.; 248-2586690; brooklynpizzaonline.com; $: New York-style pizza cooked in a brick oven, fueled by coal or wood, available by the slice or pie. Cafe Via 310 E. Maple Rd.; 248-644-8800; cafevia310.com; $: Just 15 tables inside, a tiny bar and a few seats for drinks. All dishes are lovely. Dick O’Dow’s Irish Public House 160 W. Maple Rd.; 248-642-1135; $$: Dimly lit pub with pizza, burgers, Guinnessbattered zucchini and “Irish nachos.” Elie’s Cafe & Fresh Juice Bar 263 Pierce St.; 248-647-2420; $: Has inventive daily specials, but even the standard menu has unusual Middle Eastern delicacies and a dozen vegetarian entrées. Forest Grill 735 Forest Ave.; 248-258-9400; theforestgrill.com; $$$: Brian Polcyn’s stylish bistro is a handsome, narrow room, with huge windows and a bustling open kitchen. Forté 201 S. Old Woodward Ave.; 248-5947300; forterestaurant.com; $$: The chef’s knack for comfort food means inventive but affordable dishes. Luxe Bar & Grill 525 N. Old Woodward Ave.; 248-792-6051; $$$: A good-looking place to scarf down Caesar salads and burgers, or splurge on a pricey bottle of wine and an entrée in the high 20s. Mitchell’s Fish Market 117 Willits Rd.; 248646-3663; mitchellsfishmarket.com; $$$: This chain is an upscale take on the “you buy, we fry” joint. Freshly flown-in fish. New Bangkok Thai Bistro 183 N. Old Woodward; 248-644-2181; $$: Take their spice levels seriously. Entrées can be ordered with chicken, beef, pork, tofu, shrimp, scallops or squid. Original Pancake House 33703 Woodward Ave.; 248-642-5775; theoriginalpancakehouse.com; $: Breakfast served all day. Original makes everything from scratch. Phat Sammich 34186 Woodward Ave.; 248-723-0860; phatsammich.com; $$: Sixty sandwich selections, a mishmash of

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retro and stylin’ fare. Phoenicia Restaurant 588 S. Old Woodward; 248-644-3122; phoeniciabirmingham.com; $$$: Serving meticulously prepared Middle Eastern food since 1970. Seafood dishes and ribs are specialties. Quattro Cucina Italiana 203 Hamilton Row; 248-593-6060; quattrocucina. com; $$: Aims to create the feeling of old-fashioned service, crawling with attentive staff serving wonderful food. Rugby Grille 100 Townsend St.; 248-6425999; townsendhotel.com/rugby-grille. html; $$$: Located in the Townsend, a boutique hotel in downtown Birmingham favored by visiting athletes and rock stars. Streetside Seafood 273 Pierce St.; 248645-9123; streetsideseafood.com; $$: Just 60 seats and a well-deserved reputation for wonderful fish; fills up fast every day of the week. Sy Thai 315 Hamilton Row; 248-258-9830; $: Very hot, peppery Thai fare. A busy, noisy, friendly place, also doing a brisk take-out business. Tallulah 155 S. Bates St.; 248-731-7066; tallulahwine.com; $$$: A commitment to fresh, local produce guides the menu. The kitchen eschews heavy sauces and oils. Intelligent wine list. Toast Birmingham 203 Pierce St.; 248-2586278; toastbirmingham.com; $$: Great food and wine, serving firm favorites and less-common options, such as duck pie and venison sausage. Whistle Stop 501 S. Eton St.; 248-6475588; $: Cheese and meat omelets, pancakes with fruit, cinnamon rolls, French toast — a breakfast winner. Zazios 34977 Woodward Ave.; 248-5306400; zazios.com; $$$$: Chef Matt Schellig is the star here. Every night, Schellig performs in front of as many as 24 patrons at his Chef’s Table.

BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP/ HILLS Andiamo Italia West 6676 Telegraph Rd., Bloomfield Twp.; 248-865-9300; andiamoitalia.com; $$: Solid Italian fare interpreted by a crew of young chefs in the open kitchen. Lively bar action is in an adjoining room. Crust Pizza & Wine Bar 6622 Telegraph Rd., Bloomfield Plaza, Bloomfield Township; 248-855-5855; crustpizza.net; $$: Crust’s pizza’s flavors are a revelation. Wine pairings are excellent. Moose Preserve 43034 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills; 248-858-7688; moosepreserve.com; $$: Serves a forest full of critters. Great salads too. My Cousin’s New York Pizzeria 42967 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills; 248874-9999; $: Mostly carryout, this place trades on the mystique of New York pizza. Northern Lakes Seafood Company 39495 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills; 248646-7900; mattprenticerg.com; $$$: Sprawling establishment can seat 300. Excellent quality. Pasta Fagioli 2398 Franklin Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-332-1111; pastaf.tripod.com; $$: A modest place in a suburban strip mall, what’s on the small menu is very good. Steve’s Deli 6646 Telegraph Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-932-0800; stevesdeli.com; $$: World-class chickennoodle soup. Terrific pastrami sandwich, the meat coated with spices.

CANTON Carrabba’s Italian Grill 1900 N. Haggerty Rd.; 734-844-7400; carrabbas.com; $$: Fresh, flavorful Italian dishes made from


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Good Girls Go To

PARIS CREPES

BEST CREPES

PARK SHELTON

15 E KIRBY WOODWARD SIDE

1-877-PARIS CREPES www.goodgirlsgotopariscrepes.com

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scratch daily using fine, fresh ingredients. Chopstick House 3500 N. Lilley Rd.; 734983-9288; thechopstickhouse.com; $: Casual, fast service, low prices, with Chinese fare that spans the country, all fresh and cooked to order. Max & Erma’s 2240 N. Canton Center Rd.; 734-981-3370; maxandermas.com; $$: The successful chain serves gourmet hamburgers, steaks, chicken, pasta, salads and sandwiches. Neehee’s Indian Vegetarian Street Food 45490 Ford Rd.; 734-737-9777; neehees. com; $$: The 96 dishes are a bewildering array, incorporating street snacks from all over the subcontinent. Thai Bistro 45620 Ford Rd.; 734-416-2122; $$: Affordable Thai food, with fire levels may dialed down to accommodate those new to the fare. Closed Sundays.

CLAWSON Black Lotus Brewing Company 1 E. 14 Mile Rd.; 248-577-1878; blacklotusbrewery.com; $$: A laid-back microbrewery whose small kitchen churns out generous starters. Clawson Steakhouse 56 S. Rochester Rd.; 248-588-5788; clawsonsteakhouse.com; $$$: Roadhouse-nightclub opened in 1958 and remains in that decade. Da Nang 1 S. Main St.; 248-577-5130; danangrestaurant.com; $$: Great Vietnamese cuisine. Catering to mainstream diners, the spice levels are very low. Great pho options. Due Venti 220 S. Main St.; 248-288-0220; dueventidining.com; $$$: A sedate trattoria with a sophisticated Northern Italian kitchen. Local produce and fromscratch cooking. Frittata 236 S. Main St.; 248-280-2552; $: Serving the omelet’s open-faced Mediterranean cousin, which is finished under the broiler and served unfolded. Upscale and family-friendly. Noble Fish 45 E. 14 Mile Rd.; 248-5852314; noblefi sh.com; $$: An authentic sushi bar is hidden in the back of this small Japanese grocery. Royal Kubo 27 E. 14 Mile Rd.; 248-5882300; $: A Filipino karaoke bar and restaurant, serving food that is a mix of native methods and ingredients. Shilla 1119 W. Maple Rd.; 248-655-0120; $$: Shilla’s menu combines Korean with Japanese, two cuisines that complement each other.

CLINTON TOWNSHIP Dublin Fish & Chips 41900 Hayes Rd., Clinton Twp.; 586-416-3474; dublinfishandchips.com; $$: Friendly spot with mahi mahi, catfish, tilapia, smelt and butter breaded mushrooms. Great Baraboo Brewing Co. 35905 Utica Rd.; 586-792-7397; greatbaraboo.com; $$: Great Baraboo is a lively, family-style microbrewery in the heart of Budweiser country. Hankuk Oriental and Korean Market 33717 S. Gratiot Ave.; 586-791-8877; $: The setting is diner-plain, but the Korean cuisine is authentic, with few compromises for the American palate. J. Baldwin’s Restaurant & To Go 16981 18 Mile Rd.; 586-416-3500; jbaldwins. com; $$$: Simple furnishings, casual dress policy, reasonable pricing, uptown fare. Luciano’s 39091 Garfield Rd.; 586-2636540; $$: Located in a prosaic strip mall but opulently decorated and big enough for an Italian wedding party. Pasta specialties average around $16. Zack’s Hot Dogs 40097 S. Groesbeck Hwy.; 586-738-6152; $: Hot dogs, burgers, sausages, footlongs, all under the slogan, “Hot dogs with attitude!”

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DEARBORN AND DEARBORN HEIGHTS Al-Ajami 14633 W. Warren Ave., Dearborn, 313-846-9330, $$: Al-Ajami is a bit more affordable than the other Middle Eastern restaurants around it. And servings are enormous. Amani’s 13823 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-584-1890; $: Amani’s is a halal neighborhood place that serves all the tried-and-true dishes of Lebanese cuisine, plus some rarities. Andiamo Dearborn 21400 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-359-3300; andiamoitalia. com; $$: The Dearborn outpost of the Andiamo mini-chain ever so lightly tweaks the old-line cuisine Andiamo is known for. Bangkok 96 2450 S. Telegraph Rd.; 313730-8161; bangkok96restaurant.com; $$: Bright, warm space enjoys a steady stream of loyal dine-in and take-out customers. Closed Sundays. B.D.’s Mongolian Barbeque 22115 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-7929660; gomongo.com; $: You pick out what you’d like in your stir-fry, then the grillmasters cook it in a flash. Big Fish Seafood Bistro 700 Town Center Dr., Dearborn; 313-336-6350; muer.com; $$$: One of the Muer family’s seafood restaurants, there’s plenty of fish bric-abrac about, some lovely, some kitschy. Bistro 222 22266 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-792-7500; bistro222. com; $$$: Reasonable prices, stylishly retrofi tted space and imaginative Californian-Italian cuisine. Cariera’s 6565 Telegraph Rd., Dearborn Heights; 313-278-4060; carieras.com/ Dearborn; $$: Family- owned charming little Italian restaurant with authentic Italian fare and big portions. Cedarland Restaurant 13007 W. Warren Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-4849; cedarlandrestaurants.com; $$: Whether eating in or taking out, quality Middle Eastern food. Drive-through window. Cheli’s Chili Bar 21918 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-274-9700; chelischilibar. com; $$: Cheli’s is not for hockey agnostics, but with 14 TVs in one room, it’s the place to exult in hockey-ness. Country Chicken 5131 Schaefer Rd., Dearborn; 313-582-6677; $: Tiny Lebanese storefront serves mammoth portions. No alcohol. Crave 22075 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-277-7283; cravelounge.com; $$$: The food emphasizes Japanese cuisine but successfully incorporates Mediterranean flavors. Great sushi; after 10 p.m., Crave becomes a lounge. Deliziosa 22439 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-277-4990; $$: Traditional Italian cuisine with a few unconventional twists. Gargantuan portions, and no wildcards among the diverse pasta dishes. Famous Hamburger 5808 Schaefer Rd., Dearborn; 313-945-0002; famoushamburger.com; $: Bargain steak (a special); meat is halal; friendly place with dizzying options. Fuego Mexican Grill 7040 Schaefer Rd., Dearborn; 313-581-9800; The Mexicangone-halal restaurant has an upscale feel to it. Kiernan’s Steak House 21931 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-565-8975; $$: Atmospheric room with fringed red lamps and leather booths. Expect surf and turf, with choices including steak, lobster tail and lamb chops. L.A. Express Mediterranean Bistro 22018 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-277-5999; $$: Lunch options include sandwiches; the dinner menu has chicken scallopini and pasta aioli.


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M&M Cafe 13714 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-581-5775; $$: The menu is a mix of American and a smattering of Lebanese choices: hamburgers, chef salad and turkey sandwiches, kafta, hummus and laban. Miller’s Bar 23700 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-565-2577; millersbar.com; $: Consistently rated as one of the best burgers in the region. New Yasmeen Bakery 13900 W. Warren Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-6035; yasmeenbakery.com; $: This deli and bakery serves exceptional, unusual Lebanese dishes, usually hand-made. Richter’s Chalet 23920 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-565-0484; richterschalet. com; $$: A throwback to those days when two people could enjoy dinner and drinks for $40. Roman Village 9924 Dix Rd., Dearborn; 313-842-2100; antoniosrestaurants.com; $$: This is the real deal: house-made pasta, fresh sauces, traditional dishes at reasonable prices. Shatila Bakery & Café 14300 W. Warren Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-1952; shatila.com; $: Shatila combines fruit purees with butterfat to produce that rich taste and velvety texture that only cream can bestow.

DETROIT

DETROIT — DOWNTOWN 24 Grille inside the Book-Cadillac Hotel, 204 Michigan Ave.; 313-964-3821; spa1924grille.com; $$: Dark and sexy, with cushioned stools, Swarovski crystal and more create a sumptuous interior. Various nods to industrial design, right down to an exposed 1920s I-beam. Outdoor patio. American Coney Island 114 W. Lafayette Blvd.; 313-964-6542; americanconeyisland.com; $: Second banana to next-door Lafayette Coney Island, American still does a great job serving a Detroit classic. Open 24/7. Anchor Bar 450 W. Fort St.; 313-964-9127; anchorbardetroit.com; $: Enjoy waxedpaper-wrapped burgers and sandwiches with crisp steak fries and creamy coleslaw sides. Andiamo Detroit Riverfront 400 Renaissance Center; 313-567-6700; andiamoitalia.com; $$$: Right on the river off the redesigned RenCen’s sunny Winter Garden, upscale Italian cuisine in luxurious atmosphere, often with live music. Angelina Italian Bistro 1565 Broadway, at Grand Circus Park; 313-962-1355; angelinadetroit.com; $$$: Italian food (and some extras) at “prices that reflect the new reality” — at least when it comes to the entrées and the wines. Closed Mondays. Astoria Pastry Shop 541 Monroe St.; 313-963-2530; astoriapastryshop.com; $: Classic Greektown sweets shop, with pastries to please all. Atlas Global Bistro 3111 Woodward Ave.; 313-831-2241; atlasglobalbistro. com; $$$$: At Atlas, you’ll find Carolina catfish, pork taquitos, short ribs, ravioli and polenta, Hawaiian shrimp and Moroccan beef. Bangkok Crossing 620 Woodward Ave.; 313-961-3861; $$: Tasty and enjoyable pla dook pad ped (crisp red snapper stir-fried with mushrooms, peppers and eggplant), pad ma kher (fried eggplant). Bookies Bar & Grille 2208 Cass Ave.; 313-962-0319; bookiesbar.com; $$: Dependable downtown joint, on game days, it’s right in the heart of things, with enough plasma screens to warm the heart of any sports fan.

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Bourbon Steak 1777 Third St., (inside MGM Grand Detroit); 313-465-1648; mgmgranddetroit.com; $$$: Open only for dinner after 5 p.m., features “modern American classics.” Usually, all tables are taken on the weekends. Bucharest Grill 2040 Park Ave.; 313-9653111; $: Minimal and inexpensive menu inside Park Bar. Cafe D’Mongo’s Speakeasy 1439 Griswold St.; cafedmongos.com; $$: Open Friday nights only; quirky hipster hangout; limited soul food menu. Centaur Bar 2233 Park Ave.; 313963-4040; centaurbar.com; $$: This sophisticated setting for an after-work nip garners a diverse clientele. Century Grille (open for events only) 333 Madison Ave.; 313-963-9800; gemtheatre. com; $$: Menu weighted toward meatlovers, but with some vegetarian crêpes and two fish entrées. Cliff Bell’s 2030 Park Ave.; 313-961-2543; cliffbells.com; $$$: Art deco wonder has it all, classic cocktails, great music and excellent food. Coach Insignia 200 Renaissance Center, 72nd Floor; 313-567-2622; mattprenticerg.com; $$$: Perched spectacularly on the 71st and 72nd floors of the Marriott Hotel, the second highest restaurant in the United States. Only open for dinner. Unsurpassed views. Closed Sundays. Da Edoardo Foxtown Grille 2203 Woodward Ave.; 313-471-3500; daedoardo.com; $$$: Most menu offerings are simple, grilled, including three steaks. Closed Sunday-Monday. Detroit Beer Co. 1529 E. Broadway; 313962-1529; detroitbeerco.com; $$: Across from the opera house, this full-service restaurant and microbrewery offers a half-dozen unique quaff s. Detroiter Bar 655 Beaubien St.; 313-9633355; $$: Downtown spot packs ‘em in for lunch with solid bar fare. The House Special Burger is meaty enough to make vegetarians weep. Detroit Seafood Market 1435 Randolph St.; 313-962-4180; thedetroitseafoodmarket.com; $$$: Airy, open restaurant serves the fruit of the sea in a stylish building. Elwood Bar & Grill 300 Adams St.; 313-962-2337; elwoodgrill.com; $$: Charming little art deco diner was moved down the street to make way for Comerica Park. Closed Sundays. Fishbone’s Rhythm Kitchen Cafe 400 Monroe St.; 313-965-4600; fishboneusa. com; $$$: Fishbone’s Cajun and Creole dishes go beyond jambalaya and fried catfish. Huge weekly brunch. Flood’s Bar & Grille 731 St. Antoine St.; 313963-1090; floodsdetroit.com; $$: You can tell the clientele by the bottlenecked line of glimmering Jags, Beemers, Mercedes and SUVs lined up for valet parking. Gateway Deli Café 333 W. Fort St.; 313-2561900; $$: Below street level in Detroit’s finance district, they serve quality sandwiches and soups mostly for carryout. Grand Trunk Pub 612 Woodward Ave.; 313-961-3043; $$: The food is good, the ambience is one-of-a-kind and the beer selection kills. And don’t forget the appealing weekend breakfasts. Harbor House 440 Clinton St.; 313-9679900; harborhousedetroit.com; $$: Table-served, all-you-can-eat bar and grill specializing in quality seafood; live music; intimate setting. Hard Rock Cafe 45 Monroe St.; 313-9647625; hardrock.com; $$: The food and drinks are American classics done well. Portions are generous.

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Southern Fires Restaurant Serves Southern Style Home Cooked Food. We also offer Carryout Orders (313) 393-4930, Catering Department (313) 393-4931, Gift Cards Are Available. Monday 11:00 am - 7:00 pm 575 Bellevue, Detroit, MI 48207 Tuesday - Friday 11:00 am - 9:00 pm (313) 393-4930 Saturday 12:00 Noon - 9:00 pm www.southernfiresrestaurant.com Sunday 12:00 Noon - 8:00 pm

LUNCH & DINNER 7 Days a Week M-Th: 11am-10pm F & Sat: 11am 11pm (dance 11pm-2am) Sun: 12pm - 9pm

1250 Library St. • Detroit www.vicente.us • 313.962.8800


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CALL TO BOOK YOUR PRIVATE PARTY Pitcher & 4 Shots $15 During all Detroit Sporting Home Events Shuttle To and From Detroit Home Games

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Harry’s Detroit Bar & Grill 2482 Clifford St.; 313-964-1575; harrysdetroit.com; $$: Quirky space, 10 TV monitors tuned to sports, a 30-yard-long bar, serving burgers, chili and draft s. Hockeytown Cafe 2301 Woodward Ave.; 313-965-9500; hockeytowncafe.com; $$: Offering snazzy dinners, upscale atmosphere and a Zamboni in the lobby, the Red Wing-mementoed watering hole draws the theatre crowd. Jacoby’s German Biergarten 624 Brush St.; 313-962-7067; jacobysbar.com; $: This narrow bar on Brush Street is one of the oldest establishments in Detroit, but its kitchen draws a good lunch crowd too. Sunday brunch until 4 p.m. Lafayette Coney Island 118 W. Lafayette Blvd.; 313-964-8198; $: The most notable little diner in the city. Open 24 hours, but never more interesting than at 2:30 a.m. Laikon Cafe 569 Monroe St.; 313-9637058; $$: With its central bar under the stairway to its balcony, this is one of the more appealing spots in Greektown. Open daily until 11- 4 a.m. Loco Bar & Grill 454 E. Lafayette Blvd.; 313-965-3737; locobarandgrill.com; $$: Tex-Mex restaurant in Greektown featuring homestyle cooking, salsa music and tequila mixes. Lunchtime Global 660 Woodward Ave., Suite 110; 313-963-4871; lunchtimeglobal. com; $: A loyal clientele of downtown workers are partial to the six soups a day and the house rules: everything from scratch and made in-house. MGM Grand Palette Dining Studio 1777 Third St., (inside MGM Grand Detroit); 313-393-7777; mgmgranddetroit.com; $$: Like the food court at your local mall, but several notches up; everything is done to excess in casino-land. Mosaic 501 Monroe St.; 313-962-9366; mosaic-detroit.com; $$$: With a menu culled from major world cuisines (Asian, Mediterranean, French, South American, Caribbean and more), it’s fusion food. Fascinating interior. Niki’s Pizza 735 Beaubien St.; 313-9614303; nikispizza.com; $: Just outside of Greektown, Niki’s Pizza offers a full menu of Greek foods and square pizzas; patio seating in good weather. Completely remodeled interior. Opus One 565 E. Larned St.; 313-9617766; opus-one.com; $$$$: Downtown’s handsomest restaurant. The kitchen makes virtually everything from scratch, and the menu changes seasonally. Upscale, excellent service. Orchid Thai 115 Monroe St.; 313-962-0225; $$: Good renditions of Thai food at reasonable prices, including soups that combine sweet, sour and spicy. Oslo 1456 Woodward Ave.; 313-962-7200; oslodetroit.com; $$$: Expect superior Thai dishes, fresh sushi and more. Closed Sundays. Pizza Papalis Taverna 553 Monroe St.; 313-879-0038; pizzapapalis.com; $$: Detroit’s main spot for Chicago-style pizza, in the heart of Greektown. Plaka 535 Monroe St.; 313-962-4687; $: Who knew that a tiny 24-hour diner in Greektown would have not only the best French toast in the city, but in the entire universe? Lively at 2:30 a.m. Red Smoke Barbeque 573 Monroe St.; 313962-2100; $$: Stylish new barbecue joint. The pork ribs are dry-rubbed and tasty, perfectly cooked. Roast 1128 Washington Blvd.; 313961-2500; roastdetroit.com; $$$$: All meat is naturally raised and dry-aged for a minimum of 21 days. The same gastronomic attention is paid to the poultry and seafood dishes.

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Rowland Cafe 500 Griswold St.; 313964-1928; therowlandcafe.com; $: Sandwiches and coffee are first-rate, but take a back seat to the setting. Rub BBQ 18 W. Adams St.; 313-9640782; rubbbqdetroit.com; $$: They like beer: 29 drafts and 42 domestic and 38 international bottles. The stars are the meats and sides, naturally. Saltwater inside MGM Grand Detroit, 1777 Third St.; 313-465-1646; mgmgranddetroit.com; $$$: An oasis of tranquility amid the chiming gaming floor, the food is marvelous. Small Plates 1521 Broadway; 313-9630497; smallplates.com; $: The diminutive dishes here run the gamut from handcut fries to pan-seared scallops. Mostly house-made fare. Taste Pizza Bar 1431 Times Square; 313962-8700; tastepizzabar.com; $$: Chefowner Dale Daniel offers diners a wide variety of pizzas, starters, soups, salads and grilled sandwiches. Tom’s Oyster Bar 519 E. Jefferson Ave.; 313-964-4010; tomsoysterbar.com; $$: Noisy and cheerful at lunchtime and after work, Tom’s gives a very convincing impression of a well-preserved 19th century pub. Vicente’s Cuban Cuisine 1250 Library St.; 313-962-8800; vicente.us; $$: Familiar elements from the Caribbean are here. Come for dinner, stay for dancing lessons. Wah-Hoo 536 Shelby St.; 313-324-8700; wah-hoo.net; $$: Art deco sconces are as stylish as the entrées, divided into Garden, Sky, Ocean and Land.

DETROIT — MIDTOWN Avalon International Breads 422 W. Willis St.; 313-832-0008; $: Avalon brought breadstarved customers flocking years ago, today offering sandwiches, coffees and more. Byblos Cafe and Grill 87 W. Palmer St.; 313-831-4420; bybloscafeandgrill.com; $: Huge menu of more than 90 dishes. Cass Cafe 4620 Cass Ave.; 313-831-1400; casscafe.com; $$: Inventive daily specials, varied beer and wine list, rotating art installations and chatty neighbors always add something. Circa 1890 Saloon 5474 Cass Ave.; 313-8311122; $$: An “old reliable” for WSU faculty and students, Circa features homemade soups, pizza, and their famous burgers, as well as daily drink specials. Cuisine 670 Lothrop Rd.; 313-872-5110; cuisinedetroit.com; $$$: Inside a 1920s house is a simple but elegant space. Ambitious French-American cuisine is creative, sophisticated and memorable. Good Girls Go to Paris Crepes 15 E. Kirby St.; 877-727-4727; goodgirlsgotopariscrepes.com; $: The traditional French pancake gets an American treatment here. Honest John’s Bar and No Grill 488 Selden St.; 313-832-5646; $$: Cheap eats and drinks, including local microbrews, a great jukebox and loyal regulars. International Mini-Cafe 111 E. Kirby St.; 313-874-2103; $: Mini-Café serves dishes from around the world. Offerings are generous and varied. Left y’s Lounge 5440 Cass Ave.; 313831-5338; left ysloungedetroit.com; $$: Sports bar-grill on the ground floor of the Belcrest with a patio overlooking the Belcrest’s art-deco swimming pool. Majestic Cafe 4140 Woodward Ave.; 313-8339700; majesticdetroit.com/majestic-café; $$: Comfort foods drawn from around the globe served in an open, airy setting. Mario’s Restaurant 4222 Second Ave.; 313-832-1616; mariosdetroit.com; $$$:


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Inviting Italian spot where generations of theatergoers have enjoyed multicourse meals before the theater. RAW Café 4160 Woodward Ave.; 313-7789774; therawcafe.com; $$: The food at RAW Café — none of which is cooked — is vegan, tasty, healthful and mostly a bargain. Rice Bowl Asian Kitchen New Center One Building, 3031 W. Grand Blvd.; 313-871-7000; ricebowlasiankitchen.com; $: Growing local chain offers healthful food at reasonable prices. Three locations in Detroit. Shangri-La 4710-12 Cass Ave.; 313-9747669; midtownshangri-la.com; $$: Quirky interior, attentive servers, and excellent dim sum, and small plates that are like Chinese tapas. Slows to Go 4107 Cass Ave.; 877-569-7246; $$: Hey, none of the great beers on tap at the actual Slows in Corktown, but you can pick it up without the two-hour wait. Traffic Jam & Snug 511 W. Canfield St.; 313-831-9470; trafficjamdetroit.com; $$: Serves interesting food, much of it is made in-house, including beers, bread, even ice cream. Union Street 4145 Woodward Ave.; 313831-3965; unionstreetdetroit.com; $$: Art Deco decor, eclectic crowd. Menu ranges from chicken wings to filet mignon; 100-plus beers. The Whitney 4421 Woodward Ave.; 313832-5700; thewhitney.com; $$$$: The 52-room three-story pink-granite edifice built for a lumber baron in 1894 has been one of Detroit’s most celebrated restaurants since 1986. Woodbridge Pub 5169 Trumbull St.; 313833-2701; $$: Open from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. every day, serving inventive burgers including a half-pound certified Angus and a vegetarian black-bean patty. Hip setting, friendly service. Wasabi Korean & Japanese Cuisine 15 E. Kirby St., Suite E; 313-638-1272; wasabidetroit.com; $$: A full line specialties that includes everything from bibimbab to hearty udon soups.

DETROIT — MEXICANTOWN Armando’s 4242 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313554-0666; $: Modest, cheerful and very affordable cantina offers enchiladas, tacos and burritos, plus a few Cuban touches. El Barzón 3710 Junction St.; 313-894-2070; $: Italian-Mexican place offers excellent house-made moles, a sauce made with chocolate that is unusually rich and fruity, and soups of all kinds. Exceptionally competent wait staff. El Comal 3456 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313841-7753; elcomaldetroit.com; $: Elda Castellanos’ Central American fare includes pupusas and chuchitos. Unpretentious space. El Zocalo 3400 Bagley St.; 313-8413700; elzocalodetroit.com; $: Friendly, attentive waitstaff. House specialties include queso flameado, chili relleno and the Mexican sandwich. Giovanni’s Ristorante 330 S. Oakwood Blvd.; 313-841-0122; giovannisristorante. com; $$$: Handmade pastas, the best veal Marsala around, as well as chicken and seafood dishes. Closed Sundays. Las Brisas 8445 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313-8428252; $: Neighborhood spot has peasant exuberance. The menu and atmosphere come alive on weekends, when specialty dishes are added. La Tapatia 4314 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313297-2755; $$: Southwest Detroit’s La Tapatia takes you on an inexpensive taco adventure with a variety of tacos prepared in the traditional manner. La Terraza 1633 Lawndale St.; 313-843-

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1433; $$: A bit off the beaten path, La Terraza focuses on Mexican seafood, in addition to the usual pleasing classics. Los Altos 7056 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313-8413109; $: Unpretentious, friendly spot off the beaten path, their tacos al pastor are out of this world. Los Corrales 2244 Junction St.; 313-8493196; $$: One of several, less-touristy establishments that seem to cater to the local population. Los Galanes 3362 Bagley St.; 313-554-4444; $: The expected enchiladas, tacos and burritos, as well as specialties. Mariscos, El Rincon Taraxco 1414 Junction St.; 313-843-6595; $$: High-quality Mexican seafood, particularly stews, plus a mural of Selena as a sultry mermaid. Mexican Village 2600 Bagley St.; 313237-0333; mexicanvillagefood.com; $: Michigan’s oldest Mexican restaurant has atmosphere, authentic Mexican cuisine, a full bar; secure parking. Senor Lopez Taqueria 7146 Michigan Ave.; 313-551-0685; $: The menu ranges from the standard Mexican-joint fare to less common dishes, such as whole tilapia. Taqueria Lupita’s 3443 Bagley St.; 313-843-1105; $: Smack dab on Mexicantown’s touristy strip, Lupita’s caters to a back-home crowd. Taqueria Mi Pueblo 7278 Dix Rd.; 313841-3315; mipueblorestaurant.com; $$: Although it’s large (three levels), Mi Pueblo is pretty. Three tamales served with rice and beans for $5.75. Vince’s Italian Restaurant 1341 Springwells St.; 313-842-4857; vincesdetroit.com; $$: A dose of ‘50s-era Italian-American spaghetti served by waitresses who call you “honey.” Xochimilco 3409 Bagley St.; 313-8430179; $$: Most nights, this popular Mexicantown eatery has a dining crowd filling it, drawn by large portions and an inexpensive menu.

