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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | NOVEMBER 23-29, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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When it comes to Snow Days and philanthropic ways, the more the merrier. Every time you enjoy New Belgium beer you’re giving back through our $1 Per Barrel Brewed Program. Since 1995, we’ve donated more than $4 million to good causes. This year, we’re gonna pile it on and let you choose the good cause with every glassware gift pack you purchase.

Give, drink, and be merry at newbelgium.com


Manhattan Transfer

Tony Bennett

Dave Koz

New Shanghai Circus

Clover Stornetta Family Fun

Max & Ruby: Bunny Party November 29 MagicSpace Entertainment Presents

Riverdance

Dave Koz & Friends Christmas 2011

Roustabout Theater Presents

White Christmas December 1 - 4 Tickets at 1.800.838.3006

Posada Navideña December 9

David Archuleta Christmas December 13

Rodney Carrington

January 24

Gladys Knight

Mike Birbiglia

Mythbusters Behind the Myths Tour Adam Savage & Jamie Hyneman

January 27

Spirit of Uganda a project of Empower African Children

Copperfield’s Books Renowned Speakers

American Philharmonic Sonoma County

Larry King: Standing Up

Winter Concert: The Grand Tour

February 1

January 8

February 5

Clover Stornetta Family Fun

Copperfield’s Books Renowned Speakers

Fred Garbo Inflatable Theater Co. January 11

Tony Bennett

Joan Rivers

December 16

January 14

Moscow Ballet Presents

JE Media Presents Psychic Medium and Author

December 17

My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend

January 7

December 15

Great Russian Nutcracker

The New Shanghai Circus

December 22 January 6

November 30

Clover Stornetta Family Fun

John Edward January 15

Manhattan Transfer Christmas December 20

Good vs. Evil: An Evening with Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert February 10 Clover Stornetta Family Fun

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters February 21

Don’t Fence Me In: Songs, Music and Poetry of the American West February 24

Full schedule on our new website: wellsfargocenterarts.org

Box Office now open Mondays!

For tickets call For c 707.546.3600 707.546.3600 (noon-6pm Mon-Sat) Online e wellsfargocenterarts.org wellsfargocentterarts.org t tHighway Highw way 101 to River Road,, Santa Rosa Wells W ells F Fargo argo Center Cente er for the Arts gratefully gratefully acknowled acknowledges ges generous support from

3 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23-29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Tickets make great gifts

Nutcracker


Bohemian

BANKRUPTCY

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Give Yourself a Fresh Start Editor

Free Consultation

Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Craig A. Burnett

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Attorney at Law

Jewelry Repurposing Specialist

We trade or buy gold & platinum

NoMoreDebt.com 707-523-3328

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor

Se Habla Español

Expert Repairs

Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Extended hours for your shopping pleasure: Thur, Fri & Sat 10–8pm

Local Designers Branded Consignment Items

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Darwin BondGraham, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Stett Holbrook, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Samantha Larson, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Interns Anna Freeman, Lacie Schwarz, Alma Shaw

Spend your day the Windsor way in Old Downtown Windsor

Design Director Kara Brown

Senior Designer

8JOETPS3PBEt8JOETPS $" 707 836 1840 markshimizudesign.com

Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Blake Chiao, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Susan M. Sulc, ext. 206

Everyone Needs a Flu Shot!

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Ashley Potter, ext. 215

Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30-11:30am

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor

WESTERN FARM CENTER

Dan Pulcrano

707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

December 3

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Information: 707-565-4477 www.sonoma-county.orgȀϐŽ— SUGGESTED DONATION: $15 No one turned away due to inability to pay.

ÂTdap (tetanus/diphtheria/whooping cough) vaccine also available (Free). This message is sponsored and funded by the Sonoma Health Alliance – health agencies working together for a healthy Sonoma County. Flu shot clinics dependent on vaccine availability.

Petaluma Health Center 1170 N McDowell Blvd. Petaluma 9 a.m. – 12 noon Shots will be provided for all individuals, including children (at least 6 months of age) and pregnant women. Children under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Flu vaccine is also available (at cost) from medical providers, community clinics and various pharmacies.

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TOYS & DOLLS • ARTS & CRAFTS • POST MODERN

FLU S HOT S ATURDAY

At these locations: Empire College 3035 Cleveland Ave. Santa Rosa 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

LIGHTING • KITCHEN TOOLS • ARCHITECTURAL • GLASS

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.


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This photo is courtesy of #OccupySantaRosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘Are we finished with oversized, puffedup stuff that takes up too much room and winds up in storage?’ G IFT G UIDE P1 8 Can Clean Power Be Cheap, too? T H E PAP E R P 8

You’ll Shoot Your Eye Out! STAGE P 24

Little Joe y la Familia MUS IC P 2 8 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Green Zone p12 Dining p14 Wineries p17

Swirl p17 Gift Guide p18 Culture Crush p21 Arts & Ideas p22 Stage p24

Film p25 Music p27 A&E p30 Astrology p34 Classifieds p35

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23–29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

nb HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Police surround the intersection near city hall in Santa Rosa on Tuesday morning while evicting Occupy protesters.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Staying Negative People under 30 face greatest risk of contracting HIV BY SAM HO

P

eople who weren’t yet born when AIDS first emerged are today most at risk for becoming HIV positive, an alarming development that underscores how essential awareness is, especially as we approach World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. From 2006 to 2009, the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that the HIV incidence rate for Americans between 13 and 29 years old increased by about 21 percent. In fact, most of the new HIV infections reported in this country involve people under 30. Americans under 30 have never known a world without AIDS. At the same time, they’ve never really known a time when effective treatment for HIV and AIDS wasn’t available. This hasn’t always been the case. As this disease turns 30, we need to ensure that people—especially younger people—remain aware of AIDS and how to prevent it. Awareness is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to prevent AIDS. After 30 years of what was once considered one of America’s most pressing health problems, AIDS is no longer front-page news. On this World AIDS Day, let’s not forget that about 56,000 Americans become infected with HIV each year, according to the CDC, and that more than 14,000 Americans with AIDS die each year. Thanks to more effective and more available treatments, more Americans who have HIV and AIDS are able to live. The CDC estimates this number at more than 1 million nationwide. Regularly testing people most at risk for HIV—and then providing antiretroviral drugs for HIV/AIDS patients—dramatically reduces the number of new infections. Preventing HIV is not complicated. If you’re sexually active, get tested. Don’t use IV drugs or share needles. Abstain or practice safer sex. With preventive care, patients and their healthcare providers can fight and manage this disease and slow its spread. But we can’t allow today’s more effective treatments to make us complacent or ambivalent, or to lessen our resolve to find a cure. To learn more or to find a place near you to get tested, visit www.actagainstaids.org. Dr. Sam Ho is the chief medical officer for UnitedHealthcare. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Tiny Tears for the American Idol Why does your article (“’Tis the Season,” Nov. 16) refer to David Archuleta as a pipsqueak? The writeups for the other shows don’t use condescending words to describe the artists. I think you owe David and his fans an apology. You have lost any respect from me as a Bay Area resident who is paying VIP to attend David’s concert. He is the best live performer on this planet. Maybe you should attend his concert and you will definitely use a more respectful word for him after you witness his voice and command of the stage.

DEBBIE HUSARY El Sobrante

Here’s an Idea Are you a citizen of the United States who wants to act now, and to also adopt your position as one of the 99th percentile which is falling further behind? Simply get a voter registration form, change your party affiliation to the Ninety-Niner Party, and send it in. If a sufficient number of registrants are recorded statewide, the NinetyNiner party will be entitled to the same privileges and recognition as any other official political party in the state. Official political party members elect their own leaders, platforms, candidates etc. You will continue to have the opportunity, in general elections, to vote for any candidate you choose, regardless of political affiliation.

JOHN BAUER Martinez

Village Life

Thanks for the positive coverage of Growing a Village/Cultivando un Pueblo! I would like to point out an additional, far-reaching benefit of building relationships with our neighbors: We drive less! For every new friendship formed close to home, every local creek cleaned up, every musical or artistic endeavor or shared gardening project happening within a neighborhood, there is less need for people to travel across town. For each child who gets involved with other kids in his or her neighborhood, there is one less parent/caregiver on the road playing chauffeur. In this way, we are reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, while deepening our connections with both other community members and the ecosystems in which we live.

JULIE CHASEN Santa Rosa

Talking Turkey While President Obama is pardoning two turkeys for Thanksgiving, every one of us has that same presidential power by choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance that spares a turkey’s life. And here are some good reasons: You are what you eat. Who wants to be a “butterball”? Your kids can tell their friends about their cool “Tofurky.” You won’t have to call Poultry Hotline to keep your family alive. Fruits and vegetables don’t have to carry government warning labels. Animal advocates, including some of your best friends, will cherish you. You won’t sweat the environment and food resources devastation guilt trip. You won’t spend a sleepless night wondering how the turkey lived and died. Your body will appreciate a holiday from saturated fat, cholesterol and hormones.


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

A Most Loved Gift Holiday Gift Cards on Sale Wednesday M assage & Hydro-Bath Specials Now Open Tuesdays for the Holidays!

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Seriously, this Thanksgiving, let’s give thanks for our good fortune, health, and happiness with a life-afďŹ rming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits, and grains. Our own dinner will feature a “Tofurky,â€? lentil roast, mashed potatoes, corn stufďŹ ng, stuffed squash, candied yams, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie.

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

On the Nose Thanks to Richard von Busack for such a brilliant review of a brilliant ďŹ lm (“Skin Graft,â€? Nov. 9). I am a huge AlmodĂłvar fan and have been struggling with describing this ďŹ lm to my friends. This review was right on.

LINDA WOSSKOW Novato

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

A bunch of dumb bigbox stores decide to open at midnight for Black Friday

2

SSU professor Jonah Raskin to retire from the hallowed halls of academia

3

The Roots’ clever, sly walk-on music for Michele Bachmann, on Fallon

4

San Rafael mayor Al Boro steps down, leaves public service after 40 years

5 Fried chicken goes

gourmet: Sweet T’s opens in Fountaingrove

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23–29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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THE

Paper

Bluebird Song With its blue back and rustcolored chest, the Western bluebird is a birder’s favorite. Soon, viticulturists may number among its fans. According to research by Dr. Julie Jedlicka at UC Santa Cruz, the Western bluebird may serve as a natural alternative to insecticides at California vineyards. Jedlicka found that placing nesting boxes on vineyard plots lures populations of the entirely insectivorous bird, which in turn can fend off insect-borne blights such as the deadly Pierce’s disease. Ron Rosenbrand, vineyard manager of Napa Valley’s Spring Mountain Vineyard, has put this research into practice. He discovered the agricultural value of the Western bluebird while fighting bluegreen sharpshooters, an insect that spreads Pierce’s disease. Five years and 800 boxes later, Rosenbrand says he now has “almost zero cases of Pierce’s.”

SHINE A LIGHT Paul Fenn asserts that public power rates in Sonoma County wouldn’t have to rise $4–$10 a month.

