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JANUARY 2018

YEARS OF #OKCFAMILYFUN

T

EX

C TA N O , C on N ic AR this E , L or RE f O ook L l P


2018 winter/spring season

Activities Guide

edmond parks & recreation

Come with us!

@ edmond parks

Kids in the Kitchen | Spring Ar t & Po ttery | Upstage Theatre | Dance Classes

Spring Break Activities

Follow us on


The Catholic School of St. Eugene PreK3 - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK steugeneschool.org 405.751.0067 Open House: 1/25/18 Grades 1-8 Open House: 2/10/18 Grades PreK3-Kindergarten

St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School PreK - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK stcharlesokc.org 405.789.0224 Open House: 3/4/18, 2:30-3:45 pm

St. Philip Neri Catholic School PreK3 - 8th Grade Midwest City, OK stphilipnerischool.com 405.737.4496 Open House: 1/28/18, 12:15-2 pm

Rosary Catholic School

National Blue Ribbon School PreK3 - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK rosaryschool.com 405.525.9272 Open House: 1/28/18, 1-3 pm

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School PreK3-8th Grade Edmond, OK stelizabethedmond.org 405.348.5364 Open House: 1/28/18, 1-3 pm

St. John Nepomuk Catholic School PreK3 - 8th Grade Yukon, OK sjnok.org/school 405.354.2509 Open House: 1/28/18, 12-1:30 pm

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School

Secondary College Preparatory Grades 9 - 12 Oklahoma City, OK bmchs.org 405.842.6638

Private tours may be scheduled with the principal.

Call to schedule a shadow visit & tour.

Sacred Heart Catholic School/OKC

PreK3 - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK ckschool.com 405.843.3909

PreK4 - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK sacredheartokc.org 405.634.5673

Call to schedule a visit.

Cristo Rey Oklahoma City Catholic High School Secondary College Preparatory Grades 9 - 12 Oklahoma City, OK (On the OSU-OKC Campus) cristoreyokc.org 405.896.2300 Call to schedule a visit.

Mount St. Mary Catholic High School

Secondary College Preparatory Grades 9 - 12 Oklahoma City, OK mountstmary.org 405.631.8865

Call to set up a shadow visit & tour.

Christ the King Catholic School

Call to schedule a visit.

St. James Catholic School PreK3 - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK stjames-catholic.org 405.636.6810 Open House: 1/28/18, 12-2 pm

Bishop John Carroll Cathedral School PreK - 8th Grade Oklahoma City, OK bjccs.org 405.525.0956 Open House: PreK-Kindergarten, 2/27/18, 5:30-7 pm

Tours for other grades by appointment.

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Features 8 New & Noteworthy Four things catching our attention this month in OKC 10 Teacher for a Day Discover what our editor learned in a local classroom 12 Immigrants in OKC Learn more about education barriers for immigrant students 16 Celebrating 20 Years A timeline of milestones from 20 years of MetroFamily Magazine 38 Education Guide 44 Exploring Prehistoric Oklahoma Four dinosaur destinations

38

In Every Issue 6 Ages & Stages Something for every age and stage at the Oklahoma State Capitol 20 Calendar of Events 42 Where Are They Now? Catch up with cover kids from one of our early issues 46 Real Dad of the Metro Get to know the new OKC Philharmonic Conductor Alexander Mickelthwate

44

8

Tackle those resolutions: If your family is resolving to be healthier this year, you’re in luck. We’ve gathered some of the best fitness events and activities for families all in one place at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/ fitness-fun.

Your child could be the lucky winner of a child’s pair. Enter to win our Skate Galaxy contest, which includes a one-year VIP Family Pass! Enter before Feb. 6.

Web Exclusives Family Favorites nominations are open: We’re inviting our readers to tell us about the best familyfriendly businesses and services in the Oklahoma City metro. Nominations are open Jan. 9-26. Readers will be able to vote on the most-nominated businesses Feb. 1-16. Submit your nominations at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/ nominate-favorites. 2018 OKC Bucket List: One of our most popular features from 2017 is back! We’ve rounded up our top 18 activities for families to do in Oklahoma City in 2018. Find them at www.metrofamilymagazine. com/2018.

4 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

Nominate a Family Advocate: We’re honoring the businesses, organization and people who make Oklahoma City a great place to raise a family. Nominate someone by Jan. 20 at www.metrofamilymagazine. com/nominate.

Contests

Skate through 2018 at Skate Galaxy OKC: Santa didn’t bring you skates?