DETROIT — EASTERN MARKET Butcher’s Inn 1489 Winder St.; 313-3940120; $$: Perhaps among Detroit’s oldest establishments serving food in the same space, this big spot is open Friday afternoons and Saturdays 8 a.m.-6 p.m. to cater to market crowds. Cutter’s Bar & Grill 2638 Orleans St., Detroit, 313-393-0960, $: Good-size burgers for $5, gigantic and hearty, as well as stuffed chicken breasts, baby back ribs, whitefish and more. Farmer’s Restaurant 2542 Market St., Detroit; 313-259-8230: Nothing like Farmer’s massive plate of corned beef hash: Hash browns, grilled onions and thinly sliced corned beef piled high beneath two eggs. Roma Cafe 3401 Riopelle St.; 313-8315940; romacafe.com; $$: One hundred years old and counting, with formal servers proffering Italian classics in the bar and main dining room. Reservations recommended. Russell Street Deli 2465 Russell St.; 313567-2900; russellstreetdeli.com; $: This chattery Eastern Market deli serves lunch on weekdays and lunch and breakfast on Saturdays to a loyal crowd. Closed Sundays. Sala Thai 3400 Russell St.; 313-831-1302; salathai.us; $: Curries, fried rice, Thai salads and noodles all done in authentic Thai style. Extensive appetizer selections, sushi service and tasty soups. Vegetarian entrées too. Supino Pizzeria 2457 Russell St.; 313-567-7879; supinopizza.com; $$: Brilliant thin-crust pizza with imaginative fresh ingredients and a thin crust that’s not too chewy.

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Vivio’s 2460 Market St.; 313-393-1711; viviosbloodymary.com; $$: Decked out in historic ads and posters, Vivio’s is the place to get a 20-ounce porterhouse, a full pound of crablegs, “pub style” mussels or a great Bloody Mary.

DETROITWIDE Beirut Kabob 5827 W. Vernor Hwy.; 313841-2100; $: The menu is short but covers the usual bases, and at prices well cheaper than those of the Lebanese restaurants a few miles further west in Dearborn. Buddy’s Restaurant & Pizzeria 17125 Conant St.; 313-892-9001; buddyspizza. com; $$: Our readers love Buddy’s, perennial winner of Best Neighborhood Pizza. Enjoy the meaty square-cut pizza in its original setting. See website for scads of locations. Cadieux Cafe 4300 Cadieux Rd.; 313882-8560; cadieuxcafe.com; $$: Belgian cuisine: pomfrites, mussels steamed in white wine and vegetables and accompanied by both clarified butter and a mustard-and-vinegar sauce. Live music; feather bowling. The Dakota Inn Rathskeller 17324 John R St.; 313-867-9722; dakota-inn.com; $$: German-style beer hall survives in north Detroit. See the din of mirth as diners accompany German singing, or just grab a beer and sausage platter. Gracie-See 6889 Greenfield Rd.; 313-5818070; $$: More than 30 years in business thanks to the faithful who flock there nightly. The pizza is thin-crust and soft , laden with cheese. Homey atmosphere, friendly service. Hygrade Delicatessen Restaurant 3640 Michigan Ave.; 313-894-6620; $: Motherly and well-informed waitresses preside over an eclectic crowd. Closed Sundays. Iridescence 2901 Grand River Ave.; 313237-7711; motorcitycasino.com; $$$$: Elegantly decorated; focuses on game and fish rather than more traditional steakhouse fare; entrées are unique, tasty and show special attention to detail, but the desserts are the real showstoppers. Closed Mondays. La Dolce Vita 17546 Woodward Ave.; 313-865-0331; $$: A little hidden jewel behind a devastated-looking stretch of Woodward holds a garden-court restaurant with pastas, dessert-tray gems, and refreshing sorbets. Lady Louisa’s Place 15535 W. McNichols Rd.; 313-273-3663; ladylouisas.com; $$: “Slow Cooked Ribs and Comfort Food” is the motto. All meats, even turkey, are smoked before cooking. Le Petit Zinc Creperie & Cafe 1055 Trumbull St.; 313-963-2805; lepetitzincdetroit.com; $$: Breakfastand-lunch spot in Corktown run by Parisian Charles Sorel. Excellent crêpes range from simple to sweet to savory. MotorCity Casino Hotel’s Assembly Line Buffet inside MotorCity Casino Hotel, 2901 Grand River Ave.; 313-237-7711; motorcitycasino.com; $$: All-you-can-eat fare, meat being the main attraction. The desserts are all great. Mudgie’s 1300 Porter St.; 313-961-2000; mudgiesdeli.com; $: A pleasant 12-table sandwich spot with exceptionally friendly waitstaff, free WiFi, delicious housemade quality, and solidly local products. Rattlesnake Club 300 River Place Dr.; 313-567-4400; $$$: Fresh, seasonal, simple menu: grilled fi sh, steaks and chops as well as imaginative dishes. Airy and sophisticated riverfront setting. Closed Sundays. Roostertail 100 Marquette Dr.; 313-822-

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1234; roostertail.com; $$$: For almost a half-century, the Roostertail has been synonymous with snazzy riverfront dining and entertainment. Sindbad’s 100 Saint Clair St.; 313-822-7817; sindbads.com; $$: Roadhouse fare with an emphasis on steaks, chops and fish. The all-you-can-eat brunch buffet makes a great Sunday morning. Slows Bar BQ 2138 Michigan Ave.; 313962-9828; slowsbarbq.com; $$: In a meticulously revamped 1880s building, Slows offers excellent barbecue and amazing beer selection. Southern Fires Restaurant 575 Bellevue St.; 313-393-4930: Considered the staple soul food restaurant in Detroit, Southern Fires packs ’em in, particularly the Sunday after-church crowd. No alcohol. Wolfgang Puck Grille 1777 Third St., (inside MGM Grand Detroit); 313-4651648; mgmgranddetroit.com; $$$: Open and spacious, Puck’s restaurant serves innovative, seasonal, organic cuisine he helped popularize.

DOWNRIVER

(ALLEN PARK, ECORSE, LINCOLN PARK, TRENTON) Auburn Cafe 3520 W. Jefferson Ave., Ecorse; 313-381-8133; $$: Brick archways and grape arbor contribute to the atmosphere amid a family bar crowd. Both lamb and chicken gyros are nicely done. The Broadcast Booth 6550 Allen Rd., Allen Park; 313-389-5050; thebroadcastbooth. com; $$: More a restaurant than a sports bar; yes, the lounge is dominated by scores of TVs, but other areas are sedate. Fort Street Brewery 1660 Fort St., Lincoln Park; 313-389-9620; fortstreetbeer.com: Brewpub and restaurant with a friendly atmosphere, games, and a large beer list, including house-brewed suds. Hunan Hunan 4327 Allen Rd., Allen Park; 313-389-0939; $: Offering traditional Chinese fare, plus Cantonese and Mandarin dishes that are particularly well-done. Hungarian-American Cultural Center 26257 Goddard Rd., Taylor; 734-946-6261; hungariandetroit.com; $: Good, solid meals, mostly in the $7 range. Moro’s Dining 6535 Allen Rd., Allen Park; 313-382-7152; morosdining.com; $$: Old-fashioned (tuxedoed) professional service; most entrées are around $12. Owner Thomas Moro butchers the veal, the house specialty.

FARMINGTON/ FARMINGTON HILLS 2Booli Fresh Mediterranean Eats 37610 W. 12 Mile Rd.; 248-994-0614; 2booli. com; $$: Farmington Hills’ 2Booli has not only satisfying Middle Eastern fare, but a full bar, plus a happy hour that lasts all weekday evening. Bangkok Sala Cafe 27903 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-4220; bangkoksalacafe.com; $: Attractive, good entrées (gingery pad king is great) and dreamy house-made coconut ice cream. Bombay Grille 29200 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-626-2982; bombaygrille.com; $$: Grilled items are prepared in deep clay ovens heated by charcoal fires for better flavor. Wine, beer and liquor. The Breakfast Club 38467 W. 10 Mile Rd., Farmington; 248-473-0714; thebreakfastclubrestaurant.com; $: Omelets and quiche; pancakes, waffles, French toast and crêpes; even potato pancakes with sour cream. Camelia’s Mexican Grill 30685 W. 12 Mile


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Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-381-5455; cameliasmexicangrill.com; $$: Mexican food with a wide gamut of heat levels. Not just tacos, fajitas and burritos, but steaks, sandwiches and even some vegetarian choices. Culinary Studies Institute at Oakland Community College 27055 Orchard Lake Rd., at I-696, Building J, Farmington Hills; 248-522-3700; oaklandcc.edu/culinary; $: The Culinary Studies Institute at Oakland Community College churns out aspiring chefs and offers the lunch-loving public bargain meals. Greene’s 24155 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington; 248-474-7980; $: The menu tops out at $2.49 for a double cheeseburger. The hamburgers are small and very greasy, but flavorful. Hong Hua Fine Chinese Dining 27925 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-489-2280; honghuafinedining.com; $$: More like fine-dining than authentic Chinese, Hong Hua is elegant. Tasty, slightly sweet and crisped mu-shu pork. House of India 28841 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-7391; houseofindiami.com; $: You can get a four-course meal for less than $13. For mild, try lamb dopiyaza; for hot, stuffed bhindi. Best bet: mango lassi. John Cowley & Sons 33338 Grand River Ave., Farmington; 248-4745941; johncowleys.com; $$: Nestled in downtown Farmington; lengthy menu ranges from starters to traditional Irish fare and American entrées. Kabuki 28972 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-538-0664; $$: Japanese and Korean specialties, including shabu-shabu and bibimbap). A wide assortment of sushi and sashimi is also offered. New Sahara 29222 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-851-1122; newsahara.com; $$: Chaldean restaurants are subtly different. Expect pickled cabbage as a starter, plus some tomatobased stews. And their daily specials are Iraqi favorites. Priya 36600 Grand River Ave., Farmington Hills; 248-615-7700; priyacuisine.com; $$: Sister restaurant to Priya in Troy, chef Sukhdev Singh is especially talented with northern Indian dishes. Daily lunch buffet. Ristorante Cafe Cortina 30715 W. 10 Mile Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-474-3033; cafecortina.com; $$$$: The fresh pastas and veals are the real thing and the setting, aiming for elegance, does not disappoint. Shangri-la Garden 27626 Middlebelt Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-474-8183; $$: Large parties fill the round tables, scattered across several rooms. They do serve plenty of dishes cooked to American taste, but less familiar dishes to Chinese taste abound as well. Tomatoes Apizza 24369 Halsted Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-888-4888; tomatoesapizza.com; $: Thin-crust, freshtasting, naturally cooked, garlicky, madewith-high-art pizzas rank with the best in the area. Udipi 29210 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-626-6021; udipirestaurantonline.com; $$: The only vegetarian restaurant along a stretch of Orchard Lake Road that is home to several Indian places.

FERNDALE Anita’s Kitchen 22651 Woodward Ave.; 248-548-0680; anitaskitchenonline. com; $$: The bar serves beer, wine, juice, smoothies and wine and craft brews. Salads, veggie-intensive appetizers, pita

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pizzas, kebabs or shawarma, lamb chops, shanks and kibbeh dazzle the palate. Assaggi Mediterranean Bistro 330 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-584-3499; assaggibistro.com; $$$: Attractive atmosphere, creative menu of Mediterranean dishes influenced by Italian, French, Middle Eastern and Spanish cuisines. Full wine list. Blue Nile 545 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-5476699; bluenilemi.com; $$: You get to eat with bread, choosing from two all-youcan-eat choices. In a nod to the West, a full bar awaits your order. Buffalo Wild Wings 280 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-744-4470; buffalowildwings.com; $$: The nation’s leading chain sports bar offers its winning formula; website lists dozens in Michigan. Cantina Diablos 175 Troy St.; 248-808-6633; cantinadiablos.com; $$: Tex-Mex fare, frosty margaritas and friendly service. Christine’s Cuisine 729 E. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-584-3354; $$: A casual, comfortable place to dine, the menu dances from Eastern Europe into Italy, America and France. Daily specials. Club Bart 22726 Woodward Ave.; 248548-8746; $$: Club Bart’s normal breakfast menu is extensive enough, with 13 omelets and 10 pancakes or waffles. Full bar. Como’s 22812 Woodward Ave.; 248-5485005; $$: Though they do serve pizzas and pastas, Como’s is best-known as a lively bar scene. The Fly Trap 22950 Woodward Ave.; 248-399-5150; thefl ytrapferndale.com; $: You can get a burger and fries, or bacon and eggs, but after that the menu goes in all sorts of interesting direction. Closed Mondays. French Gourmet 23421 Woodward Ave.; 248-541-1200; $$: Grapevine-wrapped pillars, classical background music and jeweled murals provide the setting, but the prepared-to-order entrées are gems. Howe’s Bayou 22848 Woodward Ave.; 248-691-7145; howesbayouferndale.net; $$: Cajun and Creole food pleases those seeking a bit of Nawlins living. Full bar. Great bread pudding. Inyo Restaurant & Lounge 22871 Woodward Ave.; 248-543-9500; inyorestaurant.com; $$$: Wide-ranging menu, striking presentations, pleasing texture contrasts within a dish and excellent sushi and specialty cocktails. Maria’s Front Room 215 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-542-7379; mariasfrontroom.com; $$: Old-line Italian classics and some new lighter fare. Full liquor license. MiChigo Pizza 255 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248439-6195; michigopizza.com; $$: Chicagostyle deep dish pizza even diehard Chicagoans can appreciate. Sumptuous desserts and locally roasted coffee. Omega Hawg & Dawg Deli 2100 Hilton Rd.; 248-548-5700; $: Minimalist diner décor and “coney” fare. But expect inventive twists, such as a bag of sliders, “chilly dilly” and all-day breakfast. Cash only. Pete’s Place 1225 Woodward Heights; 248-544-4215; petesbroadwaycafe.com; $$: Peter Mel has transformed a dreary Coney Island into a hip eatery open all day. Broadway-themed posters and soundtrack, nice prices. Pinwheel Bakery 220 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-398-8018; pinwheelbakery.com; $: It’s a cozy neighborhood bakery, but also a gourmet bakery. Gift-ready items include bite-sized cookies sold by the pound and boxed with a ribbon. Rosie O’Grady’s 279 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-591-9163; 4rosieogradys.com; $$:

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313.886.8101 123 kercheval Grosse Pointe farms

www.thehillgrossepointe.com


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Bar-grill serves shrimp, burgers, chicken tenders, fries, pizza and frosty boat drinks. See website for Chesterfield location. Sakana Sushi Lounge 22914 Woodward Ave.; 248-336-2555; sakanasushilounge. com; $$$: Upscale sushi lounge, lush electro-acoustic lounge and raw fish artfully prepared. Good sake selection. Star of India 180 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248546-5996; $: Classic Indian menu includes two variations on korma, a creamy, yogurt-based sauce with a mild blend of spices punctuated by yellow raisins and slivers of almonds. Strawberry Moon Bakery 301 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-544-3141; $: Kid-friendly bakery uses organic flour from Owosso, selling not only baguettes and other loaves, but cookies, pastries, rolls, muffins and pizza. Toast 23144 Woodward Ave.; 248-3980444; $: Beautiful to look at. Weekday egg-fests include some pretty fancy fixings along with more regular fare, but it gets more lavish on the weekend. Via Nove 344 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-3369936; vianoverestaurant.com; $$: Upscale Italian fare includes several pasta choices, and dinner comes with crusty focaccia. Full bar has a nice selection of wines. Woodward Avenue Brewers 22646 Woodward Ave.; 248-546-3696; thewabsite.com; $: Dubbed, “a neighborhood bar with lots of style,” the top floor has huge windows overlooking Woodward Avenue.

FRANKLIN The Franklin Grill 32760 Franklin Rd.; 248-865-6600; thefranklingrill.com; $$: Seasonal menus, fresh ingredients, historic neighborhood. Housed in an original 1840 building, serving lunch, dinner, appetizers and drinks.

THE GROSSE POINTES Antonio’s in the Park 15117 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-821-2433; $$: Although the dishes are authentic Italian ones, mostly, they bow to American preferences. Nice space and a long and varied menu. Bambu 75 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe; 313-640-4115; $$: Lunchtime sees the largest crowds, drawn by creative paninis. Vegetarian-friendly choices. Dinner entrées (usually meat, fi sh, pasta) are adjusted daily. Bucci Ristorante 20217 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-882-1044; ristorantebucci.com; $$: Elegant, spacious, comfortable surroundings, open kitchen. Closed Mondays. Buddy’s Restaurant & Pizzeria 19163 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313884-7400; buddyspizza.com; $$: Buddy’s only started pumping out its awardwinning pizza in 1946. Nine locations in southeastern Michigan. City Kitchen 16844 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-882-6667; city-kitchen. com; $$$: Just about everything at City Kitchen merits praise: individual pizzas, generously proportioned mains, creative pairings of vegetables and starches. Excellent! Cotswold Café 1100 Lakeshore Rd., Grosse Pointe Shores; 313-884-4222; fordhouse. org; $$: An airy, solarium-like space, the café seats 54 at its white-clothed tables and an additional 20 at a lovely outdoor patio. Da Edoardo Ristorante & Trattoria 19767 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-881-8540; daedoardo.com; $$: Specializes in superb entrées; features

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formal and casual dining rooms; in business since 1978. Dirty Dog Jazz Café 97 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-882-5299; dirtydogjazz.com; $$: Jazz has a home on the east side in this pub-like setting. Good jazz performed in an upscale setting with fine food. Dylan’s Raw Bar and Grill 15402 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-8846030; dylansrawbar.com; $$: Full-size entrées are reasonably priced; the main attraction are 40-odd small plates averaging $6. Michigan beers. Ferlito’s 20745 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-882-1600; $: Neighborhood pizza joint’s selections range from a variety of pies to noodles to barbecue. Harvard Grill 16624 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-882-9090; $: You can create your own omelet here, piling items on until you’ve created a 2,000-calorie breakfast bomb. All omelets come with hash browns and toast. The Hill Seafood & Chop House 123 Kerchaval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313886-8101; thehillgrossepointe.com; $$$: Seafood is a strong point; desserts are rich; inventive chef’s specials. Janet’s Lunch 15033 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-331-5776; $: Founded in 1938, Janet’s still serves such diner mainstays as hot beef, hot pork, hot turkey and homemade pies. Jumps 63 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-882-9555; $$: The best choices, and best deals, are the appetizer samplers. The soups are reliable. Excellent service. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds 115 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-640-1700; $: Lakeside neighborhood burger joint also offers local fish dishes and other tavern fare. Mack Avenue Diner 19841 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-886-0680; mackavenuediner.com; $: Friendly diner, menu of down-to-earth dishes such as roast turkey, pastas and more. Original Pancake House 20273 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-884-4144; originalpancakehouse.com; $: Makes everything from scratch, and adheres to truth-in-menu honesty. Sanders Candy & Dessert Shop 16837 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-8824966; sanderscandy.com; $: You’ll find plenty of flavors of ice cream here, and it all can be made into sundaes, shakes, sodas, malts or “coolers.” Sprout House 15233 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe; 313-331-3200; $: A sort of organic grocery, also does a thriving carryout business in sandwiches and refrigerated dishes. Closed Sundays. TN Thai Bistro 17100 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe; 313-885-2695; $$: Dependable Thai food, sushi options, friendly service. Trattoria Andiamo 20930 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-886-9933; $$: Friendly trattoria is just right for casual, family dining. Reservations accepted, extensive wine list, cigar-friendly bar, disabled accessible. Village Grille and Bar 16930 Kercheval St., Grosse Pointe; 313-882-4555; $: This small neighborhood joint’s reliable food, friendly service and location, location, location often keep it full during the lunch hours.

HAMTRAMCK Aladdin Sweets & Cafe 11945 Conant St.; 313-891-8050; $: If you’re cool with plastic cutlery and polystyrene plates, prepare yourself for some of the best and

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cheapest Indian-influenced food. Café 1923 2287 Holbrook, 313-319-8766; cafe1923.com; $: Built in 1923, this former corner store has been lovingly restored with the period details that now make it such an appealing coffeehouse. Maria’s Comida 11411 Joseph Campau St.; 313-733-8406; mariascomida.com; $: Mexican-Asian fusion restaurant serves everything from jalapeños stuffed with lime cream cheese to several Asianinspired dishes. Polish Village Cafe 2990 Yemans St.; 313874-5726; thepolishvillagecafe.com; $: In a space with old-style character, Polish Village serves a few pages of meatand-potatoes Polish dishes and their accompanying sides. Polonia Restaurant 2934 Yemans St.; 313873-8432; polonia-restaurant.com; $: A menu of traditional Polish food, heavy on the meat and potatoes, but without gargantuan serving sizes. Monday through Saturday. Royal Kabob 3236 Caniff St.; 313-872-9454; $$: Short menu has everything from an ambitious platter to a humble, wax-paperwrapped falafel sandwich. Brisk take-out business, bright and commodious interior. Under the Eagle 9000 Joseph Campau St.; 313-875-5905; $: Solid Polish fare served by a staff in native dress in a room filled with colorful folk art. Amenities are extremely modest, but the value is outstanding.

HARPER WOODS Steve’s Back Room 19872 Kelly Rd.; 313527-5047; $$: An east side institution since 1988, serving Mediterranean lunches, it closes at 4 p.m. daily, but the St. Clair Shores location is open for dinner.

HARRISON TOWNSHIP Luigi’s 36691 Jefferson Ave.; 586-4687711; luigisoriginal.com; $$$: Typical Italian fare done well; seafood options include whitefish, steamed mussels, Cajun crawfish; exceptional pizzas.

HAZEL PARK Loui’s Pizza 23141 Dequindre Rd.; 248-5471711; $: The quintessential pizza joint, with food is served on plain plastic tableware. Aficionados flock to Loui’s for the uniquely charred, thick-crust, deep-dish pizza. Pi’s Thai Cuisine 24940 John R St.; 248-5454070; $: Friendly prices, superior spring rolls and limited seating. Pi’s heat levels should be approached with caution.

HUNTINGTON WOODS A Taste of the Orient 26661 Coolidge Hwy.; 248-546-6800; $$: Take-out place that gives lots of Asian options, including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai and Vietnamese.

KEEGO HARBOR Jeremy Restaurant and Bar 1978 Cass Lake Rd.; 248-681-2124; jeremysrestaurantandbar.com; $$$: Frequently changing, seasonal menu is short, so be confi dent what you order is done right. A lovely, stylish place. Modern Food & Spirits 1535 Cass Lake Rd.; 248-681-4231; modernfoodspirits. com; $$: A comfortable eatery where working stiff s can afford the highquality, sophisticated cuisine.

LIVONIA Akasaka 37152 Six Mile Rd.; 734-4622630; $$$: Sushi bar; full array of Japanese dishes that includes teriyakis, tempuras, noodles and yakitori. Claddagh Irish Pub 17800 Haggerty Rd.;

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734-542-8141; $$: Attempts to re-create the rich traditions of the great pubs of Ireland with an authentic “pub house” experience. Fun, friendly atmosphere. Traditional Irish fare. Giulio’s Cucina Italiana 31735 Plymouth Rd.; 734-427-9500; giuliositalian.com; $$: Great “al pesto” pizza and four veal dishes plus a braised veal roast and some American-sounding steaks. Haandi Cuisine of India 37116 Six Mile Rd.; 734-432-2088; haandimichigan.com; $$: Quiet, cloth-napkin atmosphere but intense and multifaceted flavors and a very long, mostly northern Indian menu. J. Alexander’s 19200 Haggerty Rd.; 734-464-9220; jalexanders.com; $$: J. Alexander’s is the kind of place where chicken fingers and coleslaw get all the attention that fi llet mignon might get at some gourmet joint. . Macaroni Grill 39300 Seven Mile Rd.; 734462-6676; macaronigrill.com; $$: The popular chain translates mom-and-pop Italian into a slick production. Szechuan Empire 29215 Five Mile Rd.; 734-458-7160; szechuanempire.com; $$: This is a busy little place, but the staff is friendly and attentive. CantoneseAmerican menu.

MADISON HEIGHTS Boodles 935 W. 11 Mile Rd.; 248-3995960; $$: Steak dominates here. Six “VIP” dishes are fl ambéed at two stations in the dining room. Soup or salad comes with entrées. The Breakfast Club 30600 John R Rd.; 248-307-9090; thebreakfastclubrestaurant.com; $: Fresh juice and daisies on the tables, delicious breakfast, quick service, kids menu. Open daily 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Grand Azteca 321 W. 14 Mile Rd.; grandazteca.com; 248-733-9662; $$: The menu is dominated by tacos, burritos, enchiladas, nachos and fajitas with the spice level toned down. Green Lantern Lounge 28960 John R Rd.; greenlaternlounge.com; $$: Thincrusted round pies and deep-dish pies come in four sizes from 10 inches to 16 inches. Reasonable prices. Juan’s Hacienda 31313 Dequindre Rd.; 248-583-9792; $$: The home of the flaming fajita? Yes, it’s excellent, and comes with three small tortillas and a plate of beans and rice. Pho Hang 30921 Dequindre Rd.; 248-5839210; $: Diners find the real deal at Pho Hang, where they’ll get the lightness and grace of Vietnamese soups, with their strong clear broths. QQ Café and Bakery 30941 Dequindre Rd.; 248-588-9899; $: In lieu of an expedition to Southeast Asia, local food enthusiasts can visit the southwest corner of 13 Mile and Dequindre roads. Thang Long 27641 John R Rd.; 248-5476763; $$: Delicious pho: A large bowl of clear beef broth, beef and rice noodles, with scallions and herbs added as chef and the diner decide. Thuy Trang 30491 John R Rd.; 248588-7823; $: A long menu of terrifi c, refreshing Vietnamese food in a stripmall setting. No one speaks much English, but the food is worth it.

MILFORD Cinco Lagos 424 N. Main St.; 248-6847455; cincolagos.com; $$: Imaginative, creative chef Brian Polcyn, a Beard Award nominee, serves high-quality Mexican fare in this spacious restaurant.


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MOUNT CLEMENS Bath City Bistro 75 Macomb Place; 586-4690917; bathcitybistro.com; $$: Expect bar appetizers, Belgian-style mussels, specialty steaks and Belgian trough bowling. Luigi’s 104 Macomb St.; 586-468-7200; $$: Traditional Italian fare: pasta, fish, chicken, veal, lamb beef — nary a disappointment among them. Pizzas are the gooey gourmet kind.

NORTHVILLE Deadwood Bar & Grill 18730 Northville Rd.; 248-347-4353; $$: Casual, comfortable atmosphere, magnificent hunting-lodge interior, varied menu offerings, outdoor terrace. Gaucho Brazilian Steak House 39550 W. Seven Mile Rd.; 248-380-7770; gauchosteakhouse.com; $$$: Brazilian churrascaria (steakhouse) is rodizio- style: all-you-can-eat, brought to you. Genitti’s Hole in the Wall 108 E. Main St.; 248-349-0522; genittis.com; $$$: Originally a meat and grocery store, it’s now a restaurant that adjoins a small theater. Good Italian food, comfortable environment. Guernsey Farms Dairy Family Style Restaurant 21300 Novi Rd.; 248-3491466; guernseyfarmsdairy.com; $: Go for an ice cream cone, or dairy products, or a meal of broasted chicken (the specialty). Koji Japanese Restaurant 146 Mary Alexander Court; 248-344-0888; kojisushi. com; $$: Family-owned Japanese restaurant committed to high quality, natural ingredients and no MSG. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro 17905 Haggerty Rd.; 248-675-0066; pfchangs.com; $$: Blends traditional Chinese cuisine and American hospitality in an upbeat bistro setting. Moderate prices. Poole’s Tavern 157 E. Main St.; 248-3491715; poolestavern.com $: A tavern since the early 1900s, now an updated bar and grille, serving baby-back ribs and inventive daily specials. Red Pepper Deli 116 W. Main St.; 248-7737672; redpepperdeli.org; $$: A dining destination for raw food enthusiasts, serving scrumptious, cashew-strewn fare, with vegetables, nuts, fruits, sprouts and seeds. Rocky’s Northville 41122 W. Seven Mile Rd.; 248-349-4434; rockysnorthville.com; $$: Founded in 1992, the award-winning restaurant prepares its dishes fresh and changes menus daily. Rusty Bucket Corner Tavern 15400 Sheldon Rd.; 734-254-9699; myrustybucket.com; $$: Midwestern mini-chain offers an “unpretentious, friendly, and approachable place to dine, celebrate or just hang.” Sizzling Sticks Cafe 144 Mary Alexander Court; 248-380-9400; $$: You select the combo of ingredients, and the agile young cooks wok it before your eyes. Tuscan Cafe 150 N. Center St.; 248-305-8629; thetuscancafe.com; $$: Freshly brewed coffees, high quality pastries, giant grilled sandwiches, friendly service, casual atmosphere. Zoup! Northville 20065 Haggerty Rd.; 248-374-1000; zoup.com; $: Zillions of varieties of soups that rotate on a daily and seasonal basis.

NOVI Ajishin Sushi & Noodle 42270 Grand River Ave.; 248-380-9850; $$: Yes, there’s excellent sushi and even grilled fish, but soup lovers rejoice: Ajishin’s hearty soups are extraordinary. Andiamo Novi 42705 Grand River Ave.; 248-348-3838; andiamoitalia.com; $$$$: Serving the award-winning cuisine that has

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propelled the Andiamo mini-chain to its current success. B.D.’s Mongolian Barbeque 43155 Main St., Suite 200; 248-735-1900; gomongo.com; $: You pick it, they wok it, you eat it. A winning formula that’s fun for everyone. Cherry Blossom 43588 W. Oaks Dr.; 248-3809160; $$: Marble-topped sushi and yakitori bars, tatami rooms and conventional tables with settings in shades of blue, green and brown. The full range of Japanese fare. Don’s of Traverse City 48730 Grand River Ave.; 248-380-0333; donsoftraversecity. com; $: This ‘50s-style diner serves handpatted burgers, shakes and malts. Gus O’Connor’s Irish 42875 Grand River Ave.; 248-465-9670; gusoconnors.com; $$: Irishinspired dishes (corned beef hash, bangers instead of regular sausage), but also omelets and waffles, salads and much more. The Melting Pot 26425 Novi Rd.; 248347-6358; meltingpot.com; $$$: Dip an assortment of breads, vegetables and apples in cheese fondue, or fruit in chocolate. See website for locations in Ann Arbor and Troy. Moe’s on Ten Seafood Grill 39455 W. 10 Mile Rd.; 248-478-9742; moeson10.com; $$: A simple formula: Take the freshest possible fish, complement it with light salsa lets the flavor through. No. VI Chop House & Lobster Bar 27790 Novi Rd.; 248-305-5210; $$$: As plush a steak and seafood house as can be found in the area, serving top-of-the-line fare in a darkly sophisticated setting. Rojo Mexican Bistro 44375 12 Mile Rd., Suite G-147; 248-374-4600; rojomexicanbistro. com; $$: Not just beans and rice here: They’re skillfully mixing contemporary and classic Mexican dishes for freshness, flavor. Shiro 43180 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-348-1212; shiro-restaurant.com; $$: Shiro attempts to balance the opposing cuisines of Japan and France — Japan’s stark simplicity, France’s rich excess. Steve & Rocky’s 43150 Grand River Ave.; 248-374-0688; steveandrockys.com; $$: Desserts are some of the best features of this upscale yet casual fi sh place. A lower-priced lunch menu makes it an affordable treat. Toasted Oak Grill & Market at the Baronette Renaissance, 27890 Novi Rd.; 248-277-6000; toastedoak.com; $$: Such charcuterie as terrines, patés and rillettes are excellent, served amid bare tables, a mirrored ceiling, vintage signs and posters.