The Bottom Line Green and cheap energy: Can Sonoma County have both? BY DARWIN BOND-GRAHAM

A

ccording to the recently released feasibility study for establishing community choice aggregation in Sonoma County—a public power program presented to the board of supervisors on Oct. 18 under the name

Sonoma Clean Power— green energy will come at a cost, about $4 to $10 added to the average consumer’s monthly bill. But Paul Fenn thinks otherwise. Fenn, a widely respected energy consultant who wrote the 2002 California law that enables cities and counties to aggregate

ratepayers, purchase energy on the open market and develop their own sources of local power, says the goals of green power and lower rates are not at odds. In fact, says Fenn, the faster the county moves toward local green energy production and retooling its buildings and infrastructure, the faster bills will drop. “The key problem is ) 10

Of the bluebird, Rosenbrand says, “not only are they beautiful to look at, they’re tremendously effective. It’s great having Mother Nature actually work with you rather than against you as a farmer.” Although her research is new, Jedlicka explains that the thought of using birds for pest control is not necessarily novel. But since the 1950s, much of the bluebird’s preferred habitats—oak woodlands and savannas—have been converted into agricultural and urban land. That the bluebird’s propensity to eat squirmy grub has earned it a new home in some California vineyards offers a hopeful solution to the species decline it has experienced over the 20th century.—Samantha Larson

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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Green Energy ( 8 that they used these pre-existing rate models,â€? says Fenn about the Sonoma County feasibility study’s methods. “Community choice aggregation [CCA] is a new structure. It’s not a private utility. It’s not deregulation. It’s not a municipal utility.â€? Dalessi Management Consulting, the company contracted to conduct the study for the Sonoma County Water Agency, came to its conclusions using a model that “excluded demand-side technologies from their portfolio design,â€? says Fenn. “It’s so harmful to the current economics of the model if you do that. It’s sort of like picking the cheapest item out of your grocery bag so that the average cost of everything remaining goes up tremendously. Efficiency, broadly deďŹ ned, is the radical economic opportunity in energy. If you exclude it, it makes localization and CCA look expensive.â€? Even so, Fenn says he is pleased with the reception CCA has gotten in Sonoma County. Indeed, the board of supervisors enthusiastically embraced the study’s ďŹ ndings. Some board members and water agency staff also seem aware that green energy and cheaper bills are not mutually exclusive. Tucked into the preface of the feasibility study is a note to further investigate the exact point Fenn is making. The report tasks stakeholders with determining “whether varying the mix of power resources could reduce CCA power costs, while still providing greenhouse gasreduction beneďŹ tsâ€? and “whether the addition of a signiďŹ cant energy efficiency component could result in a decrease in the estimated CCA program rates.â€? Fenn and his colleagues at Local Power Inc. have been helping to establish community choice aggregation programs for over a decade. Since the 2002 California law, his company has worked behind the scenes on San Francisco’s nascent CCA, CleanPowerSF, the Marin Energy Authority and in the battle to

repel PG&E’s legislative attack against CCAs in 2010 with Proposition 16. Experts at Local Power Inc. have also contributed to Sonoma County’s push to establish a CCA. To understand how Sonoma Clean Power can provide green energy and cheaper bills, it’s instructive to look south, to the state’s ďŹ rst CCA, Marin Energy Authority. Although MEA has provided a greener mix to consumers, its average bills are slightly higher than PG&E’s. What went wrong? Charles Schwartz, a colleague of Fenn’s at Local Power Inc., says the biggest problem is MEA’s reliance on purchasing green power on the open market through Shell Energy North America, a subsidiary of the oil giant. According to Schwartz, MEA failed to localize energy production, choosing instead to buy green electricity from distant power plants. Fenn says it’s a matter of renting vs. owning. “Green power on the wholesale market is sold at a premium. If you’re going to go out on the market and buy power from a plant that somebody else owns, you’re going to have to pay for the renewable energy credits.â€? The extra costs derive partly from the companies that own the landďŹ ll gas, wind and solar plants exporting energy to Marin from the interior of California and to the middleman, Shell. “Sonoma, to its credit, is focusing on building resources,â€? explains Fenn. “We worked pretty hard getting that to the center of the table, rather than this ‘rent ďŹ rst and own later’ approach,â€? explains Fenn. When Sonoma County’s CCA ďŹ nally rolls out, Fenn and others think rates will be lower than the feasibility study estimates, largely because the county’s leaders, business community and activists are committed to a vibrant, local green model. “If they had just scoped the model the way we scoped it,â€? says Fenn of the study, “you don’t have to come out saying there’s a premium. You don’t have to give the argument to PG&E that this is going to raise your rates.â€?


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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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From the Soil

Biochar: Climate Superstar? BY JULIANE POIRIER

S

ince 2009, when he learned how biochar protects the atmosphere, Ray Gallian has been busy. “I’ve been running around like a crazy person,” Gallian explains, “telling anybody who would listen.”

WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Anti Aging & Sleep with Dr. Stella 12/5/11 - 6:30 – 7:30pm Puffy eyes, crinkly skin, foggy brain, and even weight gain can be caused by lack of sleep.

Manage Your Stress this Holiday Season 12/8/11 - 7:00 – 8:00pm An effective approach to stress allows us to lead happy, centered, successful lives.

Taming Insulin Resistance 12/15/11 - 6:30 – 7:30pm A discussion on the growing epidemic of insulin resistance. Learn about dietary interventions & supplementation that can help avoid the pitfalls.

Kick Your Sugar Addiction 12/27/11 - 6:00 – 7:00pm Recommendations on how to kick the sugar habit once and for all! Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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Hearing it praised sure beats looking at it—biochar is lumpy, burnt and no sexier than barbecue briquettes. But put biochar in the ground, and you’ve not only got healthier, more productive soil that needs less irrigation, you’ve also taken carbon out of the cycle for possibly thousands of years. “It’s what they call a fast mitigation technology,” explains Gallian, founding member of the Sonoma Biochar Initiative. “By making biochar, we get carbon out of the air and into the ground where it can do some good.” As a functional enterprise, biochar production is still embryonic, its technology still more promise than product. “But we have to move ahead,” Gallian claims, “because the benefits are so great.” Biochar is made by burning plant and animal waste products in a low-oxygen environment, much like smoldering. The liquid

and gas byproducts can then be captured to generate clean energy. To garner funding for large-scale projects, advocates need to demonstrate viability. “We need to make this work,” said Gallian. “We’re trying to make sure something sensible happens before we don’t have an option.” But soil science researchers can only go so fast. “If we’re really going to promote this stuff,” says UC Berkeley researcher Andrew CraneDroesch, “we should know to the best of our ability how long it works.” Crane-Droesch is investigating the degree to which mechanical disturbances (plowing) or the presence of root zones impact the potential decomposition of biochar. He wants to understand the conditions under which carbon remains in the soil. Because there are so many types of soils and cultivation conditions, Crane-Droesch says gardeners and farmers may contact the international biochar initiative for guidelines on experiments. “Researchers like me,” says CraneDroesch, “would love to have a huge data set to run the stats and find out what works where and why.” Mark Sandler of the Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority says the RCPA is “loosely” looking at biochar. “There’s a lot of potential in biochar for addressing carbon emissions in the agricultural sector,” says Sandler. “A carbon price would make biochar’s carbon sequestration even more valuable.” Ten tons of biochar will be available for use in vineyard field trials beginning March 2012. According to David Morell, former EPA official and founding member of the Sonoma Biochar Initiative, these are the first such trials in North America. “We don’t want to grow more grapes,” Morell explains. “We’re looking for water retention [in biocharamended soils].” See www.biochar-international.org or www.sonomabiocharinitiative.org.


13

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W h at aare What re tthe h e ppolitical o li ti c a l fforces o rc e s shaping sh a p in g the th e food fo o d ssystem? ys te m? Join J o in two t wo of of America’s A m e r i c a’s dynamic d yn a m i c food fo o d aactivists, c tiv is t s , Michael Michael D Dimock im o c k aand nd D Dan a n IImhoff, m h of f, ffor or a wide-ranging w i d e -r a n gin g ddiscussion is c u s si o n oon n ttopics, o p i c s , such su c h aass the th e ffuture u tu re of of animal a n im a l agriculture, a g r i c u l tu re, the th e Farm Fa r m Bill, B ill, aand n d tthe he llocal o c a l ffood o o d and a n d Occupy O c c u py movements. m ove m e n t s . From Fro m veggie ve g g i e p re s c r ipti o n s , to to the th e fight f ig h t ttoo eend n d animal a n im a l ffactories, a c to r i e s , prescriptions, ttoo tthe h e iins n s aand n d oouts u t s ooff aartesinal r te sin a l ffood o o d pproduction, ro d u c ti o n , tthis h is is is sure su re to to bbee a sstimulating tim u latin g cconversation o nve r s a ti o n and a n d an an Summerfield’s series. eexcellent xc e ll e n t kkickoff i ckof f ttoo S um m e r fi eld d ’s llecture e c ture se rie s.

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14

NORTH COUNTRY Steve Rose in the kitchen at the Vineyards Inn. “We finally pulled it off,” he says of their Basque dinners.

Spanish Torch Kenwood’s Vineyards Inn goes Basque to the future BY STETT HOLBROOK

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efore it closed, I once ate at San Francisco’s Des Alpes Hotel. The wood paneling, heavy drapes and carpeted floors created a dark, clubby atmosphere suffused with history; the restaurant had served as a home away from home for Basque immigrants since 1908. The attraction at Des Alpes

was its all-you-can-eat-and-drink menu, served family-style. A few years later, the restaurant closed, and the city lost a link to the past. So I was thrilled to learn this history—and food—live on at the Vineyards Inn in Kenwood, with a glowing fireplace, a lively bar and a dining room framed by some seriously old vines growing inside. Steve and Colleen Rose have owned the Vineyards Inn since 1981, when it was predominantly a Mexican restaurant. They originally moved to San Francisco

from the Spanish Basque country, and Steve’s late father, also a chef, even worked at Des Alpes for a while. About 15 years ago, the Roses started serving Spanish food at Vineyards, and, encouraged by Steve’s father, considered a specialty Basque menu, but they weren’t sure how Sonoma County would respond to the cuisine. They needn’t have been so hesitant. Four years ago, the Vineyards began offering monthly Basque dinners, by reservation only, on the second Thursday of

the month. They usually fill up a month in advance. “We finally pulled it off,” says Rose, crediting his father. “It’s definitely in honor of him.” Basque cooking in America is far different from the modernist fare championed by Spanish chef Ferran Adrià, known for deconstructionst and innovative cuisine. As practiced by Des Alpes, Basque cooking was ranch food—hearty, simple and bold. The Vineyards Inn serves basically the same all-you-can-eat sheep-rancher food that Des Alpes served, with the notable difference that almost all the food and wine comes from either the Roses’ nearby garden or local purveyors. At the couple’s 11-acre ranch, they grow merlot and primativo for Benziger Winery, but hold a little back to make into wine for the restaurant. In between the vines, Steve grows vegetables year-round, a rarity in this region of grape monoculture. With its extensive composting program, biodynamic and organic-certified produce, ecocertified seafood and wine-on-tap program, the Vineyards Inn is also one of the greenest restaurants in Sonoma County. How’s the food? At $45 per person including wine, it’s great, especially considering it comes from premium, local ingredients. The seven-course meal begins with a simple soup; on my visit it was a chicken broth-based soup with last-of-the-season zucchini, white beans, saffron and garlic. Other dishes include lamb albondigas (meatballs) in a mushroom cream sauce, garlic chicken, wonderful double-fried fries and homemade ice cream. A highlight is the kale salad. It’s made with the same egg-white vinaigrette served at Des Alpes long ago. Steve Rose acquired the recipe from the late owner, and he makes it with a different seasonal green each month. A passing of the torch? Yes, in Kenwood, the tradition lives on. Vineyards Inn, 8445 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.833.4500.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

SONOMA COUNTY

Insalataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Bear Korean Restaurant Korean. $$. Authentic Korean home cooking in informal setting. Exciting array of side-dish condiments add extra oomph. Lunch and dinner daily. 8577 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati. 707.794.9828.

Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Gary Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$ Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fancy, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

Johnny Garlicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s California. $$. At Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, garlic is Godâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

LaSalette Portuguese. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic dishes include classic lusty Portuguese stews and seafood. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 452-H First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.1927.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent foodâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

Sky Lounge Steakhouse & Raw Bar American/ sushi. $$$. An overpriced coffee shop with a tiny sushi bar. Breakfast and lunch daily; dinner, Wed-Sun. 2200 Airport Blvd (in Sonoma County Airport), Santa Rosa. 707.542.9400.