My Venture Pass giveaway: A Venture Pass is your ticket to family fun in the new year! We’re giving away four all-inclusive passes, which grant you access to a dozen venues, including White Water Bay, Frontier City, Andy Alligator’s and Elevation Trampoline Park. Deadline to enter is Feb. 9. Enter at metrofamilymagazine.com/ contests.


Publisher

Sarah Taylor

Managing Editor Hannah Schmitt

Assistant Editor Lindsay Cuomo

Contributing Writers

Erin Page & Miranda Steffen & Mae Kiggins

Contributing Photographer Emily Hart

Contributing Illustrator Chris Castro

Art Director Stacy Noakes

Marketing Director Callie Collins

Sales

Athena Delce, Dana Price

Project Manager Jessica Misun

Office/Distribution Kathy Alberty

Business Development

PHOTO COURTESY OF VISIT OKC

J

anuary is a new start for a lot of people. For us here at the magazine, this month kicks off a celebration of the past. MetroFamily turns 20 years old this year! We’re honored to have been a part of Oklahoma City families for two decades. I’ve had the privilege of looking through the magazine’s archives the past few months and so much has changed in the city and with the magazine during that time. We’ve certainly weathered ups and downs (flip to page 16 to see lots of the “ups” on our timeline of magazine milestones). You don’t have to be in publishing to know there have been times in the past few years that the future looked a little uncertain for

Shelly Sanderson

magazines. But we’re experiencing a more dedicated audience than ever before. As Oklahoma City continues to gain a reputation as a great place for young families, we’re thrilled to connect parents with endless ideas for having fun and growing together. We’re grateful for new platforms and technologies that help us keep connecting with our audience in new and exciting ways and we can’t wait to see what our next 20 years will bring. To learn more about everything we’re doing to celebrate our 20th anniversary, visit www.metrofamilymagazine.com/20. Hannah Schmitt Editor

Contact us

318 NW 13th St, Ste 101 OKC OK 73103 Phone: 405-601-2081 Fax: 405-445-7509 sarah@metrofamilymagazine.com www.metrofamilymagazine.com

This Month’s Cover

MetroFamily Magazine is published monthly. Copyright 2018 by Inprint Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Articles and advertisements in MetroFamily do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Inprint Publishing, Inc. We do not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by MetroFamily does not constitute an endorsement of the products, services, or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service which is fraudulent or misleading in nature.

Our 20th anniversary cover photo was provided by the Oklahoma City Convention & Visitor’s Bureau (visitokc.com). The photo was taken at the Wheeler Wheel, one of many family-friendly destinations that have popped up in Oklahoma City since our magazine started in 1998.

Circulation audited by

Proud member of

Wheeler District

Also a member of Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, Edmond Chamber of Commerce & Moore Chamber of Commerce

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

5


&

JUST ABOUT

ages stages

ANYTHING can happen at the

Oklahoma History Center!

The Oklahoma Capitol:

A Visitor’s Guide for Every Age & Stage BY MIRANDA STEFFEN

A passion for politics, or simply a working knowledge of what is happening in one’s state does not have an age restriction. Just like a sport, a skill or any interest, exposing children to the political process while they are young will increase the chances of involved and informed future voters. The Oklahoma Capitol is an ideal place to take children of all ages and abilities for a handson learning experience. Here’s how to explore our Capitol with kids of all ages and abilities.

Infants and Toddlers

It’s never too early to expose your children to local government. But before children are old enough to experience what’s happening at the Capitol, they’ll enjoy the public art and unique architecture. Visitor parking is directly south of the Capitol building behind the legislators’ assigned parking spots. Wearing your infant or bringing a stroller for your toddler will make the trip a little easier. Upon arrival, you’ll go through a metal detector and all bags are scanned. Liquids like bubbles are prohibited but snacks and bottles are approved for entry.

School Aged

Taking a school-aged child to the Capitol is a wonderful opportunity to not only teach children about the basics of government but to also teach them how to advocate for issues important to them. DeLyn Rich is a local mom who advocates for issues impacting Oklahoma children and she takes her sons, 7 and 11, with her. “I am attempting to plant the seed of involvement and political action, early” Rich said about visiting the Capitol with her kids. While the public is welcome to visit their representative or senator’s offices at any time, parents can call ahead to request

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(405) 522-0765 www.okhistory.org 800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr./OKC

6 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


an appointment to guarantee a face-toface. Allowing children to speak to their lawmakers shows them they have a voice that is just as important as everyone else’s.

