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ARCADIA FOOD & WINE ISSUE

Plated & Sated

Notable Newcomers, Noodles, Nuevo Mex


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Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writer Leilani Clark, ext. 106

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicholas Haig-Arack, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Katrina Fried, Stett Holbrook, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow.

Interns Emily Hunt, Justine McDaniel, Blake Montgomery

Design Director Kara Brown

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Designer Mark Schaumann

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Susan M. Sulc, ext. 206

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Ashley Potter, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Teresa Kabba by Sara Sanger. Design by Kara Brown.


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This photo was submitted by Melissa Wadlow of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘All of us, either well-off or with cardboard in our shoes, can find a piece of culinary paradise.’ ARCA DIA P21 Arcadia 2011 P21 Noodles, Noodles P22 Taqueria Twists P24 Vegan Delights P26 Hey, Bartender! P28 New & Notable P30 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Green Zone p11 Dining p12

Wineries p16 Swirl p19 Culture Crush p33 Film p34

Music p35 A&E p41 Classified p49 Astrology p51

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nb BEST IN TOWN ‘I’m feelin’ like some good food tonight,’ she said. ‘Really?’ he asked, ‘Well, how about some GREAT FOOD?’ Thus, the two drove to Bodega.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Not ‘News’

Loss of British tabloid no real loss BY TOM MARIANI

I

t is an insult to the word “news” to call the British rag that had its final run the News of the World. However, Americans should not be the first to throw stones. We have our fair share of Enquirers and Stars. Even taking a look in the back pages of the Bohemian shows where a part of its ad revenue comes from. I had a great aunt who never beat around the bush. She called a spade a spade—or as the Brits put it in the early 1900s, “Call a spade a bloody shovel.” She called papers like The News, Enquirer and Star what they are: scandal sheets. Scandal seems to increase paid circulation. As Hearst used to say about headlines, “If it bleeds, it leads. Some of America’s newspapers are also not qualified to use the word “news.” I worked my way through college in the late 1960s as a newspaper apprentice pressman for the partially merged San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner. Someone at the Examiner decided the paper could increase its smaller afternoon home delivery if it put on a moral crusade against the popular topless bars in North Beach. It made a big deal about taking a stand for children coming home from school by refusing to run ads for topless nightclubs and XXX movies in its afternoon paper. But the Examiner didn’t mention in its series of page-one stories that through its joint-operating agreement, it would continue to share the revenue the Chronicle was bringing in by carrying these same ads. The most popular guy in the “newsroom” was the guy assigned to airbrush the photos of the topless performers to make the images fit to print in the entertainment section. He had lots of visitors from other parts of the newsroom to check out the unretouched photos he’d hung all around his workstation. So I know what motivates readers. The loss of The News of the World is no big deal. There are other scandal sheets out there eager to continue to use the “bloody shovel” and take your money. Rupert Murdoch is not dumb. He can’t claim he wasn’t looking at his high circulation. Sorry to say, there are few real newspapers. Tom Mariani is a retired banker, published poet and short story writer who lives in Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Kickstart My Heart

What timing to see a copy of the Bohemian in a cafe with the cover story on scooters (“What a Scoot,” July 20) while my sister and I were scooting through town on our twoweek Vespa tour from Seattle to San Diego! We are on day six of this journey, and the article was spot-on. We have enjoyed every minute of the beautiful scenery on all the backroads in Washington, Oregon and California. The freedom of open air, the smells in the air and the sound of “the wasp” have made this adventure something I will never forget. Dork? No way! If you want to check out photos and stories about our journey, visit our blog, SchnitzelWithNoodles.com. Cheers to scooters everywhere!

ANNA LOEWIN & GINA FREIZE Traveling

A Reckless Ride I enjoyed Leilani Clark’s piece on scooters, but I’m wondering why she seemed to completely neglect the most important part of the article—rider responsibility and safety practices that are required for operating any motorcycle or scooter. There was nothing in the piece that talked about the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s reasonably-priced classes for M1 license seekers or that there’s a far higher rate of accidents for new, untrained riders, emphasizing the need for beginning riders to buy and wear proper protective gear and to ride defensively. The total lack of helmets or other protective gear as depicted in your otherwise excellent cover illustration does a major disservice to all people interested in scooters or other twowheeled motorized transport.

Riding is fun, but it is not carefree. In even a low-speed accident, the riders on your cover could be hospitalized with serious road rash and possibly irreversible head injury. I see few scooter riders wearing even the basics, like gloves. Perhaps an addendum or a followup article can help your readers make an informed decision about using scooters—fun, inexpensive transportation for getting around town, but with all the personal responsibility and safety discipline that comes with a larger motorcycle.

DOUG BROUSSARD San Jose Hi Doug, thanks for writing. If you read the article again, you’ll find that Leilani did in fact mention the need to take a safety training course.—Ed.

Why Risk It? When we drive by large electric lines, it sometimes interferes with our car radio reception. The pulsed radiation transmissions (approximately 22,500 per day) from wireless smart meters dominate by thousands of times the tiny bioelectrical signals sent from the brain to all the systems, organs and cells in our body. These bioelectric signals are responsible for recovery in adults when we sleep (recharging us for the next day). The bioelectric signals are also responsible for growth, proper development and healthy survival in infants and children. Now that the National Institute of Health has confirmed biological effects from smart meter–type radiation and the World Health Organization put the non-ionizing radiation on its possible carcinogen list, why would anyone even consider risking putting such a device in their home, especially if they have children?

ROBERT WILLIAMS Online


THIS MODERN WORLD

Dept. of Tooting Our Own Horn Well, color us thrilled! At the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies conference in New Orleans last Friday, the Bohemian was honored with two national awards. One second-place award for Alastair Bland in Best Food Writing makes us very proud indeed, and another second-place award for Gabe Meline’s City Sound Inertia as Best Music Blog, second only to the almighty Village Voice, has our heads veritably spinning. With 11 AAN awards in the last eight years, we just can’t stop awshucksin’ and well-gollyin’.

THE ED. Off to Find Some More Frames

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Tour de France: Congrats to Santa Rosa’s own Gavin Chilcott, BMC team founder!

2

Tears Dry on Their Own: Amy Winehouse, gone far too soon at 27

3

SF Giants meet Obama, Brian Wilson gives him iciest stare in history

4

’Tis the season for the parking lot at Train Town to be completely overflowing

5 Don’t forget those cheap, cool, snack-bar-equipped, city-owned pools, folks

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Rants

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Alastair Bland

Paper POSTED With no contact from his neighbors, all Will Bucklin can do now is post a sign requesting no more spraying.

Big Sprayback How the state sprayed herbicide on 130-year-old vines and caused a small farmer to lose organic status—and hasn’t so much as apologized BY ALASTAIR BLAND

F

armer Will Bucklin does not apply chemicals to his land. The Glen Ellen grape grower has farmed organically for 30 years and, as a farmer inspected every year by California Certified Organic Farmers, he has the papers to prove it.

But in the fall of 2009, someone sprayed a highly potent herbicide on approximately 200 of his grapevines. A handful of those vines are now dead, a dozen or more appear to be dying and at least a hundred damaged plants haven’t borne fruit since the incident. Moreover, Bucklin is no longer an organic farmer. This year, as a result of the spraying, he had to forfeit his organic status.

Just who caused the damage to Bucklin’s grapevines seems clear. According to a report filed by an investigator with the Sonoma County Agricultural Commissioner, the spraying was conducted by Bucklin’s neighbors at the Sonoma Developmental Center on Arnold Drive, a stateowned hospital for the mentally disabled, during a routine herbicide application of ) 10 roadside shrubbery in

On July 20, the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California reached a settlement with the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department and the county of Sonoma that may begin the process of repairing the relationship between law enforcement and the immigrant community. The settlement lays out a three-part plan of action. First, the sheriff’s office will not participate in joint field operations with U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) unless the federal investigative agency refrains from taking individuals into custody solely on the basis of suspected illegal immigration. Second, the sheriff will not volunteer information to ICE if a person is in custody for traffic infractions or driving without a license. Third, signs will be posted in the jail informing people in English and Spanish of their rights under federal law. “The first step,” said Al Pfeiffer, the attorney who litigated the case, “will be to rebuild trust.”

Message Music Nueva trova rose from the Cuban revolution in the 1960s, and the new music was political and progressive; trova practitioners took on themes of class, racism, sexism and social justice, proving that political fire can add burning energy to a song. On July 29, the North Bay Organizing Project celebrates the connection between culture and activism with Organizing Is Culture, an evening of music, wine and potluck (bring your own plates and utensils, por favor) featuring the nueva trova of CantaFlor from Santa Rosa. Also on the bill is Sang Matiz, a Latin fusion band from San Francisco. Between acts, leaders of the NBOP present. Party (and get informed) on Friday, July 29, at Bayer Farm. 1550 West Ave., Santa Rosa. 5pm. Free.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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THE

Three Steps Forward


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Herbicide ( 9

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

November 2009. Now, 21 months later, after a thorough county investigation finding the state accountable for the damage, the veteran farmer is still waiting for some level of recognition, apology or legal action. “Ideally, a state official would voluntarily call, come and visit, and talk, rather than put the burden on the farmer to prove something happened,” says Bucklin, who was reluctant to contact the press about the alleged poisoning of his property. “I don’t want to be the jerk neighbor,” he explains, adding that he holds the hospital—founded in 1891 and home now to almost 600 residents—in the highest regard for its community work. But Bucklin has lost patience, in part because a monetary claim to the state’s Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board last October has produced not a dime to date. The spraying occurred on Nov. 9, 2009, according to the Agricultural Commissioner’s report filed by senior agricultural biologist Marilyn Vernon. On that day, the report says, the Sonoma Developmental Center’s groundskeeper, Robert Balich, doused the shoulder of John Mesa Drive with a blend of several herbicides, including Roundup Pro and a particularly nasty poison called Milestone VM. Balich told Vernon that he “kept the nozzle of the application hose directed toward the ground,” according to Vernon’s report. Yet herbicidal fallout somehow drifted 15 vine rows and 132 feet into Bucklin’s property, where a grapevine that Bucklin has flagged with a strip of tape exhibits the stunted, wrinkled, cup-shaped leaves typical of Milestone VM poisoning. Closer to the road, flagged vines are numerous and their symptoms severe. Bucklin has written off several as already dead and others as dying— including, he says, vines 130 years old. According to Vernon’s report,

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Balich violated several state laws when he sprayed the boundary of Bucklin’s land. One law, section 6614 of the California Code of Regulations, says “no pesticide application shall be made or continued when . . . [t]here is reasonable possibility of contamination of nontarget public or private property.” Vernon also noted that the applicator of the herbicide failed to follow advisories printed on containers of Milestone VM, which at the time warned users not to apply the agent “within 50 feet of a border” or “within the root zone of desirable trees.” But a barren, five-foot-wide dead zone abutting Bucklin’s fence clearly shows that the herbicide was applied directly on a border and on the exposed tree roots of several oaks and eucalyptus, whose foliage shows symptoms of poisoning. Several old, dead trees on the state’s property also appear to have been poisoned. Officials with the Sonoma Developmental Center, seemingly uninterested in addressing or alleviating tensions with their neighbor, did not return repeated phone calls seeking comment for this article. Lisa Correia, Sonoma County’s chief deputy agricultural commissioner, says state law requires following label warnings printed on containers of registered pesticides, and her department, she says, may proceed with “enforcement action” against the hospital. The state’s compensation board recently sent Bucklin a letter informing him that claims must be filed within six months of incurred damage. Since Bucklin submitted his claim a full year after the damage, he might receive nothing. But he says he’s not so worried about his money. He isn’t even sure he’ll re-register for organic status. What saddens him most, he says, is the loss of the historic trees. “Losing the vines, well, they’re money and it sucks,” he says. “But the trees are the worst part. I’m just mad at myself for not saying something to the state 10 years ago—like, ‘Stop spraying.’”


Green Zone

Quarryhill protects biodiversity BY JULIANE POIRIER

C

an a modest grove of saplings in Glen Ellen turn the tide of biodiversity loss in China? The answer may be yes for the Chinese maple Acer pentaphyllum, of which there are about 50 left in China. But Quarryhill Botanical Gardens has 50 of its own. And while Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bulldozers rev up for more Western-style development, Quarryhill has just planted 200 more Acer pentaphyllum maples in hopes of conserving this disappearing species. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This conservation project is needed urgently,â&#x20AC;? says Quarryhillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development director Christine Walker, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because the species may not survive our lifetime.â&#x20AC;? I ask Walker how much it cost to put in the grove as she parks a golf cart beside the hillside, where each knee-high tree is protected by a wire cage and watered by a drip feed from a newly installed tank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forty thousand dollars,â&#x20AC;? says Walker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paid for by donors. The once-private Quarryhill, now a public garden, is better

Quarryhill is open daily to visitors. 12841 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen; 707.996.3166. www.quarryhillbg.org.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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known internationally than locally for its global role in Asian ďŹ&#x201A;ora conservation. With guidance from Kew Gardens and Howick Hall Gardens, Quarryhill made its ďŹ rst scientiďŹ c seed-collecting expedition to Japan in 1987 and has since has been bringing seeds, mostly from Asia, to cultivate here. Critics fear these exotic species might escape the garden boundaries and spread, but, explains Walker, â&#x20AC;&#x153;these plants canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t escape. They require summer water and could not survive outside an irrigated environment.â&#x20AC;? (Quarryhill irrigates from two wells and pond-held rainwater.) Every tree, shrub and ďŹ&#x201A;ower in the 25 cultivated acres of Quarryhillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 62-acre site has come from seeds collected in the wild and scientiďŹ cally documented in the botanical collection. Quarryhill functions as a safe house for Asian species, including medicinal plants, which have been disappearing via habitat loss and poaching. Not only a major North American plant collection and open-air classroom for fourthand ďŹ fth-graders, Quarryhill has a staff to educate visitors who, puzzled by the new rose garden in an otherwise Asian landscape, learn that roses did not spring up at Queen Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s command, but rather were smuggled into Europe to indulge Napoleonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Josephine. All English tea roses, it turns out, can be traced to four stud roses in China. On our way back from the maple grove, Walker points out a specimen of the tree used to make paper in China, a hundred years before the rest of the world. Whatever other secrets may await discovery in Asian plantsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; perhaps especially for medical advancesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Quarryhill will keep its collection viable and look forward to repatriating those Chinese maples now getting their start in Glen Ellen.