Washoe House Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

Water Street Bistro Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrĂŠes. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

M A R I N COUNTY Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic dĂŠcor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in

Take a Break from Your Kitchen

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Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

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Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

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Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

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Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883. )

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16

santarosaseafood.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

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incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.


Dining ( 15

16 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

N A P A COUNTY Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale â&#x20AC;&#x2122;cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

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American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nostalgiaâ&#x20AC;? cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

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SMALL BITES

Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Closes After 79 years in business, Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gourmet Foods will close its doors on Wednesday, Nov. 30. Though there has been some interest in a late-hour sale of the local Italian market, co-owners George Traverso (pictured) and his son Michael will be moving on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dad will retire,â&#x20AC;? says Michael. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I plan to explore my options. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll definitely stay in the area and will probably end up doing something more with wine.â&#x20AC;? As one of Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beloved finefood markets, Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has been part of the community since 1932, when Charlie Traverso opened the original store near Railroad Square. It moved to Third and B in 1973, and the family business will end at its newest location in Fountaingrove. Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is planning a weekend closing sale and celebration from Friday, Nov. 25, through Sunday, Nov. 27. Store hours are 10am to 5pm (10am to 6pm on Sunday). The storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twitter and Facebook feeds will post a daily percentage discount. Delicious Italian food and quality wines may have brought one to Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the first place, but the friendly, helpful atmosphere kept everyone coming back. Stop by this weekend for a chance to say thanks to the nice folks who brought us a lifetime of quality foodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;always with a smile. Traversoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 2097 Stagecoach Road, Santa Rosa. 707.542.2530.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Anna Freeman

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

La Toque Restaurant

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner,

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroir-informed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.


Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY Armida The wines are original, and there are three mysterious geodesic domes on the property. Plus: bocce! 2201 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.433.2222.

Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 888.404.9463.

Gary Farrell The namesake is gone but the quality remains. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 10701 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.473.2900.

The Natural Process Alliance & Salinia Wine Co. A beige warehouse and a clean-cut, UC Davis–trained winemaker belie the wild-eyed truth: Unusual, fruity “natural wine” as fresh as next Friday, bottled in stainless steel Kleen Kanteens. Ask for Hardy. 3350 Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Friday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm, or by appointment. 707.527.7063.

Passalacqua Winery Family-run, boasting good reds and Chardonnay as well as a fun wine-aroma kit to train your senses to identify common wine smells. Large deck, garden and vineyard. 3805 Lambert Bridge Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.5575.

Paul Hobbs Winery Unfiltered and unfined wines, fermented with native yeasts. 3355 Gravenstein Hwy. N. (Highway 116), Sebastopol. By appointment. 707.824.9879.

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced

Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

Robledo Family Winery Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and “Los Braceros” red blend are highly recommended. 21901 Bonness Road, Sonoma. Open daily, Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm; Sunday, 11am– 4pm. 707.939.6903.

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

NAPA COUNTY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659. Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809. Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774. Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

Hawley Winery

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patchwork quilt of yellow, flame-red and burnt sienna over a carpet of green, the North Bay’s vineyards are closing out the year with a flourish. By mid-November, the hubbub of harvest is over, and, to the relief of neighbors, the booming cannons and screeching noisemakers employed to scare off marauding birds from succulent grapes have fallen silent. Soon, workers will mark the young vines that were overcome by hungry gophers for spring replanting. Amid organically grown vineyards above West Dry Creek Road, John Hawley is already prepping his latest weapon of bird-scaring, gopherabating technology: a red-tailed hawk named Breeze. Just hatched this year, two-pound Breeze is already an imposing bird. After being released from her leash, she scouts out from the eaves of Hawley’s modest winery before gliding back to his gloved hand—and a little reward. Naturally, she dines on wine country cuisine: cage-raised quail, shipped in bulk from a supplier. “She’s got a gentle personality,” Hawley says, and indeed, she took to him rather easily. After only three weeks in captivity, she began following him on walks, tracing his path like a faithful dog. And although his vineyard pest troubles are minor, Hawley— license to hunt in hand—says that Breeze will get to play her role. Not until the hawk is returned to her perch does a single finch skitter back into view. Straight out of UC Davis in the 1970s, Hawley made wine for some of the area’s biggest wineries, but since 2000 has enjoyed the smaller scale of his 3,000-case family business. Hawley’s bestseller, Viognier: The 2010 Sonoma County ($26), has demure white peach and apricot aromas, moderate acidity and a body rounded by aging in neutral oak. The vibrantly hued 2006 Hawley Vineyard Merlot ($27), with licorice, chocolate liqueur and brambleberry flavors, is an exciting expression of this maligned varietal. With the encouragement of sons Austin and Paul, Hawley opened a retail room in downtown Healdsburg. Paul, who studied photography and film, says that taking up his father’s vocation was furthest from his mind until he signed on to the New Zealand crush. Made in the kiwi style, the tonic 2010 Dry Creek Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($21) has clean, mineral and lime qualities. The brothers insisted on taking responsibility for this new release, so when they ran into problems, the master vintner only told them, “I don’t know, you figure it out.” But Hawley says he’s relieved that the boys came around—he’d like to take a day off now and then. All he had to do was let them go. Hawley Tasting Room, 36 North St., Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.—James Knight

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Just a

Little Something This holiday season, less is more fun BY JESSICA DUR, ANNA FREEMAN, TRACI HUKILL, CAT JOHNSON, SAMANTHA LARSON, JACOB PIERCE AND TESSA STUART

A

re we over big yet? Are we finished with oversized, puffedup stuff that takes up too much room and winds up in storage? Then go small this holiday season with gifts that are small in size but big on style.

For the Mad Man in Your Life TEROFORMA WHISKEY STONES ($20)

Chiseled chunks of Vermont soapstone will lower the temperature without diluting your giftee’s favorite dram. To use: toss the stones in the freezer

for a couple hours before the imbibing begins.

For the Aspiring Spike Jonze in Your Life MAGNETIC / DETACHABLE FISHEYE LENS ($19)

This lens, compatible with the iPhone4 or the iPad2, creates photos with curved edges and a 180degree angle of view, giving images a spherical look—and it’s just plain fun. It’s also a great way to make videos and photos look something like the Beastie Boys might have filmed circa 1992. Guaranteed, there’d be Ad-Roc, face distorted and stretched out, huge mocking grin, all made better by the nifty fisheye lens effect. With this sweet

little gadget, amateur photographers and skate / bike / snowboard videographers can make every day a bubbled-up, bugged-out Check Your Head kinda day. Immensely portable, it’s easy to slip into your pocket for a day documenting extreme sports (and PBR drinking) at the skatepark or on the slopes. So watcha’ watcha’ watcha’ waiting for?

For the Compulsively Tidy Tea Enthusiast in Your Life R&M INTERNATIONAL NO-DRIP TEA STRAINER ($4.95)

All finicky tea drinkers know how vexing it can be to lift a tea infuser from a perfectly steeped cup and have no saucer to rest

it upon. Tea puddles on a raw tabletop—disgusting! Possibly unsanitary, even! The no-drip tea strainer solves the problem with a built–in drip–catch base. The entire apparatus is affixed to a hook that fits nicely over the side of a mug. Sanity and order at last prevail.

For the Wannabe Rapper in Your Life TOOTH JEWELS ($20–$200)

Since the dawn of time, humans have bejeweled their appendages, phalanges, nasal septums, ear conches and just about any showworthy body part. Now it’s time to give those long-neglected bicuspids their due attention. Once solely the domain of hip-hop


reissue and rough equivalent to the original 1987 AB1 model will provide anyone with a sure-fire way to awaken whenever needed, no phone call necessary.

For the Eco-Conscious Gadget Addict in Your Life JOOS ORANGE SOLAR CHARGER ($150)

This whiz-bang contraption converts an hour of full sunlight into three hours of pleasure yakking on the phone. According to the website, it can also keep the iPad rocking, the video camera filming, the night vision goggles skulking and the small medical refrigerator humming—all without tapping into nasty fossil fuels.

For the Gamer in Your Life VIDEO GAME POINT CARD ($20–$60)

For the Hungover Bro in Your Life BLACK BRAUN BNC002 TRAVEL CLOCK ($30)

The other day a friend and I were talking when all of a sudden she said, “Oh no, I have to go. I have to get a nap in before the kid and the hub get home. Would you call me back at 2:30pm to wake me up?” I ended up spending the next two hours hyperaware of the time, only to have my friend call me right on time to let me know she didn’t need a wake-up call after all. Needless to say, she will be getting an alarm clock as her holiday gift. I had heard that a current SFMOMA exhibit spotlighted the designs of Dieter Rams. A former Braun designer, Rams’ modernist approach to function and design was exactly what I had in mind: simple to use with clean, classy lines. The winner of my shopping spree was a Black Braun BNC002 travel clock ($30). This stylish

A world exists where people trade real money for digitally rendered items such as swords, maps, outfits for avatars, tools, downloadable games and other video game “add-ons.” These items are paid for with video game points. One way to get points is to buy video game point cards. Available in different denominations for PS3, XBOX 360 and Wii, these cards provide an entry point to enhancing one’s gamer profile, skill set, credibility and access to premium content. They can also be used to get movies, TV shows and apps, but sadly, not girlfriends.

For the Disaster Preparedness Obsessive in Your Life KIKKERLAND DYNAMO SOLAR RADIO ($24.95)

Normally, we associate emergency radios with clunky, industrial-looking schwag handed out by almost tearfully grateful public radio stations during the pledge drive. Not this beauty! Super green—both literally and figuratively—and measuring a compact 3-by-3 inches, this stylish solar radio gives users the option of hand-cranking or just chillin’ in the earthquake rubble while the sun’s rays do all the work of recharging the battery, leaving hands free to work on that slingshot standing between you and starvation.

For the Covert Government Operative in Your Life RAVI RATAN FLASHDRIVE CUFFLINKS ($100)

Sleek silver fasteners keep the cuffs of a fine tailored shirt in line with a tuxedo jacket and important documents just north of those manicured fingertips. There are two gigabytes of storage per link—that’s enough space for a thousand songs, 400 photos or an undisclosed number of top-secret dossiers.

For the Adventurous Lady Lover in Your Life LYLA VIBRATOR ($125)

These days, everything has a remote control—even the hottest vibrators. By tilting or shaking a Lyla vibrator’s remote, the pleasure-giver (or receiver) can control the speed and rhythm of this toy’s bed-rocking pulsations. The remote works from more than 35 feet away and also has preprogrammed patterns for multitaskers or the lazy. This waterproof, rechargeable toy comes in three colors with a warranty to cover a full year that will probably go down in the books as vivacious. Oh, there’s more: the remote vibrates too, for couples that really want to share the love.

For the Caffeine Addict in Your Life OUTDOORS MINI ESPRESSO MAKER ($19.95)

For the Crack Addict in Your Life BLACK DIAMOND CAMALOT C3’S ($59.95)

When shimmying up a sheer rock face, it helps to have a magic lifesaving device to jam into cracks so small they’re almost invisible. Rock climbers can secure a hold in even the thinnest of cracks with these microcams. Said to fit into more placements than any other camming unit, the only other thing a crack climber could wish for is smaller fingertips (and perhaps some climbing tape). Available in sizes 000 to 2.

straightforward concept, but this one has a twist. The individual toys are packaged in “blind boxes,” meaning that no one—supposedly even the manufacturer—knows which toy is in which box. While it may sound like a frustrating venture into overbuying, the toys are a huge hit and the packaging is part of the fun.

For the SurpriseLoving Toy Collector in Your Life KID ROBOT BLIND BOX TOYS ($5–$20)

Here’s the deal: a run of collectible toy figures is released by Kid Robot with, say, nine different figures. Collectors generally want all of them, and casual customers generally want to pick their favorites. It’s a

A glimmer of hope for those who long for the freedom of a weekend out in the wild but are bound to civilization by the headache they get if they miss their morning cup of joe. Small and light enough to throw in a pack, this baby brews up a single shot of espresso in just 90 seconds over a backpacking stove.