OAK PARK Bread Basket 26052 Greenfield Rd.; 248-968-0022: A favorite local deli with four-deckers, cold beet borscht, cheese blintzes and stuffed cabbages. Eddie’s Gourmet 25920 Greenfield Rd.; 248-968-4060; $$: At Giorgio’s, you can get a grilled cheese sandwich or steak Diane, or choose from the gourmet section of the menu. Ernie’s Market 8500 Capital St.; 248541-9703; $: Ernie himself slices meat, adds toppings and gives your sandwich “the love,” telling stories and spreading happiness. Pita Cafe 25282 Greenfield Rd.; 248-9682225; pitacafe.com; $$: Busy place serves the familiar (baba, shawarma, roasted veggies) and the less-so (arayis, ghallaba). Excellent food. Sukhothai 25226 Greenfield Rd.; 248-9689495; sukhothai-thaicuisine.com; $$: Strip mall location conceals quality food.

PLEASANT RIDGE Cork Wine Pub 23810 Woodward Ave.; 248-544-2675; corkwinepub.com; $$:

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Decorated in an eclectic, contemporary kitsch, the menu showcases about 18 small plates. In wine and spirits, Cork really shines. Mae’s 24060 Woodward Ave.; 248-5485355; maesdetroit.com; $$: Open until 4 p.m. every day except Mondays, Mae’s menu is naturally focused toward breakfast and sandwiches.

PLYMOUTH Addis Ababa 273 N. Main St.; 734-4149935; Little heaps of fabulous dishes are placed on a giant circle of spongy injera bread, which everyone shares. Compari’s on the Park 350 S. Main St.; 734-416-0100; comparisdining.com; $$: Authentic Italian fare, with outdoor dining on a good summer day. Sidewalk seating in good weather. Fiamma Grille 380 S. Main St.; 734-416-9340; fiammagrille.com; $$$: Boasting a sleek and retro-accented ambience, Fiamma has steaks and seafood dishes to boast about. Grape Expectations Wine Bar and Merchant 555 Forest Ave.; 734-455-9463; gewinebar.com; $$: Stocks more than 100 bottles, 50 of them for sale by the glass, and serves Italian- and Spanishinfluenced small plates. Ironwood Grill 840 W. Ann Arbor Trail; 734-667-5614; ironwoodgrillplymouth. com; $$; Meat-centered menu includes ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and ovenfired pizzas. Open daily. La Bistecca Italian Grille 39405 Plymouth Rd.; 734-254-0400; labistecca.net; $$$: Serving certified Piedmontese beef that’s low in fat and cholesterol, as well as fresh seafood, veal and chops. Wine list, live music. Little Bangkok Cuisine 545 Forest Ave.; 734-414-8696; $$: The Von Bondies’ Jason Stollsteimer adores this Thai place in downtown Plymouth, where he orders the pad see ew. Omelette & Waffle Cafe 580 Forest Ave.; 734-454-6510; $: Don’t entrust your breakfast to people who only do it part time. “Breakfast is our specialty!” Open daily 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Penn Bar & Grill 820 Penniman Ave.; 734453-3570; $$: Serving American pub fare for lunch and dinner in a bustling environment. Kitchen open until 1 a.m. weekend nights. The Plymouth Crossing 340 N. Main St., #100; 734-455-3700; plymouth-crossing. com; $$: Steaks, chops, veal, chicken and pasta. Extensive wine list, good service, relaxed atmosphere, bar, banquet center, open-air patio. Zapata’s Mexican Kitchen 600 Ann Arbor Trail; 734-451-8226; zapatas-plymouth. com; $: Mexican fare, salsas made fresh throughout the day.

ROCHESTER/ ROCHESTER HILLS CK Diggs 2010 W. Auburn Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-853-6600; ckdiggs.com; $$: Beer galore at this sports pub-grill; lunch and dinner menus offer traditional bar fare. Crust Pizza & Wine Bar 2595 Rochester Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-844-8899; crustpizza.net; $$: The flavors at Crust are a revelation — not to mention the wines chosen to go along with them. Kruse and Muer on Main 327 N. Main St., Rochester; 248-652-9400; kruseandmuerrestaurant.com; $$: American-style steak and seafood restaurant has pastas, char-broiled fish and chicken, and pizza bread. Mind Body & Spirits 301 S. Main St., Rochester; 248-651-3663; $$$: Rooftop solar panels, cork flooring and a bio-

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digester? Yes, it’s earth-friendly, but it also has tasty, filling but light food. Mitchell’s Fish Market 370 N. Adams Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-340-5900; mitchellsfishmarket.com; $$: Fresh seafood, ever-changing menu can include fish from the Chilean coast, Bering Strait and beyond. Paint Creek Tavern 613 N. Main St., Rochester; 248-656-2322; paintcreektavern.com; $: Serving appetizers, soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches and specialty pizzas. Red Knapp’s Dairy Bar 304 S. Main St., Rochester; 248-651-4545; $: Thick malted milkshakes, burgers that are big and simple half-pound, hand-formed patties on bakery-fresh buns. Rochester Mills Beer Co. 400 Water St.; 248-650-5080; beercos.com; $$: Brewpub has extensive menu of pastas, fish, ribs, lasagna and more. Sukhothai 54 W. Auburn Rd.; Rochester Hills; 248-844-4800; sukhothaithaicuisine.com; $$: Quality Thai fare in a friendly, casual setting. Take Sushi 1304 Walton Blvd., Rochester Hills; 248-652-7800; takesushimichigan. com; $$, Tiny and busy, serving Japanese beer, offering sushi to eat in or to go. Two Sisters Polish Family Restaurant 121 S. Main St., Rochester; 248-656-3092; $$: Down-home Polish cooking and the nononsense ambiance of granny’s kitchen.

ROSEVILLE Lazybones Smokehouse 27475 Groesbeck Hwy.; 586-775-7427; lazybonessmokehouse.net; $$: You can tell by the smiling pig mascot, this is the east side’s beefiest bone yard. Mr. Paul’s Chop House 29850 Groesbeck Hwy.; 586-777-7770; mrpaulchophouse. com; $$: A good old steakhouse in a dimly lit, brick-walled structure. Beef dishes average $25. Leave room for cherries jubilee.

ROYAL OAK Al’s Famous Deli 32906 Woodward Ave.; 248-549-3663; alsfamousdeli.com; $: Local deli for locavores, buying and selling Michigan-based products. See breadbasketdelis.com for more locations. Andiamo 129 S. Main St.; 248-582-9300; andiamoitalia.com; $$: Unquestioned master of the Best Italian Chain category in our annual readers’ poll. In the Royal Oak kitchen, Stephen J. Kuclo Jr. has helped add a few specialties to the menu of old reliables. Bastone 419 S. Main St.; 248-544-6250; bastone.net; $$: Belgian brewpub is unpretentious, quirky and interesting, with fare heavily influenced by Germany and France. Beirut Palace 105 S. Main St.; 248-399-4600; $: Just across the street from the Main Art Theatre, Beirut makes a great start to a night at the movies. All food is very fresh, and they make a great Turkish coffee. BlackFinn 530 S. Main St.; 248-542-9466; blackfinnroyaloak.com; $$: Referred to instead as “an American saloon,” the sprawling, boisterous lounge has great standards, including steaks. Cafe Habana 419 S. Main St.; 248-5446255; cafehabanas.com; $$: Excellent, reasonably priced Cuban cuisine in a fun, funky-chic setting, along with Latin music and a full bar. Cafe Muse 418 S. Washington Ave.; 248544-4749; cafemuseroyaloak.com; $$: No “omelets”; the kitchen serves scrambled eggs instead, and ingredients can include truffle oil, Boursin cheese and shredded basil. Camelia’s Mexican Grill 1304 E. 11 Mile Rd.;

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248-544-8900; cameliasmexicangrill.com; $$: Mexican food made from fresh ingredients, with a wide gamut of heat levels. Chicken Shack 1320 E. 11 Mile Rd.; 248541-5100; chickenshack.com; $: Since starting in Royal Oak in 1956, Chicken Shack’s “broasted” chicken, pressurecooks birds in their own juices; 18 locations listed at its website. Comet Burger 207 S. Main St.; 248-4144567; $: Quirky décor includes pink vinyl, stainless steel chairs, Formica tabletops and album covers on the walls. The sliders and malts are tasty. D’Amato’s 222 S. Sherman Dr.; 248-5847400; damatos.com; $$: Neighborhood Italian joint has eclectic and “from scratch” fare, and 30 glasses and 60 bottles of wine. Inside is the Goodnight Gracie martini bar. Delmar Family Restaurant 1207 E. 11 Mile Rd.; 248-543-2773; $: Most of the omelets are less than $6, and they’re all classics. Falaffel King 32748 Woodward Ave.; 248554-9881; falaffelking.com; $: Inexpensive Middle Eastern standards served in a plain, tiny storefront. Green Lantern Lounge 4326 Rochester Rd.; 248-298-3005; greeenlanternlounge. com; $: Reasonable prices, and signature Detroit-style pies. Inn Season Café 500 E. Fourth St.; 248-5477916; theinnseasoncafe.com; $$: Fine, organic ingredients have always been this vegetarian restaurant’s hallmark, but the health food nature of the cooking has been eclipsed. Katana Nu-Asian Steakhouse 111 S. Main St.; 248-591-9900; $$$: Katana offers the fine art of teppanyaki, or grilling. Expect to pay extra for this dinner-and-a-show, or take the booths and tables for the bistro-sushi menu. Leo’s Coney Island 110 S. Main St.; 248336-8093; leosconeyisland.com; $: Chances are that if you’re walking out of a bar in metro Detroit, there’s a Leo’s location within striking distance. Lily’s Seafood 410 S. Washington Ave.; 248-591-5459; lilysseafood.com; $$: Stunning interior, friendly service and a kitchen that believes homemade is best, down to the house-made cream soda and four house-made beers. Lockhart’s BBQ 202 E. Third St.; 248-5842227; lockhartsbbq.com; $$: Teasonably priced, heft y portions of barbecue; appetizers average $8; barbecue plates around $13. Memphis Smoke 100 S. Main St.; 248-5434300; $$: Memphis Smoke offers more than juicy ribs and pulled pork po’ boys — it also plays a gracious host to many of the area’s best blues acts. Mezza Mediterranean Grille 212 Fifth Ave.; 248-414-7000; mezzagrille.com $$; Mezza has all the usual classics at bargain prices, and with larger than usual servings. Motimahal 411 S. Washington Ave.; 248298-3198; $$: Indian curries get a variety of treatments: biryani, korma, balti, rogan and tandoori, to name a few. Lunch buffet seven days a week. Monterrey Cantina 312 S. Main St.; 248-545-1940; $$: Young, friendly staff, big portions, colorful setting, serving burritos, quesadillas, tacos and enchiladas and some fun drinks, such as the “Iguana” margarita. Mt. Chalet 32955 Woodward Ave.; 248549-2929; $$: It’s both a full-service restaurant with pretensions of culinary respectability and a boisterous watering hole with sports on TV. National Coney Island 1812 N. Main St.; 248-398-6111; nationalconeyisland.com; $: More than 20 locations. See website

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for spots from Clawson to Waterford; some serve beer and wine. Noodles & Company 470 S. Main St.; 248-548-7700; $: Fast food made with fresh vegetables and organic tofu. Menu is internationally inspired, including specialties from China, Japan, Thailand, Russia and Italy. Oak City Grille 212 W. Sixth St.; 248-5560947; oakcitygrille.com $$$: Menu spills over with filet mignon, peppercorn sirloin and pecan-encrusted trout at reasonable prices. Pasquale’s 31555 Woodward Ave.; 248549-4002; pasqualesrestaurant.com; $$: Try “Brown’s special”: It’s loaded with cheese, pepperoni, bacon, ham, onions, green peppers, green and black olives, and mushrooms. Pizzallica 121 E. 13 Mile Rd.; 248-733-1111; pizzallica.com; $$: Self-described as making “platinum-selling pizza,” as well as subs and salads, they offer take-out and delivery until 3 a.m. most nights, midnight on Sundays. Pizza Paesano 415 S. Washington Ave.; 248-547-2751; $: Open late for Royal Oak hanger-outers, Pizza Paesano serves more than pies, including marvelous gyros, calzones, a spinach pie and a spicy meat pie. Pronto! Royal Oak 608 S. Washington Ave.; 248-544-7900; $: If you want to avoid the pricey, overcrowded Main Street restaurants, go to Pronto. Brightly colored walls, a creative and fun sandwich menu. Red Coat Tavern 31542 Woodward Ave.; 248549-0300; $$: Red Coat offers its famous hearty half-pound hamburger, regularly judged the best burger in the region. Ronin 326 W. Fourth St.; 248-546-0888; roninsushi.com; $$$: In a stylish setting, bandana-clad sushi chefs vigorously chop and slice at the sushi bar turning out firstrate sushi and sashimi. Sangria 401 S. Lafayette Ave.; 248-5431964; sangriaroyaloak.com; $$: The featured dishes, tapas and paella, require a leisurely schedule. With a pitcher of sangria and a good friend, you have an enjoyable evening ahead. Tokyo Sushi & Grill 315 S. Center St.; 248284-0165; $$: Offers more than 100 items just in the “rolls” category. For those who fear the raw, there are plenty of tempura items in the rolls. Hot appetizers are also done well. Town Tavern 116 W. Fourth St.; 248-5447300; towntavernroyaloak.com; $$: Elegant 21st century bistro. Grazers can easily make a hearty meal of the “barplate” appetizers. Bustling, noisy. Tongue Thai’d 32166 Woodward Ave.; 248-549-4112; $: Serves authentic, fine Thai cuisine: spring rolls so good, they often sell out after lunch, Thai flavored beef jerky with sticky rice and a variety of fried rice, noodles and curry dishes. Vinotecca 417 S. Main St.; 248-5446256; vinotecca.com; $$: Patrons can learn from knowledgeable waiters; eclectic wine list is well-balanced among vineyards around the globe. Vinsetta Grill 28028 Woodward Ave.; 248-543-2626; vinsettagrill.com; $$: Build your own burger of beef, turkey or veggie with a dazzling array of choices. What Crêpe? 317 S. Washington Ave.; 248629-9391; whatcrepe.com; $: The little French food pocket is a hit because it’s all fresh, it cooks in a flash, and it doesn’t break the bank. And What Crêpe? has 50 to choose from. Zumba Mexican Grille 121 N. Main St.; 248-542-1400; zumbagrille.com; $: The entrées are familiar: burritos, tacos, quesadillas and tacons. But you get your


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choices of meats and toppings as it’s built, then eat in or take out.

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Athens Souvlaki 21738 W. 11 Mile Rd.; 248-356-6463; $: Little Greek diner that’s home of the most consistently satisfying gyros in Michigan. Bacco Ristorante 29410 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-358-0344; baccoristorante. com; $$$: Glitzy crowd. Menu focuses on light, contemporary Italian. Beans and Cornbread 29508 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-208-1680; beansandcornbread.com; $$: Busy, colorful dining spot features bright artwork and a bustling open kitchen. Copper Canyon Brewery 27522 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-223-1700; coppercanyonbrewery.com; $$: The menu encompasses everything from

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cheese sticks, onion rings and wings through pizza, burgers and filet mignon. Fishbone’s Rhythm Kitchen Cafe 29244 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-351-2925; fishbonesusa.com; $$$: The Fishbones formula is simple: rich Cajun food, more food and a lively, fun setting. Irene’s Southern Cookin’ 18680 W. Eight Mile Rd.; 248-423-0988; $: A little neighborhood place with all the virtues and vices of down-home cooking. Meriwether’s 25485 Telegraph Rd.; 248358-1310; $$$: Comfortable, down-home ambience, with fresh fish and seafood delicacies plus steaks, pastas, sandwiches and salads. Mi Loc 23043 Beech Rd.; 248-356-2155; $$: Korean restaurant also serves Japanese food, but also Korean barbecue: thinsliced marinated beef prepared on gas grills built into the tables, then eaten with sauces. New Seoul Garden 27566 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-827-1600; newseoulgarden. com; $$$: Japanese and Korean food, including a grand “barbecue combination special” that comes with soup, appetizer and dessert. Original Pancake House 19355 W. 10 Mile Rd.; 248-357-3399; originalpancakehouse. com; $: The quintessential breakfast, served all day. Pizzeria Biga 29110 Franklin Rd.; 248750-2500; pizzeriabiga.com; $$: Biga is a pizzeria plus — pizza is the only main course, but the menu includes homefashioned charcuterie and small plates. Sweet Lorraine’s Cafe 29101 Greenfield Rd.; 248-559-5985; sweetlorraines.com; $$: Casual, fun and sophisticated, awardwinning chef Lorraine Platman’s fusion joint has marked 25 years. Taste of Ethiopia 29702 Southfield Rd.; 248-905-5560; tasteofeuthiopia.com; $: The delicious Ethiopian bread, injera, is simply the vehicle for eating the various stews and sautes. Zoup! 29177 Northwestern Hwy.; 248-7992800; $: All-soup, nothing-but-soup, and a rotating list of 200 varieties at that. Ziggy’s Cheesesteaks 30140 Southfield Rd.; 248-594-3890; ziggyscheesesteaks. com; $: A line of 10 different cheesesteak sandwiches, as well as loose steakburgers, chicken sandwiches and combo meals. Zyggyz Grill & Chill Indo-American Fast Food 28505 Northwestern Hwy.; 248796-7234; zyggyz.com; $: A sit-down place, quite informal, where you order from a menu and a server brings your food. Try the mango lassi.

STERLING HEIGHTS Andiamo Italian Bistro 14425 Lakeside Circle, at Lakeside Mall; 586-532-8800; andiamoitalia.com; $$: This spot, part of Detroit’s dominant mini-chain, specializes in upscale Italian cooking. Bangkok Cuisine 2149 15 Mile Rd.; 586977-0130; bangkokcuisine.net; $$: Beef, pork, chicken, vegetable and seafood entrées come in various, delicious, spicy styles. Beer and wine. Cheeseburger in Paradise 13883 Lakeside Circle, at Lakeside Mall; 586-532-9828; cheeseburgerinparadise.com; $: The food is a good foundation for all manner of fun boat drinks. Ike’s Restaurant 38550 Van Dyke Rd.; 586979-4460; ikesrestaurant.com; $$: The huge menu meanders through steaks and seafood to Italian and Greek dishes before it gets to Lebanon, with heft y portions. Joe Bologna Trattoria 2135 17 Mile Rd.; 586-939-5700; joebologna.com; $$:

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S. State St.

Andiamo Lakefront Bistro 24026 E. Jefferson Ave., Harbor 9 Marina; 586-7737770; andiamoitalia.com; $$$: Upscale Italian fare with a few concessions for powerboaters; excellent water views and a cozy bar. Beach Grill 24420 Jefferson Ave.; 586-7714455; beachgrillrestaurantandresort. com; $$: From burgers and pizza on the spacious lakefront patio to Dom and filet mignon in the dining room, the Beach Grill caters to all. Blue Goose Inn 28911 E. Jefferson Ave.; 586-296-0950; bluegooseinn.com; $$: Bill of fare includes appetizers, soups, salads, burgers, sandwiches, pizza and a variety of seafood and steaks. Fishbone’s Rhythm Kitchen Cafe 23722 Jefferson Ave.; 586-498-3000; fishbonesusa.com; $$: What began as a Creole-Cajun sort of establishment now offers not just Nawlins-influenced fare but American and sushi as well. Gim Ling Restaurant 31402 Harper Ave., St. Clair Shores; 586-296-0070; $: The food is artfully presented and attended to with extra attention. Golden Chopsticks 24301 Jefferson Ave.; 586-776-7711; $: Food quality varies widely, with sizzling rice soup and nongreasy potstickers a definite yes. Familiar Chinese menu. Moy’s 21425 Greater Mack Ave.; 586772-6662; $: The friendly neighborhood Chinese takeout joint. Nautical Deli 23839 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores; 586-776-9898; $$: With everything baked, prepared and mixed every morning, the emphasis is on freshness. River Crab and Blue Water Inn 1337 N. River Rd.; 810-329-2261; $$: Lakefront restaurant specializes in seafood, and also runs the 21-room inn, which has terrific water views. Shores Inn 23410 Greater Mack Ave.; 586-773-8940; shoresinn.com; $$: Shores Inn specializes in regional and creative American cuisine. Featuring a huge dark wood bar. Choose among 150 beers that span the globe. Steve’s Back Room 24935 Jefferson Ave.; 586-774-4545; stevesbackroom.net; $: The house specials feature what is best about Middle Eastern food: the sprightly flavors of lemon, garlic, parsley and olive oil. Travis Restaurant 23500 Greater Mack Ave.; 586-778-0101; $: Quirky corner diner that, in the wee hours, hostels the night owls of the Nautical Mile bar scene. Open 24-7. Waves 24223 Jefferson Ave.; 586-773-3840; waveschillgrill.com; $: Join other revelers slurping their tsunamis and clams on the half-shell, or try the Montego Bay calamari.

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N. University Ave.

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Cuisine that scores well on the cost-benefit scale, with a reasonably priced wine list. La Saj Lebanese Bistro 13776 Southcove Dr.; 586-566-6600; lasaj.com; $$: Vegetarian-friendly. One of the best bets is madjara, an earthy mélange of lentils and cracked wheat. Loon River Cafe 34911 Van Dyke Rd.; 586-979-1420; $$: Attached to a Best Western Hotel, the lodgelike dining room succeeds nicely in its woodsy up-North feeling. The fare is in keeping with the rural Michigan theme. The Pantry 34220 Van Dyke Ave.; 586939-1370; thepantryrestaurant.com; $$: Extensive breakfast selections. See website for locations in Clinton Township and Washington. Seoul Garden 2101 15 Mile Road; 586264-4488; $$: Seoul Garden holds down the basics of Korean cooking: garlic and sesame. A horizon-broadening selection of 10 side dishes in white bowls accompanies dinner.

TROY Ashoka Indian Cuisine 3642 Rochester Rd.; 248-689-7070; ashokaindiancuisine.com; $$: Bright colors, rich fl avors, exotic aromas, and more than 150 items on the menu, from the North to the South. Full bar. Baja Fresh Mexican Grill 1357 Coolidge Hwy.; 248-822-9000; bajafresh.com; $: Tex-Mex food that’s fast, inexpensive and tasty. Big Beaver Tavern 645 Big Beaver Rd.; 248-680-0066; bigbeavertavern.com; $$: Sports tavern, with burgers, fries, wide-screen televisions and poker and blackjack tables in the basement. Cafe Sushi 1933 W. Maple Rd.; 248-2801831; $$$: Sleek sushi bar for those who want to try Japanese food but are scared away by raw fi sh. Delicious food, above-average service. Camp Ticonderoga 5725 Rochester Rd.; 248-828-2825; campticonderoga.com; $$: Loaded with hunting lodge appeal, Ticonderoga serves plenty of game. Franco’s Cafe 3614 Rochester Rd.; 248528-0153; myfrancoscafe.com; $$: Simply decorated, with the pastas averaging around $13 and the other entrées around $18. Closed Mondays. Hippo’s 1648 Rochester Rd.; 248-5249778; hipposhotdog.com; $: Hippo’s serves all manner of hot dogs, from all over the United States. Kona Grill 30 E. Big Beaver Rd.; 248-6199060; konagrill.com; $$: Moderately priced Hawaiian cuisine in an attractive dining space. Most mains cost less than $20. Small, versatile wine list. Lebanese Grill 1600 Rochester Rd.; 248-526-1444; lebanesegrill.com; $$: Informal, bare-tabled restaurant with an encyclopedic menu of more than 50 dinner entrées. Loccino Italian Grill & Bar 5600 Crooks Rd.; 248-813-0700; loccino.com; $$: Elegant but casual, the kitchen covers most of the Italian bases with a slight overemphasis on creamy sauces and breaded dishes. Intelligent wine list. Maggiano’s Little Italy 2089 W. Big Beaver Rd.; 248-205-1060; maggianos. com; $$$: One of dozens in a national chain, this upscale family restaurant is designed to look and feel like a venerable neighborhood institution. McCormick & Schmick’s Seafood Restaurant 2850 Coolidge Hwy.; 248637-6400; mccormickandschmicks.com; $$: Posh setting, but the food’s the clincher. An impressive list of more than

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30 fresh-catch off erings. Mon Jin Lau 1515 E. Maple Rd.; 248-6892332; monjinlau.com; $$$: One of the most extravagantly decorated of all the Chinese restaurants on this side of the river, serving nouveau Asian fare. NYC Pizza 2885 W. Maple Rd.; 248-2809800; nycitypizzeria.com; $: NYC’s creative pies range from simple cheese to Buff alo chicken to a “spicy taco” pie. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro 2801 W. Big Beaver Rd.; 248-816-8000; pfchangs. com; $$: P.F. Chang’s menu strays from authentic. But the entrées are excellent, and drinks include a variety of wine, beer and spirits. Parrot Cove Yacht Club 33475 Dequindre Rd.; 248-585-6080; parrotcoveyachtclub.com; $$: Huge servings of solid bar food in a raffi sh but homey clubhouse. Flaunts seven burger variations that can also be constructed with ground turkey. Priya 72 W. Maple Rd.; 248-2690100; priyarestaurant.com; $$: Priya specializes in hard-to-find dishes from southern India, such as ricelentil crêpes, but the extensive menu sprawls across the subcontinent. Recipes 2919 Crooks Rd.; 248-6145390; $: An upscale but relaxed place for breakfast, with fare that runs the gamut from the traditional to the adventurous. Tokyo Sushi & Grill 30 W. Square Lake Rd.; 248-828-0090; $$: If the thought of raw fi sh strikes fear in your heart, order tempura or teriyaki. Or go for the big bowls of udon and soba noodle soups. Tre Monti Ristorante 1695 Big Beaver Rd.; 248-680-1100; tremontitroy.com; $$: Serving the food of San Marino, which is very similar to Italian, but includes some pleasing variations.

UTICA Buca di Beppo 12575 Hall Rd.; 586803-9473; bucadibeppo.com; $$: Fast-growing chain attempts to recreate the Southern Italian immigrant experience of the 1950s. Good, inexpensive food, even the tiramisu. Dave & Buster’s 45511 Park Ave.; 586930-1515; $$$: Chuck E. Cheese for grown-ups serves up big portions of tender ribs, good half-pound burgers, broccoli-and-cheddar soup and overthe-top desserts.

WALLED LAKE Uptown Grille 3100 E. West Maple Rd.; 248-960-3344; uptowngrille. com; $$: Fun environment, oft en with live entertainment, full bar, specialty drinks, kid-friendly.

WARREN Andiamo Italia 7096 E. 14 Mile Rd.; 586268-3200; andiamoitalia.com; $$: The fl agship of the Andiamo mini-chain, their newly expanded banquet facility can cater parties of 650. The Chocolate Gallery Cafe 3672 Chicago Rd.; 586-979-1140; chocolategallerycafe.com; $: A breakfast and lunch place built on desserts. The prices are sweet too. Golden Harvest 6880 E. 12 Mile Rd.; 586751-5288; $$: Specialty is seafood and daily dim sum. Quiet, soothing décor. Open 11 a.m.-12 a.m. daily. Grand Azteca 26548 Dequindre Rd., Warren; 586-558-7373; grandazteca. com; $$: Tacos, burritos, enchiladas, nachos and fajitas with the spice and

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fi re level toned down.

WATERFORD Bread Basket Deli 101 N. Telegraph Rd., Waterford; 248-683-2244; breadbasketdelis.com; $: Local chain has its newest location in Waterford; see website for all seven locations. Chung’s of Waterford 4187 Highland Rd.; 248-681-3200; $$: Glamorous setting for old favorites, including the famous Chung egg roll, along with Cantonese, Szechuan, Hunan dishes.

WEST BLOOMFIELD Allegro 7295 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-7375075; $$: Expect herring and potatoes, blini with caviar, pilimeni, smoked fish, sturgeon, and lamb, chicken or pork shashlik. D’Pauli’s Gourmet Diner 6215 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-737-3636; $$: A mix of traditional diner fare with gourmet Italian dishes. Eurasian Grill 4771 Haggerty Rd.; 248-6246109; eurasiangrill.com; $$: Asian-based, new-American cooking. Kitchen Hanzo 6073 Haggerty Rd.; 248624-8666; $$: Japanese salarymen go here after work — and there’s a large and loyal clientele. Larco’s Italian Grill 6480 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-626-6969; larcositalian.com; $$: Pastas and steaks in generous portions are equally emphasized in an upbeat setting. The Lark 6430 Farmington Rd.; 248661-4466; thelark.com; $$$$: This tilelavished country inn with just a dozen tables is charming. Attentive staff, reservations a must. Maria’s Restaurant 2080 Walnut Lake Rd.; 248-851-2500; mariaswestbloomfield. com; $$$: Maria’s leans towards traditional, heavily sauced Italian dishes, but often with welcome touches. Mene Sushi 6239 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-538-7081; $$: The multi-course “Bento Box for Two” is a bargain. The long, complex menu includes Korean specialties such as bimbimbap. Milk & Honey 6600 W. Maple Rd.; 248661-2327; $$: Located inside the Jewish Community Center, Milk and Honey is a gourmet restaurant that just happens to be kosher. Red Coat Tavern 6745 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-865-0500; $$: Northern outpost of the famous Red Coat in Royal Oak, serving some of the most famous burgers in metro Detroit. Sea Grille 6199 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248487-0326; seagrille.com; $$$: Expect such seafood as Parmesan-crusted whitefish and ahi tuna with Asian peanut vinaigrette. Affordable wines. Shangri-La 6407 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248626-8585; ordershangrila.com; $$: Dim sum is the Chinese equivalent of Sunday brunch; carts rolling to your table, you point out what you want. Sharaku Sushidokoro 6159 Haggerty Rd.; 248-960-1888; $$: The most authentic Japanese restaurant in metro Detroit, offering 25 daily-changing appetizers and a relatively short list of entrées. Stage Deli 6873 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-8556622; thestagedeli.com; $$: Serving deli classics and almost anything else, from salmon teriyaki to English-style fish and chips. Uptown Parthenon 4301 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-538-6000; $$: Greek fare, but with some unusual dishes, such as baby octopus in a wine sauce. Yotsuba Japanese Restaurant and Bar 7365 Orchard Lake Rd.; 248-7378282; yotsuba-restaurant.com; $$: The restaurant, which has a twin in Ann

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Arbor (2222 Hogback Rd., 734-971-5168), serves both sushi and an extensive menu of cooked foods.