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Abyssinia Ethiopian/

Owens marries the very best Sonoma ingredients with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Cafe Zazzle Eclectic cafe. $-$$. Colorful, tasty food cooked Mexican-, Japanese-, Thai- and Italian-style. Lunch and dinner daily. 121 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.1700.

Barndiva California cuisine.

De Schmire Hearty

$$-$$$. Delicious food with outdoor seating great for balmy summer nights. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 231 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.0100.

Bluewater Bistro California cuisine. $$-$$$. Homey and rich seafood with warm service. Terrific specialoccasion spot. Dinner, ThursSat; lunch daily; breakfast, SatSun. 21301 Heron Dr, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3513.

Borolo’s Original Pizza Pizza $. Classic, California and European pizza combos beyond the ordinary. Borolo’s uses organic mozzarella, locally sourced produce and milled flour. Salads are made to order, with homemade dressings, and the pizza is baked in a stone oven. Takeout and delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Mission Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.539.3937.

Bruno’s on Fourth

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

Dry Creek Kitchen

Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

California cuisine. $$$-$$$$. Fresh wine country cuisine from chef Charlie Palmer. Lunch and dinner, ThursTues. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

East West Cafe California cuisine. $$. Comfortable, casual, all vegetarian-friendly. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 557 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2822.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Cafe Cape Fear Cafe. $$.

Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Cafe La Haye CaliforniaFrench. $$-$$$. Chef Norman

Hallie’s Diner American and more. $-$$. Classic diner food with a gourmet touch, plus Latin American items and homemade pizzas. Great for breakfast. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 125 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.773.1143.

continental. $$-$$$. Informal, with emphasis on seafood. Generous portions, open kitchen, outside dining. Dinner daily. 304 Bodega Ave, Petaluma. 70.762.1901.

American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; brunch, Sun. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222. Comforting atmosphere and Southern-kissed California flavors. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 25191 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.9246.

creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

The Girl & the Fig

Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on

JhanThong BanBua

Khoom Lanna Thai. $$. Outstanding Thai dishes and seasonal specialties with an authentic cooking style. Fresh ingredients, serene dining room, convenient Railroad Square location. Lunch and dinner daily. 107 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8424.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Lynn’s Thai Thai. $$. A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in


the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

Mai Vietnamese Cuisine

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

Pamposh Indian. $-$$. Clean, fresh, exciting traditional Indian food. Chicken tikka masala is indescribably good. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 52 Mission Circle, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.538.3367. Ravenous Bistro. $$. Eclectic menu. Try the smoked salmon and caviar appetizer, the house-made soups, and the vegetarian specials. Outdoor seating is like a comfy backyard. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 420 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1302. Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch, SunFri; dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.933.3191.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly

Best Chinese Restaurant

Holy Cow! Every downtown needs a coffeehouse, especially in a purportedly countercultural green town like Sebastopol. While the city does have a few worthy java joints like Hardcore Espresso, Coffee Catz, My Friend Joe and Ninja Star, there hasn’t been a proper cafe in the downtown core. But now there’s Holy Cow on South Main Street, a light and bright cafe with great coffee, whole leaf tea and locally made pastries. Holy Cow opened about a month ago, serving pastries from Sebastopol’s Village Bakery and Petaluma’s Bovine Bakery. Keeping with Sebastopol’s green theme, the milk and cream are organic and all cups are compostable. Like the coffee, the free wi-fi connection is fresh and strong, too. Co-owners Michael Welch and Penny Winett say they opened the cafe to give locals and visitors alike a place to slow down and hang out. “Our idea was to make this a community gathering place,” says Welch. In time, don’t be surprised to see a “happy hour” featuring local wines and small bites of food. A beer and wine license is still in the works. Holy Cow hosts an official grand opening—featuring a representative of Temple Coffee (the cafe’s primary coffee purveyor) and a “shoot out” between different styles of roasted coffee—on Saturday, Aug. 6. 130 S. Main St., Sebastopol. Noon–4pm. 707.861.9050.—Stett Holbrook

soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Shangri-La Nepalese. $-$$. Authentic and enriching Nepalese cuisine. As its name suggests, a culinary paradise. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1708 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.793.0300.

Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri.

Best Chinese in Marin

Homestyle Chinese Cooking

Novato • 415-892-8838 Vintage Oak Shopping Center

Petaluma • 707-762-6888 Theater Square, C Street & 2nd W W W. J E N N I E L O W. C O M

521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Thai Taste Restaurant Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner daily. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. ) 707.588.0893.

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Vietnamese. $. Fresh and authentic, with a warm and breezy atmosphere. Lunch and dinner daily. 8494 Gravenstein Hwy (in Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.665.9628.

SMALL BITES


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ew for Summer

Dining ( 13 Tres Hombres Mexican.

Special Occasion Cakes & Desserts Custom Gift Baskets Fresh Fruit Pies & Tarts & Champagne Cakes Wedding Cakes

$-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Truc Linh Vietnamese. $. Your basic Vietnamse fare, prepared to perfection. Great for light meals. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 810 McClelland Dr, Windsor. 707.838.6746.

Water Street Bistro Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious 7225 HEALDSBURG AVE SEBASTOPOL • 707.829.8101 1445 TOWN & COUNTRY DR SANTA ROSA • 707.527.7654 1353 LINCOLN AVE CALISTOGA • 707.942.1443

preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, WedSun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner

daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Cafe Gratitude Vegan. $$$. Mecca for vegans and raw foodists. Clean, light, refreshing food. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 2200 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.824.4652. Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

N A PA CO U N T Y

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations.


6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Alexis Baking Co

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, MonSat. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Bounty Hunter Wine

Fujiya Japanese. $$-$$$.

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Good, solid sushi. The Fujiya Deluxe combo is a standout. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 921 Factory Stores Dr, Napa. 707.257.0639.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Go Fish Seafood/sushi. $$$$$. An über-trio of chefs all in one fantastic fresh fish house: Cindy Pawlcyn, Victor Scargle and Ken Tominaga. Need we say more? Open for lunch and

dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

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Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly

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Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633. Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

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Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment.

SONOMA CO U N TY Atascadero Creek Winery Produces mostly red wines and specializes in small lots of single-vineyard Pinot and Zin. At West County Wine Collective in Pizzavino707, 6948 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Friday– Sunday, noon-6pm, $12 fee. 707.829.9500.

Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 888.404.9463.

D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

DaVero Sonoma Get

now available on draft at Oliver’s Market Marke et hand crafted in small batches with organic/fair trade ingr ingredients redients

lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000.

Enkidu Wines Savage,

deliciously refreshing kombucha soda

sustainably created, brewed, fermented, bottled in Sonoma County

revivedrinks.com

facebook.com/revive facebook.com/revivedrinks edrinks

dark Rhône-style wines and floral, seductive rosé star in this Sonoma winery named for a supporting actor in the epic of Gilgamesh. Enkidu, a hairy wild man who drank from watering holes with the animals, was domesticated by love and introduced to the pleasures of wine. Get

introduced to toothsome Syrah and other pleasures at this comfortable tasting room located in genteel Kenwood. 8910 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open 11am–6pm, Tuesday–Sunday. Tasting fee $10. 707.939.3930.

reorganized their operation, and Hook & Ladder is a favorite. Here’s a place where they’ll proudly serve up estategrown white Zinfandel. 2134 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daiy, 10am–4:30pm. 707.526.2255.

Eric Kent Wine Cellars

Inman Family Wines

Nevermind the art of wine, there’s art on the wine. Limited release Chard, Pinot, Syrah from ad man turned cellar geek. 1014 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa. Barrel tasting, by appointment only. 707.527.9700.

Unique, single-vineyard Russian River Pinot Noir is a good reason to visit Inman Family Wine’s new winery and tasting room in genteel vineyard location; don’t miss the Thorn Road Ranch Pinot. 3900 Piner Road, Santa Rosa. Open 11am–4pm Thursday through Sunday. 707.293.9576.

Freestone Vineyards The casual, airy space is furnished in a whitewashed country French theme. Sit down at long tables for tasting, or have a picnic. Fogdog Pinot and Ovation Chardonnay will have you applauding. 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. Open Friday– Monday, 10am–4pm. 707.874.1010.

Korbel Champagne Cellars A large, ivy-covered winery with a huge tasting room, fun staff, excellent deli and hourly tours, a perfect stop on the way to the Russian River. 13250 River Road, near Rio Nido. Open daily, 10am– 5pm daily. 707.824.7316.

Gourmet au Bay Seafood takes to wine even better than water. Wine bar and retail shop offers flights served on custom wooden “surfboards,” artisan cheese and cracker plate, and liberal bring-your-own picnic policy. Cold crab cakes and sparkling wine at sunset on the bay? Sounds like a date. 913 Hwy. 1, Bodega. Wine surfing, $8. 707.875.9875.

Kunde Estate Winery

Gundlach Bundschu Winery (WC) A fun, casual

Lambert Bridge Winery On gloomy

winery with enjoyable wines. Shakespeare and Mozart performed on the grounds in the summer. 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.938.5277.

Homewood Homewood offers tasting in a small, somewhat disheveled indoor office or an outdoor deck. Indoors is where the tasty black olive and bread samples are, and the folks are lowpressure and friendly. Free tasting, anything you like. 23120 Burndale Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.996.6935.

Hook & Ladder Having sold the brand to a Burgundian clan, the De Loach family

(WC) Kunde is one of 12 wineries in Sonoma County to be distinguished with Second Level Green Business Certification. It also has beautiful wine caves carved into 5million-year-old volcanic rock. 9825 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Tasting room open daily, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.833.5501.

afternoons, a string of lights and a curl of smoke from the stone chimney make this Dry Creek landmark all the more inviting. Chandelierilluminated redwood cellar is a warm setting to sample meticulously crafted Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Zin and claret. 4085 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.431.9600.

Mill Creek While the historically inspired building is just spinning a decorative wheel, quaint is just a footnote to quality. All the wines are above average. 1401 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.431.2121.


Novy Family Winery Daily tastings by appointment in a no-nonsense warehouse, and is better known as a celebrated member of the “Pinot posse” by its other moniker, Siduri. 980 Airway Court, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. 707.578.3882.

Old World Winery

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

Sebastiani The winery

Pey-Marin Vineyards

is charming and warm, with wines that are mostly straightforward, honest affairs. One of the best picnic areas around. 389 Fourth St. E., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.933.3230.

A Marin wine adventure where cow country meets conifer forest, at the historic, hospitable Olema Inn. Discover razor-lean “Shell Mound” Marin County Riesling, opaquely purple, yet eminently food-friendly “Punchdown” Syrah, and more. 10000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Olema. Open daily from noon to 4pm. $12 fee. 415.663.9559.

Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, familyowned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Simi Winery Pioneered

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis

Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

Ravenswood Winery The winery motto is “No wimpy wines,” and they make strong, much-praised Zinfandels. A great place to learn that wine is supposed to be fun. 18701 Gehricke Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.933.2332.

Robert Hunter Winery Surprise–fine méthode champenoise sparkling wine hails from the warm “banana belt” of Sonoma Valley. Colorful history of estate once owned by a sugar heiress, and tour of gardens leads to sit-down tasting in far-from-the-crowds setting where visitors with a yen for the intimate rather than glitz find a hidden gem on the wine road less traveled. 15655 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Tours by appointment only, $25. 707.996.3056.

MARIN CO U N TY

Sapphire Hill Sharing a property with such as Camilla Cellars and other boutique wineries on a compound they simply call “Front Street 5,” production is mainly reds, with the exception of an estate Chardonnay. 51 Front St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.431.1888.

female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213.

Valley of the Moon Winery This winery was once owned by Sen. George Hearst. Perhaps instead of the epochal utterance “Rosebud,” we could dub in “Rosé.” 777 Madrone Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.996.6941.

Westwood Winery Wonky wine scientist crafts soil-driven wines of beguiling complexity from the promising Annadel Estate vineyard, on the western frontier of Sonoma Valley. Tucked away in historic downtown Sonoma, the handsomely furnished tasting salon is a casual setting for a serious sit-down tasting of food-friendly Pinot Noir and some of the most savory Rhône west of the Rhône. 11 E. Napa St., #3, Sonoma. Hours by appointment; tasting fee $10. 707.935.3246.

Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesday– Sunday, 1–7pm. 415.457.5157. Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday–Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. ) 707.942.5854.

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Nicholson Ranch (WC) Best known for its Chardonnays and a winery tour from the depths of the caves to the height of the property’s grandmother oak. 4200 Napa Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm; tours by appointment. 707.938.8822.


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Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am– 6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Castello di Amorosa Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste

sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Eagle & Rose Estate (WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784. Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in “beefy” wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. New tasting room will be by Frank Gehry. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5:30pm. 866.667.HALL. Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

PlumpJack Winery Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with scrumptious food pairings.

Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Storybook Mountain Vineyards (WC) Jerry and Sigrid Seps and a few likeminded winemakers founded Zinfandel Advocates and Producers (ZAP), through which they continue to proselytize on behalf of “America’s heritage grape.” 3835 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.5310.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals Albariño and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–7pm; Friday– Saturday, 11am–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600. Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.


8ZLUO

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Whitetail Wine Bar

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he problem was, the economy of the Russian River area tends to wash out new businesses with a regularity as unforgiving as the roiling river waters that sweep the beach camps of summer out to sea. When Leslie Bahr walked the main street of her new hometown, there was no trace of a “wine lounge” that the Bohemian reviewed only a few years back.