For the Gadget-Savvy Little Kid at Heart JAWS SHARK IPOD COZY ($18)

It’s a scary world out there, filled with puddles, dirt and )

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stars, tooth jewels have infiltrated the mainstream market, and with good reason: less invasive than grills, they are affordable, subtle and temporary. No drilling is involved, either—jewels are bonded to the teeth in 20 painless minutes (either by oneself, or more commonly, a dentist). Unlike bulky braces, these tiny gems won’t trap errant corn kernels, leave no mark once removed and even encourage better oral hygiene, given all that extra attention to the pearly whites. And, hey, the worst that can happen to a tooth jewel—coming loose and being swallowed—results in nothing more than a little bling down the porcelain king.


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20 Gift Guide ( 21 creepy germs trying to cling to our valuable touch screens. Luckily there’s a hand-knit iPod shark cozy to protect 21st-century technology and take the edge off it, too. Based in Brookesville, Fla., Chris and Yaya have an endearing made-to-order fluffy fish design for those who want to keep their mp3 player safe in the belly of a beast. Their collection is available on Etsy, under “Chris and Yaya.”

For the Wrap Star in Your Life FUROSHIKI BY LINK LOS ANGELES ($50)

A couple of strategically placed twists can turn this striped satin swath of cloth into a bag, a bottle holder, a headband, a scarf and much more. Check out Furoshiki. com for folding diagrams and ideas.

For the Sharp Shooter in Your Life FUJIFILM INSTAX MINI 7S INSTANT FILM CAMERA ($58)

The grandchild of the Polaroid spits out credit-card-sized prints directly into the palm of your hand, and at 4.8-by-4.7-by-2.5 inches, fits perfectly in a purse or pocket.

For the Downsized Audiophile in Your Life

the living room with thumping bass at home.

For the Chocolate Snob in Your Life SCHARFFEN BERGER MINI CHOCOLATE BAR ($2.35)

These one-ounce bars from the Berkeley-based chocolatier are just big enough to provide a taste of heaven and perfectly sized for a stocking toe. And as the makers specialize in darker varieties with high cocoa content—up to 82 percent—a taste might be more than enough for us mere mortals to handle. Available individually or in a six-bar sampler.

For the Outdoor Adventurer with Back Issues UCO MICRO-CANDLE LANTERN ($12.95)

Heading into the back country without a pleasant and flattering source of light just because you don’t want to risk permanent back injury? That’s a terrible idea! This wee lantern not only provides light and a little warmth, it packs down to 2.5 inches tall and a feathery 4.2 ounces. That includes the two tea lights (one in the globe and an extra in the base), which give three to four hours of burn time apiece. In bright red, green or turquoise.

For the Indie Sock Fan in Your Life GUMBALL POODLE SOCKS ($12)

These dual-colored striped socks are ideal for the alternative fashionista. Made in the U.S.A., these warm accessories have vertical block lettering spelling out words like “bimbo,” “whiskey,” “gay,” “zombie,” “meat,” “beer,” “bacon,” “ninja,” “Obama,” “Santa” and “weed.”

tall, they will channel the Force to get at even the most stubborn walnut meat. Also available as Darth Vader (“I am your nutcracker”) and Yoda (“Crack your nuts I will”).

For the Environmentally Conscious Commuter in Your Life THE 16-OUNCE NALGENE ($9)

Using a refillable water bottle may reduce plastic waste, but who wants to haul around a quart-sized jug of anything? This smaller version of Nalgene’s most popular bottle may be just the thing to reduce both your gift recipient’s load and his or her environmental impact.

For the Droid-Loving Nut in Your Life PERENNIAL TEA ROOM ROBOT TEA INFUSER ($9.95)

For years, robots have been vacuuming pools, monitoring hearts and dropping bombs on other countries. So why not brewing tea or cracking nuts? The stainless steel robot tea infuser doesn’t even need batteries: simply load the tiny chest cavity with loose tea and send it for a dip inside a mug of hot water. With adjustable arms that can hold on to any size mug, this whimsical robot is guaranteed to make any kind of drinker a tea-totaler.

JAWBONE JAMBOX BLUETOOTH SPEAKER ($200)

KURT S. ADLER R2D2 NUTCRACKER ($25–$45)

By all accounts the best portable wireless speaker on the market, the Jambox comes in four cute colors (red, blue, silver and black) and is roughly the size of a block of Velveeta, according to the wags at Gizmodo. It’s also really, really loud and reportedly very clean, meaning it can anchor a conference call at work, guarantee near–perfect clarity on a phone call in the car and fill

And just when you thought that R2D2 was only good for delivering the blueprints to the Death Star, our culture’s most beloved droid steals the show from Tchaikovsky’s mustachioed soldier with the stodgy outfit and stiff arms. That’s right, folks: Star Wars has gone nutcrackers. But don’t be fooled by their size—just because these wooden shellsmashers stand only seven inches

For the (Not Too) Cute Couple ROBOT TUNES FOR TWO HEADPHONE SPLITTER ($12.49)

Here’s a gift for the romantic, musically inclined couple who want to listen one song at the same time—without blasting it for the world to hear or being one of those obnoxiously cute pairs that actually shares one set of headphones (because, let’s be honest, that’s a look we can’t all pull off). This earphone splitter comes with a spring-loaded, robotshaped keychain easily removable from your set of keys.

For the Reborn Athlete in Your Life TIMEX MIDSIZE HEALTH TRACKER WATCH ($64.95)

It’s the time of the year to start thinking about New Year’s resolutions. Like most folks, I’m choosing a more active lifestyle, planning to spend hours exploring the beautiful parks and trails of Central California, and looked for just the right pedometer. Upon discovering the Timex midsize health tracker watch, I knew I had found my personal coach. It’s water-resistant, comfortable and built for everyday wear. All I have to do is enter my height, weight, age and gender, and the watch automatically tracks my daily activity including steps, distance and calories burned. I hope Christmas comes early this year.


S A N TA R O S A

I’m on Fire

While the “normal” girls at my elementary school were openly obsessing over Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonathan Taylor Thomas, I had a more closeted celebrity attraction. Chris Isaak’s writhing, water-drenched body in the “Wicked Game” video was enough to cement my undying love for this lessthan-likely heartthrob even at the young age of eight. Isaak steals hearts with his come-hither voice and countryish twang on Wednesday, Nov. 23, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $45.50–$67.50. 707.546.3600.

P E TA L U M A

Damn Hippies If God really was one of us, he’d probably be camped out at one of the Occupy protests or backing the ban on plastic grocery bags. Joan Osborne, who first posed the question “What if God was one of us?,” ditches such existential inquisitions in her newest endeavor. Trigger Hippy joins Osborne with guitarist Jackie Greene and former Black Crowes members Steve Gorman and Audley Freed. The rock ’n’ roll revival takes place Monday, Nov. 28, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8pm. $29–$31. 707.765.2121.

N A PA

Dance Turkeys The notion of creativity is often stifled in times of economic downfall. Whereas programs throughout the country are losing funding in the wake of seemingly more pressing issues, the good people of Napa’s Slack Collective are keeping the arts alive, offering cheap rent on studio space and providing creative outlets for local talent. This week, the Collective lends its stage to musicians Magnanimous, Comfort Slacks, Bear

Hug and Creepy Marbles. Kick it live on Friday, Nov. 25, at Slack Collective Studios. 964 Pearl St., Napa. 8pm. $5. 707.344.7133.

S A N TA R O S A

Arts Alive

scarf and smoother than fine whiskey. This fluid trio takes the stage on Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Raven Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. 7:30. $12. 707.522.0330.

—Lacie Schwarz

“Absence makes the heart grow fonder” couldn’t be a truer statement for the boys of Oh Apollo. After a long hiatus, the Santa Rosa natives have reassembled the band that gained them their local renown. Along with No Sir, Strike to Survive, Caravels and Brother Bear, Oh Apollo set the atmosphere for local artists including Loren Buchart, Celeste Turconi, Julia Davis, Lindsey Kessler and others to display their works. Local art comes alive on Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $8. 707.528.3009.

HEALDSBURG

Smooth as Butter Yes, Echorev frontman Johnny Nicholson has a voice softer than velvet and a face worth swooning over. But beyond this alluring façade lies pure talent. The Geyserville native joined forces with experimental German drummer Jörn Biefeldt and singersongwriter-bassist Ann Driscoll to form the band, and the result, evidenced on their album, Find North, is a sound that’s warmer than a winter

THROTTLE! Regis Philbin shows off his mad scooter skills at Book Passage on Nov. 27. See Readings, p32.

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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


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ArtsIdeas

gadget was equipped with edge sensors and a vacuum in case its inch-long dustpan missed anything. ($56 on eBay) Omnibot With his mechanical drone and ďŹ&#x201A;ashing red eyes,

FULL SERVE Decades of artiďŹ cial-intelligence innovation has come to this: Roxxy TrueCompanion, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst sex robot.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Can I Help You?

Omnibot could have been marketed as a device for scaring cats. Instead, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;fullyprogrammableâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s â&#x20AC;&#x2122;bot was equipped with a remote-control handset, speaker and tray so he could bring you Kool-Aid and swear in Klingon for your friends. ($299 on eBay) AIBO This robotic pooch fetched, sat, wagged its plastic tail

Helpful service robots over the decades, from workout coaches to sex companions BY RACHEL DOVEY

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iri, the iPhone 4S â&#x20AC;&#x153;personal assistant,â&#x20AC;? makes a great Christmas gift, and not just because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helpful. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a tech-savvy asshole (or just curious), you probably already know how the sassy robot voice responds to questions like â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are you wearing?â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;When do you menstruate?â&#x20AC;? Of course,

poor Siri isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the ďŹ rst bionic being to suffer indignity in the name of progress. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a list of some other â&#x20AC;&#x2122;bots that have served us doggedly over the yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no matter what we subject them toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for that person in your life who just needs something to abuse. HERO Both the 1982 HERO-1 and its successor HERO Jr. looked like a cross between R2-D2 and a copy machine, but the latter was

inďŹ nitely more useful, acting as an alarm clock, home security system and (it was the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s) workout coach. ($560 on eBay) Tomy Dustbot What Roomba does now, Dustbot started doing in 1985, but with stick-thin arms and a mini broom. The Tomy

and resembled a deformed sheep. Though technically not a service robot, the 1999 pup did help make the â&#x20AC;&#x153;RoboCup Four-Legged Robot Soccer Leagueâ&#x20AC;? a reality, and if


Wakamaru The 2005 â&#x20AC;&#x153;caretakerâ&#x20AC;? from Japan is

so she just lies on the ground and sighs, hoping you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about her but knowing you probably will. ($98.50 on Amazon) Roxxxy TrueCompanion Complete with conversational abilities and a vapid expression, this life-size sex robot has several settings, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Wendy,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frigid Farrahâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Yoko,â&#x20AC;? who, according to the True Companion Website, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;barely 18.â&#x20AC;? Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just a pleasure-bot, you see; according to creator Douglas Hines, she was released in 2009 to address your emotional and intellectual needs as well. Roxxxy has endless

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

Nov 14â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jan 7 Holiday Reception: Dec 3, 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, Ca 95472 707-829-7200 info@sebastopol-gallery.com

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designed to look out for your sick and elderly family members, if you happen to be fantastically wealthy. Its services include reminding patients to take their meds and calling emergency services if anything goes wrong. An embedded web camera allows family members to watch their ailing relative from afar. (Between $9,000 and $15,000) Femisapien WowWeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s female version of the Kung-Foo Fighting Robosapien can be your back-up singer, hold your business cards and make kissing noises in your general direction, because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a girl and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we do. Sadly, since she only speaks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emotish,â&#x20AC;? Femisapien canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you if sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fallen over,

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possibilities: You can tailor her personality to yours and, as the website points out, you can easily swap her with your friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roxxxys, which is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the same as wife or girlfriend swapping without any of the social issues or sexual-disease-related concerns!â&#x20AC;? And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, TrueCompanion is neither sexist nor creepy, because Roxxxy has a male counterpart, Rocky, who is, apparently, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;beautiful hunk.â&#x20AC;? ($1,495 for Rocky; $2,995 for Roxxxy; ďŹ nd out more, if you dare, at TrueCompanion.com)

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Untitled by Roy De Forest, Circa 1950 Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern & contemporary artworks.