WESTLAND Ashley’s 7525 Wayne Rd.; 734-525-1667; ashleys.com; $$: Another iteration of the successful Ann Arbor multi-tap pub. Burgers, pizzas, pastas, steaks and more. Beaver Creek Tackle & Beer 1609 N. Wayne Rd.; 734-722-5330; beavercreektackleandbeer.com; $$: A menu with lots of meaty classics, running from wings to even game.

WYANDOTTE Portofino 3455 Biddle Ave.; 734-2816700; portofinoontheriver.com; $$$: Great water views. In fine weather, boats even tie up at Portofino’s dock. Seafood appetizers and pasta choices are consistently excellent. R.P. McMurphy’s 2922 Biddle Ave.; 734285-4885; $$: There are more than a dozen sandwiches on the menu at this eclectic neighborhood gathering place, including several vegetarian choices. Full bar; brief wine list.

YPSILANTI Abe’s Coney Island 402 W. Michigan Ave.; 734-485-2008; $: Popular after-bar stop and breakfast. Open 24-7. Aubree’s Saloon 39 E. Cross St.; 734-4831870; aubrees.com; $: Friendly joint with pizzas and beer, warm hospitality and family ownership. Beezy’s Coffee and Café 20 N. Washington St., Ypsilanti; 734-485-9625; beezyscafe. com: Coffeehouse also serves fresh soups, salads, sandwiches and fresh bread. Bentley’s American Grille 1274 S. Huron St.; 734-821-6116; $$: A restaurant inside the Ypsilanti Marriott serving American grill cuisine; great views. Bread Basket 4003 Carpenter Rd.; 734677-7717; breadbasketdelis.com; $: A favorite local deli with four-deckers, cold beet borscht, blintzes and more. Cafe Luwak 42 E. Cross St.; 734-4828050; cafeluwak.co; $$: Perhaps best known for its weekend breakfast buffet: scrambled eggs, mini omelets, pancakes, waffles and more. Dalat Vietnamese Restaurant 100 W. Michigan Ave.; 734-487-7600; dalatcorestaurant.com; $: Ypsi’s outpost for the famed and healthful Southeast Asian cuisine. Fattoush Grill 2224 Washtenaw Rd.; 734434-8801; $$: The authentic Lebanese salad, huge food portions, bargain prices and attentive staff make this place memorable. Golden Wall 421 W. Cross Ave.; 734-4827600; $: The menu combines Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine in an ambitious list of entrées, adapted to Midwestern tastes. Harvest Moon Cafe 5484 W. Michigan Ave.; 734-434-8100; harvestmooncafe. biz; $$: Home-style country cooking, extensive kids’ menu, many choices when it comes to beer and wine. Sidetrack Bar and Grill 56 E. Cross St.; 734-483-1035; sidetrackbarandgrill.com; $$: Specialty is interesting beers, and the undisputed star of Sidetrack’s extensive menu is the burger. Tap Room 201 W. Michigan Ave.; 734-4825320; taproomypsi.com; $$: Downtown Ypsilanti’s oldest bar has atmosphere, live music and broiled 1/3-pound burgers. Ugly Mug Cafe & Roastery 317 W. Cross Ave.; 734-484-4684; uglymugcafeandroastery.com; $: Hip, artisan coffee shop uses “scientific theory” to brew its coffee. Smart!


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(Located on the NW corner of Woodward Ave & Warren - near Wayne State University campus)


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a grab bag of cultural jetsam, from completed paint-by-numbers canvases to foot-powered player pianos. The Town Peddler Craft and Antique Mall 35323 Plymouth Rd., Livonia; 734-513-2577: Mammoth antiques mall with everything from Victorian lampshades to vintage baseball cards in 24,000 square feet. Xavier’s 2546 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313964-1222: Midcentury modern design and couture clothing, beautiful blown glass, Lucite tables.

AUDIO EQUIPMENT DJS Pro Audio and Lighting 3842 E. 13 Mile Rd., Warren; 586-582-0871; djsproaudioandlighting.com: Supplier of DJ equipment, such as lighting, speakers and karaoke machines.

BEAUTY SUPPLY

SHOPPING „ Quirky shopping abounds at the Rocket in downtown Ypsilanti.

ADULTS ONLY 42 Degrees 615-1/2 E. William St., Ann Arbor; 734-665-9600: A favorite smoke and head shop, with artfully crafted, hand-blown glass pipes. BDT Pipe & Tobacco 21640 John R Rd., Hazel Park; 248-542-6110; buzzbdt. com: Meticulously cluttered specialty boutique, with water pipes and professional, knowledgeable staff. The Foggy Bottom Bayou 213 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-913-1040: Pipe and accessory store featuring in-house crafted materials at attractive prices. Helpful, intelligent staff. Harp’s Lingerie 265 S. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-642-2555: A small store stuffed with bras, nighties and lingerie. Helpful, discreet. Intimate Ideas 32239 Little Mack Ave., Roseville; 586-285-9439; see myintimateideas.com for locations throughout metro Detroit: Adult novelty store sells all the old standbys — sex toys, bachelorette party supplies, videos and, of course, books. Lover’s Lane 31372 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak; 248-549-9478; seven more locations in Clinton Township, Flint, Novi and Ypsilanti at loverslanestore. com: With enough kink to satisfy the curious, both Lover’s Lane offer racy negligees and fetish accoutrements aplenty. Noir Leather 124 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-541-3979; noirleather.com: Kinky suburban establishment with a saucy selection of masks, paddles and clothes. A local classic since the 1980s. Puff Danny’s Glass Boutique 19 N. Hamilton St., Ypsilanti; 734-480-1422; puffdannys.com: Head shop peddles blown glass items and other accessories, such as papers, vaporizers and more. The Station 25940 Michigan Ave., Inkster; 313-561-7969; thestationboutique.com: Long a way-station for heads, hippies and novelty-seekers, the helpful folks here will help you light up in style. Three Doors Down 5526 Dixie Hwy., Waterford; Pipes, hookahs, bongs, all for legal tobacco use, natch, as well as detox drinks and incense. Uptown Books 16541 Woodward Ave., Highland Park; 313-869-9477; 16401 W. Eight Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-836-0647:

Central city and Detroit border locations for the trench coat crowd; magazines, DVDs and adult novelties; secure parking.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES American POP 175 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-837-2127: Like the coolest garage sale ever. Packed to the rafters with kitschy memorabilia: movie posters, board games, Pee-Wee Herman toys, wind-up robots, cocktail shakers and vintage furniture. Ann Arbor Antiques Market 5055 Ann Arbor Saline Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-6620496; annarborantiquesmarket.com: Presents several large showings each year of antiques and collectibles of a wide array of styles. Antelope Antiques & Coins 255 E. Liberty St, Ann Arbor; 734-663-2828; antelopeantiques.com: Buying, selling, appraising and estate liquidation. Bowerbird Mongo 210 W. Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-482-4595; bowerbirdmongo.com: Self-described as a “collection of wonderful treasures that … might be found in a museum of antiquity in the distant future.” DuMouchelles 409 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-963-6255: From furniture to tribal art to toys, textiles and costumes, the place to go for blue-chip art and antiques. Found 407 N. Fifth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734302-3060; foundgallery.com: Eco-friendly, handmade jewelry, candles, vintage finds, art supplies, paper goods, skin care, workshops. Many gifts less than $20. Leon & Lulu 96 W. 14 Mile Rd., Clawson; 248-288-3600; leaonandlulu.com: Former roller rink-turned-store. A whopping 15,000 square feet of expansive, charming, home decoration and highend tchotchke heaven. Materials Unlimited 2 W. Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-483-6980; materialsunlimited.com: Architectural salvage, with antique restored lighting, fireplace mantels, stained and beveled glass and more. Retro 14246 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-3074: Desks, dressers, armoires and other furnishings from 1900-1970. Jewelry, accessories, clothing, glassware, linens. Leading antique dealer. Showcase Collectibles 3409 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-831-6397: Resale shop with

Cherry Beauty Department 13421 W. 10 Mile Rd, Oak Park; 248-545-4900: Perennial winner of best mega beauty supply store. MAC Cosmetics 18900 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-996-8071; more locations at maccosmetics.com: Garnered honors as having the “best makeup counter.” Sally’s Beauty Supply 16201 Ford Rd., #102, Dearborn; 313-336-7140; more locations at sallybeauty.com: Best nonmega beauty supply store.

BOOKS & COMICS The Big Bookstore 5911 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-831-8511: Quirky, hit-or-miss used selection, but very unusual selection of old stag magazines. Book Beat 26010 Greenfield, Oak Park; 248-968-1190; thebookbeat.com: Stuffed-to-the-gills store feels more like a compulsive collection of cool stuff that just happens to be for sale. Crazy Wisdom Bookstore & Tea Room 114 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-6652757; crazywidsom.net: Holistic health, body-mind therapies, psychology, Buddhism, alternative spiritual practices, spiritual development. Detroit Comics 23333 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-548-2669; detroitcomics. com: Boutique feel, decent periodicals selection, graphic novels and handcrafted comics-related merchandise. Green Brain Comics 13210 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-9444: Comic books, collectibles, perfect-bound graphic novels, from superheroes to avantegarde and beyond. Live events. John K. King Books 901 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit; 313-961-0622 and 22524 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-5489050: Best independent bookstore. The Ferndale store has a great selection, but it’s dwarfed by the original store with volumes on the four stories of an old glove factory. Leopold’s 15 E. Kirby St., Detroit; 313875-4677; www.leopoldsbooks.com: Good general selection of books, graphic novels, periodicals, small-market books, note cards. Library Bookstore 169 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-545-4300: Small, friendly bookstore with an intelligently managed collection of books and old magazines. Marwil Bookstore 4870 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-832-3078: In business forever, specializing in textbooks for students, but also a very good magazine selection. Nicola’s Books 2513 Jackson Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-662-0600; nicolasbooks.com: Extensive children’s section, fiction and more. Vault of Midnight 219 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-998-1413; vaultofmidnight.com: Geek

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heaven, with comics, toys and collectibles. Wonderworld 22347 Ecorse Rd., Taylor; 313-292-8697; wonderworldcomics.com: Comics, graphic novels, both the latest releases and hundreds of thousands of back-issues, plus toys and games. BREWING SUPPLIES Kuhnhenn Brewing Co. 5919 Chicago Rd., Warren; 586-979-8361: The storied brewery has a full line of brewing materials across the parking lot. Wine Barrel Plus 30303 Plymouth Rd., Livonia; 734-522-9463; winebarrel.com: Seller of wines, but primarily of home brewing and winemaking materials and hydro supplies.

CLOTHING Caruso Caruso 166 W. Maple Rd., Birmingham; 248-645-5151; carusocaruso.net: Men’s and women’s apparel, largely shirts and denim pants. Chi Chi and the Greek 3543 Elizabeth Lake Rd. Waterford; 248-255-5039; chichiandthegreek.com: Cozy vintage resale store that’s more like a fashion museum with its collection of designer clothes and French fashions. Collected Works 303 Detroit St., Suite 107, Ann Arbor; 734-995-4222; collectedworksannarbor.com: Clothing, jewelry, accessories and gifts with an “arty” flavor. Personal service. Council Resale Shops 13297 W. 12 Mile Rd., Berkley; 248-548-6664: Resale shops with selection, style, savings. Dragonfly Clothing 163 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-547-7545: Stylish boutique with up-to-the-minute clothes for clubbing or kicking back. Wearable art, soaps and candles. DSE @ Grand 202 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-963-0533; dsedetroit.com: T-shirts from such designers as Chillers Clothing, Destroy, Exact Science and King Poetic. Fantasy Attic 19 E. Cross St., Ypsilanti; 734482-5409; fantasyattic.com: Costume and theater supplies (think makeup, wigs) shop specializing in character costumes (think Star Trek , Dorothy). Flo’s Boutique 404 W. Willis St., Detroit; 313-831-4901: Selling women’s apparel, as well as belts, hats, caps and shirts for men, this hip shop is right along a strip of like-minded independent businesses. Hosiery with Style at the Shops in Kresge, 1201 Woodward Ave., Detroit; hosierywithstyle.com: Women’s clothing, including hosiery, jewelry, and some racier stuff. Incognito 323 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-548-2980: Punky, funky and fun attire for scenesters and wannabes alike. Footwear, clothing and accessories. Maggie’s Functional Organics 306 W. Cross St., Ypsilanti; 734-482-4000; maggiesorganics.com: Believes workers should be treated ethically and that clothing should be durable, affordable and constructed of environmentally sustainable materials. Mathilde’s Imports 407 N. Fifth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-214-1248: Women’s boutique offers a carefully selected collection of unique apparel from around the world. Mr. Alan’s 24734 Southfield Rd., Southfield; 248-559-7818; for more locations, see mralans.com: The latest kicks and freshest hip-hop threads for the fashion-savvy. Affordable prices and special sales. Rachel’s Place 2124 Pine St., Detroit; 313-964-9008: A resale shop chock-full of vintage clothing, shoes, hats and accessories. Set inside an old home, it’s tucked away on an anonymous street.


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Rear Ends 6905 Orchard Lake Rd., West Bloomfield; 248-626-4333: Great selection of women’s premium denims and designer T-shirts. Rebecca Lambers, Couture 201 E. Liberty St., Suite 4, Ann Arbor; rebeccalambers. com: Dressmaker and designer of fine, custom apparel for women. Renaissance 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor; 734-769-8511; renaissanceannarbor.com: Established in 1971, carries clothing, with “made to measure” service for suits, sport jackets, trousers, vests, shirts, overcoats, skirts, blouses and dresses. Showtime Clothing 5708 Woodward, Detroit; 313-875-9280: Terrific selection of hip men’s clothing, especially affordable rock star glam. Unleash your inner Keith Richards.

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SEE 160 S. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-723-1900; for more locations in Ann Arbor, Birmingham, Rochester and Troy, see seeeyewear. com: Funky, fabulous eyewear designed exclusively for their stores and offered at affordable prices. Optik Birmingham 245 W. Maple Rd., Birmingham; 248-646-6699; optikbirmingham.com: Vintage and contemporary eyewear, accessories and objets d’art. Spectacles 230 E. Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-963-6886: “For those that like to stand out” is Spectacles’ motto.

FABRICS Haberman Fabrics 905 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-541-0010; habermanfabrics. com: Extensive collection of fine fabrics and patterns, bridal accoutrements, down pillows, decorating fabrics and more.

FLEA MARKETS, BAZAARS & THRIFT Bloomfield-Keego Resale Shop 3425 Orchard Lake Rd., Keego Harbor; 248681-5424: Great used haute couture, and sometimes a Dior dress for a third of the retail cost. All in a little red-and-white brick building next to a diner. DAV Thrift Store 8050 N. Middlebelt Rd., Westland; 734-513-6020: Could have everything from tight-fitting ’80s T-shirts for $1 to car seats and golf clubs for bargain prices. Proceeds go to programs that help veterans. Dixieland Flea Market 2045 Dixie Hwy., Waterford; 248-338-3220; dixielandfleamkt.com: Has more than 250 independent merchants offering antiques and collectibles. Gibraltar Trade Center 237 N. River Rd., Mt. Clemens; 586-465-6440; Eureka Rd. & 1-75 (Exit 36), Taylor; 734-287-2000: Best flea market has everything from antiques to cell phones — or even antique cell phones. Royal Oak Flea Market 316 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak; 248-246-3276: Wild array of cool stuff at an indoor-outdoor flea market that spills onto the porch of the Farmers’ Market Sunday mornings (except holidays). Russell Bazaar 1600 Clay St., Detroit; russellbazaar.com: More than 100 vendors offering a diverse grab bag of goods and services, selling everything from clothing and fine art to imported Asian crafts and kitchenware. Value World 8300 Woodward, Ave., Detroit; 313-294-0018: Best thrift store has several locations, but this inner-city locations seems to have the most hidden treasures.

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FLORISTS Blumz 1300 Broadway, Detroit; 313-9645777; 503 E. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248398-5130: Great florist, vibrant window displays and reasonable pricing.

GENERAL Acme Mercantile 111 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-213-3722; acmemercantile. com: Like “the world’s smallest department store” in 900 square feet.

GIFTS Aroma of the Alps 1008 Oak St., Wyandotte; 734-818-7445: For the all-natural person who still enjoys the warmth of a flame, this new business vends homemade, scented soy candles. Blast in the Past 28071 S. Gratiot Ave., Roseville; 586-775-3289: Action figures, toys (some still in boxes), videos, CDs, vinyl. Bargains galore. The Boston Tea Room 195 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-547-2987; 121 Elm St., Wyandotte; 734-281-2244: bostontearoom.com: Hosts psychic readings and stocks metaphysical products, meaningful gems and stones, good books and organic tea. The Candle Wick Shoppe 195 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-547-2987; candlewickshoppe.com; bostontearoom. com: The Candle Wick Shoppe stocks an in-house line of hand-made-in-Ferndale candles, intentional candles and incenses, oils. Chelsea Teddy Bear Company 400 N. Main St., Chelsea; 734-433-5499; chelseateddybear.com: They can help you find the right teddy bear, even with a custom message on teddy’s T-shirt. Made to order, just for you. City Bird 460 W. Canfield St., Detroit; 313831-9146; ilovecitybird.com: Siblings Andy and Emily Linn’s Detroit-themed craft business is an example of how the young, smart and creative can thrive in Detroit. Earth Lore 15076 Middlebelt Rd., Livonia; 734-762-0717: New Age emporium is a little Zen oasis in a sweltering corporate American desert, specializing in unique, multicultural gifts from across the globe. Hollander’s 410 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-741-7531; hollanders.com: Artistic papers, bookbinding supplies, how-to books, stationery and more. Middle Earth 1209 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-769-1488; middleearthgift s. com: Everything from anti-authoritarian T-shirts to entire picture books about bad haircuts, as well as soaps, candles, art postcards, old-timey candies, and more. Organic Bliss 117 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-3047; organicblissproducts.com: Organic products promote natural, pure, healthy living. The Peaceable Kingdom 210 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-668-7886; theaapk.com: Accessories, bath and body, folk art, holiday presents, jewelry and toys. Polish Art Center 9539 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 888-619-9771: Authentic Polish arts items available for that handmade touch. The Rocket 122 W. Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-483-2291; shoptherocket. com: Astounding selection of candies, T-shirts, novelties, humor and other gift s, with a local emphasis. Scout 508 S. Washington Ave., Royal Oak; 248-548-1065: A seamless array of new and vintage, from offbeat kitchen items and funky home decor to greeting cards, fine art prints and books. Selo Shevel Gallery 301 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-6263; seloshevelgallery.


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com: The finest hand-crafted American and imported folk art available, including hand-blown glass, ceramics and wood. Shine 621 S. Washington Ave., Royal Oak; 248-414-5277; shopshine.net: Eclectic boutique, includes highend candles and beauty products, stylish housewares, swanky jewelry, contemporary home decor. Sports Mania 400 Monroe St., Detroit; 313-962-0391: Deals on big league sports apparel, both college and pro, as well as Detroit souvenirs, right near Greektown. Tranquilitea 904 Ann Arbor Trail, Plymouth; 734-459-9686; tranquilitea. com: Fine teas from around the world and an interesting gift selection. The Twisted Shamrock 276 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-544-4170; thetwistedshamrock.com: Bringing products from Ireland to Michigan, including apparel, glassware, music, books and stationery, but especially jewelry with a Celtic touch. Wall Candy at BSC, Inc. 20919 John R Rd., Hazel Park; 248-545-5888; wallcandyshop.com: Wall Candy can take your favorite photo and turn it into an awesome work of art with photo enhancement, and can put that photo on almost anything.

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LIVING

HYDRO & GROWING SUPPLIES Ann Arbor Hydroponics (Hot Hydro) 5245 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-761-5040; hothydro.com: Hydroponic lighting, seeds, organic fertilizer, planting media, environmental controls and more. Big Daddy’s Hydroponics 13211 Northend, Oak Park; 248-399-5299; bigdaddyshydro.com: Hydroponic growing accessories sold by owner Rick Ferris, who designs custom grow systems. The Cultivation Station 23529 Little Mack, St. Clair Shores; 877-HYDRO-313; more locations in Allen Park, Chesterfield and Detroit at tcs-hydroponics.com: Yearround supplier of indoor and outdoor gardening supplies, specializing in hydroponic products. Everything Green Hydroponics 29460 Ford Rd., Garden City; 734-421-GROW: The newest entry in the hydroponics business, this shop just opened in February 2011. Gro Blue 207 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-913-2750; gro-blue.com: A familyowned hydroponic gardening supplies store specializing in organic and eco-

Shadow Art Fair shadowartfair.com THIS DIY craft fest of “stuff that people make” has run since 2005, and now draws thousands of visitors twice a year. It was founded by a group of friends that included Ypsilanti zinesters Linette and Mark Maynard, and Mark says they “started it for all the reasons we got into zining ... to bring together a lot of people doing creative stuff who had dead-end jobs.” But the fair is no small beer, and it has grown into a large, juried and fun event allowing local artists to exhibit and sell works within a “comfortable, friendly, and supportive setting.” Twice a year, the 12-hour mini-fest takes over Ypsi’s Corner Brewery, keeping shopping local and spirited, with live music, craft beer and unusual special activities.

16 Hands Gallery 216 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1110: Jewelry, Judaica, wall art, kitchen and dining, gifts, home accents, lighting, office supplies, books and cards. The Brass and Iron Bed Shop 863 W. Ann Arbor Trail, Plymouth; 734-455-1909: The finest in brass and cast iron bed frames, including custom work. Bureau of Urban Living 460 W. Canfield St., Detroit; 313-833-9336: A bit pricy, but a lovingly curated collection of everything from kitschy stationery and kitchenware to cookbooks from Eastern Market to Mrs. Meyer’s cleaning products. Ikea 41640 Ford Rd., Canton; 734-9816300: It’s 311,000 square feet of furniture and other goodies designed with sleek Swedish lines. Mezzanine 206 E. Grand River Ave., Second Floor, Detroit; 313-887-0900: Mezzanine boasts a carefully curated showroom of modern and contemporary furniture and lighting. Moss & Associates Furniture Distributors 1804 Miller Rd., Dearborn; 313-8410460; mossfurniture.com: Family-owned, affordable, mostly for commercial shoppers, but residential dwellers shouldn’t be deterred. Motawi Tileworks 170 Enterprise Dr.,

LODGING

Ann Arbor ; 734-213-0017; motawi.com: Handcrafted art tiles known for rich glazes and uniquely American, designs inspired by nature, art and architecture since 1992.

CRAFT CORNER

HOMEGOODS & FURNISHINGS

GETTING AROUND

friendly products. The Grow Show Stone School Plaza, 4095 Stone School Rd., Ann Arbor; 734677-0009; thegrowshow.org: Extensive hydroponic and organic growing supplies. H2Hydroponics 702 Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake; h2hydro.com: Your one-stopshop for indoor gardening, with lights, growing media, fans, filters, pots, nutrients and more. Hydro Giant 21651 W. Eight Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-387-7700; hydrogiant.com: “Family-friendly” hydroponic indoor gardening supply store with large showrooms and “earth-friendly” products. The Hydro Grow 8210 Telegraph Rd., Taylor; 313-633-0641; thehydrogrow. com: Lighting, nutrients, containers, hydro setups and more make this a great grow supply house. Hydro Harry’s 24500 Dequindre Rd., Warren; 586-758-6020; in February, at 29581 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills: The very finest in garden supply and hydroponics equipment. Hydro Heaven 13641 W. Eight Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-861-0333; hydro-heaven. com: A full line of products for the hydroponic gardener, including pro-mix can filters. HydroSpot 34236 Michigan Ave., Wayne; 734-722-1285; hydrospots.com:

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Hydroponic equipment store stocks extensive supplies on Wayne’s main drag. Indoor Garden Superstore 2570 Dixie Hwy., Waterford; 248-673-2200; indoorgardensuperstore.com: Advanced nutrients, general hydroponics equipment, grow lights, cloning supplies and more. Superior Growers 29220 Seven Mile Rd., Livonia; 248-473-0450; see superiorgrowers.com for Lansing location: Showroom with hydroponics systems, grow lights, greenhouse and indoor gardening supplies for commercial and hobby growers. Third Coast Garden Supply 2327 Auburn Rd., Shelby Twp.; 586-997-2700; thirdcoastgardensupply.com: Organic and hydroponic gardening supplies with a focus on environmental sustainability. UltraGreen Hydroponics 9300 Telegraph Rd., Redford; 313-534-9376: Plenty of supplies for indoor and hydroponic gardening; the store is “very pro-medical marijuana.” Wine Barrel Plus 30303 Plymouth Rd., Livonia; 734-522-9463; winebarrel.com: Seller of wines, brewing supplies has a huge hydroponics section.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

JEWELRY

PET SUPPLIES

Abracadabra Jewelry & Gem Gallery 205 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-9944848; abragem.com: Artisan jeweler offers exquisitely crafted custom-made and artisan jewelry and a selection of sparkling gems. Astreins Jewelers 120 W. Maple Rd., Birmingham; 248-644-1651; astreinjewelers.com: Owned and operated by Richard and Gary Astrein more than 30 years. Friendly, knowledgable staff. Custom work. Dillon’s Jewelers 1007 S. Wayne Rd., Westland; 734-722-3839; dillonsjewelers. com: Cash for gold, but also a complete line of new jewelry. Two miles south of Ford Road. Emery’s Creative Jewelry 30975 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-855-0433: Neighborhood jeweler offers the chance to have it your way. Fredrick Jewelers 889 W. Long Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-646-0973; fredrickjewelers.com: Custom designs and full-service repair since 1953. Greis Jewelers 32940 Middlebelt Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-855-1730; greis.com: The go-to spot for those seeking upscale, quality jewelry (although items priced as low as $25 can be spotted in the store). Mastercraft Jewlers Laurel Park Place Mall, 37668 W. Six Mile Rd., D-205, Livonia; 734464-3555; mastercraftjewelers.com: New location. Reputation for quality design and service, great selection, repair services. MB Jewelry 6600 Telegraph Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-356-7007; mbjewelrydesign.com: Women’s and men’s jewelry, custom designs for earrings, watches, necklaces, brooches, rings and more. Mount-N-Repair Silver Jewelry 205 Pierce St., Birmingham; 248-647-8670: Huge inventory for browsing, custom designs, appraisals, restrings and repair, engraving and more. Steven Bernard Jewelers 22266 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-562-8484: Serving Dearborn for generations, with selection and repair. Tapper’s Diamonds & Fine Jewelry 6337 Orchard Lake Rd., West Bloomfield; 248932-7700 and 27716 Novi Rd., Novi; 248465-1800; tappers.com: Extensive selection is only outshone by the blinding brilliance of its diamond engagement rings.

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Blues Airmen Guitars 30955 Ford Rd., Garden City; 734-525-9101; bluesairmenmusic.com: Billed as “the store for real musicians,” they do their guitar and amp repair in-house, sometimes while you wait. Guitar Center 31940 Gratiot Ave., Roseville; 586-296-6161; for more locations, see guitarcenter.com: Many employees are local rockers who can answer tech questions that some huge dude eating a sandwich behind a glass counter probably wouldn’t know. Play before you buy, but no “Stairway.”

GETTING AROUND

LODGING

LIVING

| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 39

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PAWN SHOPS Bim’s Jewelry & Loan 5676 W. Fort St., Detroit; 313-843-7113: Family-owned pawnshop has the usual goods: tools, musical instruments, coins, jewelry and more. Zeidman’s Loan Office 2669 Gratiot Ave., Detroit; 313-567-7170: Zeidman’s says you can pawn up to $1 million worth of stuff. Get rid of musical instruments, stereos, hunting equipment, power tools, boat titles and more, here. Or buy them.

Dogma Catmantoo 208 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-929-0022; dogmacatmantoo.com: Veterinarianowned, comfortable place where pets and their people can find great stuff, hang out, have fun, and learn. Pet Supplies Plus various locations at petsuppliesplus.com: Friendly chain where your pet is welcome while you shop. Chew toys are located on lower shelves for easy canine grabs.

RECORD STORES Dearborn Music 22000 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-561-1000: Classic record store stocks not just music but has an excellent selection of rock ’n’ roll toys and novelties, including lifelike action figures. Detroit Threads 10022 Joseph Campau St., Hamtramck; 313-872-1777: Like a hip thrift store. Walkways are small, stuff is stacked and packed, but a lot of clothes, records and everything in between. Encore Recordings 417 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-662-6776: For a truly tactile record-buying experience, Encore in Ann Arbor beats all comers. Recordings in every format and genre tower around you. Record Collector 327 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-548-9888: Specializing in rock, jazz and old- and new-school R&B, but plenty of classical, country, bluegrass, and more, CDs and vinyl. Highly knowledgeable staff and low-key vibe. Record Time 27360 Gratiot Ave., Roseville; 586-775-1550: Independent record store with plenty of vinyl discs, cool staff of witty dudes in specs and cynical girls in dirty Converse, just like the old days. Melodies and Memories 23013 Gratiot Ave., Eastpointe; 586-774-8480: Great CD selection in a seemingly neverending maze of rooms, but it’s also a pop museum, with thousands of rare 45 picture sleeves, signed photos, myriad classic lunch pails and more. People’s Records 3161 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-831-0864; peoplesdetroit. com: Crate-digger’s paradise with tons of amazing vinyl, all had on the cheap, with 45s, LPs, soul, funk, electro, disco, hip hop and soul-jazz vinyl. Stormy Records 13210 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-581-9322;

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stormyrecords.com: Self-described “weirdo music” specialty store. Street Corner Music Unlimited 17620 W. 13 Mile Rd., Beverly Hills; 248-6444777: Good find for your inner cratedigger, drawing vinyl-heads from all over, stocking classic soul, funk, hip hop, jazz and rock.

SHOE STORES Bob’s Classic Kicks 4717 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-832-7513: Boutique sneaker inventory includes Converse, Reebok, Nike and more, with discerning taste in inventory. Burn Rubber Sneakers Boutique 202 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-5433000; burnrubberdetroit.com: Rapper Roland Coit (stage name Octane) and professional tap dancer Rick Williams peddle multihued, hard-to-find shoes. DSW Shoes Oakland Plaza, 600 John R Rd., Troy; 248-307-1428; more locations at dsw.com: Unleash your inner Imelda with thousands of discounted designer shoes fi t for the true footwear connoisseur. Mast Shoes 1517 Jackson Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-662-8118; mastshoes.com: Open since 1942, providing quality shoes and excellent service, with footwear designed for improving your personal level of comfort. Red Wing Shoe Store 16054 Eureka Rd., Southgate; 734-282-4015; redwingshoes. com: Specializing in heavy duty, purposebuilt work boots. Scott Colburn 20411 Farmington Rd., Livonia; 248-476-1262: One of Detroit best Western outfi tters, with thousands

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| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 41

of boots for men, women and children. Van Boven Shoes 17 Nickels Arcade, Ann Arbor; 734-665-7240; vanbovenshoes. com: Washtenaw County’s largest UGG boot and shoe dealer.

SPORTING GOODS Bivouac 336 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-6207; bivouacannarbor.com: Personal service at this local, non-chain outdoor shop. Sells general brand gear, as well as the more expensive, lightweight boots, jackets, backpacks and tents for climbing and hiking. Putterz 2675 Washtenaw Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-434-2838; putterz.com: Onestop shop for golfing gear and family entertainment, with everything from a large game room to batting cages to a 54-hole miniature golf course. Open spring through fall.