Old haunts remain, but Bahr, a San Francisco interior architect before decamping for the woods of Guerneville in an Airstream trailer, was looking for the kind of place where she’d want to hang out—with fine wines, but a casual vibe. At the pre-opening party, enthusiasm for Bahr’s vision was high. “Someone should have done this for years!” one local was overheard to exclaim. “I mean, I’m sorry, but this is wine country! But you go to a bar, and it’s, ‘We’ve got red, we’ve got white.’” It takes many 12-hour days before even a “rustic minimalist” joint can open its doors, says Bahr, relaxing for a minute on a recent evening. The work has been involved: the ceiling was removed to expose an airy, barnlike space above the zinc bar, custom-designed tables have been topped with cross-sections of a fallen log, and sofas and divans invite lounging. The wine list is long on local underdogs like Hobo, Sheldon, Wild Hog, Frick, Horse and Plow and others that are, in the main, not turnkey boutiques but small wineries whose owners put their shoulder to the barrel. A Greystack Cellars 2010 Bennett Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($3.50 to taste; $7 glass; $35 bottle) has floral aromas of tall grass gone to seed, with lychee, honeydew melon flavors. It’s crisp with subtle richness, like some mousse of sour grass, refreshing and engaging. Paul Mathew Vineyard’s 2010 Valdiguié (née Napa Gamay) is an easy-drinking red, with an exotic admixture of incense and maple syrup to this Beaujolaisstyle quaffer. Microbrews will be on offer soon, along with small bites like cheese plates. About the name? There’s no long, must-hear story, so it may as well be told here. A former city dweller, Bahr is charmed by the white-tailed deer that run through her West County property. The antlers also lend the chic space a bit of requisite rural flavor, but the deer-horn candelabras were fashioned from naturally shed antlers, the sign made by a resin artist. In other words, no Bambis were harmed in the making of this wine bar. Whitetail Wine Bar, 16230 Main St., Guerneville. Open 3pm to 10pm weekdays, till 11pm, Friday and Saturday, and till 9 on Sunday. Closed Tuesdays. 707.604.7449.—James Knight

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all it trickle-down cuisine, if you will. Just as Hollywood’s celebrity culture tends to infuse every aspect of life in Los Angeles, and as the arts in New York find their way from the largest museums to the smallest streets, so the nationally renowned quality of culinary delights here in wine country trickles down to everyday little places and pieces of life in the North Bay. Not everyone, we know—as we eat packed lunches from home at our desks—can indulge in our world-class, Michelin-rated restaurants. But just about anyone can afford a bowl of noodles, and you know what? Those noodles are made better simply by being in good company, as you’ll find with Leilani Clark’s noodle roundup. Likewise, Stett Holbrook shows that our Mexican food has gotten more creative, with fresh, local ingredients born from our farm-to-table emphasis. Fine vegan dining was once a veritable oxymoron, but Emily Hunt finds we’ve got a groundswell of better options. We’ve even refined the art of batender banter, ever the blue-collar staple that David Templeton explores as a finely honed skill. And Justine McDaniel lets us in on new restaurants blazing the way. It’s all about availability, which is why this year’s Arcadia issue, devoted to the North Bay’s food and wine, has gone all-access. Of course, few of us can be as alluring as model Teresa Kabba, who adorns these pages beautifully, or as talented as photographer Sara Sanger. But all of us, either well-off or with cardboard in our shoes, can find a piece of accessible culinary paradise here in the North Bay—and we’re glad to be your guide. —Gabe Meline

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Noodles, Long & Lovely In which the perfect dish receives overdue attention By Leilani Clark

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epression, hangovers and a stout hunger are all easily defeated by one of the world’s greatest comfort foods—a pile of starchy, broth-drenched noodles. In fact, noodles are so essential to the improvement of the human condition that the staff of Lucky Peach—a new food writing journal published by McSweeney’s and edited by David Chang, chef of the hipper-than-thou Momofuku restaurants in Manhattan— themed their entire inaugural issue around ramen. While the North Bay may not be the most ramen-centric place on earth (unless you count the Santa Rosa Junior College area neighborhood), we do have a decent and growing selection of places dedicated to the almighty noodle in a big bowl of brothy yum.

Saigon Village Though rife with Thai and Chinese places, Marin is a bit of a dry spot for the dedicated noodle haven, so thank goodness for this authentic noodle house in downtown San Rafael. A bowl of combo beef pho scented with star anise, scallion and hefty servings of basil and bean sprouts over slurpworthy rice noodles ($7.55) will cure the most stalwart of ills, especially if followed by a creamy, strong Thai iced coffee ($3). 720 B St., San Rafael. 415.453.3505.

there’s nothing shady about his little hidden gem. The egg rolls in a bowl of rice vermicelli noodles with prawns ($7.75) are crisp and savory, though the shrimp are slightly oversalted. The barbecue beef and prawns over rice noodles ($7.75) contain thin slices of smoky grilled and marinated beef that nicely contrast with the generous helping of cabbage, carrots and radishes. Wash it all down with a chilled club soda and lemonade ($2.95) served in a dainty soda fountain glass. 1310 Petaluma Hill Road, Santa Rosa. 707.528.1548.

Noodle Bowl The $3.95 banh mi from this strip-mall treasure has been getting all the buzz, but don’t forget that this Cambodian restaurant also serves a wide variety of noodles (as if the name didn’t give it away). The curry tofu over vermicelli ($8.75 medium) is tasty and filled with plenty of celery, carrots and onions to carry the flavor. The spice could be kicked up a notch, but that’s as easy as putting in a request with the cook. On a recent visit, the grilled shrimp with vermicelli ($8.50 medium) left much to be desired; the shrimp was dry and the noodles overpowered the sparse vegetables included with the dish. The popular chicken noodle soup ($7.50) recommended by the waiter would be a better choice. 817 Russell Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.843.5256.

Lee’s Noodle House Tucked away in a strip mall between a shuttered photography studio and a liquor store, Lee’s is bare-bones but booming on a Wednesday afternoon at lunchtime. Soothing, tinkling Asian tunes play quietly over the stereo as friendly servers bring around trays of spring rolls, chow mein and, of course, noodles. A southern noodle soup with rice noodles, prawns, and pork ($5.95 small) contains thin slices of meat in a rich, flavorful broth. The basil leaves and bean sprouts are fresh and crunchy, and the scallions and hot green chiles add just the right amount of tang and spice. Even on a hot day, this dish puts a spring in the step. 1010 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.523.2358.

Noodle Palace Don’t let the run-down building, security-barred windows and hand-painted sign fool you:

Shimo The latest restaurant from Cyrus owner Douglas Keane, Shimo is probably the closest thing to Momofuku in Sonoma County. Here, the prince meets the pauper as $55 steaks sidle up to $7.95

noodle bowls. The noodle bar offers a basic bowl of ramen or soba noodles and choice of shoyo, miso, ginger shiso dashi or vegetarian broth. Add anything from pork belly chashu ($4.50) to slow cooked egg ($3) to build the noodles into what you like best. 241 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.6000. Simply Vietnam Mention Simply Vietnam and inevitably someone will say, “Oh, blah blah, Pho Vietnam is way better”—and vice versa. But heated debate aside, the fact is that Simply Vietnam serves consistently fresh, cheap noodle bowls and provides an excellent atmosphere for a recession-era date night. A combination beef noodle soup topped with white onions, scallions, cilantro, bean sprouts, basil leaves and slices of jalapeno and lime ($6.95–$8.50) is the perfect power food for a moonlit bike ride around town. 966 N. Dutton Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910. Pho Vietnam An expanded dining area means this Sonoma County favorite is almost always packed to the gills with locals slurping up noodles by the dozen. Calling itself a “beef noodle soup restaurant,” Pho Vietnam lets noodles dominate the menu in a way that would make even the most wily noodle master blush with pleasure. Try the salty, pungent egg noodle soup laden with prawn, crab, squid and fish cake ($5.95– $8.50), or get traditional and dig into the beef pho flavored with steak, brisket, tendon and tripe ($5.50–$7.50). 711 Stony Point Road #8, Santa Rosa. 707.571.7687.

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Nuevo Mexicano Taqueria twists and regional rejuvenation By Stett Holbrook

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et’s be honest. Mexican food can be onedimensional. Taqueria standards from the careful-the-plates-are-hot, slushy-margarita school of Mexican-American food—chimichangas, overcheesed enchiladas, fajitas, sour-cream-laden nachos and burritos the girth of a small child—abound. But this state of affairs presents a culinary riddle: Given the North Bay’s large Latino population, where are the authentically regional restaurants? Furthermore, given the popularity of Mexican food, great culinary talent and superb local ingredients, where are the restaurants taking Mexican food in new and creative directions? The good news is there are a handful of distinctive Mexican restaurants that think outside the burrito. Healdsburg chef Mateo Granados (www.mateogranados. com) is one on a short list of North Bay chefs who offer distinctive Mexican food. By distinctive, I mean specializing in regional Mexican food—with ingredients and flavors unique to its area in Mexico—or those with an innovative approach to Mexican food. As a native of Campeche in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, Granados grew up eating one of the world’s most complex cuisines. Yucatecan food is rooted in Mayan culture, but because the region in southeastern Mexico juts like a thumb into the Caribbean Sea, it’s a culinary crossroads that bears influences from Spain, France and even faraway Lebanon. Back home, Granados remembers that if you wanted pork, you walked down the street to fetch a live pig and butchered it. “Black beans? Black beans we feed the pigs, and then we eat the pigs,” Granados says. “That’s how we lived. We lived well.” In true Yucatan style, Granados has immersed himself in a number of culinary traditions since coming to the States, working at acclaimed restaurants such as 42 Degrees, Masa’s, Manka’s Inverness Lodge and Charlie Palmer’s Dry Creek Kitchen. Today, he runs a popular catering company and is a regular vendor at the Healdsburg and Sebastopol farmers markets. Fans of his are eagerly awaiting the opening of his new restaurant, Mateo’s Cocina Latina, coming to Healdsburg in late August.

Granados’ repertoire ranges from traditional banana-leaf-wrapped tamales to lamb headcheese tacos and duck-eggtopped salt cod hash. “I’m really dedicated to evolving Latino food,” says Granados. At a recent event, he served a tostada made with baby Oregon shrimp and locally sourced cucumbers and celery finished with lime juice and a dash or two of habanero sauce made from chiles that he grows himself. It was fresh, delicious and worlds away from the typical North Bay Mexican joint. At Napa’s C Casa (610 First St., Napa; 707.226.7700), you can taste the evolution

of the humble taco. Located in the buzzing Oxbow Public Market, the restaurant makes tortillas while you watch and tops them with standards like the excellent pineapplestudded al pastor and chicken—but also with creative combinations like skirt steak and blue cheese, spiced lamb and goat cheese, and white beans, spinach, avocado and cotija cheese. On my visit, they even had a roasted duck with oranges and baby spinach. In addition to eclectic toppings and combinations, what sets the restaurant apart are the quality ingredients and commitment


to more sustainable produce and meats. The beef is grass-fed. Much of the produce comes from local sources. The fish comes from sustainable sources. The tacos cost more than your typical taco truck ($4–$7.25 each), but the fresh, responsibly sourced ingredients are worth it. Santa Rosa’s Sebastopol Road is arguably Sonoma County’s best stretch of Mexican eats. The strip between Dutton and Wright roads in the Roseland neighborhood has got it all: sit-down places, markets, taco trucks, mobile fruit vendors and even a revolving cast of street stalls. La Texanita (1667 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa; 707.527.7331), an outpost of Michoacan cuisine, was cool before Guy Fieri and crew set up shop to shoot an episode of Diners, Drive-ins and Dives—and it still is. The hard-tomiss yellow building is a solid choice for its tacos made with fresh tortillas, but the deeply flavored, wonderful pork pozole rojo and huaraches—crisp, oblong masa-cakes topped with meat, lettuce and avocado—are my favorites. Best of all is the unassuming dish of beans served on the side. Unlike the pinto beans that dominate most North and Central-Mexican restaurants, La Texanita serves peruano beans, a delicious, creamy white bean. However, pass on the molcajete, a bubbling cauldron of meat or fish, panela cheese and nopales in a tomato sauce served in an ovenheated molcajete (a stone vessel made for grinding ingredients)—it’s more flash than substance. If you want to dive deeper into Michoacán cuisine, walk half a block west and look for a nameless restaurant right on the side of the road. I call it the No Name Comedor (1905 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa). An unsmiling woman cooks over two gas burners outside a bare-bones dining room. The specialty of the house on my visit was morisqueta, a hearty, satisfying stew made with chunks of

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FROM THE STREET Get the chilaquiles here. Trust us.

pork served over a heap of rice and beans. This is a cash- and Spanishonly restaurant that invites deeper exploration. I’ve only seen it open after 5pm, but hours probably vary given the guerrilla style of the place. At Mi Pueblo Food Center (330 Bellam Blvd., San Rafael; 415.578.3971), a scrupulously clean Latino supermarket in San Rafael, Latinos and gringos alike can get a taste of Mexican food right from the source. Fresh tortillas are bagged warm right off a small assembly line, and there’s a vast food court filled with an encyclopedic array of Mexican standards. One of the main attractions is the spit-roasted and grilled chicken. For a taste of the chicken—and other meats including carne asada, al pastor, beef lips, beef cheeks and buche (fried pig esophagus)—get in line at the in-store taqueria. These tacos are the real deal. The tortillas are no bigger than a beer coaster and topped with a judicious application of toppings. They’re gone in two bites. My favorite Mexican restaurant at the moment is El Molino Central in Boyes Hot Springs (11 Central Ave.; 707.939.1010). The restaurant leans toward Oaxacan cooking but takes in a wide range of Mexican cuisine. “Molino” means mill in Spanish, and that means the corn is ground right there in the kitchen for Molino’s supremely delicious tamales and tortillas. The restaurant is owner Karen Waikiki’s second venture. (Waikiki also owns Primavera, wholesaler and retailer of excellent tortillas and tamales.) At Molino Central, you can dine on the appealing patio out back or you can get your food to go. The menu is small, but I’ve loved everything I’ve tried. The tamales are a must. (Try the roasted green chiles and cheese, and Oaxacan chicken tamales.) There’re also the crispy beef brisket tacos made with Niman Ranch beef and great beer-battered fish tacos served with salsa de arbol and avocadolime mayonnaise. The made-to-order guacamole is fantastic. If you come before 11am, you must get the chilaquiles “El Cardenal”— Early Girl tomatoes and chipotle salsa with soft-scrambled eggs and tortillas. A side of Rancho Gordo beans will cost you a buck. Get them. There’s also a small selection of freshly made salsas and moles for sale, and the fact they serve Blue Bottle Coffee doesn’t hurt either.