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youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never watched a team of mechanical dogs play soccer, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never lived. ($750 on eBay)

Gallery

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24

EYES INTACT John David Vozaitis is Ralphie Parker at Sixth Street Playhouse.

C’mere, Kid!

‘A Christmas Story’ as fun as the film BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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he genius of Bob Clark’s beloved 1983 holiday comedy A Christmas Story is largely of tone, a blend of warm nostalgia and razor-sharp observational honesty. With a story constructed from the writings of Jean Shepherd, the film’s best element— Shepherd’s voiceover narration—successfully uses the author’s distinctive voice, mirroring the same determination, wonder, enthusiasm, horror and amazement of his 10-yearold younger self.

And poor 10-year-old Ralphie goes through a lot in his Christmas-season quest for a Red Ryder carbine-action, 200-shot, range model air rifle BB gun. As

Christmas draws closer, Ralphie must square off against a parade of bullies, teachers, parents and department-store Santas, all eager to warn the would-be sharpshooter that he’ll shoot his eye out. In Sixth Street Playhouse’s stage adaptation, the same type of funny but wicked magic inherent in the film occurs. This is due largely to the clever staging and skillful comic pacing of director Bronwen Shears, but also to the cast, playing characters from the 1930s without the usual modern-day speech cadences to spoil the illusion. Best is Mark Bradbury as the grownup Ralph, narrating the shenanigans with his own affably enthusiastic variation on Shepherd’s caught-up-in-theaction storytelling. The stage adaptation by Philip Grecian streamlines the plot, constructing a less tangential storyline than in the movie. As Ralph relives the best Christmas of his life, he wanders through his childhood home (great set by Paul Gilger), interpreting the antics of his firm but loving mother (Kim Williams), his dad, aka “the Old Man” (Chris Schloemp), and his odd little brother, Randy (Ari Vozaitis). His younger self is played with great comic timing by John David Vozaitis, and much of this production’s warmhearted pleasure is watching his Ralphie connive his way through a mounting stream of obstacles. Fans of the movie will find all of their favorite moments recreated, from the kid with his tongue stuck to the flagpole (hilarious!) all the way to Ralphie’s Christmas Eve appearance in a fluffy, pink bunny suit (costumes by Pamela Enz). There is plenty that’s familiar here, but much that is fresh and new, all blending together like the perfect Christmas dinner, as Ralph/ Ralphie’s favorite Christmas memory draws to an expected but thrillingly satisfying conclusion. ‘A Christmas Story’ runs Thursday– Sunday through Dec. 23 at the Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; Sunday at 2pm. Additional 2pm matinees on Nov. 26 and Dec. 17. One Wednesday show, Dec. 21, at 8pm. $15–$32. 707.523.4185.


Film

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Buy 3 tires, Get One Free all brands and types included Offer is up to $100 off.

Free Oil Change TORN Rose Bosch’s film views the horrors of occupied France through children’s eyes.

Summer of ’42

with any purchase of $ 50 or more Inquire about our other services— BRAKES, TUNE-UPS, ALIGNMENTS

‘La Rafle’ an important step for French cinema BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

ny accusations against Steven Spielberg for putting a happy ending on the Holocaust in Schindler’s List have to be repeated for Rose Bosch’s La Rafle (The Round-Up). The French director is the second to make a film about the Rafle du Vel d’Hiv (Gilles Paquet-Brenner, who made Sarah’s Key, is the other), and perhaps because the subject matter has been cautiously untouched in film for 70 years, the films ends on a strangely peaceful note. In the summer of 1942, the Nazis commenced their ethnic cleansing of Paris. The Jewish population was rounded up and herded into a bicycle velodrome without food, water or sanitary facilities, before being taken to concentration camps. Bosch focuses here on those with heart—Jean Reno as the facility’s one doctor, with a selfless nurse by his side, Melanie Laurent (fighting the Nazis again, as she was Inglourious Basterds). Likewise, Hugo Leverdez is appealing as the clever blonde kid who seems able to outwit the Nazis. Bosch wants to wring the viewer’s heart, and she’s often blatant about it, as with the reappearance of an interned child’s teddy bear. She uses multiple viewpoints of the powerful and the powerless together, as when lit cigarettes link a stateless Jew in Paris with the Vichy politician Pierre Laval. Sometimes this matching is too perfect—from a smuggled gift of toffees in the Beane camp, Bosch cuts to a chocolate cake Hitler receives as a gift in Berchtesgaden. (It’s the cinematic equivalent of the novelists’ “While the peasants starved, the king lived in luxury.”) Along with Sarah’s Key, La Rafle is a big step for the French in admitting the country’s past. It’s all very gripping and emotional, but in the end, the tense scenes of occupied Paris seem more authentic than Bosch’s insistence on a return to normalcy, with Debussy’s Clair de Lune spread all over it like Nutella on a crêpe. ‘La Rafle’ screens as part of the Jewish Film Festival on Nov. 29 (1pm, 7:15pm) and Dec. 7 (7:15pm) at Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W. Sixth St., S anta Rosa. $10-$12. 707.528.4222.

19160 Sonoma Highway | Sonoma CA 95476 707.996.1401 | SonomaValleyTires.com

Holiday Holiday O p en H ouse Open House &C Community o m m u nit y T Tree ree LLighting ighting

111/25 1/ 2 5 – 112/1 2 /1

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My Week My Week with with M arilyn R Marilyn Sunday S u n d ay N Nov ov 2 27, 7, 4 4–6pm – 6pm

(11:00, (11: 0 0, 1:30, 1: 30, 3:45) 3 : 4 5 ) 7:15, 7:15, 9:35 9 : 35

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Paint ings and Paintings and Collages Collage s by by Harley Har ley will w ill ccontinue ont inue iin n tthe he G Gallery aller y tthrough hrou gh D December e ce mb e r 31. 31.

Margin M argin Call Call R (1(11:00, 1: 00 , 4:15) 4 :15 ) 99:25 : 25 Sunday Sunday 11/27 11/27 only: only : 9:25pm 9 : 25pm

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11- 6 T 11-6 Thurs Thurs–Mon hurs – Mon Mon ((closed c l os e d T Tues ues & W Weds) eds) 6671 6 671 Front Front Street/Hwy St r e e t / H w y 1 116 16 Downtown D ow ntow n Forestville Fo re s t v i l l e 707-887-0799 7 07- 8 87- 079 9 quicksilvermineco.com q uick sil ver mineco.com

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551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road S an t a R osa 7 707-522-0719 07- 52 2- 07 719 Santa Rosa

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23–29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Fall Special!


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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“A DEFINITE BEST PICTURE CONTENDER...

Film

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt, Richard von Busack and Leilani Clark.

NEW MOVIES filled with laughs and tears and a never-better George Clooney.” Lou Lumenick

####”

Peter Travers

Arthur Christmas (PG; 97 min.) Santa’s second son, Arthur, comes to the rescue when the Claus crew neglect to deliver a gift in this animated film from producers of Wallace & Gromit series. With the voices of Jim Broadbent, James McAvoy and Hugh Laurie. (NB)

The Descendants (R; 115 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (NB)

drama-thriller about the causes of the current recession stars Kevin Spacey, Paul Bettany and Jeremy Irons as analysts at an investment firm on the cusp of the ’08 financial meltdown. (NB)

The Muppets (PG; 120 min.)

Jack and Jill (PG; 91 min.) Riding

The first Muppet movie in 12 years co-stars Amy Adams and Jason Segal (who also wrote the script), who must rally the Muppet gang to save Muppet Theater from the evil oil magnate (Chris Cooper). (NB)

the wave of Thanksgiving holiday movies is Adam Sandler vehicle Jack and Jill, with Sandler playing both roles of staid executive brother and irritating passive-aggressive sister. Co-stars Katie Holmes, Al Pacino and Dana Carvey. (NB)

Elijah Wood, Pink, Robin Williams et al. provide the voices for Mumble and his family in the further adventures of . . . (NB)

Like Crazy (PG-13; 89 min.) Dram-

©2011 TCFFC

EXCLUSIVE EN EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT NGAGEMENT SSTARTS TART A S WWEDNESDAY, EDNESDAY, NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 23

SANTA ROSA R Summerfield Cinemas (707) 522 2-0330 522-0330

Immortals (PG-13; 98 min.) From the dingalings who brought you 300 comes the CG-enchanced story of Theseus leading the war against the titans. (NB) J. Edgar (R; 137 min.) Clint Eastwood’s biopic takes on a half-century of history, but is mostly staged in a few rooms. Leonardo DiCaprio plays J. Edgar Hoover, founder of the FBI. It’s a catastrophically recessive part. Protected from the world by his mother (Judi Dench) and his secretary (Naomi Watts), Hoover emerges for lunches, dinners and the racetrack with longtime companion Clyde Tolson (Armie Hammer). Scriptwriter Dustin Lance Black (Milk) underscores the urban legend of Hoover’s gayness and transvestitism. At their worst, Eastwood’s films are a series of incidents with little connection; J. Edgar is a colossal bore. (RvB)

Happy Feet Two (PG; 117 min.)

foxsearchlight.com

drama about an idealistic young campaign consultant who discovers that all is not what it seems on the campaign trail. George Clooney plays the presidential candidate at the center of a struggle for power. The power-house cast includes Paul Giamatti, Marisa Tomei, Jeffrey Wright and Philip Seymour Hoffman. (LC)

rom-com about a British student and her American classmate whose romance turns to the long-distance type after she violates her visa. (NB)

Margin Call (R; 109 min.) First

My Week with Marilyn (R; 106 min.) An assistant on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956 recounts his week spent with the bombshell while her husband Arthur Miller is out of town. Stars Michelle Williams as Marilyn. (NB)

ALSO PLAYING Footloose (PG-13; 117 min.) Remake of the 1984 film that launched Kevin Bacon stars newcomer Kenny Wormald. Also with Andie MacDowell and Dennis Quaid. (NB) The Ides of March (R; 101 min.) Ryan Gosling continues his rise to ultimate movie-star status in this

Melancholia (R; 130 min.) (R; 130 min.) In two parts, Lars von Trier forecasts the end of the world: the first half is a wormwood-bitter comedy of the nigh-royal wedding. Kirsten Dunst does the best work of her career as Justine, a woman who connects von Trier’s previous visions of abused Little Match Girl and dangerous vixen. In the second half, we see the cause of her despair: a massive planet heading for ours. With first-rate supporting work by Stellan Skarsgard at his most swinish, Charlotte Gainsbourg at her most tender and Kiefer Sutherland with a previously unheard, cigar-toned bass note in his voice this is a work wrought out of profound depression, and yet there’s nothing adolescent about it. (RvB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

Puss in Boots (PG; 90 min.) Puss in Boots (based on the Shrek character) goes wrong where prequels usually do, by changing the nature of the characters we love in the name of fleshing them out. Naturally, though, there are sweet lines (“Fear me if you dare,” Puss threatens) and some lovely sequences, such as the characters’ romp in the clouds outside the giant’s castle at the nether end of the beanstalk. But the plot is convoluted and doesn’t seem about something, the way a fairy tale has to be—it doesn’t have any resonance. Features the voices of Anotonio Banderas (as Puss), Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis and Billy Bob Thornton. (RvB)

Revenge of the Electric Car (NR; 90 min.) Chris Paine, director of Who Killed the Electric Car?, provides his own update in new doc about the now brighter future of gasless autos. (NB)

The Skin I Live In (R; 117 min.) Pedro Almodovar’s newest stars Antonio Banderas as a loony plastic surgeon bent on perfecting synthetic skin. (NB)

Tower Heist (PG-13; 103 min.) Ben Stiller and Eddie Murphy star in a comedy about a band of N.Y.C. apartment dwellers who avenge the Ponzi schemer (Alan Alda) who made off with their pensions. With a slew of co-stars: Matthew Broderick, Michael Pena, Casey Affleck and the very funny Tea Leoni. (NB) Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 1 (PG-13; 115 min.) The first part of the adaptation of Stephanie Meyer’s final book in her hugely popular Twilight series brings the gang back for Christmas. The second part is due November 2012. (NB)

A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas (R; 90 min.) Yet another low-comedy franchise swiping the title from the late-’80s Brady Bunch reunion film. (NB)

The Way (PG-13; 115 min.) A California doctor (Martin Sheen) takes a journey that will change his life after he flies to France to collect the remains of his son (Emilio Estevez), killed while trekking the Pyrenees, and decides to finish his son’s pilgrimage. Written and directed by Estevez. (NB)

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Echorev Electric folk trio presents songs from debut, with Johnny Nicholson and David Luning opening. Nov 26 at 7:30. $12. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

Chris Isaak Rootsy rocker and darling of cult filmmakers performs new material from “Beyond the Sun.” Nov 23 at 8. $47.50$67.50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Little Joe y La Familia Grammy-winning Tejano musician plays with DJ Camacho opening. Nov 26 at 8. $30-$55. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.5876.

