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TRUMP MARCH

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metroactive.com | sanjose.com | metrosiliconvalley.com | JANUARY 11-17, 2017

Tori Truscheit

AMERICA’S PREMIER INDOOR KARTING CENTER TOP HAT Jennifer Allen, right, created ‘Another Nasty Woman’ hats for her daughter Laura (left) and dozens of friends and family.

ARRIVE & DRIVE

ADULTS AND

JUNIORS 48” AND UP

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

CORPORATE EVENTS

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sexism in the workplace. They had hoped Hillary Clinton's decades of experience would break the country's highest glass ceiling and were devastated when an ignorant Twitter troll bullied his way past her. Margot Nack, 44, felt “physically ill” on election night. “You live in a bubble, and the bubble popped,” she says. The lavender-haired manager at Adobe and mentor for Girls Who Code booked her plane ticket two days later, then formed a Slack channel to coordinate with 12 local friends who also plan to fly to D.C. “It’s pretty lonely in product development. There’s a lot of unconscious bias,” she says. “Male engineers don’t mean to be exclusionary, but women drop out of those fields.” For Nack, the march is an opportunity to have her voice heard. “I’ve always had a big mouth,” she says. “On every elementary school report card, it said, ‘Margot talks too much.’

Maybe now that’s not a bad thing.” Before Amy Bayersdorfer, 50, left her job as a tech consultant to work for Hillary Clinton’s campaign in Michigan, she’d had only one female boss in 30 years in Silicon Valley. “I have friends founding startups who were told, ‘Oh, sweetheart, why don’t you go start a lifestyle business?’” Bayersdorfer made her plane reservations for the march right away. “We can’t be quiet on this one,” she says. As a field organizer in a blue-collar county outside of Detroit, she spent months talking to former autoworkers who eventually voted for Trump. “What people want is safety, economic opportunity, and for people to care about their community,” Bayersdorfer says, “but that can mean different things to different people.” Trump supporters aren’t just “different people,” though. In many case, they’re our people. Jane Burgunder, 50, knows one Trump

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December 11-17, 2017

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