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Not-So-Guilty Pleasures Vegan dining in the North Bay By Emily Hunt

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he scene is a familiar one. “Veganism just ruins the fun of the whole thing,” your stout-hearted omnivore friend says as he reclines back and happily pats his grilled-cheese-filled stomach. And, yes, it would indeed seem that some of the most comforting of comfort foods are rooted in dairy: pizza, creamy soups, cake and a variety of other delectable dishes. Yet North Bay restaurant owners and chefs are increasingly proving the myth wrong by offering humane versions of our most sinfully delicious dining staples—no granola necessary.


For high-class flair and Michelin-assured quality, try out Ubuntu Restaurant in Napa. This allveggie restaurant doubles as a yoga studio and still manages to be revered as one of the best restaurants in the Bay Area, attracting master chefs, food-connoisseurs and nods in Oprah magazine. 1140 Main St., Napa. 707.251.5656. The regional restaurant chain Cafe Gratitude has stood the test of time and diversification. Originally a “live”-food-only cafe in the Mission district of San Francisco, Cafe Gratitude now has several locations throughout the Bay Area as well as in Los Angeles, and offers both raw and cooked dishes. 2200 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.578.4928. Gaia’s Garden in Santa Rosa is the ultimate veggie haven, whether you’re in the mood to sit and scarf down a few bowls of gluten-free curry or make your own salad and quickly jet off to continue your busy day. Gaia’s full buffet-style lunch and dinners offer vegan, vegetarian, sugarand gluten-free meals along with assorted beers and wines, and live music—often jazz—is a nearnightly standby. 1899 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Lydia’s Kitchen in Fairfax, for example (31 Bolinas Road; 415.258.9866), has a menu stocked with both raw and cooked meals featuring cashew cheese, pizzas, crepes and vegan deserts ranging from “cheez” cake to flavored raw chocolates. Owner Lydia Kindheart is also the creator of Lydia’s Organics, a company that hosts several lines of raw vegan snacks available locally and internationally. According to Kindheart, the key to promoting vegan products is intrinsic. “The people who work for me believe in what they’re doing,” says Kindheart. “The key ingredients are passion and infrastructure—getting the right people in the ‘family,’ if you wish.” This philosophy seems to have proven successful for Lydia’s Organics. With plans to diversify the company in the near future with an 8,000-squarefoot community center and cafe appropriately deemed the Sunflower Center in Petaluma, Kindheart hopes to host an even larger menu, live music,

presentations and interactive workshops. Seed in Santa Rosa (www.seedrestaurant.com) also expanded its vegan menu beyond the crunchy stigma. Owner Jerri Hastley’s foray into veganism started with a twoweek raw-food cleanse; at her restaurant, nondairy boundaries were pushed to the limit with tacos, berry crepes and chocolate caramel pie. Although Seed’s location has recently closed, Hastley continues Seed’s line of vegan products, its catering services and its weekly boxes, which provide healthy and lowfat meal plans for busy people. Just 15 minutes west, Slice of Life in Sebastopol (6970 McKinley Ave.; 707.829.6627) creates lighter alternatives to foods that might otherwise force you to unbutton your pants’ top button. Though Slice of Life focuses on dining classics, the restaurant’s American, Italian and Mexican options are anything but typical; the restaurant boldly offers varieties of innovative veggie burgers, vegan lasagna, tofu tostadas and, of course, soy pizza.

Owner and sometimes-chef David Burns observes that the popularity of vegan cuisine is rising, largely due to the increase in health consciousness. “In ’94, it was all the fat-free rage, which was a very good thing for people’s awareness,” says Burns. “People needed that extreme to change the way they thought about food. Now the big food wave is gluten-free. And, of course, the organic wave grows in popularity each year. We’re on the march.” Luckily, vegan dining isn’t actually as lofty as it might seem. According to Burns, vegan cooking is as easy as tofusubstitute pie. “I wouldn’t say there’s anything difficult about it,” says Burns. “Anything animal-based can certainly be duplicated. [Vegan cooking] is really about desire and creativity, and anyone who’s a good chef can do it.” Under a reign of fancy foie gras chefs and venerated veal butchers, the alternative in vegan dining allows consumers to enjoy not-so-guilty pleasure foods—and look good while doing it.

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Talk on the Rocks Magic, mirth and the art of bartender banter By David Templeton

A

t half past 6 in the evening, the inevitable crowds of young scene-makers have yet to invade Christy’s on the Square in Santa Rosa (96 Old Courthouse Square; 707.528.8565). Though there are less than a dozen people in the place, Christy’s is alive with a cacophony of sounds: ice shaken with a ch-ch-chattering snap, the tiny thunder of dice on the bar, lyrical fits of soprano laughter from a small group perched on a sofa nearby, the band’s guitarists strumming chords in prep for their next set—and the recognizable voice of bar manager Jason Flint conducting an impromptu master class on tequila. A few moments later, he’ll be conversing on the joys of the television show Wipeout (“Best TV show ever!” he says), and within the hour, he’ll produce a long piece of ribbon and commence to dazzle the bar-sitters with a classic magic trick.

Flint, as his many regulars will attest, is a master of the art of neighborly bar banter. From solemn attentiveness in times of sorrow to inspired silliness in moments of levity, Flint has a gift for gab that’s earned him a reputation as one of the most entertaining bartenders in the North Bay. “Of all the things a bartender does on the job,” testifies Flint, “from mixing drinks to handling money to bantering with customers, the banter is number one.” After 10pm, Christy’s tends to get too crowded for extended bartender conversation, but between 5 and 9, when the clientele is mainly working folks transitioning from their 9-to-5 shift, the vibe is loose enough that Flint can do what he loves best, which is making connections with people. As an 11-year veteran, Flint knows that good bar banter isn’t just a fun way to pass the night behind the bar—it’s also good business. “If you can’t talk to people, if you can’t socialize, then you don’t get any repeat customers,” he says. “Sometimes, a bartender has to approach a customer from a few different angles until he figures out how to engage them. But eventually, that’s what builds a loyal clientele. The whole point of life is the friendships you make, the stories you tell, the fun you have. Good bar banter is all of that.” Tom Wilson, daytime bartender for the Brasserie Restaurant at the Vineyard Creek Hyatt in Santa Rosa (170 Railroad St.; 707.636.7388), agrees. “A bar is just a building,” he says. “And any monkey can be trained to mix drinks. But most people choose their favorite bar by its bartender, and they judge their bartenders by the quality of that bartender’s banter.” Wilson, in the business for over 30 years, spent much of that time in San Francisco, working everywhere from the Washington Square Grill to the legendary Speck’s, where he once overheard a banterchallenged bartender ripping


has a really healthy sense of humorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and usually a pretty thick skin.â&#x20AC;? Of course, a bartender needs to know when a customer wants a joke, a conversation, a magic trickâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or just a nice quiet drink. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about reading people, and there is no formula to doing that because everyone is different,â&#x20AC;? says Bill Woodbridge, owner of Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Petaluma (132 Keller St.; 707.763.3333), a restaurant with a huge TV thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost always playing offbeat classic movies, a subject Woodbridge can talk about with the best (â&#x20AC;&#x153;I speak fluent movie,â&#x20AC;? he laughs). Having been in the business for over 30 years, Woodbridge has learned a lot of clever bar-banter tricks. One of them is an ability to transfer his end of the conversation to other patrons without them knowing it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sitting at this end of the bar, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about your cats, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some other guy sitting down the bar, and he says something about his dog, then Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to try and get the two of you talkingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and then I go do something else. A big part of bar banter is the social experience, and that shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just be between the patron and the person behind the bar.â&#x20AC;? Another skill that separates the good bartenders from all the others is an ability to talk across generations or genders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to talk to someone 30 years older or 20 years younger,â&#x20AC;? Woodbridge says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most men donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to talk to women. A good bartender can talk to anyone!â&#x20AC;? Woodbridge, as a matter of fact, once earned a fan base of women who prized his ability to identify jerks almost instantly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I worked in Marin, a lot of my customers were women whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bring their new boyfriends in so I could judge them,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A woman would say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jane told me you did a really good job with her last boyfriend, who really did turn out to be a jerk!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; So sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bring in her boyfriend, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d all talk for a while at the bar, then sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go to the ladies room and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have a little conversation with the guy. And then when sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d come back, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d give a little â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;thumbs up, thumbs downâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; signal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A good bartender,â&#x20AC;? Woodbridge laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;knows when to banterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and when to just smile and nod.â&#x20AC;?

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into a pair of customers for ordering two â&#x20AC;&#x153;gin and tonicsâ&#x20AC;? instead of the grammatically preferable â&#x20AC;&#x153;gins and tonic.â&#x20AC;? To Wilson, the most artful bartenders are those who maintain a level of conversational grace, making their banter appear to flow effortlessly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just have to figure out how to start a conversation with different kinds of people,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of my customers are tourists, so my conversations are often about where the person is from. It might begin with something as simple as my saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re from Arkansas? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never been to Arkansas! Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arkansas like?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; And off we go. Or they make a comment about how perfect the weather is in California, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opening for a good little conversation. A good bartender recognizes the opportunities for good conversationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and knows which conversations to avoid.â&#x20AC;? And some conversations should be avoided. Most bartenders know to keep away from politics and religion, unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to agree politely and change the subject. But in an environment where people are consuming alcoholâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;often lots of itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a bartenderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job is keeping the conversation friendly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes good bar banter is just that: casual bar banter,â&#x20AC;? says Laura Fontan, who works afternoons at John & Zekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Healdsburg (111 Plaza St.; 707.433.3735). â&#x20AC;&#x153;But sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about redirecting the mood, staying positive, helping your customers find their silver lining.â&#x20AC;? Fontan cut her teeth during the summer of 2004, working at her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working-class bar in Berkeley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At my momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place,â&#x20AC;? she relays, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the banter was all sexual innuendo, all the time. So I developed this huge archive of really filthy jokes, because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kind of place that was. John & Zekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like that. There are definitely the customers who like a good dirty joke now and then, but the range of people is much bigger, so the banter isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just one kind of thing.â&#x20AC;? Still, for Fontan, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about displaying a good sense of humor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What cuts across the spectrum, almost universally, is having a good, solid repertoire of jokes filed away on mental 3-by-5 cards,â&#x20AC;? she reveals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jokes can always break the ice, they can cut tension, and they can defuse a situation. In general, a good bartender


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31

New and Notable

Fresh stars on the North Bay restaurant scene By Justine McDaniel

W

e all have our favorite restaurants, those enduring and endearing haunts that feel a little bit like home. But it would be a mistake to forget that we live in a culinary dreamland; new gems are popping up in every corner, just waiting to be tried, from the down-home hot dog to the paradisiacal pad Thai.

Challenge: eat in Healdsburg without rubbing elbows with wine tourists! Drawing a blank? Head to Frank and Ernieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steak House, a locally owned, locally loved restaurant that serves up all the classics for good, clean food, plain and simpleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;oh, and they still have the wines. 9 Mitchell Lane, Healdsburg. 707.433.2147. . . . Casual yet classy, traditional yet freshâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;there is no better way to describe Thai Time Asian Bistro, where good service, great food and slices of cucumber and strawberry in your water glass make you forget youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on busy Mendocino Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and even make you forget about its predecessor, the Golden Dragon, a favorite for Chinese food. 402 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.526.7777. . . . If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re one of those folks who likes a heartwarming history served up with your comfort food, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find just that at Catelliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Originally opened in 1936 by Santi and Virginia Catelli, the restaurant became a Sonoma County staple. Santi and Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandchildren have taken up the mantle 25 years after its closure, serving up perfect Italian food as well as a sumptuous burgerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the old favorite, Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ravioli. 21047 Geyserville Road, Geyserville. 707.857.3471. . . . Smoky sauce slathered over steaming steak seems to be a theme this year, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect anything pretentious from BubbaQueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The restaurant, hidden in the back of a food mart, is unabashedly

traditional, with a fiery menu lusciously limited to tri-tip, pulled pork, burgers and chicken. Bubba himself mans the kitchen, where you can get exactly the barbecue youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re craving. 1105 Bodega Ave., Petaluma. 707.763.4401. . . . Put down that Safeway sandwich. Woodruffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Artisan Foods and Cafe Marcella is here to save you from the perils of another ordinary deli day, offering gourmet sandwiches, cheeses and groceries and serving up lunch and dinner in their restaurant. Sealing the deal are owner David Woodruffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handcrafted beers. 966 Gravenstein Hwy. S., Sebastopol. 707.829.2141. . . . Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the four Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: barbecue, burgers, bacon and beerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and it couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be further from owners Matthew and Bryan Bousquetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last culinary endeavor, Mirepoix. Despite their hard-earned Michelin star, the couple closed Mirepoix earlier this year in favor of this more family-friendly restaurant, Mamma Pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 275 Windsor Road, Windsor. 707.838.PIGS. . . . With a menu overflowing with local ingredients, Space XXV aims its focus on the Sonoma County lifestyle, not just Sonoma County food. The restaurant features art and music as well as all the usual favorite dishes. 25 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa, 415.816.9084. . . . The Wurst has come, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t panic! The new sausage spot has been buzzing since day one.

Adding variety to Healdsburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant scene, the Wurst serves up brats and beers, with a burger and chicken sausages for the less-brave customers. Find the German in you at 22 Matheson St., Healdsburg, 707.694.0770. . . . Everyone knew the Cantina in downtown Santa Rosa desperately needed an update, and the owners of La Rosa, who took over the space in April, have done us one better. The menu is similar, with fresh burritos, enchiladas and tacos paired with savory meats, but with one major difference: the food is actually tasty. With the added bonus of over 160 tequilas, La Rosa has fashioned itself a buzzworthy downtown spot, whether for afterwork margaritas or a family dinner. 500 Fourth St., Santa Rosa, 707.579.3200. . . . Continuing this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s streak of restaurants that look like they should be for truckers but taste like they cook for gods (OK, that might be a bit of an exaggeration), Five Guys Burgers bring their East Coast formula out West to do battle with In-N-Out. 2280 Mendocino Ave. #B5, Santa Rosa. 707.528.2507. . . . A family-friendly restaurant that actually lives up to Momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home cooking? Burgers, pizzas and beerbraised ribs abound at Kin, where adults can enjoy Grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special pot roast and kids can order off a menu in the form of a cootiecatcher. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for everyone at 740 McClelland Drive, Windsor. 707.837.7546.