New Riders of the Purple Sage SF psychedelic vets play country rock, with Mookie Siegel opening. Nov 26 at 8:30. $26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Trigger Hippy Supergroup composed of Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene, Steve Gorman, Audley Freed and Nick Govrik, with opener Jabe Beyer. Nov 28 at 8. $29-$31. Mystic

Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

MARIN COUNTY Rwanda Children’s Choir Twenty-four young Rwandans tour the county to say thank you to the organizations that have helped feed, clothe and provide medical care for them. Various Marin and Sonoma County performances through Dec 2. Angelico Hall, Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.948.8357.

Centre du Vin Nov 26, Jonathan Poretz. 480 First St East, Sonoma. 707.996.9779.

W WED ED –NOV –NOV 23 23

WEEKLY W EEKLY E EVENT VENT THE T HE JJUNCTION UNCTION PR PRESENTS ESE NT S

JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

WITH W ITH G GUACAMOLE UACAMOLE C HANGO B / MALARKEY CHANGO B/MALARKEY

McNear’s Dining House

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GY P S Y D DOODLE O O D LE

Flamingo Lounge Wed & Thurs, karaoke. Fri & Sat, live music. Nov 25-26, Reed Fromer Band. Sun, salsa with lessons. Tues, swing night with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Every Tues, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). Nov 28, Neil Buckley Octet. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

$3 $ 3 WITH WITH FFEATHERS/$5 EATHERS/$5 WITHOUT WI T H OU T DOORS D OORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

F FRI– RI – N NOV OV 2 25 5

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S ROOTS/ROCK/REGGAE R OOTS/ ROCK / REGGAE

SOL S OL HO HORIZON RIZON +V VERSION E R SI O N

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

S SAT AT – NOV NOV 2 26 6

BUZZWERKS B UZZWERKS P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

Hopmonk Sonoma

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Nov 25, Ricky Alan Ray Band. Nov 26, Solid Air. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Nov 23, bluegrass and old time jam. Nov 25, Kingsborough. Nov 26, Ain’t Misbehavin’. Every Sunday, Sunday Jazz. Nov 27, Mike DiFranco. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Wed at 7, open mic. Nov 25, Beso Negro, Dgiin. Nov 26, Frankie Boots & All Nighters, John Courage & Great Plains, Zodiac Death Valley. Last Sunday of the month, Irish

Nov 23, One Year Anniversary with Pat Jordan. Nov 25, Dan Martin. Nov 26, Matt Bolton. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern Nov 23, Special Wednesday Juke Joint with Guacamole, Chango B, Malarkey. Nov 25, Sol Horizon. Nov 26, John Kimock, Bobby Vega, Eric Levy, Kinky Buddha. Nov 27, Orgone. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Every Wed, Brainstorm. Last Sat monthly, Good HipHop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 23, Lauralee Brown. Nov 25, Disorderly House Band. Nov 26, A Thousand )

28

JJAM/FOLK/AMERICANA AM / FOLK /AMERIC R ANA

JJOHN OHN KIMOCK/BOBBY KIMOCK/ BOBBY V VEGA/ERIC EGA/ ERIC LEVY LEVY +K KINKY INK Y BUDDHA BUDDHA

((MEMBERS MEMBE RS O OF FH HOT OT B BUTTERED UT TE R E D R RUM) UM )

$$10 10 A ADV/$13 DV/$13 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

S SUN– UN– N NOV OV 2 27 7

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

FFUNK/OLD UNK / OLD SCHOOL/HIP SCHOOL / HIP HOP HOP

AN A N EVENING EVENING WITH W ITH

ORGONE OR GONE

$$10 10 A ADV/$13 DV/$13 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88PM/21+ PM /21+ M MON ON – NOV NOV 28 W WEEKLY EEK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT WITH W ITH D DJJ JJACQUES ACQUES &

D ACAMOLE DJJ GU GUACAMOLE

$3 $ 3R RED ED S STRIPES T R I PE S A ALL LL NIGHT N I G HT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11PM/DOORS 11PM / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+ TUES TUES –NOV –NOV 29 29 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S ANYTHING A NY THING GOES GO E S

SAT 11/26 • 7:30PM DOORS • $26 • 21+ COUNTRY ROCK

NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE

FEATURING MOOKIE SIEGEL PLUS SCAREKROW MON 11/28 • 7:00PM DOORS • $29 ADV/$31 DOS • 21+ AMERICAN ROCK-N-ROLL

TRIGGER HIPPY FEATURING JOAN OSBORNE,

JACKIE GREEN, AUDLEY FREED, NICK GOVRIK, STEVE GORMAN THUR 12/1 • 7:30PM DOORS • $19 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ CELTIC ROCK-N-ROLL

YOUNG DUBLINERS PLUS JERRY HANNAN FRI 12/2 • 7:00PM DOORS • $29 ADV/$31 DOS • 21+ BLUES/ROCK

THE MANZAREKROGERS BAND SAT 12/3 • 7:30PM DOORS • $16 • 21+ BLUEGRASS

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE

JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

PLUS THE HIGHWAY POETS

PRETTY P RETTY LIGHTS LIGHTS M USIC T OUR MUSIC TOUR

TUE & WED 12/6 & 12/7 • 7:00PM DOORS • $31 • 16+ ROCK/FOLK

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES–10PM AGES–10PM T THUR HUR –DEC – D EC 1 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GY P S Y D DOODLE O O D LE

GRAMATIK, G RAMATIK, M MICHAEL ICHAEL M MENERT, ENERT, S SUPERVISON UPERVISON

WITH W ITH

$20/DOORS $ 20 / DOORS 1 10PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI– F RI – D DEC EC 2

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S JJAM/FOLK/AMERICANA AM / FOLK /AMER RIC ANA

MOONALICE M OONALICE +D DAVID AVID G GANS ANS

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SAT– S AT– D DEC EC 3

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

THE EASY LEAVES

RICHARD THOMPSON THUR 12/8 • 8:00PM DOORS • $21 • 21+ ROCK

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD FRI 12/9 • 7:00PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$23 DOS • 18+ BLUES/FUNK/JAZZ

CHARLIE HUNTER

HIP H IP H HOP/JAZZ/FREESTYLE OP/JA ZZ / FREEST YLE

PLUS BHI BHIMAN

((OF OF BLACKALICIOUS) BLACK ALICIOUS)

No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

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$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

JAWS Sharky Coast plays new venue the Transient Lounge on Nov. 25. See Clubs, p29.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23–29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

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Seisun with Riggy Rackin. Tues at 7, ladies’ limelight open mic with Tawnie. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.


Music ( 27

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Years at Sea. Nov 27, Grandpa Banana’s Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

GATOR BEAT Saturday, Nov 26

Last Day Saloon

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Jazzercise 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Farm Animal Protection Thanksgiving Dinner reservations 707.974.7387 Manley Comino Fri, Nov 25 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther presents MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ’N ROLL Sat, Nov 26 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance with Gary Thomas 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts GATOR BEAT Sun, Nov 27 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am ZUMBA GOLD WITH TONING 1:30–3:30Pm VINTAGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 5:30–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Nov 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Nov 29 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African and World Music Dance Wed, Nov 23 5:45–6:45pm Thur, Nov 24 3–7pm

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

The LOUNGE FRI & SAT NOV 25 & 26

REED FROMER BAND

FRI & SAT DEC 2&3

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FRI & SAT DEC 9 & 10 FRI DEC 16

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

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THANKSGIVING DINNER Thurs, Nov 24, Noon–7pm

Nov 25 Sat

Nov 26 Sun

Nov 27 Fri

Dec 2 Sat

Dec 3

BUD E LUV’S

7th Annual Holiday Party 8:30pm

THE MUDDY ROSES

Harmonious Country, Blues, Thorns 4:00pm / No Cover

Rancho Debut!

T HE T ICKETS BAND Rancht!o

Shovel-Ready Rock & Roll 8:00pm / No Cover

Debu

A NNUAL CHRISTMAS PARTY DOUG ADAMZ AND BRAVO!

8:30pm

4:00pm / No Cover

Fri

Dec 9 Dec 10

FROBECK

Old School Funk, Rock and Pop 8:30pm

VOLKER STRIFLER BAND

Original Blues and Grooves 8:30pm

Dec 17 JOHNNY A LLAIR’S C HRISTMAS ROCK & ROLL DANCE PARTY! Sat

70 7- 5 4 5 707-54 5-853 - 8 5 3 0 eexx tt.. 7 727 27 www.FlamingoResort.com w w w.Flamin g oResor t.c o m

D’BUNCHOVUS

Talented, Humorous, Very Vocal 8:30pm The Fabulous

KYLE ALDEN Dec 4 Irish-Inspired Melodious Original Songs Sun

Sat

SANTA S ANTA ROSA’S RO SA’S FAVORITE FAVO R ITE RESORT, R ESO RT, S SONOMA O NOMA C COUNTY’S O U NT Y ’ S B BEST E ST V VALUE A LU E

Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Fri

8:30pm

415.662.2219

CRITIC’S CHOICE

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Nov 23, Pop Fiction. Nov 25, Give Thanks benefit with High Speed Wobble Musical Entertainment Group, Pat Jordan Band. Nov 26, Little Joe y La Familia, DJ Camacho (see Concerts). Mon, karaoke. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Nov 23, Phat Chance Quartet. Nov 25, Vernelle Anders. Nov 26, Susan Sutton. Nov 29, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Nov 29, Get Down. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall Nov 26, Gator Beat. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Nov 23, Gentleman Soldiers. Wed at 7:30, trivia night. Nov 25, David Thom Band CD release party. Nov 26, Timothy O’Neil Band. Nov 27, Dave Aguilar and Peter McCauley. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Nov 26, New Riders of the Purple Sage with Mookie Siegel (see Concerts). Nov 28, Trigger Hippy featuring Joan Osborne, Jackie Greene, Steve Gorman, Audley Freed, Nick Govrik with Jabe Beyer (see Concerts). 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Wed at 6, jazz jam. Sun at 5, rock and blues jam. Mon at 7, young people’s AA. Tues at 7, acoustic Americana jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Raven Theater Nov 26, Echorev (see Concerts). 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Grandes Exitos Little Joe y la Familia keep Tejano spirit alive At the height of the Chicano Rights movement in the 1970s, Little Joe’s polka-ranchera “Las Nubes,” a song inspired by Cesar Chavez, became an anthem for Mexican-Americans and the United Farmworkers Movement across California. “I can’t go on, if I have to go on suffering,” sings Little Joe, between zesty horn flourishes. “The years go passing by and I don’t lose my hope.” The song is just one example of the Grammy award–winning Tejano pioneer’s border-crossing, culture-busting way of making music that mixes social commentary with crowd-pleasing, danceable energy. A byproduct of the working-class conjunto sound made popular by Flaco Jimenez, Little Joe’s style of Tejano blends country, rock, blues, polka and guttural hoots and hollers with beautiful synthesizer beats. Born in Texas, Little Joe has been playing this hybrid music since the late 1950s—long before Selena (the reigning “Queen of Tejano”) bridged the gap between American pop and Latino sounds—and he was considered the leader of the Chicano wave; luckily, this TexMex king continues to please crowds with high-energy performances to this day. See Little Joe y la Familia play their hearts out on Saturday, Nov. 26, at the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $35–$50. 707.545.2343.—Leilani Clark

Redwood Cafe Wed at 6, local music. Thurs at 7:30, open mic. Fri-Sun, live music. Tues at 6:30, SSU night open mic & poetry reading. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Nov 26, Brothers of Siren. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

The Rocks Fri-Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Nov 26, Steve Pile. Nov 27, Crazy

Famous, True Mud North. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Nov 24, Be Thankful Thanksgiving Celebration with DJs Truthlive, Konnex and


Beset. Every Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St., Santa Rosa, No Phone. Thurs at 9, DJ Dray Lopez. Nov 26, E Minor & Dirty Diamonds. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Stout Brothers Nov 26, Terry Savastano. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Toad in the Hole Pub Nov 26, Trivlerackasaurus Rex. Every second and fourth Sun, Ian Scherer (jazz). Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Nov 23, Brotherhood of Groove. Thurs, DJ Dave. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Nov 25, Johnny Tsunami. Nov 26, Levi Lloyd and the 501s. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Transient Lounge Thurs, Reggae Night. Nov 25, Bill Wild, Wu, BossOk1.Chill, Sharky Coast, Dyke Fights. Nov 26, Understudies, Park, Street Harmony, Sleaze Locust. 400 Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.583.9080.

Rancho Nicasio Nov 25, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus CD Release Party. Nov 26, Bud E Luvâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Nov 27, Muddy Roses. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Nov 23, Marcelo & Seth. Wed, Tengo Tango. Nov 26, Freddy Clarke. Sun at 4, Salsa-lito. Nov 27, Candela y Edgardo. Tues, Noel Jewkes and friends (jazz jam). 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Sleeping Lady Nov 23, This Old Earthquake. Thurs at 9, Texas Blues. Nov 25, Biambu. Nov 26, Uke Jam, Drew Gasparini. Sat at 2, uke jam. Sun at 2, Irish music. Nov 27, Namely Us. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Wed, Philip Claypool and friends. Nov 25, Seventh Sons. Nov 26, Lara Johnston Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

Station House Cafe

MARIN COUNTY

Nov 27, New Copasetics.

11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

29

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nov 26, Hard Travels Blues Band. Nov 27, Ralph Woodson. Every Monday at 4, Monday Night Football with Big John. 902 Main Street, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed at 7, jam session. Nov 25, Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Singalong. Nov 26, Hall 1. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Slack Collective Nov 25, Comfort Slacks, Magnanimous, BearHug, Creepy Marbles. 964 Pearl St, Napa, No phone.

Uva Trattoria Nov 23, Dan and Margarita. Nov 25, Jack Pollard and Dan Daniels. Nov 26, Nate Lopez Trio. Nov 27, James and Ted. Sun, James & Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

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Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Nov 25, Miles Schon Band with Lara Johnston, Will Champlin and Jamie Clark. Nov 26, Big Brother & Holding Company with Stephanie Keys. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club Nov 23, Sixth Annual Black Wednesday with Cambo and Life. Nov 25, Clusterfunk. Nov 26, 85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Nov 27, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstromâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Society. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Fri at 9, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun at 3, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. Tues at 8:30, open mic with Damir. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Old Western Saloon Nov 25, Brewnel. Nov 26, Featherwitch. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Nov 23, Norris Clement. Nov 25, Bob Johnson Quartet. Nov 26, Grupo Falso Baiano. Nov 27, Sandra Aran. Nov 29, Fiver Brown. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Nov 23, Vinyl. Nov 24, Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

B. B. King Unstoppable 86 year-old king of the blues continues rigorous schedule. Nov 23 at the Paramount Theatre.

Digital Underground What else are you going to do on Thanksgiving night to beat the tryptophan inertia? Nov 24 at Mezzanine.

Mayhem Seminal Norwegian black metal band with notorious biography. Nov 25 at the Regency Ballroom.

Rodney-O West Coast represent with 1980s rhymester, absent former partner Joe Cooley. Nov 25 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Melt-Banana Pushing extremes is this Japanese noise bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialty, be they aural or visual. Nov 29 at the Bottom of the Hill.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Nov 23 At 6pm. Gordon Huether Gallery, Round 2 of “Art of F1RST.” 1821 Monticello Rd, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Nov 26 At 2pm. Local Color Gallery, “Celebration,” small paintings and holiday gifts by gallery artists. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

SONOMA COUNTY Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Jan 6, “Down the Rabbit Hole” with works by Ricky Watts. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256.

Calabi Gallery Through Nov, “Beyond Borders,” works by artists of the Central and South American diaspora. Through Nov, “Postwar Modernism of the West,” work by Robert McChesney, Roy De Forest, Nathan Oliveira and others. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, 2012, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,” original drawings by Charles Schulz. Through Dec 11, “Pop’d from the Panel,” parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art. Through Nov 28, “The Games Children Play.” $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Dec 31, “Make Yourself at Home,” exhibit of unusual home and garden accessories. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Dec 4, “Plein Aire

Painting” with works by Susan Ball. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Ending Nov 30, “On and On: Sequel of Memories,” installation work by Kathleen Yorba. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Local Color Gallery Through Dec 31, “Celebration” with small paintings and holiday gifts by gallery artists. Reception, Nov 26 at 2. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jan 7, “ Inside/Out Gallery Show” with various artists. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Oddfellows Lodge Through Dec 28, “The Lesters Store,” curated arts, antiques and design pop-up store. Noon-7pm. 21021 Geyserville Avenue, Geyserville. 415.572.8232.

Pelican Art Through Jan 7, “Small Works” with various artists. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Ending Nov 28, “Pirates,” a kid-friendly exhibit featuring everyone’s favorite seafaring marauders. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Dec 24, “Rambin Modes,” an evolving window display by Monty Monty. Through Jan 1, “Esse Quam Videri” with Harley. Conversation with the artist, Dec 1 at 7. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Nov 28, Michael Coy exhibit. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jan 8, “Weaver’s Dream,” featuring paintings and scarves by Karen Spratt. Through Jan 8, “Patagonia and Atacama Desert,” with photographs by Lance Kuehne. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Dec 3, “Shoes,” twoand-three-dimensional show open to all media, including video and film. Through Dec 3, “The Color of Magic,: featuring work by Art Heaven as painters celebrate 10 years of working together. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4, Sat 1 to 4. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Share Exchange Nov 27, “Artists Trunk Show.” Ongoing, work by over 75 local artists. 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

Shiloh Sophia Gallery Shiloh Sophia Galley. Ongoing, work by Shiloh Sophia. Wed-Sat, 11 to 6; Sun, 12-6. 126 Plaza Street, Healdsburg. 707.318.8189.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. Through Jan 22, “Singgalot.” Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition on history of Fillipino Immigrants in America. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jan 1, “Sonido Pirata,” curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Tin Barn Vineyards Through Dec 31, “Thanks Any/Way: A Photographic Exploration of Gratitude.” FriMon, 12 to 5. 707.938.5430. 21692 Eighth Street East, Ste 340, Sonoma.

University Art Gallery Through Dec 11, “Contemporary Abstraction” with works by

Brad Brown, Reed Danziger and Mark Grotjahn. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Art Gallery Ending Nov 27, “Dana Hooper, Sylvia Gonzalez and friends” with paintings, lithographs and mixed media. 52 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 707.763.9263.

Elsewhere Gallery Ending Nov 29, “Supercosmos des Songes” by Jean-Marc Brugeilles. Daily, 11 to 6. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.526.2855.

Espenet Studio Nov 25-27, “Open Studio” featuring functional carvings. Fri-Sun, 11 to 5. 1100 OlemaBolinas Road, Bolinas. 415.868.1542.

Gallery Route One Through Dec 11, “Vaporization” with Betty Woolfolk, “The Wilds of Point Reyes,” Artists’ Book Show. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Red Barn Gallery Through Jan 6, “Grounded: A California Indian Life,” art by Miwok/Pomo artist Kathleen Rose Smith. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

Seager Gray Gallery Formerly Donna Seager Gallery. Through November, inaugural exhibition. Tues-Sat, 11 to 6. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Feb 11, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” featuring the photography, video and other media selected from the di Rosa collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Gordon Huether Opening Nov 23, Round 2 of “Art of F1RST.” Reception, Nov 23 at 6. Ongoing, evolving exhibition of Gordon Huether’s fine art. 1821 Monticello Rd, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Funky President

W. Kamau Bell’s laughter against the machine Whereas some comedians challenge the audience to avoid flying pieces of smashed watermelon and others test the audiences’ patience and ability to sit through the most horrendous of jokes, the comedians of Laughter Against the Machine challenge the audience to do more than passively observe. Headlining comedian W. Kamau Bell is the type of comic anyone would love to have a drink with. Bell delivers his humor with a side of sass and a bit of satire, poking fun at the audience he’s aiming to entertain. Appearing on Comedy Central’s Premium Blend in 2005, Bell toyed with the idea of what it might be like to have a black president. Predicting that a man like Barack Obama could never attain status of Commander-in-Chief, he quipped, “One day there may be a black president, but there will never be one named Barack Obama—that’s too black.” Well, the joke’s on him! The righteous Nato Green and forwardthinking Janine Brito are also part of the Laughter Against the Machine tour. Through humor and pressing social and political commentary, the comedians aim to trigger the audience’s mental gears on Wednesday, Nov. 30, at George’s Nightclub. 842 Fourth St., San Rafael. 8:30pm. $10–$15. 415.226.0262.—Lacie Schwarz

Napa County Historical Society Gallery

Napa Valley Museum

Ending Nov 24, “Selling Napa,” display of advertising in Napa dating back to 1857. Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. 707.224.1739.

Through Jan 29, “Dreams of Toyland” featuring presentations by Dolph Gotelli. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Laughter Against the Machine See Critic’s Choice, adjacent.


Nov 30 at 8:30. $10-$15. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. See comedy magician Jay Alexander. Nov 25 at 8. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Holiday Celebration Complimentary tasting and appetizers for holiday shoppers. Nov 26 at 11:30. Free. Dry Creek Vineyard, 3770 Lambert Bridge Rd, Healdsburg. 707.473.4728.

Holiday Open House and Art Show Tastings, hors d’ouvres, exhibit and live music. Nov 25 at 10. Free. Kendall-Jackson Wine Center, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton. 707.571.8100.

Leftovers Done Fun

Events Adoptable Photography Exhibit

Thanksgiving leftovers paired with wine. Nov 26 at 12. $20. Cosentino Winery, 7415 St Helena Hwy, Yountville. 707.257.0322.

Through Jan, Napa Humane Society launches traveling exhibit to show faces of adoptable animals. Alexis Baking Co, 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.255.8118.