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SWEETS Doc Sweets Candy 120 S. Rochester Rd., Clawson; 248-597-1051; docsweets.com: Michigan’s largest retail candy store is a gigantic candy wonderland, with 5,000 square feet of candy and thousands of different candy items. Gayle’s Chocolates 417 S. Washington Ave., Royal Oak; 248-398-0001; gayleschocolates.com: Delicious and fun destination for an affordable luxury with unusual specialty or seasonal choices. Sarah Beez New World Bakery 734489-3523; sarahbeez.com: Fresh from their “magic oven,” providing Michigan

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EAST SIDE Melodies and Memories 23013 S. Gratiot Ave., Eastpointe; 586-774-8480

THE STORE has the Midwest’s largest selection of box sets, from country to rock to jazz to blues to avant-garde, and it takes whole rooms to house its selections — a couple for its dance titles, another for its classic and pop rock, one for its jazz and R&B, one for its Krautrock, punk, techno and used, and another room for its blues and soundtracks. It often has three stereos going at once, playing different music in different rooms. The place is huge, a lovely crammed-but-organized mess of pop culture and music, which sees more than 50,000 different titles. Melodies is Beatle-freak heaven too (try stumping Bob or Dan on any Fab Four trivia — dudes are faster than Google), and it’s a bin-diver’s dream (you actually have to get on your knees to hunt through the vinyl).

WEST SIDE Dearborn Music 22000 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-561-1000

YOU’D NEVER KNOW the sales of physical music are down and that the record biz is in the toilet when you step into this glorious record emporium. It’s like walking into late last century, a time when record stores hummed fi scally and were crammed full of new and obscure music you couldn’t wait to sift through. There are tens of thousands of titles here (more than $1,000,000 worth), including up-to-theminute and rare imports from Italy, Europe and Japan, and a whole room of just blues and jazz, used and new, plus DVDs, pop culture trinkets and assorted ephemera. You can find hi-res titles too, Alice Cooper gold CDs, box sets and tons of vinyl. This well-run, organized shop has lasted more than 50 years (!) for good reason.

(313)-561-7969 • 25940 Michigan Ave.

www.thestationboutique.com


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medical marihuana “medibles” — cookies, brownies, muffins — to caregivers, patients and collectives only. Schakolad Chocolate Factory 110 E. Washington, Ann Arbor; 734-2131700; more locations at schakolad. com: German for “chocolate,” but delicious in any language, expect dreamy confections, novelties, gift s, even sugarfree and low-carb choices. Yummy Town 16745 21 Mile Rd., Macomb Township; 586-477-2100: This unassuming Macomb Township store holds a panoply of sugary sweet treats from candy lips to Big League Chew to more upscale British and Canadian confectioneries.

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Thomas Video 4732 Rochester Rd., Royal Oak; 248-280-2833; thomasvideo.com: Great video store, amazing selection, helpful service. More than a video rental joint, with books, magazines and collectibles; scads of old VHS tapes going cheap.

VINTAGE CLOTHING Consignment Clothiers 42945 Seven Mile Rd., Northville; 248-347-4570: Great women’s accessories and clothing at this consignment shop. They do fashion resale right, with loads of newer in-season clothing, shoes, jewelry and accessories. DejaVu 32750 Franklin Rd., Franklin; 248-855-4567: Right in the heart of downtown Franklin Village, upscale ladies’ resale boutique, with designer clothing, handbags and more. The Getup Vintage 215 S. State St., No. 3, Ann Arbor; 734-327-4300; thegetup.com: With 50 years in the business, this resale shop has apparel for women and men, accessories, footwear and iron-ons. The Hoard House 10022 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-721-9956: More than just clothes, the Hoard House has an unusual selection of furniture, records, kitsch, old bottles and more. Lost & Found Vintage 510 S. Washington Ave., Royal Oak; 248-548-6154; lostandfoundvintage.com: Enough backward-gazing apparel to teleport you into the past faster than a Family Guy flashback. Eager-eyed, gracious staff, authentic period clothing. Mantra 3401 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-6570728; mantragifts.com: Nostalgia galore! But it’s not all kitschy knickknacks, with vintage furniture, lamps, wall-hangings and even clothing, at bargain prices.

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Mother Fletcher’s 234 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-398-4816: Great, longstanding vintage clothing store with beautiful broaches, ’60s dresses, A-line skirts and more. Recycled Treasures 12101 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-330-7076; recycledtreasureshamtramck.org: Community thrift store sells the usual mélange of goods, but the store also takes a larger role by helping the environment and directly servicing the local community. Regeneration 23700 Woodward Ave., Pleasant Ridge; 248-414-7440: Maybe calling it a resale shop doesn’t really do it justice, but no label seems to quite fit this outfitter with fashionable, contemporary name brands, ’70s print dresses and more.

NUTRITION

GROCERY STORES Arbor Farms Market 2103 W. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor; 734-996-8111; arborfarms.com www.arborfarms.com: Local and organic produce and protein, knowledgeable nutrition staff. Holiday Market 1203 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-541-1414; holiday-market.com: High-end everything, including fresh sushi, cheese, olives, a stunning wine and spirits selection, pastries, a butcher’s counter and cooking classes. Honey Bee/La Colmena 2443 Bagley St., Detroit; 313-237-0295; honeybeemkt. com: Roll your cart along the aisles to the tune of Mexican music and choose from homemade salsa, cactus, banana leaves, mango, organic milk and imported laundry detergent, all at cheap prices. Mediterranean Market & Bakery 32839 Northwestern Hwy., Farmington Hills; 248-538-9552: Great ethnic market: Turkish delights fill the aisles and jeweltoned hookahs line the walls. Natural Food Patch 221 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-546-5908; naturalfoodpatch. com: Good selection of dairy alternatives, health supplements and fair-trade and organic foods, including vegetarian and vegan food at great prices. Papa Joe’s Gourmet Market and Catering 6900 N. Rochester Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-853-6263; 34244 Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-723-9400; papajoesmarket.com: Has 500 fruit and vegetable items, a “breadsmith,” a patisserie and an extensive “Gourmet to Go” section. Prime meats, fresh seafood

GENERAL EXCELLENCE Acme Mercantile 111 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-213-3722; acmemercantile.com

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TAKE A SHORT TURN off Ann Arbor’s bustling Main Street and travel half a block until you reach a stately brownstone with display windows crammed with an odd assortment of products, from cleaning supplies to novelty gift s and do-it-yourself guide books. This crowded little store is Acme Mercantile, the self-described “world’s smallest department store,” which packs into 900 square feet many goods traditionally found at old school hardware stores, office supply stores and drugstores. Acme Mercantile opened in 2002 in order to fill gaps left in downtown Ann Arbor with the closing of those other indie businesses, and the resulting store, despite its size, is easy to get lost in. Products range from organic pet food and natural body washes to tiki mugs and cocktail napkins, T-shirts and shower curtains to kitchen clocks and cannabis cookbooks, as well as a plethora of other fanciful goodies that pop with practical whimsy.


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Bars & Clubs Recreation Health & Beauty

getting around Lodging Living

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| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 45

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Penzeys Spices 17712 W. 13 Mile Rd., Beverly Hills; 248-647-6177; penzeys.com: Wisconsin-based Penzeys Spices began as a mail-order outfit in the 1980s, and now has dozens of stores selling their own products, including exotics. Boutique feel. People’s Food Cooperative & Café Verde 216 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-9949174; peoplesfood.coop: Expanded in 2001 with the addition of Café Verde serving exclusively Fair Trade coffee. Local, organic, fresh and convenient. Plum Market 375 S. Maple Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-827-5000; more locations at plummarket.com: Upscale supermarket selling only the freshest produce, emphasizing local and organic products. Rocky Peanut Company 2489 Russell St., Detroit; 313-567-6871 rockypeanut.com: Selling all manner of dry goods, from peanuts to candy, this shop has appealed to Eastern Market shoppers since 1969. Western Market 447 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-546-7288; westernmarket. net: Great beer and wine selection includes organics, microbrews and other artisanal products. Family-owned and -operated, reasonable prices. Ypsilanti Food Coop & River Street Bakery 312 N. River Rd., Ypsilanti; 734483-1520; ypsifoodcoop.org: Grab-andgo deli, fresh, organic produce, baked goods from local bakeries, general merchandise and more.

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Cloverleaf Fine Wine & Spirits 711 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-357-0400; cloverleafwine.com: A retail outfi t that’s more anxious to win over a convert than make a quick buck. Staff can help determine your taste preference and offer a handful of wines to match. Cost Plus Wine 2448 Market St., Detroit; 313-259-3845: Family-owned and -run, good selection of wine and beer, with a fair amount of steals mixed in there for the diggers. Everyday Wines 410 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-827-WINE; everyday-wines. com: Careful selection of affordable wines, does special orders, hosts tastings, discounts for those who buy in volume. Meadows Fine Wine & Liquor 21099 Farmington Rd., Farmington Hills; 248476-2010: A store recently redesigned to offer more beer, liquor and wine from Michigan and beyond. Motor City Wine 608 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-483-7283; motorcitywine.com: Run by husband-and-wife team David and Melissa Armin-Parcells, they offer hundreds of bottles of wine and a tasting room.

OUTDOOR FUN Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market 315 Detroit St., Ann Arbor; 734-794-6255: Locally grown food, plants, prepared food items and handcraft s, all sold by the wonderful people who make them. In the historic Kerrytown District’s lovely open-air marketplace. May through December. No dogs allowed. Artisan Market 315 Detroit St., Ann Arbor; artisanmarket.org: Sundays’ open-air market has hand-made items of exceptional quality, including glass, textiles, wood, fiber, tile, bead, painting, drawing, digital imagery as well as jams, jellies, plants, greens and cut flowers in season. Blake’s Farm 5590 Van Dyke Rd., Almont; 810-798-3251; blakefarms. com: Train rides, pony rides, hayrides, cornstalk mazes, and several animated attractions in addition to great cider, donuts, and more.

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Downtown Ypsilanti Farmers’ Market at Farris street between S. Adams and S. Hamilton; growinghope.net: Ypsi’s second farmers’ market was started downtown in 2006. Open 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays, May through October. Franklin Cider Mill 7450 Franklin Rd., Franklin; 248-626-2968; franklincidermill. com: Many different types of apples, hayrides, plus fresh cider and donuts. Plymouth Farmers’ Market at the Gathering, on Penniman Avenue between Main and Union streets, Plymouth; 734453-1540: About 30 stalls, with fruits and vegetables, cut flowers, plants and more. Every Saturday, May to October. Ypsilanti Depot Town Farmers’ Market Rice Street between Cross and Forest, in Depot Town, Ypsilanti: One of Ypsilanti’s two seasonal farmers’ markets, established in 1978. Outside the freight house in Depot Town twice a week, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Wednesdays, 8 a.m.- 3 p.m. Saturdays, April through October.

SERVICES EDUCATION

Life Support Training Institute 25400 W. Eight Mile Rd., Southfield; 866-FOR-LSTI; lifesupporttraining.org: Since 1986, the institute has offered training for basic emergency medical technicians, paramedics, medical first responders and other jobs in pre-hospital and hospital environments. This American Heart Association training center is approved by the Michigan Department of Community Health. New Horizons Computer Learning Centers 14115 Farmington Rd., Livonia; 734-525-1501; 2800 Livernois Rd., Ste. 250, Troy; 248-824-1000; 2051 Rosa Parks Blvd., Ste. 1B, Detroit; 313-9649504; nhgreatlakes.com: World’s largest independent training company, with certifi cation training for IT, PC desktop applications, business management, project management and health care. On-campus and online classes. Tuition funding, job placement available. University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance E.V. Moore Building, 1100 Baits Dr., Ann Arbor; 734-7640583; music.umich.edu: Founded in 1880 and ranked among the top performing arts schools in the country.

LEGAL NEEDS Matthew R. Abel Attorney at Law 2930 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-446-2235; cannabiscounsel.com: Specializing in patients’ medical marijuana rights. Erica Cicchelli 18481 W. 10 Mile Rd., Ste. 201, Southfield; 866-552-9210: Attorney. Ann M. Cisco Attorney at Law 2930 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-446-2235; cannabiscounsel.com: Specializing in patients’ medical marijuana rights. Attorney Lawrence Elassal 16030 Michigan Ave., Ste. 220, Dearborn; 313-LAW-HELP: Attorney. Thomas M.J. Lavigne Attorney at Law 2930 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 313-4462235; cannabiscounsel.com: Specializing in patients’ medical marijuana rights. Neal J. Brand Associates 17117 W. Nine Mile Rd., Southfield; 866-721-5762: Attorney. Ryan Moran 25600 Woodward Ave., Ste. 201, Royal Oak; 866-473-1996: Bankruptcy attorney. Law Offices of Joshua D. Nucian 240 Daines St., Birmingham; 248-416-2979; metrodetroitdefense.com: Legal defense for criminal and civil cases. Rasor Law Firm 321 S. Williams St., Royal


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Oak; 248-543-9000: Legal firm. Michael Steinberg 300 E. Fourth St., Ste. 3, Royal Oak; 248-542-1010: Attorney.

MENTORING The Midnight Golf Program P.O. Box 31-1830, Detroit; 313-863-0463; midnightgolf.org: This 30-week mentoring experience that teaches life skills including financial literacy, college preparation, community activism, as well as golf.

TAILORS Eddie’s Alterations 826 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak; 248-542-3583: Tailor Eddie Bajju is not only knowledgeable but quick. Countless customers come in with a rush job; he just cocks his head, gives a punishing smile, and says “You’re the boss,” telling them to take a seat. Sam’s Tailor Shop 300 Renaissance Ctr., Detroit; 313-567-6960: A sartorial magic shop. Along with inspired alterations, Sam’s also sells custom-made shirts, clothing and accessories — plus tuxedo rentals.

TATTOOS & PIERCINGS Eternal Tattoos five area locations at eternaltattoos.com: Detailed artistry replaces over-inked sloppiness at Eternal Tattoo, improving the aesthetic and allowing for more flexibility in design choice. Lucky Monkey 308 S. Ashley St., Ann Arbor; 734-623-8200; luckymonkeytattoo.com: Sterile gloves, internally threaded titanium jewelry and piercers who stay up-to-date on the latest techniques.

MALLS Briarwood Mall 100 Briarwood Circle, Ann Arbor; 734-769-9610

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Eastland Center 18000 Vernier Rd., Harper Woods; 313-371-1500 Fairlane Town Center 18900 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 800-992-9500 Great Lakes Outlet 4300 Baldwin Rd., Auburn Hills; 1-877-SHOP-GLC Green Oak Village Place 9608 Village Place Blvd., Brighton; 810-225-0337 Lakeside Mall 14000-14300 Lakeside Circle, Sterling Heights; 586-247-1590 Laurel Park Place 37700 W. Six Mile Rd., Livonia; 734-462-1100 Macomb Mall 32233 Gratiot Ave., Roseville; 586-293-7800 Northland Center 21500 Northwestern Hwy., Southfield; 248-569-6272 Oakland Mall 412 W. 14 Mile Rd., Troy; 248-585-6000 Orchard Mall 6303-6445 Orchard Lake Rd., West Bloomfield; 248-851-7727 The Mall at Partridge Creek 17420 Hall Rd., Clinton Township; 586-226-0330 The Shops at Compuware inside Compuware World Headquarters, 1 Campus Martius, Detroit Somerset Collection 2800 W. Big Beaver Rd., Troy; 248-643-6360 Southland Center 23000 Eureka Rd., Taylor; 734-374-2800 Tel-Twelve Shopping Center 28400-28780 Telegraph Rd., Southfield Twelve Mile Crossing at Fountain Walk 44075-44275 W. 12 Mile Rd., Novi Twelve Oaks Mall 27470-27500 Novi Rd., Novi; 248-348-9400 Universal Mall 28582 Dequindre Rd., Warren; 586-751-3161 Village of Rochester Hills 80-400 N. Adams Rd., Rochester Hills Westland Center 35000 Warren Rd., Westland; 734-425-5001


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MUSIC „ The crowd gets bumping at Movement, Detroit’s electronic music festival.

DETROIT is a serious music town; and not just the obvious rock and hip hop. We’re a full-fl edged metro area, with our own serious kul-chur — an opera and a symphony, respectively operating out of the Detroit Opera House and Orchestra Hall. Detroit’s attractions are rivaled by a bevy of Ann Arbor venues, including the Power Center for the Performing Arts, Hill Auditorium, the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre and Rackham Auditorium, which often host performances sponsored by the University Musical Society (734-764-2538; ums.org). Similarly, every June the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival (248-559-2097; greatlakeschambermusic. org) holds concerts all over the metro area. But for edgier classical fare, the recently formed New Music Detroit (newmusicdetroit.com) is a contemporary music collective of highly accomplished musicians “dedicated to performing challenging and dynamic works.” As for what’s been called “America’s classical music,” the jazzier end of the musical spectrum has an impressive venue of its own, Music Hall for Performing Arts, with the more intimate café inside. Plenty of free outdoor music shows take over two Detroit spots, Chene Park and Hart Plaza. Most of the big concerts pass through DTE Energy Music Theatre, the Fillmore and the Fox Theatre. When it comes to somewhat smaller venues that draw the hipster set, the major destination is the block-long Majestic Theatre Complex, which comprises several different stages, including the Magic Stick, Majestic Theatre, Majestic Café and Garden Bowl, which often means the complex will host several shows within one night. Other midsize venues that host national acts include St. Andrew’s Hall in downtown Detroit, the suburban Magic Bag, and Pontiac’s Crofoot. Then there are the specialty clubs, such as Ann Arbor’s Ark, which specializes in folkie acts, or Baker’s Keyboard Lounge, one of the grandest old jazz bars in the United States, with food to match. Though a variety of talent takes its small stage, Cliff Bell’s can’t be beat for its art deco setting, modest dimensions and high-class bar. There’s even stuff for the all-ages set, such as the occasional shows at the Modern Exchange, a vintage shop and café that hosts live shows. Those adventurous enough to investigate what bands the young political lefties are into can peek in at the Trumbullplex. For improvisational, avant-garde “outside” jazz, look for shows promoted under the moniker Bohoemian National Home in Exile (myspace.com/ bohemiannationalhome) at a variety of spaces in and around Detroit. Speaking of clubs in exile, there are even some music venues that have no buildings to house them: weekly concerts at New Center Park in Detroit’s New Center area, and the bunch of blues enthusiasts who meet on Sunday afternoons in fair weather to play the blues in a vacant east side Detroit lot they’ve dubbed John’s Carpet House. The point being that, whatever your interest, there’s certain to be a club to please your ears and your budget.

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MUSIC VENUES The Ark 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734761-1451; theark.org: Prime destination for folk music. The Belmont 10215 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-871-1966; thebelmontbar. com: Dark, divey, fun, live music, DJ nights, art, inventive events. Bert’s on Broadway 1315 Broadway, Detroit; 313-962-5430; bertsentertainment.com: Downtown lounge with live music, DJs and comedy. Blind Pig 208 S. First St., Ann Arbor; 734996-8555; blindpigmusic.com: Popular nightclub and concert venue open since 1971. Blondie’s Detroit 2281 Fort St., Detroit; 586-823-9509; myspace.com/ officialblondiesnightclub: Legendary punk and metal venue with a newly opened location. Callahan’s 2105 South Blvd., Auburn Hills; 248-858-9508; atcallahans.com: Former juke joint specializing in live blues and rock. Cadieux Café 4300 Cadieux Rd., Detroit; 313-882-8560; cadieuxcafe.com: Classic Belgian bar has live music, mussels, feather bowling. Chene Park Atwater & Chene, Detroit; 313-393-7128: Open-air theater often hosts live music in good weather. Cliff Bell’s 2030 Park Ave., Detroit; 313961-2543; cliffbells.com: Art deco wonder has it all, classic cocktails, great music and excellent food. Club Bart 22728 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-548-8746; myspace.com/ clubbart: Come for the breakfast, stay late for drinks and live music on the stage behind the bar. Clutch Cargo’s 65 E. Huron St., Pontiac; 248333-2362; clutchcargos.com: Housed in a former church, atmospheric 1,400-person capacity club. The Convocation Center at Eastern Michigan University 799 N. Hewitt Rd., Ypsilanti; 734-487-5386; emich.edu/ convocation: Hosting everything from the latest in rock and comedy to even monster truck rallies! Corktown Tavern 1716 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-964-5103; corktowntavern. com: Watering hole with plenty of live music and DJ nights. The Crofoot 1 S. Saginaw St., Pontiac; 248858-9333; thecrofoot.com: Rock-oriented venue in a former theater. Detroit Opera House 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-961-3500; motopera.org: Home of Michigan Opera Theatre. Dino’s 22740 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-591-3466; dinoslounge.com: Usually there’s a live show or open-mic night to entertain, in addition to the solid food and full bar. Dirty Dog Jazz Cafe 97 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-882-5299; dirtydogjazz.com: Live jazz, sophisticated small plate dishes, English pub atmosphere DTE Energy Music Theatre 7773 Pine Knob Rd., Clarkston; 248-77-0100: Huge venue for national and international acts. Emerald Theatre 31 N. Walnut St., Mt. Clemens; 586-913-1920; emeraldtheatre. com: Former 1920s theater, hosts national acts. The Fillmore 2115 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-961-5451: Long known as the State Theatre, the Fillmore hosts national acts. Fox Theatre 2211 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-471-3200: Next door to the Fillmore, this is the glitzier of the two. Freedom Hill Amphitheater 14900

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Metropolitan Pkwy., Sterling Heights; 586-268-5100; freedomhill.net: Outdoor venue for summer concerts. Harpo’s Concert Theatre 14238 Harper Ave., Detroit; 313-824-1700; harposconcerttheatre.com: Former theater now Detroit’s primary spot for hard rock and heavy metal. Hart Plaza 2600 Atwater St., Detroit; 313877-8077: Downtown Detroit’s riverfront promenade also hosts outdoor music events. The Hayloft 140 N. Main St., Mt. Clemens; 586-468-1010; myspace.com/ thehayloft venue: Party bar hosts rock shows. Hill Auditorium 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333: Sometime venue of the University Musical Society. I-Rock 16350 Harper, Detroit; 313-8817625; irocknightclub.com: Where heads bang and manes fly; one of the best hard rock clubs in the country. Jazz Café at Music Hall 350 Madison St., Detroit; 313-877-8498; jazzcafedetroit. com: Jazz lounge, live music from jazz greats from Detroit and beyond. Jazz Loft 529 Monroe, upstairs at the Golden Fleece, Detroit; 313-962-7093: A space for music in the heart of Greektown, Mondays in winter, Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays in summer. John’s Carpet House 2133 Frederick St., Detroit; 313-948-5911: Outdoor hangout and jamming space on summer Sundays. Kerrytown Concert House 415 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-769-2999; kerrytownconcerthouse.com: Unique venue in a Victorian house in Ann Arbor’s historic Kerrytown neighborhood, classical and jazz series can feature internationally known artists. The Machine Shop 3539 S. Dort Hwy., Flint; 810-715-2650: Flint’s one-stop destination for entertainment, which can include hard rock, metal and even cage fights and comedy. The Magic Bag 22920 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-544-3030; themagicbag. com: Smallish, cozy club with cabaretstyle seating draws national acts. The Magic Stick see the Majestic Theatre Complex Majestic Theatre Complex 4120 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-9700: Venue that contains the Magic Stick, the Majestic Theatre, the Majestic Café and the Garden Bowl. Memphis Smoke 100 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-543-4300; memphissmokeroyaloak.com: Downhome food complements live rock and blues on Fridays and Saturdays. Max M. Fisher Music Center 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-5765100; detroitsymphony.com: After a multimillion-dollar facelift , this center hosts a variety of events, mostly music. Michigan Theater 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-668-8397; michtheater. org: National acts touch down at this historic theater. Modern Exchange 12219 DixToledo, Southgate; 734-284-2547; themodernexchange.com: Vintage shop doubles as all-ages show space. Music Hall For Performing Arts 350 Madison St., Detroit; 313-963-2366; musichall.org: Downtown Detroit’s big stage for jazz, funk and hip hop. See also Jazz Café. New Center Park on the south side of East Grand Boulevard between Second Avenue and Third Street, Detroit; newcenterpark.com: Schedule of summer shows kicks off July 2-5. New Dodge Lounge 8850 Joseph


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CUE THE MUSIC The Magic Stick 4120 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-9700; majesticdetroit.com

NO MATTER WHAT you spent on home speakers, headphones or subwoofers for your car, rock music has and always will sound best when reproduced live in an authentic rock club. In Detroit, Metro Times readers overwhelmingly declare the best of them to be the iconic Magic Stick. Located above the Garden Bowl in the Majestic complex, the Stick is home to 10 billiard tables, a full bar and lounge area, and the Alley Deck, where you can enjoy fresh air and a cold brew. Continually booking the best touring bands, and home to the events such as Blowout kickoff and Fucking Awesome Fest, the Magic Stick remains the hippest of hip for revelers of rock. Campau, Hamtramck; 313-874-5963; newdodgelounge.com: Bar and grill with great hamburgers, live music, billiards. Northern Lights Lounge 660 W. Baltimore, Detroit; 313-873-1739; myspace.com/ northernlightslounge: Stylish lounge, plush restrooms, good food, live music, DJ nights. The Old Miami 3930 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-831-3830; myspace.com/oldmiami: Quirky dive vet bar, live shows, terrific backyard, access permitting. Orchestra Hall 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-576-5100; detroitsymphony. com: Revamped area where the symphony holds court. Painted Lady Lounge 2930 Jacob St., Hamtramck; 313-874-2991; myspace. com/paintedlady: Classic dive, one of Hamtramck’s oldest bars, formerly the famous Lili’s 21, live shows, rock, blues, punk. Palace of Auburn Hills 6 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100; palacenet.com: Where the Pistons play, also hosts huge-ass concerts. Paycheck’s Lounge 2932 Caniff St., Hamtramck; 313-874-0909; paycheckslounge.com: Another classic Hamtramck dive bar, oft en features local bands. PJ’s Lager House 1254 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-961-4668; pjslagerhouse. com: Pleasant old-time dive pub near downtown with live, local music in an intimate side room. Power Center for the Performing Arts 121 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538: Spacious and soaring, an architectural wonder in itself, a great setting for a concert. Rackham Auditorium 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333: Newly restored, classic venue often hosts the University Musical Society. The Ritz 24300 Hoover Rd., Warren; 586756-6140; myspace.com/theritzdetroit: Gritty concert venue hosts metal and rock shows.

Royal Oak Music Theatre 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980; royaloakmusictheatre.com: A top destination for national talent, recently remodeled, with a smaller capacity that makes for a more intimate experience. Seldom Blues 400 Renaissance Center Dr., Detroit; 313-567-7301; seldomblues.com: Supper club with some of the city’s best beef, as well as live smooth jazz and even gospel. The Shelter 431 E. Congress St., Detroit; 313-961-6923: In the basement of St. Andrew’s Hall, this club-within-a-club also hosts live events, DJ nights. Silky’s Martini & Music Café 21931 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-565-6278; kiernans.com/silkys.html: Cocktail lounge features small plates, live, relaxing music. Small’s Bar 10339 Conant St., Hamtramck; 313-873-1117; smallsbardetroit.com: Large bar in the front, concert venue in the back, hosting the best in rock and punk. Sound Board at MotorCity Casino Hotel, 2901 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-2377711: MotorCity’s up-to-the-moment, 2,400-capacity concert venue, hosting national acts in a dazzling environment. St. Andrew’s Hall 431 E. Congress St., Detroit; 313-961-8137: Since the 1980s, this downtown venue has hosted national rock shows. Tap Room 205 W. Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-487-5544; taproomypsi.com: Historic bar and grill with great beers and live music some nights. The Token Lounge 28949 Joy Rd., Westland; 734-513-5030; thetokenlounge.com: Long, partly walled-off bar, large show with seating, hosts lots of live, loud music, especially hard rock. Trumbullplex (4210 Trumbull Ave., Detroit; 313-832-7952; myspace.com/ trumbullplex: DIY space with collectivefriendly bands. Ye Olde Tap Room 14915 Charlevoix St., Detroit; 313-824-1030: Former speakeasy, live music, great beer selection.

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BARS & CLUBS BARS Amnesia at MotorCity Casino Hotel 2901 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-309-4605; amnesiadetroit.com: Stylish lounge atop the hotel with city views. Anchor Bar 450 W. Fort St., Detroit; 313964-9127; anchorbardetroit.com: Food, drinks, historic bar traditionally attracted newspaper writers. Arbor Brewing Company 114 E. Washington, Ann Arbor; 734-213-1393; arborbrewing.com; arborbrewing.com: Upscale brewpub and eatery. Atlas Bar 2363 Yemans, Hamtramck: The last of Hamtramck’s “house bars,” Atlas sits on a residential corner. Lounge feel, characters. Atwater Block Brewery 237 Joseph Campau, Detroit; 313-877-9205; atwaterbeer.com: Tap room of the noted Detroit brewery, just outside downtown. Aut Bar 315 Braun Court, Ann Arbor; 734994-3677; autbar.com: Gay- and lesbianfriendly bar upstairs, cafe downstairs. Bailey’s Pub 1777 Canton Center Rd., Canton; 734-844-1137: Shuffleboard, bar fare, dozens of beers on draft, nice interior. Baker’s Streetcar Lounge 9817 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-873-8296: Terrifi c “old man” bar on Hamtramck’s main drag. Bar Louie 44375 12 Mile Rd., Novi; 248662-1100: Comfortable booths, martinis, upscale food. Beach Grill 24420 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores; 586-771-4455; beachgrillrestaurantandresort.com: Food, water views, outdoor deck, tiki bar, dance floor, video wall, handicap accessible. Belmont Bar 10215 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-871-1966; thebelmontbar.com: Too nice to be a dive, too dark to be anything else, live rock and punk, special theme nights. Berkley Front 3087 W. 12 Mile Rd., Berkley; 248-547-3331: Great beer selection downstairs, martini lounge upstairs, live music. Bert’s Marketplace 2727 Russell St., Detroit; 313-567-2030; bertsentertainment.com: Large venue hosts everything from fights to special art shows. Biergarten 22184 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-561-7711: Family-style corner bar, great beer selection, including Michigan bottles. BlackFinn 530 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-582-9460; blackfinnroyaloak.com: American pub, with food, TVs, good beers and a singles scene. Black Lotus Brewing Company 1 E. 14 Mile Rd., Clawson; 248-577-1878; blacklotusbrewingco.com: Microbrewery with food and a hip setting. Blarney Stone Pub 27253 Woodward Ave., Berkley; 248-541-1881; theblarneystonepub.com: Irish pub pulls out the stops for St. Patrick’s Day. Blue Goose Inn 28911 E. Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores; 586-296-0950; bluegooseinn.net: Rockin’ east side joint

along the “Nautical Mile.” The Bosco 22930 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-541-8818; thebosco.com: Ultra-hip hipster lounge with outdoor patio in back. Box Bar 777 W. Ann Arbor Trail, Plymouth; 734-459-7390: Good burgers, great beer selection. Box Sports Bar & Grill 41570 Garfield Rd., Clinton Township; 586-228-0465; theboxsportsbar.com: Sports bar with DJs, drink specials. Bronx Bar 4476 Second Ave., Detroit; 313832-8464: Great burgers and sandwiches, two jukeboxes, classic bar, weekend mixit-yourself Bloody Mary bar. Cadieux Cafe 4300 Cadieux Rd., Detroit; 313-882-8560; cadieuxcafe.com: Classic Belgian bar with food (mussels, frites), live music and feather bowling. Camp Ticonderoga 5725 Rochester Rd., Troy; 248-828-2825; campticonderoga. com: Restaurant and bar with daily specials, kids’ menu. Capo Lounge 11625 Joseph Campau St., Hamtramck; 313-365-2276: Atmospheric lounge with wraparound booths. Cass Cafe 4620 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313831-1400; casscafe.com: Art for sale on the walls, solid menu and creative daily specials, drink specials. Voted best bar to overhear a conversation. Cheli’s Chili Bar 21918 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-274-9700; chelischilibar. com: The place to exult in pure, unadulterated hockey-ness. Circa 1890 Saloon 5474 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-831-1122: Classic Wayne State University hangout. CK Diggs 2010 Auburn Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-853-6600; ckdiggs.com: Restaurant, bar and rock club, lunch and dinner, TVs, billiards. Wheelchair accessible. Club Bart 22726 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-548-8746: Great morning breakfasts, but also good live music at night. Club Canton 39651 Michigan Ave., Canton; 734-722-0722: One of metro Detroit’s oldest and best country and western bars. Como’s 22812 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-548-5005: Gay-friendly (but not gay-themed), this restaurant is a popular watering hole. Heated patio open longer than you’d think. Conor O’Neill’s Pub 318 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-665-2968; conoroneills.com: British-Irish-style pub with food, brink and entertainment. Corktown Tavern 1716 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-964-5103; corktowntavern. com: Watering hole with plenty of live music and DJ nights. Corner Brewery 720 Norris St., Ypsilanti; 734-480-2739; arborbrewing.com: Part of Arbor Brewing Company, large, busy microbrewery with large outdoor patio. Dakota Inn Rathskeller 17324 John R St., Detroit; 313-867-9722; dakota-inn.com: German-style beer hall with piano singalongs, food.