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33

Crush N A PA

It’s the Norm

He dropped an f-bomb while anchoring Saturday Night Live’s Weekend Update, made i Comedy Central’s list of 100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time and most recently joined A Sandler in the 2010 hit Grown Ups. Offbeat funnyman Norm MacDonald has made the rounds, and has the cult following to prove it. Recently he’s been seen on Comedy Cent Sports Show w and the Game Show Network’s High Stakes Pokerr, and just delivered an a Doing Standup. Catch him on Friday, July 29, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Nap $39. 707.259.0333.

S A N TA R O S A

Midway Madness The Diamond Jubilee is coming! And no, we’re not talking about Queen Elizabeth’s pen celebration. Just as classic and significantly more hip than the monarch (sorry, Liz) is th Sonoma County Fair, which is back for its 75th annual run. You know the drill: carnival the Hall of Flowers, horse races, cotton candy, livestock shows, gigantic stuffed animals this year, music entertainment by Huey Lewis & the News and Trace Adkins. Catch the w 27–Aug. 14 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. Sunday, 11am–11pm. Free–$9. www.sonomacountyfair.com.

S A N TA R O S A

Make a Playdate Stay calm, ladies—and head to your nearest lingerie shop to pick out a few items that think would look great flung on the stage next to the Men of Playgirl. I know you’re to fanning yourselves to read the rest of this blurb, but stay with me: the Male Revue prom “glistening muscles and pelvic thrusts,” and there’s no doubt the boys are even sexier i person than they are in the calendar. What more entertainment can you ask for on a Sa night in Santa Rosa? Collect a few pairs of panties, collect yourselves, and try not to ge speeding ticket this Saturday, July 30, on your way to the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St. Santa Rosa. 8:30pm. $15–$20. 707.545.5876.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Home Run Winner of the Cy Young Award and a six-time All-Star, Vida Blue easily carved a name himself during his 17-year stint in Major League Baseball in the ’70s and ’80s. He pitch no-hitter, won three World Series with the Oakland A’s and even made the cover of Tim magazine before going on to pitch for the San Francisco Giants and Kansas City Royals currently works with baseball teams for underprivileged kids in San Francisco, and he’ll telling his story on Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 142 Throckmorton Theatre. 142 Throckmorton Mill Valley. 7:30pm. $12–$15. 415.383.9600.

—Justine McDanie

C’MERE, LOVERBOY! ‘Dirty Dancing’ screens Jul 29 in San Anselmo. See Film, p44.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


Film

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13; 118 min.) Exactly what you think. Based on the 2006 graphic novel by Scott Mitchell Rosenberg and starring Harrison Ford, Olivia Wilde, Daniel Craig and Sam Rockwell. Jon Favreau (Iron Man) directs. (NB) Crazy Stupid Love (PG-13; 128 min.) After Steve Carrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idyllic marriage unravels, he takes love advice from single pal Ryan Gosling. Hey, that looks like The Graduateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie poster! (NB)

Road to Nowhere (R; 120 min.) A young filmmaker sets out to discover the truth behind a politicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suicide pact with his assistant, and finds darker truths behind the life of one of his actresses. Cult director Monte Hellmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first film in over 20 years. (NB)

Submarine (R; 97 min.) British coming-ofage comedy follows teenager Oliver Tate (Craig Roberts) who sets out to save his parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; marriageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and lose his virginity before his 16th birthday. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

Tabloid (NR; 86 min.) Salty and strangely light-hearted documentary from Errol Morris that investigates the question of whether former Wyoming beauty queen Joyce McKinney committed a very unusual sexual assault 30 years ago with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;love of her life,â&#x20AC;? a Mormon missionary she had met back in America. (RvB)

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Bridesmaids (R; 125 min.) Hangover for the girls. Hilarious Kristen Wiig co-stars with Maya Rudolph in raunchy-ish chic flick about a Vegas bridal party that goes too far. Directed by Paul Feig of Freaks and Geeks fame and produced by Judd Apatow. (NB) Captain America: The First Avenger (PG-13; 124 min.) A luxurious recreation of the past and an appealing comicbook story about a New York stripling who becomes the patriotic champion of World War II. Chris Evans is the titular hero, and Hugo Weaving plays the impressively disfigured villain â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Red Skull.â&#x20AC;? Joe Johnstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s direction may be too much in the mode of a classic â&#x20AC;&#x2122;40s movie for the kids, but it has loads to offer, including a drily funny Tommy Lee Jones and surprising art direction. (RvB)

Cars 2 (G; 113 min.) This sequel to the 2006 Pixar hit is a Bond parody, but the stale kind, with a bumpkin, Tow Mater (Larry the Cable Guy), mistaken for an agent. Not that Cars 2 is really bad; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just cute and relentless, and paced to tickle five-year-olds. Also , thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new emphasis on bathroom humor. Pixar usually had too much class to go there. (RvB) Friends with Benefits (R; 105 min.) Friends Dylan (Justin Timberlake) and Jamie (Mila Kunis) discover that adding a physical

element to their friendship brings complications indeedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just like the Hollywood romcoms told them. (NB)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (PG-13; 130 min.)The saga wraps up in a cluttered, confusing though fast-paced adventure in which Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) confronts Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the end game set up in the vastly superior first part; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be lost if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rewatch the first half within a week of seeing this one. Evanna (Luna Lovegood) Lynch and our lovely Snape (Alan Rickman, rolling every syllable as if it were Sisyphusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rock) steal their parts of the show. Director David Yates is at his best borrowing from Fritz Lang in the formations of men lined up in the dark, or conferring with each other in the shadows. (RvB)

Horrible Bosses (R; 98 min.) Jason Bateman, Jennifer Aniston, Jamie Foxx, Kevin Spacey and Colin Farrell co-star in dark comedy about three friends who conspire to murder their bosses. (NB) Larry Crowne (PG-13; 99 min.) After losing his job as a big-box retail manager, Larry Crowne (Tom Hanks) heads back to junior college, where he falls for his public-speaking instructor (Julia Roberts). Directed by Hanks, who also co-wrote with Nia Vardalos (My Big Fat Greek Wedding). (NB) Snow Flower and the Secret Fan (R; 100 min.) Parallel friendships in a Shanghai separated by a generation are examined in Wayne (The Joy Luck Club, Smoke) Wangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adaptation of Lisa Seeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acclaimed 2005 novel (NB)

Super 8 (PG-13; 112 min.) Something creepy may have escaped a train wreck witnessed by teens making a Super 8 movie in this film written and directed by the very busy J. J. Abrams. Produced by Steven Spielberg. (NB)

Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PG-13; 155 min.) Michael Bay is back directing the third and very long installment of the Transformers franchise. Stars Shia LeBeouf. (NB)

The Tree of Life (PG-13; 138 min.) Sean Penn and Brad Pitt co-star in Terrence Malickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambitious new film that follows the eldest son of a Texas family as he wrestles questions of life and existence. At the Rafael and Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) Winnie the Pooh (G; 68 min.) Walt Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animated franchise returns after 35 years with a new adventure narrated by John Cleese. (NB) The Zookeeper (PG-13; 104 min.) Poor Kevin James stars as lonely-guy zookeeper Griffin Keyes aided by a talking menagerie who teach him natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mating rituals to help him win his dream girl. With the voices of Nick Nolte, Cher, Don Rickles, Adam Sandler and Sylvester Stallone. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Backyard Concert Series Music and food, Thurs at 6. Jul 28, Bob Schneider, Whiskey Thieves. Free. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. www.krsh.com.

Backyard Jazz Monthly intimate house concerts. Jul 31, Richard Howell Quintet. $20 and potluck item. Santa Rosa House Concerts, address with ticket, Santa Rosa. www.backyardjazz.com.

Basin Street Music

Phenomenauts

Summer Nights on the Green

10,000 Maniacs

Every Thurs at 6, through Aug 25. Jul 28, Big Sandy & His Fly Rite Boys (rockabilly). Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Tribute to Texas Musicians pay tribute to iconic Texan songwriters. Jul 29 at 7. $15. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.9040.

Friday Night Live

Metazen celebrates new CD, “The Conscious Cicatrix,” with art and performances by Conspiracy-a-Go-Go, Dysmanic, King Ginger and others. Jul 27 at 7. $7. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Live music weekly, Fri at 5. Jul 29, Rock Steady (funk). Aug 5, Crazy Famous (indie). $5. Michel-Schlumberger Winery. 4155 Wine Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 800.447.3060.

Just for Fun Concert Zany, light-hearted afternoon of showtunes, American classics, jazz standards and more. Jul 31 at 3. $12. Guerneville Senior Center, 15010 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.2017.

Landmark Concerts Free live music Sat, 1 to 4. Jul 30, Mariposa Express. Landmark Vineyards, 101 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0053.

Live at Juilliard Every Sun, 5 to 7. Jul 31, Solid Air. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3225.

Music on the Plaza Each Thurs at 6. Jul 28, Shari Garn and Wild Iris. Free. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol. www.sebarts.org.

KD Lang Country chanteuse appears at summer concert series. Jul 30 at 7. $60-$205. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville, 1.866.777.8932.

Tuesdays in the Plaza

Friday Night Music

NAPA COUNTY

Sci-fi surf punk with openers Tornado Rider, and the Secretions. Jul 29 at 8. $10. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. www.thephoenixtheater.com.

Free live concerts every Fri, 5 to 7, in Petaluma’s theater district. Jul 22, Jill Cohn. Jul 29, Jason Bodlovich. Aug 5, C Miano Quartet. Aug 12, PO8’s. Aug 19, Sean Garvey. Theatre Square, Petaluma Blvd at C St, Petaluma. Live music and dancing every Fri at 7. Jul 29, Rumbache (salsa). Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Every Tues, 6 to 8. Aug 2, Sorentinos (alt-Americana). Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

2084: New Breed of Dystopia

Alternative rock pioneers take on new lead singer, Mary Ramsey. Jul 28 at 8. $45-$50. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Jul 29, Jon Gonzales. Jul 30, Jamison Harrison. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Jul 27, bluegrass jam. Jul 29, Wild Mustard. Jul 30 at 10:30am, Thugz Duo; at 7, Piezo Electric Effect. Jul 31 at 2, Petaluma Pete. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater Jul 27, New Breed of Dystopia (see Concerts). Jul 28, Black Bird Raum. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Village Concerts

Aubergine

Every Sat, noon to 3. Jul 30, Tall Shadows (rock). Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Jul 29, Thugz. Jul 30, Stringer Belle. Jul 31, Metal Mother. Tues at 7, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

MARIN COUNTY Al Milburn Benefit Luthier and Vietnam vet gets help from George Cole, Raveups, Fibrilators, Amalgamation, Skillbillies (with Al) and Sheets. Jul 31 from 11-6. $10. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Christy’s on the Square Every Wed, Gallery Wednesdays (live art and DJs). 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Chrome Lotus Jul 28, Casa Rasta, DJ Konnex and Secure Dem Sound. Jul 29, Vibesquad. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. www.chromelotussr.com.

BBQ on the Lawn

First Edition

Every Sun at 4. Jul 31, Asleep at the Wheel. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Jul 31, Carl & Paul Green. 1820 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

Friday Concert Series

Thurs-Fri, Ron Lacey. Jul 29-30, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Get your groove on in the plaza monthly at 6. Jul 29, Izzy & the Kesstronics. Free. Pacheco Plaza, 366 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Slavyanka Male chorus hails from Russian River area. Jul 30 at 8. $8$21. Dance Palace, Fifth and

Flamingo Lounge

French Garden Restaurant Jul 29-30, Un Deux Trois. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. ) 707.824.2030.

36


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

36

Music ( 35

The Cotati Accordion Festival

NON-PROFIT — MULTI-GENERATIONAL — MULTI-CULTURAL — MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANZA — BENEFITS LOCAL YOUTH GROUPS

non-profit organization has contributed over $300,000 to local youth groups. We are the largest cash donor to the Cotati/Rohnert Park Ed Foundation.

Hopmonk Tavern

9:30 am to 8:30 pm - La Plaza Park, Cotati

· Guy Klusevek · Polkacide · Tangonero · Murl Allen Sanders · Limpopo · Mary Torkarski · Mark St. Mary · Culann’s Hounds · The Great Morgani · Ginny Mac · Those Darn Accordions · The Mad Maggies · Cory Pesaturo · Alicia Baker · Accordion Babes’ Pageant · Amber Lee and The Anomalies · Sweet Penny Royals · Bella Ciao · Ramon Trujillo & Los Caporales · Simka · Georges Lammam · The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band · Motor Dude Zydeco · Nada Lewis · Chuck Berger · The Creole Belles · Courtableu

AND SO MUCH MORE .. Wo r k s h ops - Mov ie s D an ce I ns t ruct io n

BECOME A SPONSOR!

Jul 29, Greenhouse. Jul 30, Kevin Russell Showcase. Every Tues, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Jul 29, Levi Lloyd. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

AUGUST 20 & 21, 2011

Tickets available at all three Oliver’s Market locations The Last Record Store in Santa Rosa People’s Music in Sebastopol $17 each day (advanced sale $15) Kids under 15 free or $25 for both days. Call 888-559-2576 for tickets or order on line

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Highland Dell

Visit www.cotatifest.com for the groups we support.