EXCELLENCE CONFIDENCE INTEGRITY

Capitol Art Field Trip Guide Oklahoma Arts Council

In addition to meeting their lawmakers, selfguided and volunteer-led tours are available to families on weekdays. The volunteer-led tours begin on the first floor at the welcome center and take about 45 minutes. They begin on the hour between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Teenagers

As adolescence begins, teenagers inch closer to becoming registered voters. It is imperative they understand the importance of an informed vote, especially in Oklahoma. Although record numbers turned out for the 2016 presidential election, Oklahoma consistently ranks in the bottom 10 states in the country for voter turnout. The 2018 Legislative Session runs from February through May, giving teenagers an opportunity to sit in the gallery and watch their government at work. The House sessions typically start at 1:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays and 9 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The daily agenda for the House floor can be accessed online in order to verify any changes in schedule. Additionally, high school sophomores, juniors and seniors are encouraged to apply to the Oklahoma House of Representatives High School Page Program. If selected, the teenager will work for one week as a page assisting the legislators and working in the House Chamber. To apply, interested parties should contact their local representative’s office.

Special/Additional Needs

All children should have the opportunity to visit the Capitol, regardless of need and/or ability. Erin Taylor works at the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council. She has a son with additional needs and she’s a regular advocate at the Capitol. “I think part of my parenting job is to raise good citizens and that means showing them how the government works,” Taylor said. “Legislators need to meet a kid like mine so they can see he is filled with tremendous potential, but that we must fund supports so he can achieve that potential.”

Please join us with your family for Capitol Art Field Trip Guide • 1

Tuesday, March 6, 2018 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Print this before your visit! The Oklahoma Arts Council offers a printable Field Trip Guide at www.arts.ok.gov that families can use to discover the Capitol and State Art Collections.

MIDDLE DIVISION (Grades 5-8) McClendon Building

“It is absolutely vital for lawmakers to see and get to know all of their constituents,” said Fearing. “When kids with disabilities advocate for themselves and meet legislators, it shows our lawmakers that ‘disability’ issues are people issues with a real face and real impacts.” The Capitol offers a number of services to visitors with disabilities. Interpreters for the deaf and hard of hearing are available with a 48-hour notice. Constituents can meet with their legislators in ADA compliant conference rooms that are available on a number of floors. All documents can be made available in large print or braille. For more information, contact the House of Representatives ADA Coordinator Jennifer Shockley at 405-521-2711. [Editor’s Note: Find more ideas for age-specific adventures at www. metrofamilymagazine.com/ages-stages.]

Josh Fearing, a special education teacher in Norman, agreed. He takes students in grades 6, 7 and 8 to the Capitol to teach them about self-advocacy.

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

OPEN HOUSES

7

LOWER DIVISION (Grades 1-4) Powell Building 9500 North Pennsylvania Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73120 405.749.3185 www.casady.org

This is CASADY. Casady School is a PreK-12, independent, college preparatory, Episcopal day school committed to deeper-level learning. Casady School seeks a diverse, inclusive student body that reflects the diversity of the world around us and therefore admits students of any race, color, creed, religion, nationality, or ethnic origin.


AGES & STAGES

New & Noteworthy:

Four things catching our attention this month

12 Months

of Family Fun 1 Great Pass! Oklahoma City Venture Pass

BABIES AT THE MUSEUM. PHOTO PROVIDED.

Babies at the Museum

What a great family deal!

In July, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art launched a brand new monthly event just for tiny art lovers. Babies at the Museum was announced as a once-amonth experience for infants but the event was more popular than anyone could have guessed. Due to extraordinary demand, the museum is upping their offerings to five public sessions per month offered on the first and last Friday, first and last Saturday and first Sunday of each month. The event is $5 for members, $12 for non-members and includes admission to the museum, coffee for parents, playtime for babies and an educator-led gallery experience. Register by emailing learn@okcmoa.com.

A bright spot in local education We’re celebrating with the administrators of Oklahoma City’s Little Light Christian School this month that their 33 students get to return from the holiday break to enjoy their second semester in their new campus. Little Light is a tuition-free school exclusively for local children whose parents are incarcerated. The school depends completely on donations to provide an education but also uniforms, meals and transportation for students. Earlier this year, the school received a $1.6 million gift from the JASCO Giving Hope Foundation to purchase the new campus.

For one low price, get 12 months of FREE admission* to these great attractions, including Frontier City and White Water Bay! LEARN MORE & PURCHASE HERE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

LITTLE LIGHT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL. PHOTO PROVIDED.

www.MyVenturePass.com * Some attractions have limited days/hours to attend for free admission; Frontier City and White Water Bay have no restrictions.

8 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


LITTLE LIGHT CHRISTIAN SCHOOL. PHOTO PROVIDED.