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Delux Lounge 350 Monroe, Detroit; 313-962- 4200; deluxlounge.com: Club atmosphere, good cocktails, downtown location. Detroit Beer Co. 1529 E. Broadway, Detroit; 313-962-1529; detroitbeerco. com: Brewpub with a long menu of upscale bar food. Detroiter Bar 655 Beaubien, Detroit; 313963-3355: Downtown bar has massive hamburgers, TVs, video games. Dick O’Dow’s 160 W. Maple Rd., Birmingham; 248-642-1135: Bar with traditional (and notso-traditional) Irish food. Dino’s 22740 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-591-3466; dinoslounge.com: Stylish lounge with good food, drinks and often a lively show or open-mic. Dirty Martini Lounge 42705 Grand River Ave., Novi; 877-347-8907; thedirtymartinilounge.com: Martini lounge with specialty drinks, bottle service and cigars. Dohickey’s 232 Maple St., Wyandotte; 734285-8370: Irish pub. Beer, wine and liquor, lunch and dinner, billiards, darts. Dominick’s 812 Monroe, Ann Arbor; 734-662-5414: College students favor this bar with outdoor seating and cafeteria-style dining. Double Olive 22027 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-359-5533: Upscale cocktail lounge was there before the craze took off. Doyle’s Tavern 860 Fralick St., Plymouth; 734-207-9656; doylestavern.com: Irish pub serves burgers, pizza. Outdoor patio. Dragonmead 14600 E. 11 Mile Rd., Warren; 586-776-9428; dragonmead. com: Award-winning, stylish microbrewery with a lounge and a bar, often live entertainment. Fifth Avenue Ballroom 25750 Novi Rd., Novi; 248-735-4011: Two floors, billiards, rooftop

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Sterling Heights; 586-983-3700; gatorjakes.net: Colorful sports bar and grill serves Creole food, steaks, fi sh, pasta, sandwiches and more. The Ghost Bar on the top floor of the Whitney, 4421 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-832-5700; whitneyghostbar.com: They say the old mansion is haunted, giving the glamorous 19th century bar on the top floor its name. Grand Trunk Pub 612 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-961-3043; grandtrunkpub. com: Quirky pub with Michigan and other small brews, great food in a former railroad ticketing office. Grizzly Peak Brewing Co. 120 W. Washington, Ann Arbor; 734-741-7325; grizzlypeak.net: Popular brewpub catering to families, students, and friends. Gus O’Connor’s 48275 Grand River Ave., Novi; 13100 Hall Rd., Sterling Heights; 586-930-0300; gusoconnors.com: Awardwinning Irish pub with food, spirits and special events. Gusoline Alley 308 S. Center St., Royal Oak; 248-545-2235: Royal Oak’s last dive bar has special events, open-mic nights and characters galore. Hamlin Pub 1988 S. Rochester, Rochester Hills; 248-656-7700 hamlinpubs.com: Irish pub with beer, food and live events. See website for all six locations. Hard Luck Lounge 15412 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Park; 313-884-5825; hardlucklounge.com: Stylish cocktail lounge open seven days a week. Harry’s Detroit Bar & Grill 2482 Clifford St., Detroit; 313-964-1575; harrysdetroit. com: Sports bar with quirky charm, huge TVs and better-than-usual food. Hartfield Lanes & Lounge 3490 W. 12 Mile, Berkley; 248-543-9338; hartfieldbowling.com: Bowling alley’s bar off to the side of the action, with TVs,

CLASS ACT Cass Cafe 4620 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-831-1400 THE CASS CAFE isn’t some windowless dive you patronize when you want alone time, anonymous and wasted while the sun’s high in the sky — no, that’d be the Bronx or Honest John’s or some other old-man joint in the hood. You go to the Cass when you’re shameless but can still hold yourself together in public, like a pro drinker, when you want barstool wisdom but long for conversation that’s more “day”-friendly. It has just the right balance of Corridor grit and college campus wit, and it’s where your two cents can be of value to an overheard conversation. When the bar pours $2 Ghettoblaster beers, it’s easy to stick around, all while the irksome sun pours through those smudge-free front windows, reflecting the edges of the pleasing local art on the walls. It’s one of the best public atmospheres we can picture in which to write, study, chat, eat, sketch. As you drink the afternoon away, notice those doing the same, their laptops up, their pens on paper, and their glasses emptying at a mighty good clip. No reason to feel guilty about a good day buzz, mister, soused or not. deck in warmer months. Flood’s Bar & Grille 731 St. Antoine, Detroit; 313-963-1090; floodsdetroit.com: Where Detroit’s elite meet for bar food and drinks. Upscale, valet parking. Fort Street Brewery 1660 Fort St., Lincoln Park; 313-389-9620; fortstreetbeer.com: Brewpub and restaurant with a friendly atmosphere, games, and a large beer list, including house-brewed suds. Gaelic League 2068 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-964-8700; gaelicleagueofdetroit.org: Home to Detroit’s main Hibernian order, ground zero for the St. Patrick’s Day parade. Gator Jake’s 36863 Van Dyke Ave.,

drink specials and plenty of characters. Hayloft 140 N. Main St., Mount Clemens; 586-468-1010: Neighborhood bar with live rock and metal. Heidelberg Restaurant 215 N. Main, Ann Arbor; 734-663-7758; heidelbergannarbor.com: German-style beer hall with a traditional beer cellar. Hermann’s Olde Town Grille 195 Liberty St., Plymouth; 734-451-1213; hermannsotg.com: Game room, specials, weekend entertainment and 24 TVs. Hockeytown Cafe 2301 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-965-9500; hockeytowncafe. com: Crowded with Red Wings


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memorabilia, food, drinks. Honest John’s Bar 488 Selden Rd., Detroit; 313-832-5646; honestjohnsdetroit. com: Upscale dive bar, grill open from breakfast until 2 a.m., billiards, jukebox. Small outdoor patio. Howell’s Bar 1035 Mason St., Dearborn; 313-565-6322: Once an old-folks bar, now Howell’s draws a younger, hipper set. Good burgers, lively scene. ILounge 65 E. Huron St., Pontiac; 248333-2525: A lounge inside Pontiac’s Clutch Cargo’s. Jack’s Waterfront Restaurant 24214 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores; 586-4458080; jackswaterfront.com: Food, drinks, waterfront setting, live entertainment. Jeans Lounge 12002 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-892-9689: Down-home dive bar draws scads of characters. Jeremy Restaurant and Bar 1978 Cass Lake Rd., Keego Harbor; 248-681-2124; jeremyrestaurantandbar.com: Casual gourmet dining, but also a bar. Jumbo’s Bar 3736 Third St., Detroit; 313831-8949: Forbidding dive from the outside, but actually quite friendly inside. Video games, billiards, no kitchen, but they’re often grilling. Kuhnhenn Brewing Co. 5919 Chicago Rd., Warren; 586-979-8361; kbrewery. com: Microbrewery is one of Michigan’s largest, serving beer, wine, mead and soda, some with kick-in-the-face flavor. Brewing shop across the parking lot. La Dolce Vita 17546 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-865-0331: Hidden culinary gem is also barlike enough to garner an extra listing. Liberty Street Brewery 149 W. Liberty St., Plymouth; 734-207-9600; libertystreetbeer. com: Elegant atmosphere, hand-crafted beer, in Plymouth’s historic Old Village. Private hall. Lily’s Seafood 410 S. Washington, Royal Oak; 248-591-5459; lilysseafood.com: Stylish brewpub has excellent seafood and great craft brews. Lime Light Grill & Bar 30200 Van Dyke Ave., Warren, 586-751-7883; limelightsportsbar.com: Serves Detroit’s coldest beer, using a special cooler to get aluminum bottles of Bud down to a frigid 22 degrees. So cold your teeth will ache. Lindell A.C. 3150 Elizabeth Lake Rd., Waterford; 248-683-3355; lindellathleticclub. com: The old Detroit institution at Cass and Michigan avenues closed in 2002, but the name lives on in the burbs. Live and Gracies 102 S. First St., Ann Arbor; 734-623-1440: Stylish cocktail lounge with plenty of music and live entertainment. LJ’s Lounge 2114 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-962-0013: Unpretentious dive with cheap cans of beer and billiards makes a good place to wait for your table at nearby Slows. Loco Bar & Grill 454 E. Lafayette, Detroit; 313-965-3737: Mexican fare in a quirky setting, with jumbo margaritas. The Loving Touch 22634 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-546-3644: Billiards hall with full bar and special DJ nights. Mars Bar 10001 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-974-6575; marsbardetroit.com: Hamtramck’s bid for the upscale martini crowd, with plenty of vodka martinis on offer. Hip, stylish. Majestic Cafe 4120 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-9700; majesticdetroit. com: More than a restaurant, the wraparound bar has a full line of spirits. Memphis Smoke 100 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-543-4300: Cool nightspot with good po’ boys and live blues. Rooftop patio in warm weather. Miller’s Bar 23700 Michigan Ave.,

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Dearborn; 313-565-2577; millersbar.com: Unpretentious bar with good burgers. Don’t ask for a check. Just tell the barkeep what you had and pay him. Motor City Brewing Works 470 W. Canfield, Detroit; 313-832-2700; motorcitybeer.com: Microbrewery with appealing pizzas and apps, as well as an affordable Wednesday night art show. Nancy Whiskey’s 2644 Harrison St., Detroit; 313-962-4247: Off the beaten path, quirky old Corktown bar, newly revamped, often hosts live blues. Nice backyard. New Dodge Lounge 8850 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-874-5963; newdodgelounge.com: Large bar with good burgers, friendly service, game room and live shows. New Fift h Avenue 215 W. Fifth Ave., Royal Oak; 248-629-9423: High-quality sports bar with billiards. New Way Bar 23130 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-541-9870: Watering hole on the main drag with live entertainment. Nove Lounge 344 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-336-9936: Inside Italian restaurant Via Nove, this lounge is darker, sexier and often hosts DJs. Old Miami 3930 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313831-3830: Classic Vietnam vet bar has become famously quirky place to drink and see local music, especially on their glorious backyard stage. Old Pointe Bar 15130 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe; 313-822-9040: Neighborhood bar with drink specials, friendly atmosphere, no expensive covers. Old Shillelagh 349 Monroe St., Detroit; 313-964-0007; oldshillelagh.com: Downtown bar that’s mobbed every St. Patrick’s Day. Rooftop patio. Old Town Tavern 122 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-662-9291; oldtownaa. com: Open since the 19th century, this “townie” tavern has a casual, relaxed atmosphere, a full menu of homemade soups, sandwiches, Southwestern entrées, daily specials and great burgers. O’Mara’s 2555 W. 12 Mile Rd., Berkley; 248399-6750; omaras.net: Irish restaurant and bar with entertainment that ranges from jazz to traditional Irish sounds. O’Toole’s Novi 24555 Novi Rd., Novi, 248-349-7038; 205 Fifth Ave., Royal Oak, 248-591-9226: Irish sports pub with a full menu, wireless. See website for Royal Oak location. Oxford Tap 36 S. Washington, Oxford; 248-236-0380; theoxfordtap.com: Bar fare, daily specials, DJ nights. Park Bar 2040 Park Ave., Detroit; 313962-2933; parkbardetroit.com: Floorto-ceiling glass windows with views of downtown. Food available from Bucharest Grill. Great beer selections, friendly service, good tunes. Parrot Cove Yacht Club 33475 Dequindre, Troy; 248-585-6080; parrotcoveyachtclub.com: Good food, signature burgers, boat drinks. Pat O’Brien’s 22385 Ten Mile Rd., St. Clair Shores; 866-420-7088; patobriensbar.com: Old-fashioned, traditional Irish pub proud of its deep-fried perch. LCD and plasma TVs, relaxed environment, friendly staff. Paycheck’s Lounge 2932 Caniff, Hamtramck; 313-874-0909; paycheckslounge.com: Dive bar with good local music on its stage. Pier 500 507 Biddle, Wyandotte; 734-2810530; pier500.com: Right on the water, with food, tiki decks, unbeatable views. Portofi no 3455 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-281-6700; portofinoontheriver. com: Great water views, food, drinks, outdoor seating. Post Bar 3880 Lapeer, Auburn Hills; 248-

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ARTS

370-8909; 15 N. Walnut, Mount Clemens; 810-783-4444; postbars.com: One of the liveliest bars in the area. See the website for all six locations. Red Coat Tavern 31542 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak; 248-549-0300: Hallowed burger joint also has a bar with generous pours. Renshaw Lounge 210 E. 14 Mile Rd., Clawson; 248-616-3016: Neighborhood bar serving made-from-scratch pizzas. Lounge features eight huge TVs, two pool tables, darts and Golden Tee. Robusto’s Martini Lounge 19271 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-8810100; clubrobustos.com: Martini lounge with live music most weekends. Rochester Mills Beer Co. 400 Water St., Rochester; 248-650-5080; Brewpub with eclectic American cuisine, outdoor patio, billiards, live entertainment. In the historic former Western Knitting Mill. Roostertail 100 Marquette Dr., Detroit; 313-822-1234; roostertail.com: Beyond the riverfront location and other razzledazzle, it’s a great place to get a drink too. Rosie O’Grady’s 279 W. Nine Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248-591-9163; rosieogradysirishpub.com: Irish pub’s new digs on Nine Mile Road has food, beer, games and more. See website for other locations. Royal Oak Brewery 215 E. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-544-1141; royaloakbrewery. com: Brewpub with eclectic American cuisine, kids’ menu, seasonal beers. Rugby Grille 100 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-642-5999: Cocktail lounge where you’re likely to see a celebrity coming in or out of the swanky hotel it’s part of. Sean O’Callaghan’s Public House 821 Penniman, Plymouth; 734-459-6666;

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seanocallaghanspub.com: Authentic Irish pub in the Victorian style, unique Irish atmosphere, fine Irish whiskies. Seven Brothers 11831 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-365-6576: Dive bar has a strong following of local characters and theater folk. Shadow Bar 11425 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-365-1446; shadowbardetroit.com: Dance nights and drink specials draw crowds; valet parking in front. Sidetrack Bar and Grill 56 E. Cross St., Ypsilanti; 734-483-1035; sidetrackbarandgrill.com: Weekly specials, creative events, famous burger honored by GQ magazine. Sindbad’s 100 Saint Clair St., Detroit; 313822-7817; sindbads.com: Riverfront joint, outdoor patio, full kitchen, inventive drinks. Slingers Bar & Grill 11791 Farmington Rd., Livonia; 734-421-6070: Audience participation, sweet drinks, dramatic drink-slinging routines and pour-it-downyour-throat naughtiness seems to attract girls who’ve just turned 21. Small’s 10339 Conant, Hamtramck; 313-873-1117; smallsbardetroit.com: Neighborhood bar better known for its shows than as a watering hole. Stonehouse Bar & Grill 19803 Ralston, Detroit; 313-892-0125; thestonehousebar. tripod.com: Dive bar in an old house attracts characters galore. Tap Room 201 W. Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti; 734-482-5320; taproomypsi.com: Historic bar and grill, good beer selection, game room, live music or open-mic nights, often crowded. Tom’s Tavern 10093 W. Seven Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-862-9768: Old speakeasy, quirky space, real characters, uneven floor. Big annual celebration for Babe

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

Ruth’s birthday. Town Pump Tavern 100 W. Montcalm, Detroit; 313-961-1929; thetownpumptavern. com: Tin ceilings, wood walls, steps away from Comerica Park, Ford Field, the Fox Theatre and the Fillmore. Traffic Jam & Snug 511 W. Canfield, Detroit; 313-831-9470; trafficjamdetroit. com: Full-service restaurant makes so much stuff from scratch they even have a bar where they serve their own beer. TV Bar 2554 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-965-4789: Stylish, hip cocktail lounge, outdoor patio, hosts live entertainment, DJs. Whiskey in the Jar 2741 Yemans,

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Hamtramck; 313-873-4154: Tiny dive fills up with characters in the early evening. Billiards, draft beers, some DJ nights. In the summer, the air conditioning is intense. Woodward Avenue Brewers 22646 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-5463696; the wabsite.com: Brewpub with a small kitchen, billiards upstairs and sidewalk seating in good weather. Ye Olde Tap Room 14915 Charlevoix, Detroit; 313-824-1030; yeoldetaproom. com: Marvelous beer selection. Literally hundreds of beers. Your Mother’s 61 N. Walnut St., Mount Clemens; 586-468-4444: Homey little bar with drinks, fried fare and lots of characters.

THE LAST DIVE Gusoline Alley 309 S. Center St., Royal Oak; 248-545-2235 YEAH, YEAH, we’ve been chirping Gusoline’s juke for what feels like ages. It wins a staff pick nearly every year, and that’s no mean feat, ‘cause we swill nightly at all colors of shitholes that sport great jukes. But here, after one flip through its plastic pages, we are instantly reminded of the perfect ninth grade soundtrack to our first-ever bong hit. Nestled amid such indie-ish stars as Supergrass (RIP) and the Super Furry Animals, you get punk classics like the Pistols’ Never Mind the Bollocks and the Clash’s London’s Calling; you’ll also hit play on such locals as the Grande Nationals and Detroit Cobras, or such everperplexing perpetual college dorm heroes as Pink Floyd and Zappa, and probably Robert Johnson’s mythical lost song. We recommend playing the heady “suicide selection” by sliding in a few bucks and punching up random numbers. You’ll never be disappointed, and, if you happen to be in the correct toxic haze, you might discover a gem of a tune that you’d never, in a million years, listen to.


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| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 59

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Amnesia at Motor City Casino, 2901 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 313-309-4605: High end nightclub with a semi-strict dress code, DJs. The Bank 77 S. Main St., Mt. Clemens; 586872-7222: Relatively loose dress code. VIP status granted to birthday patrons. Boogie Fever 22901 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-541-1600: Dance club with a ’70s vibe. Boulders 1020 W. Ann Arbor Rd., Plymouth; 734-459-4190: Dance club with a laid-back atmosphere. A wide selection of draft brews. BT’s Executive Club 14417 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-584-3600: Gentlemen’s club with food, full bar, lovely ladies. Club 9 141 W. 9 Mile Rd., Ferndale; 248582-7227: Gay-themed venue (disco balltype), with Boy’s Night (Wednesday) and Women’s Night (Friday). Club Gold Coast 2971 E. Seven Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-366-6135: Historic gay-themed bar and nightclub with daily drink specials. Clutch Cargo’s 65 E. Huron St., Pontiac; 248-333-2362; clutchcargos.com: Housed in a former church, atmospheric 1,400-person capacity club. Crave 22075 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-277-7283: Chic Dearborn nightclub, known to host an array of music genres. Delux Lounge 350 Monroe St., Detroit; 313-962-4200: Host to weekly DJ’s, drink specials, good cocktails. Eden 22061 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-541-7074: Hip Ferndale music venue and bar. DJs, house. Elysium Lounge 625 Shelby St., Detroit; 313-962-2244: Several VIP areas. Envy 234 W. Larned St., Detroit; 313-9623689: A staple Detroit night and dance club. Honey 201 Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-9623000: Newish dance and hip-hop club. Kingdom 415 E. Congress, Detroit; 313961-5005: Gentlemen’s entertainment; stocked bar and DJ’s as well. Labyrinth 400 Bagley, Detroit; 313-9622300: Rock ’n’ roll dance club. The Landing Strip 36341 Goddard Rd., Romulus; 734-942-9600; landingstriplounge.com: Topless entertainment for men. Leland City Club 400 Bagley, Detroit; 313-962-2300: Popular venue with the

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younger crowd. House music. Liquor Store 44325 12 Mile Rd., Novi; 248305-8135; liquorstorenovi.com: Located in Novi Fountain Walk, home to the only mechanical bull in the area. Luna 1815 N. Main St., Royal Oak; 248298-6875; lunaroyaloak.com: Popular dance club. MbarGo 44325 12 Mile Rd., Novi; 248374-3420; mbargonovi.com: Top-shelf nightclub in Novi’s Fountain Walk. Menjo’s 928 W. McNichols, Detroit; 313863-3934: Classic Detroit gay bar often features local DJs and some karaoke. Mixx Lounge 43155 Main St., Novi; 248347-6499: Popular suburban venue. Offers private parties. Necto 516 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734994-5436: High end club with VIP rooms and top-shelf booze. Penthouse 20771 W. Eight Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-541-7000; thepenthouseclubdetroit.com: Gentlemen’s club, beautiful ladies, champagne, cigars, bottle service, fine foods., valet parking. Pulse 156 Monroe St., Detroit; 313-420-0313; pulsedetroit.com: Blend of simplicity and sophistication, atmospheric and stimulating chill-out spot. Rainbow Room 6640 E. Eight Mile Rd., Detroit; 313-891-1020: Gay-oriented club devoted to community awareness. Shadow Bar 11425 Joseph Campau St., Hamtramck; 313-365-1446; shadowbardetroit.com: True to its title, a shadow-drenched, atmospheric party venue complete with cocktail and mixer selections; dancing women. Shelter 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-9616358: Lively club below St. Andrew’s Hall where Eminem got his start. Tiki Bob’s 25 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248335-6100; tikibobspontiac.com: Popular nightclub, open until 2 a.m. most nights. Tonic 29 S. Saginaw St., Pontiac; 248-3347411: Dance club with multiple dance floors. The Toy Chest Bar 18728 Ford Rd., Detroit; 313-593-1645; toychestbar.com: Gentleman’s club open Monday through Sunday; 18 and older only. V at MGM Grand, 1777 Third St., Detroit; 877-888-2121: Casino nightclub is goldtrimmed and expensive.

rch 2-5, 2011! Ma


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RECREATION NATURE BY THE MALL University of Michigan-Dearborn natural area Corner of Fairlane Drive and John Montieth Boulevard, Dearborn; 313593-5338; umd.umich.edu/eic

NOT FAR from the bustle of Fairlane Mall, the University of MichiganDearborn owns 75 acres of natural habitat (part of the original Henry Ford Estate) and oversees another 225 acres owned by Wayne County. UM-D’s Environmental Interpretive Center on Fairlane Drive houses exhibits on topics such as the Rouge River (which runs through the area) and is the gateway to the area foot trails traversing various kinds of forest (such as one of southeast Michigan’s rare climax beech-maple forests), maturing old fields, Clara Ford’s former rose garden (now returning to nature), an 8-acre lake and a community organic garden. You can see fox, raccoon and deer; more than 250 bird species have been recorded by the Rouge River Bird Observatory, housed at the center. Open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; trails open sunrise to sunset. No dogs, no running; bicycling only on the River Rouge Gateway Trail (trailhead on Michigan Avenue).

NOTABLE PARKS MACOMB

Metro Beach Metropark 31300 Metro Parkway, Harrison Twp.; 586-463-4581; metroparks.com: Nature center, squirt zone, spray ground and water slides, beach, paved trails. Stony Creek Metropark 4300 Main Park Rd., Shelby Township; 586-781-4242; metroparks.com: Golf, nature center, beach. Wolcott Mill Metropark 65775 Wolcott Rd., Ray; 586-752-5932; metroparks.com: Golf, farm center, historic mill.

OAKLAND

Addison Oaks 1480 W. Romeo Rd., Leonard; 248-693-2432; destinationoakland.com: Boat and bike rentals. Groveland Oaks 14555 Dixie Hwy., Holly; 248-634-9811; destinationoakland.com: Minigolf, water slide, boat and bike rentals, skateboard area. Independence Oaks 9501 Sashabaw Rd., Clarkston; 248-625-0877; destinationoakland.com: Nature center, camping, ski rentals Indian Springs Metropark 5200 Indian Trail, White Lake; 248-625-6640; metroparks.com: Golf, nature center, splay ’n’ spray, rock climbing wall, athletic fi elds Kensington Metropark 2240 W. Buno Rd., Milford; 248-685-1561; metroparks.com: Golf, nature center, water park, farm center, cross-country skiing, lake. Red Oaks County Park 29600 John R Rd., Madison Heights; 888-OCPARKS; www. destinationoakland: Golf, water park. Springfield Oaks 12451 Andersonville Rd., Davisburg; 248-858-0916; destinationoakland.com: Golf, county fair. Waterford Oaks County Park 2800 Watkins Lake Rd., Waterford; 248-8580906; Water park, motocross track,

volleball and tennis.

WASHTENAW

Delhi Metropark 3902 E. Delhi Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-426-8211; metroparks.com: Boating and fishing Hudson Mills Metropark 8801 N. Territorial Rd., Dexter; 734-427-8211; metroparks.com: Golf, disc golf, athletic fi elds Huron Meadows 8765 Hammel Rd.; 734426-8211; metroparks.com: Golf course, boat rentals, cross country Rolling Hills Park 7660 Stony Creek Rd., Ypsilanti; 734- 484-9676; Nature center, water park, disc golf, cross country and sledding

WAYNE

Belle Isle across the MacArthur Bridge at the foot of West Grand Boulevard; 313628-2081; detroitmi.gov: Driving range, conservatory, large slide, fountain, Dossin Great Lakes Museum Chandler Park 12600 Chandler Park Dr., Detroit; 313-822-7665; chandlerparkonline.com: Golf, water park Hines Parkway along Rouge River from Dearborn to Northville; 734-261-1630; waynecounty.com: Sledding, athletic fields, picnic areas, sledding, disc golf Lake Erie Metropark 32481 W. Jefferson Ave., Brownstown; 734-379-5020; metroparks.com: Golf, nature center, wave pool, marina. Lincoln Park Community Center 3525 Dix Hwy., Lincoln Park; 313-386-4075; michigan.org: Swimming pool, skating lessons in winter. Oakwoods Metropark 17845 Savage Rd., Belleville; 734-782-3956; metroparks. com: Nature center. Rouge Park Joy and Lahser; 888-223-2363; rougeriver.com: Golf, nature center, swimming pools, D-Town Urban Farm. Willow Metropark 17845 Savage Rd.,

Belleville; 734-697-9181; metroparks.com: Golf, disc golf, tennis.

GOLFING MACOMB

Greystone Golf Club 67500 Mound Rd., Romeo; 586-752-7030; golfgreystone.com The Orchards Golf Club 62900 Campground Rd., Washington; 586-7867200; orchards.com; 18 holes. Cherry Creek Golf Club 52000 Cherry Creek Dr., Shelby Twp.; 586-254-6001; cherrycreekgolf.com; 18 holes.

OAKLAND

Boulder Pointe Golf Club 1 Champions Circle, Oxford; 248-969-1500; boulderpointe.net; 27 holes. Fieldstone Golf Club 1984 Taylor Rd., Auburn Hills; 248.370.9354; fieldstonegolfclub.com; 18 holes. Lyon Oaks Golf Course 52251 Pontiac Trail, Wixom; 248-437-1488; destinationoakland.com; 18 holes. Moose Ridge Golf Club 11801 Doane Rd., South Lyon; 248-446-9030; mooseridgegolf.com; 18 holes. Blackheath Golf Club 3311 N. Rochester Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-601-8000; blackheathgolfclub.com; 18 holes. Shepherd’s Hollow Golf Club 9085 Big Lake Rd., Clarkston; 248-922-0300; shepherdshollow.com; 27 holes. Tanglewood the Lion 53503 W. 10 Mile Rd., South Lyon; 248-486-3355; twoodonline.com; 27 holes.

WAYNE

Northville Hills Golf Club 15565 Bay Hill Dr., Northville; 734-667-4653; northvillehillsgolfclub.com; 18 holes. Lakes of Taylor Golf Club 25505 Northline Rd., Taylor; 734-784-4653; taylorgolf. com/lakes; 18 holes.

SKIING Alpine Valley 6775 E. Highland Rd., White Lake; 248-887-4183; skialpinevalley.com; 25 slopes; all-day lift ticket $31 weekdays, $48 weekends. Mt. Brighton Ski Resort 4141 Bauer Rd., Brighton; 810-229-9581; mtbrighton.com; 26 runs; all-day lift ticket $31 weekdays,

$36-$46 weekends. Mt. Holly 13536 S. Dixie Hwy., Holly; 248634-8269; skimtholly.com; 19 slopes; all-day lift ticket $31 weekdays, $38 weekends. Pine Knob Ski & Snowboard Resort 7778 Sashabaw Rd., Clarkston; 248-625-0800; skipineknob.com; 17 runs; all-day lift tickets $31 weekdays, $38 weekends.

WATER PARKS Family Aquatic Center at Chandler Park 12600 Chandler Park Dr., Detroit; 313822-7665; chandlerparkonline.com. Kennedy Outdoor Aquatic Center 3101 West Rd., Trenton; 734-676-7172; trentonkrc.org. Lincoln Park Community Center 3525 Dix Hwy., Lincoln Park; 313-386-4075. Metro Beach Metropark 31300 Metropolitan Pkwy., Harrison Twp.; 586463-4581; metroparks.com. Red Oaks Waterpark 1455 E. 13 Mile Rd., Madison Heights; 248-858-0918. Rolling Hills Water Park 7660 Stony Creek Rd., Ypsilanti; 734-484-9676. Southfield Sports Arena 26000 Evergreen Rd., Southfield; 248-796-4640. Splash-N-Blast 2240 W. Buno Rd., Kensington Metropark, Milford; 248-6851561; metroparks.com. Summit on the Park 46000 Summit Pkwy., Canton; 734-394-5460; leisure.cantonmi.org. Turtle Cove Family Aquatic Center 17845 Savage Rd., Belleville; 734-697-9181; metroparks.com. Waterford Oaks Waterpark 1702 Scott Lake Rd., Waterford; 248-858-0918.