BOOTHS & ADVERTISING 707-585-2910

Gaia’s Garden

www.cotatifest.com

707-664-0444 P.O. Box 809, Cotati, CA 94931 Volker Financial & Insurance Services

Jul 27, Greensky Bluegrass. Jul 28, Juke Joint with DOV, iNi, Guacamole. Jul 29, Dgiin, Whiskerman. Jul 30, Under the Radar. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

100 Years of Gratitude

Hotel Healdsburg

Billionaires host fundraiser

Jul 29, Susan Sutton Duo. Jul 30, Noam Lemish Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Jul 27, Brainstorm with Andrew the Pirate. Last Sat monthly, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Kodiak Jack’s Jul 29, Cliff Huey, 27 Outlaws. 256 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.765.5722.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 27, the Rivereens. Jul 28, Misner and Smith. Jul 29, David Thom Band. Jul 30, Jon Popenoe Blues Band. Jul 31, Vickie Lee & the Funny Farm. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Every Wed at 7, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Jul 30, Men of Playgirl (see Events). 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Jul 27, Gwen Sugarmama Avery. Jul 28, Susan Sutton (jazz). Jul 30, Big Cat Tolefree (blues). Jul 31, Cazadero Jazz Project. Aug 2, Out of the Blue (swing). 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

For the past century, the exclusive Bohemian Club has hosted the Monte Rio Community Variety Show during its annual retreat at Bohemian Grove. Held in the grassy Monte Rio amphitheater behind the iconic Pink Elephant Bar, the Grove presents entertainment running the gamut from comedy and skits to one-act plays and musicians of every ilk. Though the lineup is never officially announced, rumor has it that last year’s Grammy-winning headliners the Zac Brown Band will appear again this year. Other performers range from 87-year-old classical violinist John Creighton Murray, who has performed 47 times, to local blues favorite Roy Rogers. Clint Black, Jimmy Buffet, Steve Miller and Big Al Anderson of NRBQ have also appeared, as well as Sonny and Cher (both with mustaches), Merv Griffin, Ray Bolger and Bob Weir. Rich Welker, conducting the Bohemian Big Band, annually kicks off the pre-show with a jazzy flourish. Gates open at 7am for early-bird chair setup; no blanket seating is allowed on Thursday, July 28, at the Monte Rio Amphitheater, Bohemian Highway, Monte Rio. 7pm. $5–$25. 707.486.1739.—Suzanne Daly

Jul 30, Blue Shift. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jul 28, Jay Dub and Dino. Jul 29, Misner and Smith. Jul 31, Peter Lamson. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

My Friend Joe Jul 29, Vespertine Orchestra. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Mystic Theatre Jul 28, Langhorne Slim, Alison Harris & the Barn Owls. Jul 30, Rivertown Revival after party with El Radio Fantastique, Brothers Horse and Malarkey. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

North Light Books & Cafe Jul 28, the Mushrooms. 550 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.4300.

Olde Sonoma Public House Jul 28, Jason Bodlovich Group.

) 38


nightclub & restaurant

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT. & ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES, BANQUETS, FUNDRAISERS AND OUTSIDE PROMOTERS 707.545.5876 7:30 PM | $5 AGES 21+ / $8 FOR UNDER 21 (INCLUDES A SODA OR FRIES)

7/27

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

Travis Hendrix & The Blessed Moonshiners 9:00 PM | NO COVER | R&B, DISCO, 80'S, TOP 40 DANCE

7/28 & 29

Rotation Dance Nights With DJ Matt McKillop & other rotating Djs 7/30 8:30 PM | $15/20 The Ultimate Girls Night OUt with

The Men of

Playgirl Male Review Dj Dance Party after Show 8/5 8:30 PM | $15/20 | BLUES

Carolyn Wonderland + Shelley King 8/11

9:30 PM | $13/15 | ROCK&ROLL

Igor & red Elvises 8/12 7:00 PM | $15 | ACOUSTIC The Healdsburg Guitar Festival and LMI present

Finger Style Summit 8/20 8:00 PM | $15/18 | ROCK Sfarzo Live in concert presents

M.A.i.M.Ed Fest 2011 8/26

9:30 PM | $12/15 | ROCK

Petty Theft 9/15

8:30 PM | $25/30 | HARD ROCK

UFO

+ Mindflow

+ Points North + Motogruv

9/16

8:30 PM | $22/25 | BLUES

The Ford Brothers 9/23 Gallagher 9/29 Saxon all shows are 21+ unless noted for reservations: 707.545.5876

707.545.2343 120 5th st. @ davis st. santa rosa, ca

lastdaysaloon.com

37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

the last day saloon


Music ( 36

38 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Jul 29, Midnight Sun. 18615 Sonoma Hwy, Ste 110, Sonoma. 707.938.7587.

Phoenix Theater Jul 28, Jug Dealers, David Luning Band, Three Legged Sister, the Crux and others. Jul 29, Phenomenauts (see Concerts). 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jul 30, Stompy Jones. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Russian River Brewing Co Jul 30, HUGElarge. Jul 31, Ian Scherer and Fat City. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Spancky’s Jul 29, ADD/C. Jul 30, Aftertayst, Krawl, Darkside Shine. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Stout Brothers Jul 27, Cassidy Crowley. Jul 30, Ian Franklin Band (rock). 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Tradewinds Jul 27, Commandos. Jul 28, Inner Riddem. Jul 29, Jake Richmond, Leah Miller. Jul 30, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Old Western Saloon

Sleeping Lady

Jul 29, Nick Ratner Band. Jul 30, Forgotten Passage. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Jul 27, Biambu’s Groove Room Jam. Jul 28, Danny Click’s Texas blues night. Jul 29, Steve Wolf and Teja Bell. Jul 30, Spark and Whisper. Jul 31 at 2, trad Irish; at 6, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Jul 30, Wangari Trio. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jul 27, Royal Deuces. Jul 28, Izzy & the Kesstronics. Jul 29, Hillside Fire. Jul 30, Dani Paige Band. Jul 31, Beso Negro. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Presidio Yacht Club Jul 28, Seducers (country). Jul 29, Lucky Drive. Jul 30, LumaNation. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Rancho Nicasio Jul 30, Asleep at the Wheel. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Jul 27, Philip Claypool and friends. Jul 28, Mads Tolling Quartet. Jul 29, Black Market Blues Band. Jul 30, Nick Gravenites. Jul 31, Ali Weiss. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Jul 28, Ralph Woodson. Jul 29, Xstatic. Jul 30, Amber Snider Band. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Silo’s

San Geronimo Golf Course Jul 29, the Early Birds. 5800 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.4030.

Sausalito Seahorse Jul 28, Macy Blackman & the Mighty Fines. Jul 29, Eddie Neon Band. Jul 30, Doc Kraft. Jul 31, Rumbache Salsa. Aug 2, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Wed at 7, jam session. Jul 29, “Rockin” Down the Hiway (rock). Jul 30, CR Vibes (reggae). 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Wed, Philip Smith & the Gentlemen of Jazz. Jul 28, Le Jazz Hot. Jul 30, Old School Band. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

The Zoo Every Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 527 Barham Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.0980.

San Francisco’s City Guide

MARIN COUNTY George’s Nightclub

MONTE RIOfeaturing MUSIC FESTIVAL music by

JGB - both nights! groundation - hot buttered rum poorman’s whiskey - moonalice the thugz - jug dealers melvin seals -

SEPTEMBER 3RD & 4TH - 11am to 10pm MONTE RIO AMPITHEATER, MONTE RIO CA

tickets & info: www.monteriomusicfestival.com

Wed, standup comedy (see Comedy). Jul 28, Avance (salsa). Jul 29, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Jul 30, Greg Scott Band, Agape Soul. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Jul 27, Michael LaMacchia. Aug 2, Jerry Garcia birthday tribute. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club Jul 27 at 6, James Forman Jazz Ensemble; at 9, Gail “Mojo” Muldrow and Rockin’ Blues Band. Jul 28 at 6, Diamond Jazz; at 9, Beats and Bars (hiphop). Jul 29, Forró Brazuca, Samuka & the Wild Tribe Band. Jul 30, Kung Fu Vampire, Mars. Jul 31, Samuka & the Wild Tribe. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

The Cool Kids Throwback hip-hop duo rap about Pac-Man, ride BMX bikes, rep Mountain Dew. Jul 28 at the New Parish.

Kenny Burrell Jazz guitar legend celebrates 80th birthday with combo led by Steve Turre. Jul 28-31 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Das Racist Brooklyn hip-hop trio trucking in intellectualism, abstract humor and white guilt. Jul 29 at the Mezzanine.

Those Darlins High-kicking country harmonies with three swingin’ gals from Murfreesboro, Tenn. Jul 30 at Bottom of the Hill.

Rasputina Cello-based trio explores feral children, dead giants and anti-rent wars. Jul 31 at Great American Music Hall.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.


39

Thur, Jul 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–8:45pm Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club 8:45–11pm New Dancer Class, Plus Dancing 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents Motown, Disco, & Rock ‘n Roll

Fri, Jul 29 7–11pm

Sat, Jul 30 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 11:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance with Gary Thomas 8–11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance presents RATNIP Sun, Jul 31 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am Zumba Fitness with Anna 1:30–3:30pm Vintage Dance with Gary Thomas 5–9:30pm Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Scottish Country Dancing

Mon, Aug 1 7–10pm

Tues, Aug 2 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Outdoor Dining 7 Days A Week Reservations Advised

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

July 29

CHAMPLIN Former Lead Singer for Chicago

plus FROBECK 8:00pm

##################

Sat

asleep at the wheel weekend

July 30 Sun

July 31

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

8:30pm / In the Rancho Room

BBQ on the Lawn! ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL Gates at 3pm, Music at 4:00pm

################## Fri

Aug 5 Sat

Aug 6

BIG B AND HIS SNAKEOIL SAVIORS

Boogie Woogie & Western Swing 8:30pm

THE CREAM OF CLAPTON

WITH K EVIN

8:30pm Sun

Aug 7

RUSSELL

BBQ on the Lawn! MARCIA BALL

Gates at 3pm, Music at 4:00pm

BBQ on the Lawn! Aug 14 1st Annual Cajun Fest featuring Thur

BEAUSOLEIL AVEC MICHAEL DOUCET

& TOM RIGNEY AND FLAMBEAU Special Cajun BBQ Feast Gates at 3pm, Music at 4:00pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Wed, Jul 27 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

40

Music

FUNNY THING The free version of Spotify isn’t as good as the paid version.

On the Spot

Spotify takes hold in the U.S. BY BLAKE MONTGOMERY

W

ho can argue with free music?

Spotify, a free streaming music service formerly only offered in Europe, is now available on a limited basis in the United States. Those seeking a sleek, easily manageable music service with a good selection will find it—if they can get an invite to Spotify. I say “if they can get an invite,” because after attracting millions of European users, Spotify has given out invites for the free service only to a small number of those who signed up. Unless, of course, potential users want to pay for Spotify—then it’s immediately available to any and all. The false cachet created by the invite system makes for a bit of a letdown. Some of my more music-savvy friends have touted Spotify’s arrival in the U.S.A. as the Second Coming, and maybe that’s because they paid for the premium version.

In the free and therefore most popular version, there are still some glitches. Every once in a while, the service throws a tantrum and skips every other song on a playlist. The sync with iTunes leaves a number of tracks unusable. A recommendation function, à la Pandora, would be welcome; Spotify’s “related artists” feature simply recommends common artists most likely already known. Despite having 15 million available songs, Spotify probably won’t satisfy the more hipster or classic rock urges, the latter existing on Spotify only as tribute bands. Led Zeppelin, the Beatles and Arcade Fire are nowhere to be found, which isn’t surprising given that Spotify’s royalty rate is the lowest of any music service out there. (According to a recent study, artists earn $0.00029 per play on Spotify.) Compensating for these flaws is the social aspect, by far Spotify’s most exciting feature. It allows users to create and save playlists— nothing new, but the connection to Facebook is seamless. Users create public playlists comprising their profiles, and Facebook friends also on Spotify can subscribe to those playlists, lift songs or simply judge them. This eliminates penismeasuring contests over whose music is more obscure or hardcore by laying on the table all the music users are actually listening to. (Users can keep playlists private, but that violates the tacit social contract of the Spotify community: you show me your guilty pleasures, I’ll show you mine.) Because Spotify allows users to merge their iTunes libraries and, if it’s the premium version, provides access to unlimited music anywhere, it potentially means the end of dependence on iTunes for those who haven’t already decided that iTunes is just an expensive reason to buy Excedrin. While Spotify may not be the end-all, be-all music service, it’s certainly ahead of the curve. If it gets rid of the invite-or-pay system and lets the social scene flourish, it’ll be the best music-sharing service out there.


41

Galleries OPENINGS Jul 29 From 6 to 10pm. Terrasanti, photographic works by David Rodriguez. 11790 Main St, Penngrove. 707.795.5535.

Aug 2 From 6 to 7. Depot Bookstore, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosebud the Rescue Dog,â&#x20AC;? paintings and mixedmedia by Vickisa. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2665. From 6 to 8pm. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bay Area Women Artists,â&#x20AC;? a group show juried by Donna Seager. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Finley Center Ending Aug 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life,â&#x20AC;? recycled metal sculptures by Tyson Barbera. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Sep 3, landscape exhibit. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One

Graton Gallery

Slaughterhouse Space

Arts Guild of Sonoma Ending Aug 1, mixed-media and assemblage by Paul Kirley. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

BackStreet Gallery Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Common Thread,â&#x20AC;? quilted, sewn and woven works by five artists. Sat, 11 to 5, and by appointment. Uribe Studios, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.537.9507.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Change of Scene: Schulz Sketches from Abroad.â&#x20AC;? Through Dec 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d from the Panel,â&#x20AC;? parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art. Through Nov 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Games Children Play.â&#x20AC;? $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Aug 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Terra Incognita,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Suzanne Edminster. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Through Aug 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Throat: An Installationâ&#x20AC;? with Hamlet Mateo. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Journey Center Gallery Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sacred Circle Art,â&#x20AC;? illuminated mandalas of Caterina Martinico and Patricia Waters. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.2121.

Local Color Gallery Through Aug 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Visual Feast,â&#x20AC;? landscape oil paintings by Jody Shipp. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Ending Jul 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Light,â&#x20AC;? work by various artists. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Petaluma Arts Center Aug 5-Sep 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;2011 Anonymous.â&#x20AC;? 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Aug 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boxed In: A

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House Breakfast â&#x20AC;˘ Lunch â&#x20AC;˘ Dinner BBQ â&#x20AC;˘ Pasta â&#x20AC;˘ Steak

Through Sep 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Collage/ Assemblage,â&#x20AC;? a juried exhibition, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop Abstract Expressionism,â&#x20AC;? work by Elliott Jeffries. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797. Through Aug 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scorched Earth,â&#x20AC;? sculpture and ceramics by Connie Robeson, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bibliophoria,â&#x20AC;? handmade books by Lin Max. Open daily, 11 to 6. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

Through Aug 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gimme Shelter,â&#x20AC;? portraits of homeless animals, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boxed In,â&#x20AC;? a group show. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD TOO!