Pinot & Potluck Party

Costume Liquidation Sale

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets

Includes vintage outfits, wearable art and fantasy pieces from stage productions. Nov 26-27 at 10. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 415.408.8094.

Look Good, Feel Better Beauty professionals offer tips and free make-up kit for women undergoing chemotherapy. Nov 28 at 10. Free. American Cancer Society, 1451 Guerneville Rd, Ste 220, Santa Rosa, 1.800.227.2345.

Restorative Yoga A post-Thanksgiving workshop promoting healthy digestion. Nov 26 at 5. $20. Yoga Community, 577 Fifth St W, Sonoma. 707.935.8600.

Winter Fair Artwork, wine, soup, dessert and music to benefit Napa Arts Council. Nov 25 at 5; Nov 26 at 11. $15. White Barn, 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena. 510.594.7614.

Bring a dish and taste various Pinots. Nov 25 at 5. $10 tasting. Back Room Wines, First and Main streets, Napa. 707.226.1378.

Nov 29 at 1 and 7:15, Dec 7 at 7:15. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 23–29, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Magic of the Mind

Food & Drink

The Met: Live in HD High-definition opera broadcasts from the Metropolitan Theatre in NYC. Nov 24-30, “Stayagraha.” $16$23. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa.

For Kids Max & Ruby Beloved children’s book characters come to life on stage. Nov 29 at 6:30. $16-$21. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Readers of the Pack A chance for new readers to get together. Nov 29 at 3. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Holidays Festival of Lights Gourmet food, wine and carriage rides. Nov 25 at 2. Free. Downtown Yountville. 707.944.0904.

Holiday Ceramics Sale

Film Ballet & Opera Nov 27 at 1, “The Sleeping Beauty” from the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow as part of ongoing series that broadcasts live presentations from all over the world. $12-$20. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

The Films of John Korty The first major retrospective celebrating the work of John Korty: Nov 27 at 1, “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman”; Nov 27 at 7, a variety of shorts; Dec 1 at 7, “Alex and the Gypsy”; Dec 4 at 1, “Farewell to Manzanar”; Dec 4 at 7, “Twice Upon a Time.” Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

La Rafle Melanie Laurent and Jean Reno star in film about German-occupied Paris.

Sale features functional and decorative pieces. Nov 26 at 9. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Parade of Lights Nov 26, includes 40 tons of snow for sledding, parade at 5:30 and Holiday marketplace. Nov 27 at 9, sledding for kids. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael. 415.381.8793.

Napa Christmas Parade Parade leads to Oxbow Public Market for free cookies and hot chocolate. Nov 26 at 5. Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa. 707.257.0322.

Santa’s Arrival Mr and Mrs Claus arrive in downtown Petaluma via riverboat. Nov 26 at at 11. Historic Downtown Riverfront harbor, E Washington Street, Petaluma. 707.769.0429.

Tree Lighting Cookies and hot chocolate served

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Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

in the park. Nov 23 at 6. Free. Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park, Third and Main streets, Napa. 707.257.0322.

( 31

Readings Coffee Catz

Lectures Parenting Workshops Ongoing lectures help parents raise happy kids and stay sane. Registration required. First and third Wed monthly, parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; group in Spanish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Star Is Bornâ&#x20AC;? keeps kids learning too: Tues at 9:30, twos together. $45; drop-in, $12. Wed at 9:30, infantgym; at 10:45, kindergym. $30; drop-in, $9. Thurs at 10:45, infantgym in Spanish; at noon, kindergym in Spanish. $15. $20-$50. California Parenting Institute, 3650 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.585.6108.

Book Passage

Parents Place

A Christmas Carol

Nonsectarian parenting classes; registration required unless otherwise noted. Wed at 1, postpartum blues and depression support group for moms and babies. $15. Fri at 10, drop-in playtime for ages toddler to five years. $6. JFCS Sonoma County, 1360 N Dutton Ave, Ste C, Santa Rosa. 707.571.8131.

Science Buzz Cafe

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Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Critical Thinking: What Is Science?â&#x20AC;? with Dixon Wragg at Coffee Catz. $3 donation. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

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Fourth Thurs at 6, Sebastopol Great Books discussion group. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.5643. Nov 27 at 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How I Got This Wayâ&#x20AC;? with Regis Philbin. Nov 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living in Gratitudeâ&#x20AC;? with Angeles Arrien. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Point Reyes Books Fourth Mon, Spanish book group. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1542.

Theater Musical version of the classic holiday tale. Nov 25-26, Dec 13, 8-10, 15-17 at 8, Nov 27, Dec 4, Dec 11 at 3. $10-$20. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

The Glass Menagerie Play presented in honor of Tennessee Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; centennial. Nov 25-Dec 18, Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat at 8, Wed at 7:30; Sun at 7, Dec 8 at 1, Dec 3,

17 and every Sun at 2. $34â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$55. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Light Sensitive Seasonal comedy by Jim Geoghan, directed by Everett Chambers. Nov 26-27, Dec 1-4 and 8-10. $15$20. Main Stage West, 104 North Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

To Kill a Mockingbird Ross Valley Players present classic play, directed by James Dunn. Through Dec 11, Thurs at 7:30, Fri and Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

White Christmas Based on the film of the same name. Dec 1-3 at 7:30 and Dec 2-4 at 3:30. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 800.838.3006.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Sebastopol Senior Center Talks and events. Free unless otherwise noted. Mon at 2:30, help for caregivers. Tues at 1, beginning conversational Spanish class. $6; at 1:30; at 2, intermediate conversation Spanish class, $6. Wed at 5, qigong, $6. Thurs at 11:15, yoga, $6. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Tech Talk Tuesdays Bring your IT problems and solutions to freewheeling open discussion with tech pros and those with tech woes, every Tues at 7. Free. Peetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coffee and Tea, 3678 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.254.7690.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;UNTITLEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Work by Mark Grotjahn and others is at University Art Gallery. See Galleries, p30.


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34

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 23

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “Basic research is what I am doing when I don’t know what I am doing,” said rocket scientist Werner von Braun. I think it’s an excellent time for you to plunge into that kind of basic research, Aries. You’re overdue to wander around frontiers you didn’t even realize you needed to investigate. You’re ready to soak up insights from outside the boundaries of your understanding. In fact, I think it’s your sacred duty to expose yourself to raw truths and unexpected vistas that have been beyond your imagination’s power to envision. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In Woody Allen’s film Midnight in Paris, the Ernest Hemingway character says, “All cowardice comes from not loving, or not loving well enough.” Given the state of your current astrological omens, Taurus, that is an excellent piece of advice. I suspect you are going to be asked to call on previously untapped reserves of courage in the coming weeks—not because you’ll have to face physical danger, but rather because you will have a chance to get to the bottom of mysteries that can only be explored if you have more courage than you’ve had up until now. And the single best way to summon the valor you’ll need is to love like a god or goddess loves.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “When I see your face, the stones start spinning!” wrote the poet Rumi, as translated by Coleman Barks. “Water turns pearly. Fire dies down and doesn’t destroy. In your presence, I don’t want what I thought I wanted.” I think you need to be in the presence of a face like that, Gemini. You’ve got to get your fixations scrambled by an arresting vision of soulful authenticity. You need your colors transposed and your fire and water reconfigured. Most of all, it’s crucial that you get nudged into transforming your ideas about what you really want. So go find that healingly disruptive prod, please. It’s not necessarily the face of a gorgeous icon. It could be the face of a whisperer in the darkness or of a humble hero who’s skilled in the art of surrender. Do you know where to look? CANCER (June 21–July 22)

“All my life I have longed to be loved by a woman who was melancholy, thin, and an actress,” wrote 19th-century French author Stendhal in his diary. “Now I have been, and I am not happy.” I myself had a similar experience—craving a particular type of women who, when she finally showed up in the flesh, disappointed me. But it turned out to be a liberating experience. Relieved of my delusory fantasy, I was able to draw more joy from what life was actually giving me. As you contemplate your own loss, Cancerian, I hope you will find the release and deliverance I did.

LEO (July 23–August 22)

If you traveled 300 million years back in time, you might freak out in abject fear as you encountered dragonflies as big as eagles and cockroaches the size of dogs. But since you’re quite safe from those monsters here in the present, there’s no need to worry yourself sick about them. Similarly, if you managed to locate a time machine and return to an earlier phase of your current life, you’d come upon certain events that upset you and derailed you way back then. And yet the odds are very high that you’re not going to find a time machine. So maybe you could agree to relinquish all the anxiety you’re still carrying from those experiences that can no longer upset and derail you. Now would be an excellent moment to do so.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) To prepare for her role in the film The Help, actress Jessica Chastain forced herself to gain 15 pounds. It was tough, because she normally follows a very healthy diet. The strategy that worked best was to ingest a lot of calorie-heavy, estrogen-rich ice cream made from soybeans. To be in alignment with current cosmic rhythms, it would make sense for you to fatten yourself up, too, Virgo— metaphorically speaking, that is. I think you’d benefit from having more ballast, more gravitas. You need to be sure you’re well-anchored and not easy to push around. It’s nearly time to take an unshakable stand for what you care about most.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In a famous Monty Python sketch, a Hungarian tourist goes into a British tobacconist’s store to buy cigarettes. Since he doesn’t speak English, he consults a phrase book to find

the right words. “My hovercraft is full of eels,” he tells the clerk, who’s not sure what he means. The tourist tries again: “Do you want to come back to my place, bouncy bouncy?” Again, the clerk is confused. In the coming week, Libra, I foresee you having to deal with communications that are equally askew. Be patient, please. Try your best to figure out the intentions and meanings behind the odd messages you’re presented with. Your translating skills are at a peak, fortunately, as are your abilities to understand what other people—even fuzzy thinkers—are saying.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) There are modern Chinese painters who use oil paints on canvas to create near-perfect replicas of famous European masterpieces. So while the genuine copy of van Gogh’s Starry Night is worth over $100 million, you can buy an excellent copy on the internet for less than $100. If you’re faced with a comparable choice in the coming week, whether to go with a pricey original or a cheaper but good facsimile, I suggest you take the latter. For your current purposes, you just need what works, not what gives you prestige or bragging rights.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “It is a tremendous act of violence to begin anything,” said Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke. “I am not able to begin. I simply skip what should be the beginning.” I urge you to consider trying that approach yourself, Sagittarius. Instead of worrying about how to launch your rebirth, maybe you should just dive into the middle of the new life you want for yourself. Avoid stewing interminably in the frustrating mysteries of the primal chaos so you can leap into the fun in full swing.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The Golden Gate Bridge spans the place where San Francisco Bay meets the Pacific Ocean. It wasn’t easy to build. The water below is deep, wind-swept, beset with swirling currents and on occasion shrouded with blinding fog. Recognizing its magnificence, the American Society of Civil Engineers calls the bridge one of the modern Wonders of the World. Strange to think, then, that the bridge was constructed between 1933 and 1937, during the height of the Great Depression. I suggest you make it your symbol of power for the coming weeks, Capricorn. Formulate a plan to begin working toward a triumph in the least successful part of your life. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) It’s an excellent time for you to get an entourage—or if you already have one, to expand it. For that matter, it’s a perfect moment for you to recruit more soldiers to help you carry out your plot to overthrow the status quo. Or to round up more allies for your plans to change the course of local history. Or to gather more accomplices as you seek to boldly go where you have never gone before. So beef up your support system. Boost the likelihood that your conspiracy will succeed. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

If you expand your concept of what you’re capable of, you will receive a specific offer to move up a notch. If you perform your duties with intensified care and grace, you will be given new responsibilities that catalyze your sleeping potential. The universe doesn’t always act with so much karmic precision, with such sleek, efficient fairness, but that’s how it’s working in your vicinity right now. Here’s one more example of how reasonable the fates are behaving: If you resolve to compete against no one but yourself, you will be shown new secrets about how to express your idiosyncratic genius.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


35

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