SKATE PARKS Concrete Jungle Skatepark 36651 Ford Rd., Westland; 734-722-7620. Landslide Skate Park 44621 Morley Dr., Clinton Twp.; 586-469-1170; lsspark. ning.com. Modern Skate Park 1500 N. Stephenson Hwy., Royal Oak; 248-546-7275; modernskate.com. Transitions Skate Park 5616 Van Born Ct. Dearborn Heights; 313-295-5935; skatetrp.com.

URBAN BIKING The Tour de Troit tour-de-troit.org PART community activism, part exercise and part social event, the annual Tour de Troit grew by hundreds of riders last year, on a 30mile, beginner-paced fun ride or a 100-kilometer “metric century” route. With dozens of sponsors and a moderate entry fee, the event raised $45,000 for the Corktown-Mexicantown Greenlink bike route — and also raised awareness about cycling in the city. It was such a great time touring Detroit’s neighborhoods, Belle Isle and the riverfront that the beer shortage at the end didn’t even piss anyone off. Organizers of this year’s Sept. 25 event promise to have that issue remedied.


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HEALTH & BEAUTY HAIR, BODY & SPA 6 Salon 306 W. Sixth St., Royal Oak; 248398-1586; sixsalon.com: Award-winning, upscale salon has three metro locations, but the Royal Oak chop shop stands above. Visit one of their designers (don’t you dare call them hairdressers) for a cut, curl or dye that’s a work of art. BarbErella Salon 3301 Edwin St., Hamtramck; 313-871-0700: Hamtramck hairdresser Sandy Kramer Shaw knows how to cut locks. She acts modest, giving clients the credit for telling her what they want while they relax to the XM radio, quirky interior. Bloomfield Laser & Cosmetic Surgery Center 43494 Woodward Ave., Suite 101, Bloomfield Hills; 248-338-1110; drroche. com: The skilled Dr. Roche oversees plastic surgery, from abdominoplasty to tattoo removal. Carol Lewis Day Spa 386 E. Maple St., Birmingham; 248-642-1570; carollewisdayspa.com: Spa services for men, women and teenagers. Curl Up & Dye 4215 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313833-5006; curlupanddyedetroit.com: Along with cuts, color, trimmings and tamings, you can throw in a little extra pampering with a manicure, pedicure, waxing, massage or facial. Smile-inducing prices. Douglas J Aveda Institute 409 S. Center St., Royal Oak; 248-336-5500; 500 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor; 734-222-5416; douglasj.com: Cutting-edge styles and stringent quality standards, offering services performed by senior students at great rates. Envy Salon & Day Spa 15430 Haggerty Rd., Northville; 734-420-0052; envysalonanddayspa.com: Envy offers everything from lash extensions to haircuts, but many customers come just for the stylish nail work at reasonable rates. Essential Massage Therapy 22939 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-5475428; emtherapy.com: Unwind entirely at Essential Massage Therapy, which provides a variety of de-stressing massage options, including Swedish massages, prenatal and couples massages, reflexology and Reiki. The Franklin Day Spa 32751 Franklin Rd., Franklin; 248-626-1772; 5755 Maple Rd., West Bloomfi eld; 248-626-1772 thefranklinspa.com: Off ers skin care, hand-and-foot care, massages, and body treatments. The Green Room Salon & Day Spa 26571 W. 12 Mile Rd., Southfield; 248-350-9322: The Green Room offers relaxing spa treatments in a beautiful and luxurious space. Couples’ VIP room comes complete with strawberries and champagne. Instafirm Body Wraps 50 W. Square Lake Rd., Troy; 248-250-7100; instafirmbodywrap.com: Body wraps, infrared sauna, ionic detox foot spa and much more. Irene’s Myomassology Institute 26061 Franklin Rd., Southfield; 248-3501400; imieducation.com: Some of the lowest prices for high quality massages, with aromatherapy oils and quaintly decorated rooms. London Calling Salon 27380 Gratiot Ave., Roseville; 586-778-6379;

londoncallingsalon.com: Trendy east-side salon specializing in exotic dying, styling and makeup application. Margot European Day Spa 101 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-642-3770; margots. com: Extensive selection of treatments and services, full line of carefully selected health and beauty products. Metabolic Weight Loss Clinic 1020 E. Michigan Ave., Saline; 888-560-8446; 734944-4040; hcgmetabolicweightlossclinic. com: Founded by Dr. John Ross and Mary Clemons, their goal is to bring the most effective, advanced weight-loss systems to clients. Nordstrom Spa 2850 W. Big Beaver Rd., Troy; 248-816-7502: Women can pamper themselves here with exfoliations, quenchers, scrubs and rubs and refreshers. RelaxStation 300 W. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-623-1951; relaxstationmassage.com: Herbal foot baths, the popular “Belavi face lift massage,” foot reflexology, seated massage and more. Salon Awesome 290 S. Main St., Plymouth; 734-927-0800; salonawesomeplymouth. com: Full-service salon aims to “enhance and compliment your lifestyle.” The Salounge 26123 Novi Rd., Novi, 248344-4685: Modern decor, upbeat music, color, cuts, curls, up-dos, extensions, cornrows, nails, lash enhancements, eyebrow arching and more. Sayeg Plastic Surgery Center 1120 E. Long Lake Rd., Suite 150, Troy; 888-739-8040; yournewlooks.com: Board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Ayoub Sayeg, M.D. yields highly visible results that have become the hallmark of his practice. Straith Clinic 32000 Telegraph Rd., Bingham Farms; 800-401-1212; straithclinic.com: Pioneers in plastic surgery, operating in metro Detroit for more than 70 years. Todd’s Room 239 Pierce St., Birmingham; 248-594-0003; toddsroombirmingham. com: Depilate in style in this glittering haven for the bright-eyed but bushybrowed. Makeup application services, eyebrow arching and hairstyling, along with one-of-a-kind jewelry and cosmetics. Wolf Aesthetic & Laser Center Ste. 200, 1990 Union Lake Rd., Commerce Township; 248363-9413: Experienced dermatology and laser surgery practice. Offers dermatology, dermatologic surgery, skin care and a laser center, all utilizing state-of-the-art techniques and equipment.

FITNESS Ann Arbor Ice Cube 2121 Oak Valley Dr., Ann Arbor; 734-213-1600; a2ice3.com: The state’s finest ice and fi tness facility, boasting three superior skating surfaces year-round. A2 Yoga 2030 Commerce Blvd., Ann Arbor; 734-216-4006; a2yoga.com: A wide variety of classes in yoga and nia, events and workshops, attractive space, gracious atmosphere. Two classrooms and a fullservice spa and wellness center. Deep tissue massage, facials, body treatments and waxing. The Detroit Flyhouse in the FD Loft Building, 3434 Russell St., #302, Detroit; 313-674-6424; detroitflyhouse.com: A growing fitness

trend, aerial yoga replaces the downward facing dog with midair acrobatics. Fitness USA 29444 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak; 248-548-3700; 10 more Michigan locations at fitnessusa.com: Full-service, neighborhood health club with gyms all over metro Detroit. Exercise and cardio equipment, group exercise classes, pools, private locker rooms, tanning, training and more. Karma Yoga 3683 W. Maple Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-723-9168; karmayoga.net: Classes, workshops, special events and teacher training. Lumiere Medical Spa 30907 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-8555355; lumieremedspa.com: Dedicated to healthy skin and reducing the signs of aging, using technology, medicine, topicals and other treatments. Planet Rock 82 Aprill Dr., Ann Arbor; 734827-2680; planet-rock.com: Has more than 22,000 square feet of climbing area on its walls (some more than 50 feet tall), as well as a motorized climbing wall and three bouldering areas. Caters to complete novices and seasoned pros. Rasa Yoga in City Center Plaza, 25875 Novi Rd., Novi; 248-344-YOGA; rasa-yoga.com: Classes teach flexibility and strength.

St. John Riverview Center 7733 E. Jefferson Ave.; 313-343-4000; stjohnprovidence.org Triumph Hospital Detroit 4777 E. Outer Dr.; 313-369-5800; triumph-healthcare.com United Community Hospital 2401 20th St.; 313-964-4422

DOCTORS

St. Mary Mercy-Livonia 36475 Five Mile Rd.; 734-655-4800; stmarymercy.org

Michigan Institute of Medicine 38525 Eight Mile Rd., Livonia; 734-542-5512: Private practice under Keith Pierce M.D., decades of experience.

HOSPITALS ANN ARBOR

University of Michigan Health System 1500 E. Medical Center Dr.; 734-9364000; med.umich.edu

AUBURN HILLS

Havenwyck Hospital 1525 University Dr.; 248-373-9200; havenwyckhospital.com

COMMERCE TOWNSHIP

Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital 1 William Carls Dr.; 248-937-3300; hvsh.org

DEARBORN

Oakwood Hospital & Medical Center 18101 Oakwood Blvd.; 313-593-7000; oakwood.org

DETROIT

Children’s Hospital of Michigan 3901 Beaubien St.; 313-745-5437; childrensdmc.org Detroit Hope Hospital 801 Virginia Park; 313-874-0100; detroithope.com Detroit Receiving Hospital 4201 St. Antoine Blvd.; 313-745-3000; drhuhc.org Harper University Hospital 3990 John R St.; 313-745-8040; harperhutzel.org Henry Ford Hospital 2799 W. Grand Blvd.; 313-916-2600; henryfordhospital.com Hutzel Women’s Hospital 3980 John R St.; 313-745-7555; hutzel.org Kresge Eye Institute 4717 St. Antoine; 313577-8900; kresgeeye.org Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan 361 Mack Ave.; 313-745-1203; rimrehab.org Sinai-Grace Hospital 6071 W. Outer Dr.; 313-966-3300; sinaigrace.com St. John Hospital & Medical Center 22101 Moross Rd.; 313-343-4000; stjohnprovidence.org

FARMINGTON HILLS

Botsford Hospital 28050 Grand River Ave.; 248-471-8000; botsford.org

FERNDALE

Henry Ford Kingswood Hospital 10300 W. Eight Mile Rd.; 248-398-3200; henryfordhealth.org

GARDEN CITY

Garden City Hospital 6245 Inkster Rd.; 734-458-3300; gchosp.org

THE GROSSE POINTES

Beaumont Hospital-Grosse Pointe 468 Cadieux Rd., Grosse Pointe; 313-3431000; beaumonthospitals.com Henry Ford Medical Center-Cottage 159 Kercheval Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313640-2240; henryfordhealth.org

LINCOLN PARK

Kindred Hospital 26400 W. Outer Dr.; 313594-6000; kindredhealthcare.com

LIVONIA

MADISON HEIGHTS

DMC Surgery Hospital 30671 Stephenson Hwy.; 248-733-2200; dmcsurgeryhospital.org. St. John Macomb-Oakland Center 27531 Dequindre Rd.; 248-967-7000; stjohnprovidence.org

MOUNT CLEMENS

Mount Clemens Regional Medical Center 1000 Harrington Rd.; 586-493-8000; mcrmc.org Select Specialty Hospital-Macomb County 215 North Ave.; 586-307-9000; selectspecialtyhospitals.com

NOVI

Providence Park Hospital 47601 Grand River Ave.; 248-465-4100; stjohnprovidence.org

PONTIAC

Doctors’ Hospital of Michigan-Main Campus 461 W. Huron St.; 248-857-7200; dhofm.com POH Regional Medical Center 50 N. Perry St.; 248-338-5000; pohregtional.org St. Joseph Mercy-Oakland 44405 Woodward Ave.; 248-452-5252; stjoesoakland.org

ROCHESTER

Crittenton Hospital Medical Center 1101 W. University Dr.; 248-652-5000; crittenton.com

ROYAL OAK

Beaumont Hospital-Royal Oak 3601 W. 13 Mile Rd.; 248-898-5000; beaumonthospitals.com

SOUTHFIELD

Oakland Regional Hospital 22401 Foster Winter Dr.; 248-423-5100; oaklandregionalhospital.com Providence Hospital 16001 W. Nine Mile Rd.; 248-849-3000; stjohnprovidence.org

TAYLOR

Oakwood Heritage Hospital 10000


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Telegraph Rd.; 313-295-5000; oakwood.org

TRENTON

Oakwood Southshore Medical Center 5450 Fort St.; 734-671-3800; oakwood.org

TROY

Beaumont Hospital-Troy 44201 Dequindre Rd.; 248-964-5000; beaumonthospitals.com

MUSIC

BARS & CLUBS

RECREATION

Oakwood Annapolis Hospital 33155 Annaplis St.; 734-467-4000; oakwood.org

WEST BLOOMFIELD

Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital 6777 W. Maple Rd.; 248-325-1000; henryford.com

WESTLAND

Walter P. Reuther Psychiatric Hospital 30901 Palmer Rd.; 734-367-8400

WARREN

WYANDOTTE

Oakland Regional Macomb Center 11012 E. 13 Mile Rd.; 586-751-9800; oaklandregionalhospital.com Southeast Michigan Surgical Hospital 21230 Dequindre Rd.; 586-427-1000; smshinc.com St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital 11800 E. 12 Mile Rd.; 586-573-5000; stjohnprovidence.org

Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital 2333 Biddle Ave.; 734-246-6000; henryfordwyandotte

YPSILANTI

Forest Health Medical Center 135 Prospect St.; 734-547-4700; barixclinics.com St. Joseph Mercy-Ann Arbor 5301 McAuley Dr.; 734-712-3456;sjmercyhealth.org

WAYNE

Franklin pa S BFF The

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

GETTING AROUND

PUT YOUR SKINNY JEANS ON!

ARTS

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LIVING

| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 63

John Ross MD | Board Certified

DEBBY AFTER LOSING 60 LBS! › PROFESSIONAL WEIGHT LOSS TEAM TO ASSIST CLIENTS › GASTRIC BYPASS AND DIABETIC SPECIFIC PROGRAMS › CONTROL TYPE 2 DIABETES › LIPOTROPICS › FULLY DEVELOPED 3 STEP PROGRAM › HEALTH SAVINGS ACCOUNT ELIGIBLE

HCG #1 Weight-loss Program Nationally!

1-888-560-8446 michiganhcgclinic.com

HCG has not been approved for weightloss by the FDA


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MAJOR TRANSIT Amtrak: 800-USA-RAIL; amtrak.com Detroit Metro Airport: John D. Dingell Dr., Detroit; 734-942-3550; metroairport.com DDOT/Detroit Department of Transit: 313933-1300; detroitmi.gov/Departments/ DetroitDepartmentofTransportation/ tabid/80/Default.aspx The People Mover: 313-224-2160; thepeoplemover.com SMART/Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transit: 866-962-5515; smartbus.org The Ride/The Ann Arbor Transportation Authority: 734-996-0400; theride.org.

CABS & CAR SERVICES Checker Cab: 313-963-1000; 800-351-5466; checkercab-det.com Metro Cars: metrocars.com/michigan

BICYCLES, SKATES & MOTORCYCLES

GETTING AROUND „ The Detroit People Mover pulls into Bricktown Station in downtown Detroit.

CHANCES ARE if you’re traveling around the area, you’ll be driving. (It’s not called the Motor City for nothing.) The last streetcar rolled down Woodward Avenue in 1956, and efforts at building a regional transit system have stalled since then. That said, there are some exceptions, such as the region’s several bus systems, which include Detroit’s city bus system, DDOT (pronounced DEE-dot), the suburban bus system, SMART, and Ann Arbor’s bus system, the Ride. Though it’s not a citywide transit system, Detroit’s People Mover, a 3-mile, 13-station monorail that can be used to dodge the cold when getting around downtown, or to find a good parking spot and take a ride the rest of the way. Though we don’t have commuter rail, we do have a pretty decent cluster of Amtrak stations. The train times tend to be a bit inconvenient, but fares range from $5 to $12 for trips between stations in Birmingham, Dearborn, Detroit, Royal Oak and Pontiac. We even hear a stop at Detroit Metro Airport could be on the way someday soon. Chances are that if you’re not driving, you’ll still be in a car. The good news is that there are a number of reputable taxi and car services, ranging from sturdy, dependable operations like Checker Cab to the luxury sedans of Metro Cars. The bad news is that the region is so spread-out you could wind up paying a pretty penny. Things are changing, though. In the last few years, unscientifi cally, we see a rise in cycling and skateboarding, and plenty of resources to help you get up on fume-free wheels, including great bike shops, such as Hazel Park’s Continental Bike Shop, and even more collectively oriented places, such as The Hub of Detroit and the bike rental shop Wheelhouse Detroit. All that said, yeah, you’ll likely be driving. The good news is that we’ve spent more than 50 years building more freeway-lane miles than almost any other city in the United States, criss-crossing, bisecting and trisecting Detroit, and looping around it more than once, putting everything within reach — at least when it isn’t rush hour.

Biker Bob’s 14100 Telegraph Rd., Taylor; 734-947-4647; bikerbobshd.com: A full selection of Harley-Davidson motorcycles, genuine parts, accessories and more. Continental Bike Shop 24436 John R Rd., Hazel Park; 248-545-1225; continentalbikeshop.com: Open since 1937. Repair department can build custom bikes or basic repairs. Big brands, framesets, tandem cycles, racing frames and basic rides. Detroit City Skateboards 4565 Dixie Hwy., Waterford; 248-674-0379; 6019 N. Wayne Rd., Westland; 734-7213233; detroitcityskateboards.com: Decks,trucks, wheels, bearings, grip tape, accessories, clothing and protective gear, even grind rails. Great Lakes Cycling and Fitness 2015 W. Stadium Dr., Ann Arbor; 734-6686484; greatlakescycling.com: Youthful, especially caters to families who cycle. The Hub of Detroit 3611 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-879-5073; thehubofdetroit. com: Grew out of a volunteer youth education program, now sells bikes and bike accessories and offers repair services all on the cheap. Kensington Motorsports 56605 Pontiac Trail, New Hudson; 248-446-0000 kensingtonmotorsports.com: Vehicle dealer featuring an extensive selection of motorcycles, ATV’s, watercraft , snowmobiles, and trailers. Modern Skate & Surf 29862 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak: 248-545-5700; 44275 12 Mile Rd., Novi; 248-735-4443: Great skate shops with quality gear and skating tips. Motor City Harley-Davidson 34900 Grand River Ave., Farmington Hills; 248-473-7433; motorcityharley.com: Great selection of Harley hogs in the latest colors and styles; maintenance and service; parts and accessories; riding classes. Two Wheel Tango 4765 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-769-8401; 3162 Packard Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-528-3030: Once voted best bike shop, full-service bike techs, info on community rides, clothing. Wheelhouse Detroit 1340 E. Atwater St., Detroit; 313-656-2453; wheelhousedetroit.com: Bike shop offers rental, retail, service and tours from

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Rivard Plaza on the Detroit RiverWalk. CAR DEALERSHIPS Art Moran Buick GMC 29300 Telegraph Rd., Southfield; 800-261-9673; artmoranbuickpontiacgmc.com Atchinson Ford 9800 Belleville Rd., Belleville; 734-697-9161; atchinson. dealerconnection.com Bill Fox Chevrolet 725 S Rochester Rd., Rochester Hills; 866-884-4258; billfoxchevrolet.com Bob Maxey Lincoln Mercury 16901 Mack Ave., Detroit; 313-885-4000 Bob Thibodeau Ford 26333 Van Dyke Ave., Centerline; 586-755-2100 Bruce Campbell Dodge 14875 Telegraph Rd., Redford; 313-387-5513; brudecampbelldodge.com Buff Whelan Chevrolet 40445 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights; 800-943-5261; buff whelan.com Dean Sellers Ford 2600 W. Maple Rd., Troy; 800-906-6073 Dick Scott Nissan/KIA 42175 Michigan Ave., Canton; 734-495-1000; dickscottnissan.com Ed Rinke Chevrolet Buick GMC 26125 Van Dyke Ave., Center Line; 866-461-1170; edrinkechevrolet.com Fairlane Ford 14585 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 866-337-0442; fairlaneford.com Fresard Buick GMC 21800 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 800-373-7273; fresard.com Gordon Chevrolet 31850 Ford Rd., Garden City; 888-478-2606; gordonchevrolet.com Hines Park Lincoln Mercury 40601 Ann Arbor Rd., Plymouth; 866-979-3919 Jack Demmer Ford Inc. 37300 Michigan Ave., Wayne; 800-275-3673 Les Stanford Chevrolet Cadillac 21730 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-879-5540; lesstanford.com Livonia Chrysler Jeep 30777 Plymouth Rd., Livonia; 734-525-5000; livoniachrysler.com Merollis Chevrolet 21800 Gratiot Ave., Eastpointe; 586-279-2318; merollischevycars.com Metropolitan Lincoln Mercury 32000 Ford Rd., Garden City; 800-316-6179 Pat Milliken Ford 9600 Telegraph Rd., Redford; 313-255-3100; patmillikenford. com Red Holman Buick GMC 35300 Ford Rd., Westland; 734-423-1007; redholman.net Russ Milne Ford 24777 Hall Rd., Macomb; 866-353-5840 Snethkamp Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram 11600 Telegraph Rd., Redford; 313-2552700; snethkampchryslerjeep.net Southfield Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram 28100 Telegraph Rd., Southfield; 888-3880451; southfieldchrysler.com Sterling Heights Dodge Chrysler Jeep 40111 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights; 888-452-7976; sterlingheightsdodge.net Tamaroff Automotive 28585 Telegraph Rd., Southfield; 800-614-2531; tamaroff.com Telegraph Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram 12000 Telegraph Rd., Taylor; 888-791-3034; telegraphchrysler.com Victory Honda of Plymouth 315 Ann Arbor Rd., Plymouth; 800-266-1447; victoryplymouth.com Village Ford 23535 Michigan Ave., Dearborn, 800-331-4909; villageford.com Westborn Chrysler Jeep 23300 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 877-295-7806; westbornchryslerjeep.net

metrotimes.com metro times.com


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DONATE or VOLUNTEER today! We accept donations of food, new toys, house cleaning supplies, new office supplies and meal preparation for the families that stay at our RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE OF DETROIT. PLEASE consider sponsoring a family night stay with a $10 donation!

WHAT WE DO The Ronald McDonald House of Detroit serves families with seriously ill or injured children being treated in any area hospital. In some instances, we become a home for the children themselves as they receive outpatient treatment. Our goal is to give families a pleasant and comfortable “home away from home” while their child is receiving medical care.

Call: 313-745-5909 for more information! www.rmhc-detroit.org

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LODGING HOTELS Atheneum Suite Hotel 1000 Brush St., Detroit; 313-962-2323; summithotels.com The Baronette Renaissance Hotel 27790 Novi Rd., Novi; 248-349-7800; thebaronette.com Doubletree Hotel Guest Suites 525 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit; 313-963-5600 Courtyard Marriott 3555 Centerpoint Pkwy., Pontiac; 248-858-9595 Crowne Plaza Hotel 1500 N. Opdyke Rd., Auburn Hills; 248-373-4550 Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center, Detroit; 313-568-8000; marriott.com Doubletree Hotel Detroit/Dearborn 5801 Southfield Expressway, Detroit; 313-3363340; dearborn.doubletree.com Hawthorn Suites By Wyndam, DetroitSouthfield 26700 Central Park Blvd., Southfield; 248-352-8900; hawthorn.com Hilton Garden Inn Detroit Downtown 351 Gratiot Ave., Detroit; 313-967-0900; hiltongardeninn.com Holiday Inn Express Detroit 1020 Washington Blvd., Detroit; 313-8877000; hiexpress.com Holiday Inn Ann Arbor 3600 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-769-9800; hiannarbor.com Hyatt Regency Dearborn 600 Town Center Dr., Dearborn; 313-593-1234; dearborn.hyatt.com Kensington Court 610 Hilton Blvd., Ann Arbor; 734-761-7800; kcourtaa.com MGM Grand Detroit 1777 Third St., Detroit; 877-888-2121; mgmgranddetroit.com Milner Hotel 1538 Centre St., Detroit; 313-963-3950; milner-hotels.com Plaza Hotel 16400 JL Hudson Dr., Southfi eld; 248-552-8833; plazahotelsouthfi eld.com Radisson Bloomfi eld Hills 39475 Woodward Ave., Bloomfi eld Hills; 248-644-1400; radisson.com/ bloomfi eldhillsmi Ramada Plaza Troy 5500 Crooks Rd., Troy; 248-879-2100; ramada.com/ hotel/32781 Residence Inn Detroit Livonia 17250 Fox Dr., Livonia; 734-462-4201; marriott.com Gatehouse Suites Troy Central 2600 Livernois Rd., Troy; 248-689-6856; marriott.com Residence Inn Warren 30120 Civic Center Blvd., Warren; 586-558-8050; marriott.com MotorCity Casino Hotel 2901 Grand River Ave., Detroit; 866-782-9622; motorcitycasino.com Troy Marriott 200 W. Big Beaver Rd., Troy; 248-680-9797; marriott.com/dtttt Westin Book-Cadillac Detroit 1114 Washington Blvd., Detroit; 313-442-1600 Westin Detroit Metropolitan Airport 2501 WorldGateway Place, Detroit; 734942-6500; starwoodhotels.com Westin Southfi eld Detroit 1500 Town

Center Dr., Southfi eld; 248-827-4000; starwoodhotels.com

INNS AND BED & BREAKFASTS 234 Winder Street Inn 234 Winder St., Detroit; 313-831-4091; 234winderstinn. com Ann Arbor Bed and Breakfast 921 E. Huron Street Ann Arbor; 734-994-9100; annarborbedandbreakfast.com Bishop-Brighton Bed & Breakfast 2709 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-284-7309; bishop-brightonbedandbreakfast.com Bishop’s Cottage 7573 Macomb St. Grosse Ile; 734-671-9191 Blue Water Inn 1337 North River Rd., St. Clair; 810-329-2236 Burnt Toast Inn 415 W. William St. & 516 W. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-6626685; burnttoastinn.com Carriage House Bed & Breakfast 5967 Andersonville Rd., Waterford; 248-6230025; carriagehouseeventcenter.com Claire’s Guesthouse 2100 Hall Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-996-0515 Dearborn Bed & Breakfast 22331 Morely Ave., Dearborn; 313-563-2200; dearbornbb.com First Street Garden Inn 549 S. First St., Ann Arbor; 734-741-9786; firststreetgardeninn.com The Inn at 97 Winder 97 Winder St. Detroit; 313-832-4348; theinnat97winder.com The Inn on Ferry Street 84 E. Ferry St., Detroit; 313-871-6000; innonferrystreet.com Lamp Post Inn 2424 E. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor; 734-971-8000; lamppostinn.com Library Bed & Breakfast 808 Mary St., Ann Arbor; 734-668-6815 Mill Pond Inn 155 N. Main St., Clarkston; 800-867-4142; millpondinnbb.com Parish House Inn Michigan Bed and Breakfast 103 S. Huron St., Ypsilanti; 734-480-4800; parishhouseinn.com The Queen’s Residence Bed and Breakfast Inn 220 S. Huron St., Ypsilanti; 734-340-2805; queensresidence.com Steller House B & B 3990 Gleaner Hall Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-369-3106; stellerhouse.com The Wren’s Nest 7405 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfi eld; 248-624-6874; thewrensnestbb.com CONFERENCE CENTERS & SERVICES Eagle Crest Conference Center 1275 S. Huron St., Ypsilanti; 734-487-0600; eaglecrestresort.com Laurel Manor Banquet & Video Conference Center 39000 Schoolcraft Rd., Livonia; 734-462-0770; laurelmanor.com University of Michigan Conference Services 301 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-7645297; housing.umich.edu/ conferences/services


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LIVING

Downtown Detroit

Hamtramck

Area: Approximately one square mile. Boundaries: The Lodge Expressway (M-10), I-75, I-375 and the Detroit River. Estimated daytime workforce: More than 80,000 people, comprising 21 percent of all city employment.

Area: 2.1 sq. mi. Est. population: 20,000

DOWNTOWN DETROIT is the iconic hub of the action, with a tight grouping of big entertainment venues and a wide range of events, ranging from the Detroit International Jazz Festival to the Downtown Hoedown. Private and public money have built a riverfront park linking the Renaissance Center to venues, parks, restaurants and hotels. The Motown Winter Blast can pull in more than 1 million people to the Campus Martius Park area, and last year’s New Year’s Eve celebration crowded the park with midnight revelers. But it’s also a place where lots of local entrepreneurs embrace the do-it-yourself ethic, opening retro-cool cabarets and disused speakeasies, resurrecting what was best about a city of overworked people with money in their pockets. For younger, hipper tourists more likely to hit a bar and a club than a four-star dinner and a show, many of Detroit’s supposed drawbacks are strengths.

Midtown Detroit MUCH OF what we contrive as “Midtown” today used to be called the Cass Corridor. Many still call it that, and rightly so. The parcel of land takes its name from Lewis Cass, governor of Michigan Territory (1813-1831) and one-time presidential candidate. Gov. Cass’ ribbon-shaped property stretched alongside Detroit — which was itself just a thin strip of land adjoining early Woodward Avenue. The governor’s farm stretched all the way down to Michigan Avenue, running between today’s Cass and Third. In its day, it was prime property, and its lifetime tells the story of American real estate. The land went from a viceroy’s estate to farmland dotted with ostentatious mansions. It then went from uppermiddle-class to working-class to, finally, a very tough neighborhood. But the neighborhood hard by Wayne State University has managed to hang on, thanks to an unusual mix of hippies, prostitutes, artists, revolutionaries and rockers who’ve lived there. That contingent started up the original Cass Corridor block party, the end-of-summer Dally in the Alley. And the neighborhood has also done well because of (and sometimes in spite of) the university. And, over the last decade, new players have entered in, dubbing the joint Midtown, developing loft-style living spaces, repurposing warehouses, and remaking old-man bars and hourly hotels into hip dives and expensive apartments. The “Co’do’” isn’t as gritty as it used to be. Be advised, though: The comfort level goes from “day tripper” to “urban explorer” somewhere south of Selden.

SURROUNDED BY and yet insulated from Detroit politics, the people of Hamtramck have never wielded much power in matters of state. But the city’s skilled workers achieved miraculous production during World War II. And in matters of labor, Hamtramck’s working-class community united to win decisive, sit-down strikes with Detroit’s powerful auto companies. And Hamtramck had a host of workers halls and meeting places, as Hamtramckans have always loved to get together, for politics, drinking or dancing, in restaurants, in halls, and in the bars and barbershops that ringed the factories. In fact, Polish working-class culture arguably made Hamtramck into the “wettest town in America.” At one point, the city had the highest number of liquor licenses per capita in Michigan. It still has dozens of sale licenses for slightly more than two square miles. Interestingly, as heavy industry departed, the surfeit of taverns left Hamtramck in a unique position to offer live entertainment. In the 1970s and 1980s, Hamtramck became an edgy destination for punk rock shows, at bars like Paycheck’s Lounge, Lili’s 21 and the ethnic meeting halls the Polish community built. Live music and cheap rent helped attract a growing number of young people from the suburbs. In 1997, Utne Reader magazine named Hamtramck one of “the 15 hippest neighborhoods in the U.S. and Canada.” That same year, Metro Times began hosting the Hamtramck Blowout, the country’s largest local music festival at the city’s legion music spots.