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Aug 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Four Exhibits in Oneâ&#x20AC;? with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lines of Sight,â&#x20AC;? work of Ann Baldwin, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma Bounty,â&#x20AC;? work of Elizabeth Perkins,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Workâ&#x20AC;? by Sandra Speidel and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olgaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bag of Tricks,â&#x20AC;? work by Olga Storms. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY

Small Works Show,â&#x20AC;? variety of art by 56 artists. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

THUR 7/28 â&#x20AC;˘ 8:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $15 ADV/$17 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ FOLK SINGER/SONGWRITER

LANGHORNE SLIM PLUS ALISON HARRIS AND

THE BARN OWLS SAT 7/30 â&#x20AC;˘ 8:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $12 ADV/$15 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ GYPSY CABARET

Sebastopol Gallery

MYSTIC THEATRE + JUKE JOINT PRESENTS:

THE RIVER TOWN REVIVALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OFFICIAL AFTER PARTY WITH

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE PLUS BROTHERS HORSE

MALARKEY

Through Sep 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sensory Interventions,â&#x20AC;? multimedia installations by Hugh Livingston and Pat Lenz. Sat, noon to 5, and by appointment. 280 Chiquita Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.1514.

Sonoma County Museum Through Sep 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gertrud Parker: Artist and Collector,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pat Lenz: Nobodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Poodle.â&#x20AC;? Through Sep 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artistry in Wood,â&#x20AC;? fine woodworking exhibition. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

WED 8/3 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $22 ADV/$25 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ ROOTS/REGGAE

THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS PLUS BOBBY JO VALENTINE THUR 8/4 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $17 ADV/$21 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ BLUES

?8GGP?FLI ? 8GGP ?FLIÂ&#x203A;DfeĂ&#x2020;=i`#+Ă&#x2020;.gd Â&#x203A; Dfe Ă&#x2020; =i`#++Ă&#x2020;.gd

rgine e b u A

8 8cc+gdJ_fnjXi\=I<< c c + g d J _ fnj X i\ =I < <

A After Darkâ&#x20AC;Ś Da arkâ&#x20AC;Ś

N\ N\[j.&).Â&#x203A;-gdJ`^eLgÂ&#x203A;=I<< [j .&). Â&#x203A; -gd J`^e LgÂ&#x203A;=I<< Fg\eD`Z F g\eD`Z n` n`k_ k_D D`Z_X\cC`e[e\i ` Z_ X \ c C ` e [ e \ i KK_li.&)/Â&#x203A;/gdÂ&#x203A;.Â&#x203A;(/" _li.&)/Â&#x203A;/gdÂ&#x203A;.Â&#x203A;(/" d\kXc&k_iXj_&ifZb d \kX c& k_i X j_ &if Z b

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

KK?FL>?KMFD@K ?FL>?K MFD@K

Through Aug 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Six Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: Original Etchings by David Hockneyâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rebound: A Survey of Contemporary California Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books.â&#x20AC;? Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Terrasanti Jul 29-Aug 7, photographic works by David Rodriguez. Reception, Jul 29, 6 to 10. 11790 Main St, Penngrove. 707.795.5535.

Towers Gallery Ending Jul 31, new cooperative galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first exhibition features two- and threedimensional fine art, wearable art and antiques. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. ) 707.894.4331.

42

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Arts Events


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42

FUNTIME Culinary paradise aside, we still love us some deep-fried dough. The

Sonoma County Fair opens this week, running through Aug. 14. See Events, p43.

Arts Events MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Ending Jul 31, work by Wolfgang Bloch, Lawrence La Bianca, Stephen Galloway and Michael Porter; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Wooden Schooner Built in Bolinas: The Elizabeth Muir.â&#x20AC;? Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330. 7TMVMX;MRHS[4VSHYGXMSRW 'SEWXXS'SEWX4VSHYGXMSRW

Dance Palace Aug 1-Sep 15, collage by Elisa Bethptak. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

ON THE LAKE

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Depot Bookstore Aug 2-31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosebud the Rescue Dog,â&#x20AC;? paintings and mixedmedia by Vickisa. Reception, Aug 2, 6 to 7. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2665.

Donna Seager Gallery Through Aug 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Salon,â&#x20AC;? work by various artists. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. 851 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.4229.

Gallery Route One Through Aug 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outside the Lines,â&#x20AC;? annual members show. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation

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Extended through Aug 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Power, Flower Power,â&#x20AC;? black-and-white photographs of Black Panthers and HaightAshbury by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

( 41 Vault,â&#x20AC;? local artifacts; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ranching and Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at Olompaliâ&#x20AC;? features history of State Park; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing the Future: Farming Families of Marin.â&#x20AC;? Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Equilibrium,â&#x20AC;? summer exhibition. WedSun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Aug 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Open Fine Arts Show,â&#x20AC;? a juried exhibit. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Ending Jul 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Puttinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the Glitz,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media group show. Aug 2-31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bay Area Women Artists,â&#x20AC;? a group show juried by Donna Seager. Reception, Aug 2, 6 to 8. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 1-31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elegance & Essence: Visual Moments in Time,â&#x20AC;? work by Everett Jensen. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Marin History Museum

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Ongoing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treasures from the

Ending Jul 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pressing

Matters II: The Second Annual Printmakers Group Show.â&#x20AC;? 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Artist talk with Charles Linder, Jul 27 at 7. Through Sep 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zombie-Proof House,â&#x20AC;? range of media explores zombies in pop culture. Tours available Sat at 10, 11 and noon (reservation required) and Tues-Fri at 10, 11, 12 and 1 (reservation recommended). Gallery hours: Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Gallery 1870 Ongoing, works by various artists, currently highlighting Imre Buvary, Kay Geis and Takayuki Harada. 6525 Washington St, Yountville. 800.322.1870.

Napa County Historical Society Gallery Through Aug 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Pictures: Napa Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ten Threatened Treasures,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Robb McDonough. Ongoing photography exhibition explores Napa Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worldwide influence. Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. 707.224.1739.

Napa Valley Museum Aug 5-Sep 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discrepancy: Living Between War and Peace,â&#x20AC;? work by 25 artists. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.


Comedy Troupe of disabled comedians brings unique brand of humor in support of Special Olympics. Jul 30 at 8. $20. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Norm MacDonald Former SNL funnyman in an evening of standup. Jul 29 at 8. $39. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Slip-Goose Monkey Highlight performers from “Best of Sonoma County Improv 2009” tackle improvised comedic theater games on the fly. Last Thurs monthly at 7. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts with established comics and upand-comers. Tues at 8. $15$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Art Roundup Artstart’s party for the arts features benefit silent and live auctions, with music by Easy Leaves. Jul 30, 7 to 10. $40. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa. www.artstart.us.

Grapes & Grass Celebration of bluegrass music and wine with musical guests Grass It Up. Jul 29 at 8. $10. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

Men of Playgirl Join swooning tellers and squealing bachelorettes in an evening of glistening muscles and pelvic thrusts. Jul 30 at 8:30. $15-$20. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Midsummer Garden Tea Wear your best garden-party hat and enjoy traditional tea. Jul 31 at 1. $45. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Napa Valley Writers’ Conference Acclaimed poets and fiction

Panthers for Eagles Local cheerleaders help tornado-ravaged Joplin cheerleaders in gala event with wine, food, silent auction, raffles and entertainment. Jul 30, 6 to 9:30. $30. Armstrong Woods State Reserve, Armstrong Woods Road, Guerneville. 707.332.7727.

Sonoma County Fair Fair celebrates 75 years at its “Diamond Jubilee” with carnival, livestock, exhibits, flower show, contests, games, horse racing and live entertainment by Trace Adkins, Huey Lewis & the News, and others. Jul 27-Aug 14; TuesSun, 11 to 11. Free-$9. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa.www.sonomacountyfair.com.

Sunday Cruise-In Last Sun monthly at noon, fire up your hot rod and bring the kids for day of live music, food, prizes and more. Free. Fourth and Sea Restaurant, 101 Fourth St, Petaluma. www.SundayCruiseIn.com.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Cloverdale Farmers Market Fri at 5:30. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Wed, noon to 5, year round. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

Fairfax Farmers Market Wed, 4 to 8. Through Sep. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.472.6100.

French Garden

Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Friday Night Bites Interactive classes with tastes every Fri at 6. $75. Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Fort Baker, Sausalito. 888.651.2003.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Market and music every Sat, 9 to noon. Through Nov, market every Tues, 4 to 7. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand every Wed, 10 to 3. Bring your own bag. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Lobster Feed Dine upon fancy foods, sip wines, dance to live music and more. Jul 30 at 5. $95-$120. Sbragia Family Vineyards, 9990 Dry Creek Rd, Geyserville. 707.473.2992, ext 12.

Lunchtime in the Sculpture Garden Weekly activities and crepes every Thurs through Sep 29. $5-$7. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Novato Farmers Market Join 50 farmers and food purveyors and 25 different artisans in celebrating Marin county’s bounty. Every Tues, 4 to 8, through Sep. Downtown Novato, Grant Avenue, Novato. 707.472.6100, ext 104.

Occidental Farmers Market Bohemian market with live music every Fri through Oct 29, 4 to dusk. Downtown Occidental, Bohemian Highway, Occidental. www. occidentalfarmersmarket.com.

Point Reyes Farmers Market Every Sat, 9 to 1, through Nov 5. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. www.marinorganic.org.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. )

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43 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Comedians with Disabilities Act

writers present lectures and workshops throughout the week. Jul 24-29. $10-$25. Napa Valley College, Upper Valley Campus, 1088 College Ave, St Helena. www.napawritersconf.org.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

THE

ART

GALLERY

SUNDAY SERIESS

SALON

Monthly open p studios/g galleries with e red ed Ar ihF Featur A tist Sunday, July 31st

Arts Events Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

at 5:30. Free. Maxwell Farms Regional Park, 100 Verano Ave, Sonoma. 707.938.8544, ext 105.

Sea Vegetables Tonight

Live presentations of highbrow entertainment beamed from all over the world in HD. Jul 31, Don Quixote. $12-$20. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Community cooking class pulls inspiration from the sea. Jul 31, noon to 3:30. $75. Bauman College, 10151 Main St, Ste 128, Penngrove. www.baumancollege.org.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Through Nov; Sun, 10 to 1:30. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.522.9305.

Sonoma Farmers Market Fri, 9 to noon. Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Also, Through Sep; Tues, 5:30 to dusk. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Tasty Tuesdays Round-up of food trucks and home grown produce every Tues afternoon, 10 to 2. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. www.facebook. com/TastyTuesday.

Wednesday Night Market Farmers market and street fair features live music and entertainment every Wed, 5 to 8, through Aug 31. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa. www.srdowntownmarket.com.

Windsor Farmers Market Sun, 10 to 1, through Dec. Thurs evenings, 5 to 8, through Aug. Summer Thurs night market features produce, al fresco dining and live entertainment (see Concerts). Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor. 707.838.1320.

Film Still Life by Minerva Chapman, 1910 Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern & contemporary artworks.

Calabi Gallery 707.781.7070 | 144 Petaluma Blvd N calabigallery.com

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

( 43

Amos Oz: The Nature of Dreams J Street presentation and screening of film exploring Israeli-Palestinian conflict through writer’s eyes. Jul 28 at 7:30. Free. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9512.

Ballet & Opera

live music, BBQ and more every Fri at 6:30. Jul 29, “Rio.” Lucchesi Park, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. www. petalumamovies.com.

Transition Sebastopol Film Last Wed monthly at 7, join your neighbors for a monthly film series on issues of peace, justice and sustainability. Free. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

DeTurk Movies Bring a blanket for movies after dark, Fri evenings. Jul 29, “Field of Dreams.” Free. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa. jordanpoling@gmail.com.

Earth 2100: The Final Century of Civilization? Warning about what might happen will totally trip you out. Jul 28 at 6:30. Free. Sonoma Valley Grange Hall, 18627 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. 707.939.2973.

Experience the Met Summer encore of Metropolitan Opera performances live in HD. Jul 27 at 1 and 6:30, “Don Carlo.” $15. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 800.595.4849.

Film Night in the Park

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Admission: $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Central Library Babytime, Tues at 10:15. Storytime for toddlers, Tues at 11. Preschool storytime, Fri at 11. Free. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Family films en plein air now showing at parks throughout Marin county, Fri-Sat at 8pm. Jul 29, “Dirty Dancing.” Jul 30, “Casablanca.” Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo. www.filmnight.org.

Circus Bella

Finding Joe

DIY Snoopy

Filmmaker Patrick Takaya Solomon screens and discusses film about teachings of famed mythologist Joseph Campbell. Jul 31 at 7. $10.50. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Decorate and personalize your own Snoopy plush to take home. Jul 30, 1 to 3. $25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.284.1263.

Met Opera

Tues at Sat at 11, storytime for ages three and up. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Summer encore series features classic operas beamed from all over the world Sat mornings at 10am. Jul 30, “Don Carlo.” $10-$15. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Monday Night Movies Every Mon at 7:30, enjoy a classic film. Aug 1, “Viva Zapata.” Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292, ext 116.

Back to the Future

Movies in the Park

Family movie night, BBQ and skate park fundraiser. Jul 29

Free family entertainment with weekly featured film, activities,

One-ring circus with contemporary acts set to original score performed by live musicians. Jul 31 at 2. $12-$15. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Fairfax Library

Thomas John Stories, juggling and physical theater. Jul 31 at 4. $6-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Petaluma Library Tues at 10, storytime for ages three to five; at 3, read to a specially trained dog from PAWS for Healing. Wed at 10, babytime; at 7, evening pajama storytime in Spanish and


1492 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.5244.