Ferndale Area: 3.9 square miles Population: 22,000

Eastern Market

FOR FERNDALE, the dividends of the postwar suburban boom were surprisingly brief. By the 1980s, with I-696 being seen as the new dividing line between rich and poor, Ferndale was becoming grittier, sleepier, more elderly and workingclass. Luckily, its proximity to the city worked to its benefi t. In the 1980s, Detroit’s Palmer Park was Detroit’s biggest gay and lesbian neighborhood. But with urban disinvestments and the crack cocaine epidemic, crime and violence flung the gay community out along Woodward Avenue, and it settled largely in the suburbs of Ferndale, Royal Oak and Birmingham. With its affordable housing and unpretentious buildings, Ferndale attracted the scrappiest and, arguably, most activist core of the community. Within 20 years, the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community has really gussied up that graying town. Ferndale hosts the annual Motor City Pride festival, which draws tens of thousands of participants. Five years ago, Affirmations, the $6 million, three-story, 17,000-square-foot LGBT community center, opened smack in the middle of downtown Ferndale. In 2008, Ferndale swore in Michigan’s first openly gay mayor, Craig Covey.

Established: 1841 Moved to present location: 1891 Estimated typical Saturday crowd: 25,000

Royal Oak

WHEN THE SUN hangs high on a warm Saturday, an out-of- town visitor to Eastern Market would never guess how deeply divided our region is supposed to be. Motorists pour in from the suburbs, joining Detroiters in lining up, sometimes a half-mile deep, for the Mack exit of I-75. Once in the market district, motorists call a truce with pedestrians, inching along behind people pushing strollers and trucking along flats of fl owers and herbs. It’s easy to let yourself slow down here and experience nature’s bounty. Thousands of people from the city, the burbs, and the farms beyond, create a heady, sensual mash-up, a place where you’ll smell fl owers, barbecue, incense and popcorn all in the first fi ve minutes. Not only is this recognized as the world’s largest bedding fl ower market, it’s also the largest historic public market district in the United States. For more than a century, this plaza between Market and Russell streets has existed for a public purpose. It has nourished a city convulsed by growth, upheaval, retrenchment and return — and not just with food. Eastern Market rings a hopeful note, that we can come together for sustenance and fellowship, that we can bask in our collective history, even if we only came looking for some humble salad vegetables.

Area: 11.8 square miles Population: 60,000 FROM THE BEGINNING, Royal Oak was always a little more pretentious than the average bedroom suburb. It got its name from none other than Territorial Governor Lewis Cass. The one-time presidential candidate dubbed the township in 1819, while on a surveying expedition. There, Cass found a striking oak tree, near what’s now the intersection of Crooks, Rochester and Main. The tree reminded him of England’s storied Royal Oak, which sheltered a routed King Charles II from Oliver Cromwell’s army after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. Highfalutin stuff indeed! When development finally came, thanks to the electrifi ed streetcars of the 1890s, it left Main Street with a small-town feel and a dense main thoroughfare of storefronts. Today, that compact main drag is loaded up with stylish restaurants, bars and lounges, but the passenger trains that occasionally stop cars on Main Street still give it a quaint feel. Though Royal Oak’s pedestrians are often just parking in lots behind Main Street and strolling for a few hours, the enticing downtown puts the road far behind. The throngs fl ock amid neon and frosted glass where the dense old suburb formed more than 100 years ago. The sheen of urbanity makes it work. Clearly, Royal Oak ain’t your parents’ suburb anymore.


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Berkley Area: 2.6 square miles Population: 15,500 NOT TO BE confused with Berkeley (everything in metro Detroit has to be a little different, right?), the Detroit suburb with two E’s is relatively new, a squeaky clean, small city of modest homes and good schools. As late as the 1920s, its main drag, 12 Mile Road, was mostly open land, with farms and fi elds. But with the advent of the auto age, the strip filled in with small businesses and, behind them, modest homes set back against a greensward of lawns and trees. It makes sense when you consider that this slice of appealing small-town Americana is the hometown of feel-good rocker Marshall Crenshaw. In many ways, it hasn’t changed much over the years. Homogeneous, pleasing, redolent of freshly cut turf and apple pie, Berkley is prosperous, but not ostentatious: predominately white, well-educated, with about a third of residents having a degree of some kind, and sporting higher than average median household incomes. In fact, its school system is good enough to be shared with toney Huntington Woods and the northern park of Oak Park. City services are another point of pride, as their parks and recreation department furnishes parks, tennis courts, baseball diamonds and an ice arena. And if anything should go wrong, there’s the William Beaumont hospital in nearby Royal Oak.

Birmingham Area: 4.8 square miles Population: 20,000 WHAT’S NOW Birmingham was settled in 1818, when three young Detroiters, Elijah Willits, John Hamilton and John W. Hunter, all made down payments on some very desirable land. Their adjoining properties met at a promising site about a day’s ride out of downtown Detroit, where a river crossed the Saginaw Trail. At this natural way station, all three men built taverns near what’s now the corner of Maple and Pierce. By the 1830s, the village was becoming a rural industrial center with several sawmills, a flouring mill, smithies and makers of farm implements. For decades, the rural center stayed prosperous and independent. Even when the railroad reached town by 1839, the country village’s character was not threatened. But, with the improvement of the railroad and, finally, the perfection of the electric trains plying major thoroughfares in the 1890s, Birmingham increasingly found a new identity as a bedroom community for Detroit, with businessmen taking trains running downtown for work while their families lived in the relative health of the country. The suburb thickened and grew, with 3,690 residents in 1920 and more than double that a decade later. Perhaps because the Depression dampened growth, the village of Birmingham emerged in the postwar period as a denser suburb of the prewar style. For decades, it would be a city with a decidedly smalltown atmosphere; though it now has sophisticated lounges, prohibition on sale “by the glass” reigned until the 1970s. By the 1980s, Birmingham was finally maturing into what it is now, a sort of sophisticate’s bedroom community, with safe streets, good schools and a wellpreserved, walkable downtown of coffee shops, restaurants with wine by the glass, and even a historic theater. And that gives the city’s homes and businesses durable value, given today’s rising demand for pedestrian-oriented lifestyle choices.

Troy Area: 33.6 square miles Population: 81,000 INCORPORATED as a city in 1955, Troy found itself poised to grow in a way an oldfashioned streetcar suburb never could. Echoing General Motors’ superhighwayloving Futurama exhibit at the 1939 World’s Fair, Troy bravely dubbed itself in 1955, “The City of Tomorrow, Today.” As if in answer, Interstate 75 came zigzagging through the heart of the young city’s farmlands in 1963, giving Troy’s slumbering pasture more than 8-1/2 miles of freeway frontage. Troy was a land of sudden riches. The population almost doubled between 1955 and 1966, and has since quadrupled. And businesses in Troy’s “Golden Corridor” helped fuel an employment boom. By the spring of 1974, six massive buildings were going up in what one newspaper dubbed (quotation marks included) “downtown” Troy. That year’s building boom along a two-mile stretch of Big Beaver saw the construction of more than 1.5 million square feet of office space. The city, home to such high-profile businesses as Kmart, Ziebart, ExCell-O and Kelly Services, weathered the recession of the early ’80s and came out swinging. By 1985, Troy had a new record-high 57 commercial building permits. In 1986, 7 million square feet of office space were already built and leased in Troy — with another 5 million square feet either proposed, approved or under construction. In 1989, Standard Federal Bank broke ground on a six-story, 450,000-square-foot, $90 million headquarters. With already 110 office buildings in town, and plans for 30 more, Troy soon had 9.5 million square feet of office space, trailing only Southfield and Detroit in the state.

Dearborn Area: 24.5 square miles Population: 97,000 NATURALLY, Dearborn is known for its most prominent citizen: Henry Ford. The machinist was in his 40s when he finally met with big success in the 1910s. The

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market’s production demands quickly outstripped his facilities, fi rst in Detroit, then in Highland Park, culminating in his dramatic plans for his hometown. Springwells was still the country, mostly sleepy, muddy and sparsely settled. To Ford, it seemed the perfect place to site a factory and build a town from scratch. In Springwells, Ford bought hundreds of acres of real estate, much of it on land connected to the Detroit River. There he drained a marsh to construct his mammoth Rouge complex, the largest industrial facility in the world. The area darkened into a workers’ city, fi nally incorporating as the city of Fordson in 1925, and as Dearborn in 1929. The city’s character, naturally, was guided by its No. 1 employer. Until he relinquished control of the company aft er World War II, Ford played the role of benevolent dictator. He poured money into Dearborn, but it was on his terms, which were strict: Dearborn was to be a nonunion, clean-living, American company town. By the 1930s, with the economy on the skids and an increasingly militant working class, Ford hired Harry Bennett to crush union organizing. Bennett’s army of goons gave Ford some of his worst PR, belying the kindly face Ford showed the world. Ford fi nally recognized the UAW in April of 1941. Six years later, Dearborn’s fi rst citizen lay dead. These days, Dearborn is less known for Fords than falafels. The city’s old city hall faces the front of east the Arab American National Museum. The building, built in 2005, is the showpiece of the largest concentrated Middle Eastern community in the country, a religiously diverse population drawn from all over the Middle East. Now a third of Dearbornites claim Middle Eastern heritage. And the burgeoning community has invigorated formerly sleepy stretches of Schaefer and Warren, opening shops, restaurants, markets and bakeries, with gleaming signage that’s just as likely to be in Arabic as in English.

Mount Clemens Area: 4.2 square miles Population: 17,000 IN THE 19th century, Mount Clemens’ had its shot at the big time, when oil drillers struck it rich — though not in the way intended. The first well in Mt. Clemens, sunk during the 1860s oil boom, struck only brine and was abandoned. Three years later, the Mount Clemens Salt Company sank a well to get that brine, but found it too sulfurous and rich in minerals to make good commercial salt. One curious man got permission to rig up bathtubs in the salt building and found that soaking in the water cured his eczema. Quickly, a business bonanza sprang up around the healing properties of Mount Clemens’ “waters,” with larger and increasingly gaudy bath houses, hotels and sanitariums being built in the city for more than 30 years. By the 1890s, mineral well derricks pumped up the city’s life blood, serving the well-to-do travelers who poured in. At its height, “Bath City” was a bustling destination, a kind of 19th century Atlantic City, where enough wealth bubbled up to spawn a lavish building boom. The 20th century was much less kind to Mount Clemens. Hit hard by the Great Depression, “Bath City” never recovered. After World War II, air travel offered Americans distant getaways on sunny beaches. And for most Americans, miracle drugs and state-of-the-art surgeries seemed more effective than a regimented series of baths in sulfurous water. A generation later, however, it’s worth noting that the places the city didn’t demolish are now some of the most active. Though many of the newer buildings along Southbound Gratiot are perennially for rent, downtown’s remaining historic blocks host tight groupings of bars and restaurants. And some observers say Mount Clemens, with what remains of its historic downtown, is better positioned for 21st century development than most Macomb County communities, as residents, businesses and tourists are willing to pay a premium for a walkable, bikeable, livable environment.

Bloomfield Hills Area: 5 square miles Population: 4,000 FIRST OF ALL, there is more than one Bloomfi eld. There is Bloomfi eld Township (43,000 people in 26 square miles), West Bloomfi eld Township (65,000 people in 31.2 square miles) and then there’s Bloomfi eld Hills. It really did have hills once upon a time, large deposits of sand and gravel left by glaciers during the last ice age. When white settlers arrived in the 1820s, they saw hills and dales and “blooming fields” ripe for cultivation and transformation into productive farmland. Things started changing in the early 20th century, when wealthy Detroiters made rich by the auto boom bought up much of the land. Since then, that’s largely what sets Bloomfi eld Hills apart, its identity as an enclave of wealth and privilege. Recent reported median incomes for households can top $200,000, and almost half of its homes had an estimated value of more than $1 million in 2000. It’s also where you’ll fi nd the Cranbrook Academy of Art, a leading graduate school for architecture and design, with acres of woodland, outdoor theaters, gardens and buildings designed by the Saarinen family. Other fi ne institutions of learning include the Roeper School, a campus of Country Day School and the Academy of the Sacred Heart. Bloomfi eld Hills has also been home to many famous metro Detroiters over the years, including Aretha Franklin, TV judge Greg Mathis, funnyman Robin Williams, architect Minoru Yamasaki, and hockey players Steve Yzerman and Chris Chelios.


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Wyandotte Area: 7 square miles Population: 28,000 WHEN METRO DETROITERS say “Downriver,” it’s usually a catch-all for the largely blue-collar communities that fall south of Dearborn, such as Lincoln Park, Melvindale, Ecorse and Taylor. These working-class suburbs once provided the manpower for a string of steel mills and factories that used to flank the Detroit River. With the off shoring of U.S. manufacturing, these cities have had a hard time reinventing themselves as the mills have closed. One sunny exception to that gloomy trend has been the Wyandotte. For decades, the city was the site of industry, with making everything from ships to toys to chemicals. With the exception of BASF’s Wyandotte plant, though, the factories are almost completely a memory. But, unlike so many other Downriver burbs, Wyandotte has remade itself into a desirable place to live. It’s largely independent, with its own parks, and even its own power plant and water utility, a rarity in metro Detroit. It has retained its appealing main street, Biddle Avenue, which is filled with small shops, restaurants and bars. The city was amenable to the construction of new condominium developments down by the riverfront. On a bright summer day, with sun sparkling on the water, it offers a bright spot of hope for Downriver.

The Grosse Pointes TO THOSE unfamiliar with Grosse Pointe, or the handful of cities that make up the Grosse Pointes, it is a handful of affluent cities adjoining a ravaged portion of Detroit’s east side. To an outsider, it might suffice to say one is from Grosse Pointe; but to Grosse Pointers, they want to know which community you live in: The park, the pointe, the farms, the woods or the shores. If this sounds like an involved question, it is: Gradations of income and wealth stratify this loosely knit collection of cities, though not as much as its border with Detroit. Inside the Pointes, the peace and calm of wealth are all-pervading. Long streets with large houses, big lawns and leafy trees best describe the scene, with shopping and dining on quaint commercial streets that are pedestrian-and bicyclefriendly. There are even convenient little shops tucked away back in residential neighborhoods, better to appeal to people who live right there.

St. Clair Shores Area: 14.2 square miles Population: 63,000 IF YOU enjoy boating, or even if you just enjoy “boat drinks,” St. Clair Shores may be for you. Along its “Nautical Mile,” you’ll find one of the largest concentrations of boats and marinas in the Midwest. Whether you’re shopping for a sailboat or marine supplies, nosing around for affordable winter storage or summer dockage, the city has unbeatable water access, right where the land slopes gently back, putting Lake St. Clair due east. Of course, you don’t have to know anything about rigging if you just want to get three sheets to the wind. A string of restaurants, bars and party palaces line Jefferson Avenue, including Andiamo Lakefront Bistro, Blue Goose Inn, Fishbone’s Rhythm Kitchen Café and Waves. For a real blowout, there’s the Beach Grill, an award-winning, colorful, 19,000-square-foot facility with towering glass windows with striking water views, a large outdoor deck and Tiki bar, a large dance fl oor and a video wall with SurroundSound.

Southfield Area: 26.2 square miles Population: 78,000 SOUTHFIELD IS suburban, well-to-do and increasingly African-American, now more than half the total population. Much like Troy, Southfi eld was largely undeveloped until the 1950s. One of the factors working in its favor was its topography; in an area that’s overwhelmingly fl at, broadcasters chose the imperceptibly elevated ground of Southfi eld as the site for their studios, antennae and facilities. Not only has it hosted television stations and studios galore, but it also is fi ttingly home to the Specs Howard School of Media Arts. Also like Troy, which has I-75 corkscrewing through it, Southfi eld has the Lodge Expressway (OK, we’re supposed to call it M-10, but habits die hard). Along the expressway, north of West 10 Mile Road, is the “Golden Triangle,” an agglomeration of commercial real estate that comprises 2.2 million square feet of space, helping make Southfi eld the second-largest office market in metro Detroit, with a number of Fortune 500 companies locating there. Almost 800 acres of parks, a nationally recognized public school district, and eight colleges, including Lawrence Technological University. In 2003, it completed an ambitious, state-ofthe-art $23 million public library.

Pontiac Area: 20.2 square miles Population: 66,000 THE COUNTY SEAT of Oakland County, one of Michigan’s first inland settlements, home of the Detroit Lions for decades and many General Motors plants over the years, Pontiac has a long history that ties it in with the region. As with any place where a main road crossed a water source — in this case the Clinton River — its

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development as a center was a sure thing. In recent years, however, Pontiac has been hit harder than most metro Detroit communities. In 2002, it lost the Detroit Lions. In 2009, the state put it into receivership. Later that year, the city auctioned off the Silverdome and got a pittance compared to what it had hoped to earn. And, adding more bad news in 2010, the Arts, Beats and Eats festival was moved to glitzier Royal Oak. But there are bright spots. Pontiac’s surfeit of large buildings suits concert promotion well. Clutch Cargo’s is a 1,400- capacity club housed in a former church. And it’s not the only repurposed building. In 2005, Pontiac leaders had condemned a large property on South Saginaw Street and scheduled it for demolition. But before the wrecking ball could swing, a developer renovated the building and opened it in 2007 as the Crofoot a music and entertainment venue that has hosted John Waters, Girl Talk, Vampire Weekend and Public Image Ltd., among other names.

Rochester Area: 3.9 square miles Population: 11,000 WHEN IT COMES TO the evolution of cities in southeastern Michigan, Rochester got something of a head start. What is now Woodward Avenue used to travel through a series of bogs and swamps, and there were few ways to get to the hilly oak-covered lands of Oakland County. But in the 1810s, some hardy Detroiters figured out a way to travel up the riverfront to where the Clinton River dumps into Lake St. Clair. There, journeying by boat, they found an excellent site for a town, the river providing access and water power. It may sound bizarre today, but the first talk of a boom came with a proposal to cut a canal across Michigan. The plan had Mount Clemens as the eastern terminus of a water superhighway stretching to Utica, Rochester and beyond. In a community with many settlers who’d come via the Erie Canal, it sounded credible. But with the Panic of 1837, the enterprise failed by the time it reached Rochester and never recovered. By the 1890s, however, a more modern form of transportation arrived: the electric train. A spur of the Detroit United Railway reached north to the hamlet and breathed new life into it. To cross the river on Main Street, the railway built a 700-foot-long trestle with concrete footings, and even began amassing two large mounds of earth to the east for a second bridge that was never built. Today, a steel and concrete bridge spans this chasm along M-150. Though it’s distant from Detroit, the trolleys provided a framework for Rochester that today seems quaint and walkable. Upscale shops and restaurants line Main Street, providing a center for the subdivisions and mile roads or Rochester Hills that sprawl out from it.

Novi Area: 31.3 square miles Population: 52,000 THE SO-CALLED Great Recession has not been overly kind to Detroit’s suburbs, which have seen increasing rates of foreclosure and city budgets stretched to their limits. If we were to choose an exception to that rule, it would be probably have to be Novi. Since the construction of Twelve Oaks Mall in 1977, the city’s population has grown, commercial developments have followed, and Novi has attracted educated households with money to spend. This, in turn, has made the city a good place for research, technology and service companies, spurring further employment. It was ranked within the top 50 on Forbe’s magazine’s list of the 100 best places to live in 2009. It has dozens of good restaurants, the latest being Toasted Oak Grill and Market, and on a busy weekend night you’ll likely find a line at the best of them.

Northville Area: 2 square miles Population: 6,500 STRADDLING the county line between Oakland and Wayne, Northville feels very much like a small town. Due to its growth spurt during the Victorian era, many of its buildings have a quaint, old-fashioned feel to them. Its small, compact downtown is equally appealing, with plenty to eat, buy and see. Entertainment options include children’s theater at the Marquis Theatre, and a schedule of adult plays at the Tipping Point Theatre. For history buff s: Many of its architectural curiosities have been moved to Mill Race Village, which comprises a few homes, a church, a school, an inn, a blacksmith shop, a general store and an old interurban station.

Plymouth Area: 2.2 square miles Population: 9,000 ON A GOOD DAY, Plymouth’s tight downtown is fi lled with life, with lively foot traffic passing before the restaurants and shops that encircle Kellogg Park. It’s main event is the Plymouth Ice Spectacular, the biggest and longest-running ice festival in the United States, drawing a half-million people and helping solidify ice carving’s reputation as a competitive sport. Their summer art festival, Plymouth Art in the Park, rivals only Ann Arbor’s twin art fairs for size and variety. In 2007, surrounding Plymouth Township was ranked 37 in a CNN- Money magazine survey of the U.S.’ best places to live.

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Ann Arbor Area: 27.7 square miles Population: 114,000 ACCORDING TO various lists, Ann Arbor is one of the smartest cities in America. One of the greenest. A great place for families. A place to earn and save money, and to live stress-free. Does Ann Arbor really live up to all the hype? Yes it does. It’s liberal, clean and friendly. The downtown provides major entertainment and cultural attractions, with concert venues, theaters, galleries and museums. Cafes, restaurants and bars are plentiful, and independent retailers offer unique and unusual shopping. Festivals and events take place throughout the year, ranging from the renowned art fairs to the cannabis-idolizing Hash Bash. The university has played no small part in making Ann Arbor the town it is. It draws a myriad of cultural attractions to the city, and a number of the museums, concert halls and parks are university-run. The unifi ed relationship of the city and school is evident from the layout of the streets and buildings. Campus and downtown intermingle, with the only distinction sometimes being which side of State Street you’re standing on. In recent decades, more and more technology based industries have made their way there, a tendency that seems likely to continue with companies such as Google choosing to locate a campus in town. A myriad of website and online media companies are also based in or near the city. And, in lean times, the university’s 30,000 jobs are nothing to sniff at. Companies, people and students all seem to enjoy a place where cultural arts are supported, booksellers thrive and progressive policies flourish. Sort of like the idealism of the campus — carried out into the “real world.”

Ypsilanti Area: 4.5 square miles Population: 22,362 THOUGH SOME would cavalierly call Ypsilanti — or Ypsi (IP-see) — Ann Arbor’s younger sister, it misses the mark. Sure, Ypsi is a smaller town that hosts a smaller college — Eastern Michigan University — and a host of similar student-aimed hangouts, but there are some things that set it apart. The center of Ypsi isn’t the school, but Depot Town: two commodious parks set right on the Huron River, with bridges and stairways joining them to the town’s main stem. The park hosts some of the weirdest, most interesting events in metro Detroit, including the Ypsilanti Beer Fest, Billetproof’s Motor City Mania car show and Elvis Fest, where thousands of Elvis fans and impersonators descend on the park. Instead of having a huge, well-endowed university to call the tune, the town’s do-it-yourself crowd dreams up inventive events, such as the Shadow Art Fair at Ypsi’s Corner Brewery, or last year’s Krampus Costume Ball. Instead of glittering high-rises and trendy boutiques, Ypsilanti still has its stock of weathered Victorian homes and burger joints by the railroad tracks. If anything, despite Ann Arbor’s reputation as the capital of all things nondenominational, progressive and countercultural, as it gets slicker and more urbane, locals may begin to look to Ypsilanti to provide the scruff y, bohemian locale for Washtenaw County.

REAL ESTATE COMPANIES Ann Arbor Real Estate 2144 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-604-8242; piperpartners. com Lynn Caldwell Sine & Monaghan Realtors, 18412 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-884-2293 Century 21 Curran & Christie Inc.Michigan Avenue Offi ce 24711 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-274-1700; century21cc.com Century 21 Curran & Christie Inc.-Ford Road Office 25636 Ford Rd., Dearborn Heights; 313-274-7200; century21cc.com Century 21 Today Inc.-Bloomfield Hills 6611 Commerce Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-360-9100; century21today.com Century 21 Today Inc.-Farmington Hills 28544 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-855-2000; century21today.com Century 21 Today Inc.-Livonia 19500 Victor Pkwy., Livonia; 734-462-9800; century21today.com Century 21 Town & Country-Clarkston 7153 Dixie Hwy., Clarkston; 248-6207200; century21town-country.com Century 21 Town & Country-Clinton Township 39750 Garfield Rd., Clinton Township; 586- 286-6000; century21town-country.com Century 21 Town & Country-Grosse Pointe 20439 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Woods; 313-886-5040; century21town-

country.com Century 21 Town & Country-Rochester 1460 Walton Rd., Suite 110, Rochester Hills; 248-652-8000; century21towncountry.com Century 21 Town & Country-Royal Oak/ Birmingham 32121 N. Woodward Ave., Royal Oak; 248-556-7400; century21town-country.com Century 21 Town & Country-Shelby Township 48680 Van Dyke Rd., Utica; 586-731-8180; century21town-country. com Century 21 Town & Country-Troy 4820 Rochester Rd., Troy; 248-524-1600; century21town-country.com Charles Reinhart Co. 2200 Green Rd., Ann Arbor; 734-747-7888; reinhartrealtors. com Coldwell Banker Preferred Realtors 44644 Ann Arbor Rd., Ste. A, Plymouth; 734-459-6000; cbpreferred.com Coldwell Banker Weir Manuel 500 S. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 800-6621950 David Mueller & Associates 2144 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-677-6699; davidmueller.com DuBose Realty Group 16250 Northland Dr., Ste. 366, Southfield; 248-557-6107; duboserealtygroup.com Ed and Cindy Knight Realty Executive Group 8152 25 Mile Rd., Shelby Twp.; 586-336-1506; edandcindyknight.com


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Edward Surovell Realtors 1884 W. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor; 877-833-3600; surovell.com Exclusive Realty 607 Shelby St., Ste. 500, Detroit; 313-963-7653; exclusive-realty. com Gary T. Jones Real Estate, Inc. 1995 Crosswick Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-3183744; gtrealestate.com The Home Buyer’s Agent of Ann Arbor, Inc. 1905 Pauline Blvd. Ste. 1, Ann Arbor; 743-662-6240; buyersagentannarbor.com Jack Christenson Realtors -Troy 1475 W. Big Beaver Rd., Ste. 100, Troy; 248-6496800; michiganrealestate.com Jack Christenson Realtors-Sterling Heights 4415 Metro Pkwy., Sterling Heights; 586-826-8200; michiganrealestate.com Jack Christenson Realtors-Detroit 3845 W. Eight Mile Road, Detroit; 313-3400600; michiganrealestate.com Keller Williams Realty 300 River Place, Ste. 1650, Detroit; 313-877-9006; Detroit; yourkwoffice.com The PLM Group 2444 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 248-594-4888; the plmgroup. org/dnn Prudential Clarkston 32 S. Main St., Clarkston; 248-625-5700; prudentialmichigan.com Prudential Commerce 2000 Oakley Park Rd., Ste. 203, Commerce; 248-360-6800; prudential-michigan.com Prudential Davison 1040 S. State St., Davison; 810-653-2151; prudentialmichigan.com Prudential Fenton 2359 W. Shiawassee Rd., Fenton; 810-629-0680; prudentialmichigan.com Prudential Flushing 1377 Flushing Rd., Ste. 2, Flushing; 810-720-2100; prudentialmichigan.com Prudential Grand Blanc 536 Perry Rd., Grand Blanc; 810-695-1990; prudentialmichigan.com Prudential Milford 800 N. Milford Rd., Ste. 100, Milford; 248-685-0077; prudentialmichigan.com Real Estate One-Ann Arbor 555 Briarwood Circle, Ste. 333, Ann Arbor; 734-662-8600 Real Estate One Inc. 25800 Northwestern Hwy., Ste. 100, Southfield; 248-208-2900; realestateone.com Real Living Cranbrook RealtorsBirmingham Office 555 S. Old Woodward, Ste. 22U, Birmingham; 248283-8700; realliving.com/cranbrook Real Living Cranbrook Realtors-Franklin Office 32440 Franklin Rd., Franklin; 248626-8700; realliving.com/cranbrook Real Living Great Lakes Real EstateClarkston Office 7300 Dixie Hwy., Ste. 100, Clarkston; 248-625-1073;

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reallivinggreatlakes.com Real Living Great Lakes Real EstateRochester Hills Office 2915 S. Rochester Rd., Rochester Hills; 248-293-0000; reallivinggreatlakes.com Real Living Great Lakes Real EstateWest Bloomfield Office 5767 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield; 248-538-2222; reallivinggreatlakes.com Real Living John Burt Realty-Lake Orion Office 344 S. Broadway, Lake Orion; 248628-7700; realliving.com/john-burt-realty Real Living John Burt Realty- Oxford Office 15 E. Burdick, Oxford; 248-6287700; realliving.com/john-burt-realty Real Living Kee Realty-Clinton Township Office 15501 Metropolitan Parkway, Ste. 105, Clinton Twp.; 586-840-0400; realliving.com/kee-realty Real Living Kee Realty-Plymouth Office 915 S. Main St., Rear Suite, Plymouth; 734-451-5400; realliving.com/kee-realty Real Living Kee Realty-Rochester Office 210 W. University, Ste. 4, Rochester; 248651-1200; realliving.com/kee-realty Real Living Kee Realty -Washington Office 58047 Van Dyke Ave., Washington; 586566-2200; realliving.com/kee-realty Real Living Quality Real Estate 133 W. Main St., Ste. 100, Northville; 248-4685000; qualitygmac.com/ RE/MAX Classic 29630 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-737-6800; detroitmetrorealestate.com RE/MAX in the Hills 36700 Woodward Ave., Ste. 100, Bloomfield Hills; 248-6465000; realestate-mich.com RE/MAX Suburban Inc. 3599 Schoenherr Rd., Ste. 100, Sterling Heights; 586-2622000; suburbaninc.remax-detroit.com Sine & Monaghan Realtors 18412 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-884-2293; SKBK Sotheby’s International Realty 348 E. Maple Dr., Birmingham; 248-664-7000; skbk.com Wolf Properties 22750 Woodward Ave., Ste. 204, Ferndale; 248-398-7000

APARTMENT FINDERS McKinley, Inc. 320 N. Main St., Ste. 200, Ann Arbor; 734-769-8520; mckinley.com/ apartments/michigan Michigan Rent Finders 3510 Pheasant Run, Ann Arbor; 734-973-0640; michiganrents.com MLive.com 339 E. Liberty St., Ste. 210, Ann Arbor; 734-997-7090; realestate.mlive. com Michigan Housing Locator Michigan State Housing Development Authority, 735 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing; 517-373-8370; michiganhousinglocator.com/ My Michigan Apartment 866-891-5210; mymichiganapartment.com

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| THE ANNUAL MANUAL | 77

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2011 Metro Times Annual Manual  

Metro Times guide to Southeast Michigan

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