FUNCTIONAL ART

A-List Series Conversational interviews with authors, athletes, adventurers, academics and anarchists, Wed at 7:30. Aug 3, major league baseball star Vida Blue. $12$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Scores of Oars

Rivertown Revival returns I was calmly chauffeured back to my car by a man in striped MC Hammer pants, in a boat that was actually not much more than a children’s tent sewn and painted to look like a shark. Thus ended my day at Petaluma’s Rivertown Revival last year, and at that point my situation seemed fairly mundane compared to the surrealism of the previous eight hours. The Rivertown Revival, a full-blown festival at what was a deserted section of the Petaluma river, is a free event helping the town’s unofficial mission to “keep Petaluma egg-centric.” Guests, encouraged to dress in a mashup of American West and Victorian garb, enjoy live bands, local food vendors, arts and crafts, circus acts, live art performances and, of course, a drag Art Boat racing contest with dozens of vessels designed equally for speed and silliness. A new addition this year to the Rivertown Revival are $5 weddings. Perhaps the greatest service offered, however, is the ability to inhabit a deserted piece of land and turn it into something wonderful. The grounds for the Rivertown Revival—equipped with overgrown weeds, a beached steel boat and an abandoned Ghirardelli building—have become a landmark of quirky, Petaluman beauty rather than an eyesore. Indeed, that’s something to celebrate. The second annual Rivertown Revival goes off on Saturday, July 30, on the McNear Penninsula, Petaluma. 11am–7pm. Free. www.rivertownrevival.com.—Emily Hunt English. Fri at 10, storytime for toddlers. Sat at 4, parent-child reading group for second- and third-graders. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Handmade Gifts

Backpacking Basics John Counter takes the mystery out of backpacking. Jul 27 at 7. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 707.540.9025.

Science Buzz Cafe Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Jul 28, “The Secret Lives of Stars” with John Whitehouse. $3 donation. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

Spark Artists KQED and Di Rosa pair up to present arts lecture series. Jul 27 at 7, Charles Linder. Aug 31 at 7, Sandow Birk. $10. Di Rosa, 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991, ext 27.

Readings Book Passage Jul 27 at 7, “A Discovery of Witches” with Deborah Harkness. Jul 30 at 1, “Artistry Unleashed: A Guide to Pursuing Great Performance in Work and Life” with Hilary Austin; at 4, “Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex” with Joan Price; at 7, “Noe” with Phil Wolfson and Isabel Allende. Aug 1 at 7, “Conquistadora” with Esmeralda Santiago. Aug 2 at 7, “Northwest Corner” with John Burnham Schwatz. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Napa Copperfield’s Books Jul 31 at 6, “The Griff: A Graphic Novel” with Christopher Moore and Ian Corson. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002.

St Helena Library Tues and Thurs at 7, free film series. Tues at 10:30, Wed at noon and Fri at 10, story and craft time. St Helena Library,

Fine & Fashion Jewelry

Theater Company Bachelor Robert

) 46

146 N. Main Street, Sebastopol • 707.829.3036 10:30–6pm, Sun til 5pm • artisanafunctionalart.com

45 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Lectures

necklace by Kristina Kada

CRITIC’S CHOICE


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 27-AUGUST 2, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2PM

CHRISTOPHER MOORE AND IAN CORSON The Griff: A Graphic Novel WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 7PM

JOHN BURNHAM SCHWARTZ Author of Reservation Road Northwest Corner NAPA STORE

August 27-28 END OF SUMMER/BACK TO SCHOOL SALE!

...because it’s still our Birthday! FIND ALL YOUR

SUMMER

READING AND

www.copperfieldsbooks.com

and misplaced jealousies. Through Aug 7. $10-$25. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

The Complete History of America (Abridged)

Theatrical version of John Waters’ cult classic film a delightful musical. Through Aug 13. $10-$25. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)

STOREWIDE SALE

ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS AT:

weighs pros and cons of married life in Steven Sondheim musical. Through Aug 7. $10$25. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Irreverent three-man romp through annals of our nation’s past. Jul 30-Sep 25; Fri-Sun at 8, Sun at 4. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael. www.marinshakespeare.org.

NAPA STORE

6367 Sonoma Mtn. Rd. Santa Rosa, CA 95404 707.545.8105 www.smzc.net

( 45

Outdoor performance squishes the bard’s works into a delectable, bite-sized picnic treat. Jul 27-28 at 7. Free. Veteran’s Park, Third and Main streets, Napa. 707.256.7500. Outdoor performance squishes the Bard’s works into a delectable, bite-sized picnic treat. Jul 26-28 at 7. Free. Veterans Memorial Park, Third and Main, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Hairspray

Macbeth Murder, remorse and madness stalk bloody story of ambition and fate. Through Aug 14; FriSat at 8, Sun at 4. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael. 415.499.4488.

Much Ado About Nothing All the park’s a stage when actors perform Shakespearean tale of love, trickery and bickery. Ending Jul 31; Fri-Sun at 7. Free. Veterans Memorial Park, Third and Main, Napa. 707.256.7500.

The Petrified Forest

Play based on 1988 film is the musical story of two competing con men. Through Aug 11. $10$25. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Waitress and patrons in a roadside diner bare their souls after a gangster takes everyone hostage. Ending Jul 31; ThursSat at 8, Sun at 3. $20-$24. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

A Flea in Her Ear

The Piano Lesson

Classic farce follows a complex series of mistaken identities

Haunting family drama about coming to terms with the past.

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

Through Aug 9. $10-$25. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Redwood Radio Dramatic ensemble reading from local author Michael Fel’s new book “Fetching Molly.” Jul 27 at 7. Free. River Reader, 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2240.

Table Manners Domestic comedy about a chaotic British family. Through Aug 14; Thurs-Sat at 7:30, Sun at 2. $15-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Urinetown: The Musical Hilarious tale of greed, corruption, love and revolution. Jul 28-31; Thurs-Fri at 7:30, Sat-Sun at 2. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it by email to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Please DO NOT SEND e-mail attachments. The BOHEMIAN is not responsible for photos. Events costing more than $35 may be withheld. Deadline is 2 weeks prior to desired publication date.

SURF’S UP Sbragia Family Vineyards hosts a lobster feed July 30 in Geyserville. See Food & Drink, p43.


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Auditions

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

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One Instruction - Enriched Middle/High School Curriculum - Special Studies/Independent Study - Emphasizing Music & Art Serving Grades 7-12 Shared Housing NOW ENROLLING !! Call 707-795-7166 ALL AREAS www.ranchobodegaschool. ROOMMATES.COM com Browse hundreds of online

Real Estate Services

Needed immediately for Decks/Fencing upcoming roles $150$300/day depending on job Heritage Fence Paid In Advance! requirements. No experience, Make $1,000 a Week mailing Builders all looks. 1-800-560-8672 brochures from home! Quality built to withstand A-109. For casting times/ Guaranteed Income! FREE time. Free estimates. locations. (AAN CAN) Pet Services Supplies! No experience All type of fencing and gates. Status: Ad Status: NEW AD required. Start Immediately! Licensed Contractor #904463. Horse Boarding www.homemailerprogram.net 707-321-7210 Private paddocks, pastures (AAN CAN) available. Good security and bonded. Hessel road. $$$HELP Contact Jim 707-933-7118. Jobs

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Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

2011 Federal Postal Positions. $13.00-$36.50+/hr., Full Benefits plus Paid Training. No Experience plus Job Security. Call Today! 1-866-477-4953 Ext. 152. NOW Hiring. (AAN CAN)

Adoptions

Pregnant? Considering Adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

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Adult Services Do you really want to BE with a Woman who’s been with 1000s of Men? Join AshleyMadison.com and meet real Women in your city who are trapped in Sexless Marriages. We’re 100% Secure, Anonymous & Guaranteed! (AAN CAN)

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With over 2.3 million Women AshleyMadison.com is the #1 Discreet Dating service for Married Women looking to have a Discreet Affair. Sign-up for FREE at AshleyMadison.com. Featured on: Howard Stern, Sports Illustrated & MAXIM. (AAN CAN) Class: Dating

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A Rare Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please, no calls after midnight. No blocked calls, No texts. Kara, 415/233-2769.

Miscellaneous Services

Miscellaneous

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Classes & Instruction

Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-Up/Tow. Fast, affordable and Any Model/Condition. accredited. Free brochure. Help Under Privileged Call Now!. 1-888-532-6546 Children Outreach Center ext. 97 www.continentalacad- 1-800-419-7474. (AAN CAN) emy.com. (AAN CAN)

High School Diploma!

Youth Failing School or School Failing Our Youth ? Try Rancho Bodega School Small Group/One on

g listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

2 ROOMS FOR RENT I have 2 rooms for rent in an owner occupied Rohnert Park townhouse. Both are upstairs, complete with bathroom. Available at the end of July. $435 ea, or both for $860. Full use of rest of house incl. garage lounge area and organic garden in back. Call 707.795.0924 ask 4 Mark or email: schaumann1@ earthlink.net

MEET SOMEONE NOW! CALL NOW!

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Great Massage

Chiropractic

MAGIC HANDS

By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage with light stretching and pool available. Will do for men/women. Flexible M-F outcalls. 707-228-6883. schedule; Incalls only 60min/$60 | 90min/$75 Women, Men, Please call Leo 707-623-609

& Couples

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You need a massage! I am an Psychics easygoing provider of PSYCHIC PALM AND pleasure since 1991. Good virtues. NW Santa Rosa, CARD READER Jimmy, (C) 707-799-4467 Madame Lisa. Truly gifted or (L) 707-527-9497. adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707-542-9898

Massage & Relaxation

Healing & Bodywork

PAIN/STRESS RELIEF Professional male massage therapist; strong, deep healing bodywork. 1 hr $50, 1 1/2 hr/$70. 707-536-1516 www. CompleteBodyBalance.com

Man of Your Dreams Men, women, couples. TLC, massage, Tantra, nurturing mutual touch. William 707.548.2187

RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 11 yrs experience. 707-542-6856

Bearhands4u Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, professional. 707/291-3804. Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. Outcalls available.

The Relaxation Station

4HAIs$EEP4ISSUE Swedish #OUPLES-ASSAGE by appointment, walk-ins welcome

707.528.2540 3401 Cleveland Ave #2 Santa Rosa

Russian River Massage

Full body massage, body electric experience. In /Out. Body shaving/trimming available. Bob 707-865-2093.

Step off the World, into.... A sanctuary of pleasure and relaxation. Enjoy the best of healing and sensual massage by a lovely lady with a caring touch. Quality and class Accept Visa/MC. Tania. C.M.T. 707-477-1766. Santa Rosa.

A Safe Place To Be Real Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. First time client discount. Call after 10:30am. 707-793-2232.

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707/478-3952.

Guerneville M4M Massage Mitch, CMT. Mature. Professional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private discrete studio. 707-849-7409

7/2+ 3(/03 Secrets of the Vine Christ said, I am the vine; you are the branches. Walk the vineyards of Paradise Ridge Winery discussing the care of the vine in our county and spiritual lives. Wed, August 3, 5:45p, Journey Center, 707-578-2121, www.journeycenter.org .

Centering Prayer Retreat Day Experience a variety of contemplative prayer practices. Beginners welcome. Sat, August 6, 10a-3p, Journey Center, 707-578-2121, www.journeycenter.org.


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SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone. s 3UBUTEX3UBOXONE AVAILABLE s 0ROVIDING 4REATMENT SINCE  s #ONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED s -EDI#AL ACCEPTED

1901 CLEVELAND AVE SUITE B SANTA ROSA 707.576.0818 www.srtp.net

Medical Marijuana Certifications

FOOD ALLERGIES? CHRONIC FATIGUE?

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257

A & A Kitchens

Full exam. Low cost. No charge if you do not qualify. Santa Rosa. Authentication 24/7. 707-591-4088.

Integrative approaches for optimal wellness. Carlisle Holland DO 707-824-8764 holonomicinstitute.com

Creative Light Productions

Does Your Business Need a Fresh Start?

We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators- 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

Need commercial kitchen space? Our spot will accomodate all your culinary needs. Stop lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and start cookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;! Call us in St Helena, CA at 707.968.9474

Professional photographer & videographer weddings, parties, special events. Local: (707) 527-6004, Toll Free: (800) 942-8433 www.creativelightproductions.com

Euro Business Solutions Can Help You Discover & Succeed! Call Freddie Baggerman for a FREE Consultation: 707.483.5135

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE 707-546-4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

T.H. Bead Design & Repair Quality beads, sterling silver clasps, etc. Custom necklaces, earrings and bracelets for you or that someone special. Jewlery repair available also, no soldering. 707.696.9812, tiffany_beadsandpieces@yahoo.com Now doing jewelry parties

Art Roundup Artstartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party for the arts features benefit silent and live auctions, with music by Easy Leaves. Jul 30, 7 to 10. $40. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa, www.artstart.us.

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Sign up Now-Integrative Yoga Teacher Training

Attorney Evan Livingstone (707) 206-6570 740 4th St, Suite 215, Santa Rosa Free Consult

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Fair celebrates 75 years at its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diamond Jubileeâ&#x20AC;? with carnival, livestock, exhibits, flower show, contests, games, horse racing and live entertainment by Trace Adkins, Huey Lewis & the News, and others. Jul 27-Aug 14; Tues-Sun, 11 to 11. Free-$9. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, www.sonomacountyfair.com.

Call 707.527.1200

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tankless water heaters, high efficiency toilets recirculation, general plumbing needs. Call 707.528.8228

Celebration of bluegrass music and wine with musical guests Grass It Up. Jul 29 at 8. $10. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.8022.

Spiritually oriented psychotherapy for couples and individuals reveals unconditional loving as our true nature. After 15 years in Berkeley, Gateway Institute is now in Healdsburg. Heather Parrish, Ph.D. MFC36455. 707-473-9553.

Bankruptcy, DUI, Injury

Water Conservation Experts. Friendly, Honest Service. Licensed, Bonded and Insured. License #871026

Grapes & Grass

(red)Are You Seeking More Meaningful Relationships?

September 2011!! 200 hour non-residential program. 1 wknd/mo for 10 months. Bodyworks-Integrative Yoga Studio. 490 2nd St., Petaluma. 707-769-9933 or www.bodyworksyoga.com

Santa Rosa Plumbing

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BUSINESS CARDS â&#x20AC;˘ BROCHURES POSTERS â&#x20AC;˘ T-SHIRTS â&#x20AC;˘ CD COVERS FLYERS â&#x20AC;˘ PHOTOGRAPHIC RESTORATION

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. (707) 576 1919

Photography by Paul Burke 707.664.0178 boomburke@hotmail.com

MacAdvantage Macintosh Computer Repair FREE Diagnosis, Friendly In-House Staff Answer Calls, Hardware/Software, DATA Recovery, Internet, Email, Wireless Network Setup & Security, Apple Authorized Business Agent, Tam Nguyen-Chief Tech, M-F 10-6. 707.664.0400, info@themacadvantage.com

general marketing materials

Mark Schaumann 707.795.0924

schaumann1@earthlink.net


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