The school originally opened in a small Baptist church in 2012. The new campus allows them to grow and better serve existing students. “Many children of incarcerated parents struggle with issues like depression, grief, anger and ADHD,” explained Robin Khoury, the founder of Little Light Ministries and principal of Little Light Christian School. “This is why they often struggle in school. According to statistics, they are seven times more likely to follow in their parents’ footsteps to incarceration by their 24th birthday. We are committed to breaking the cycle of generational incarceration for our students. One of the keys to doing this is education.” If you’d like to give to the school to help them grow their impact in Oklahoma, visit www.littlelightschool.org.

New event for new moms It’s no secret new moms face a serious learning curve. Two local moms are hosting an event they hope lightens the load a little by connecting new parents to local resources. Dee Hoshall and Christina Hess are hosting the BabiesOK Expo from noon to 5 p.m. Jan. 7 at State Fair Park. The event will feature vendors representing a range of resources and products for new parents like smash cake bakeries, baby photographers, birthing centers and doulas and boutiques that offer maternity and baby clothes. Tickets are $7 or $15 for those who want to visit BabiesOK and the OKBrides Expo. Learn more at www.babiesok.com.

Pine Pantry makes it easy to keep the giving going Charity efforts usually ramp up during the holiday season but there’s no reason not to continue fostering a spirit of generosity in your kids this month. Pine Pantry keeps giving top-of-mind with two metro locations: in the Plaza District at N.W. 16th and Blackwelder and at Sunnyside Diner at 916 N.W. 6th St. Drop non-perishable food items in the community-supported free food pantry and use it as an opportunity to remind your children about food insecurity facing many Oklahomans. [Editor’s Note: If you drop off a donation at Sunnyside Diner, be sure to check out our Thrive & Dime blogger Keely Steger’s thoughts on the restaurant. She takes her family of six out to local hotspots for under $40 and writes about it at www. metrofamilymagazine.com/thrive-and-dime.]

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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Teacher for a Day

WORDS & PHOTOS BY HANNAH SCHMITT

A personal essay about my day in an Oklahoma City Pubic Schools classroom If I had to use one word to sum up the news that’s come out about Oklahoma education in the past year it would be grim. So when I got an email invitation from Oklahoma City Public Schools to attend their Teacher For A Day program, I honestly felt some trepidation. After all, reading about an issue and commiserating about it to your peers is so much easier than experiencing it firsthand (which I’m sure is the point of the program). But grim is the last word I would use to describe my day with Mrs. Price’s fourth grade class at Arthur Elementary in southwest Oklahoma City. The students were eager to learn, the facility was impressive and the administrators and teachers were obviously passionate about their jobs. So why all the bad news about education?

Well, the teachers are educating against all odds. When Price wasn’t being given the basic tools to do her job, she got them herself. Price is an award-winning, Nationally Board Certified teacher with 23 years of experience who hasn’t gotten a raise since 2008. But she helped write a grant a couple years ago that resulted in every student at Arthur receiving his or her own iPad. Apple provided the 715 iPads to students and about another 50 iPads and MacBooks to teachers and administrators through their ConnectEd initiative. The company launches the program in schools where at least 96 percent of students are

10 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

eligible for free or reduced-price lunch programs in an effort to level the playing field with technology. The Apple partnership is just one of many things Price rattled off she’s gotten through grants. So I asked her, “If you’re a teacher and you don’t write grants, are you basically screwed?” “Oh yeah,” she said. “In fact, nobody does that anymore. Either the teachers buy it, they clean out their closets at home to bring it here or they ask for it on donorschoose.org.” Donorschoose.org invites public school teachers to post classroom project requests that are fulfilled by the general public. Price pointed out some of her own classroom materials provided by donors on the site, including her printer and printer ink. It’s a huge resource for all OKCPS teachers. A search on the site at the beginning of December showed 285 unfulfilled needs posted by local teachers. But surprisingly, a lack of classroom resources aren’t Price’s biggest pain point. I asked her to tell me the biggest change in her job in the past 23 years. “Teaching with people who aren’t teachers,” she said. Dipping teacher salaries combined with growing classroom sizes are just a couple of the challenges OKCPS has faced while trying to recruit teachers in the past few years. District officials have tried a variety of tactics to get teachers into classrooms, Price said, but many of the students in her fourth grade class today have spent the past couple years without

consistent instruction from certified teachers. Teacher recruitment issues led to her fourth graders being taught by a combination of student teachers, substitutes and teachers with emergency certifications in second and third grade. Those experiences have snowballed into fourth graders who are behind. “If you are a warm body without a felony on your record, you can get emergency certified,” Price said jokingly (there are some other requirements to obtaining an emergency certification). Granting emergency certifications to make up for a teacher shortage is a problem the State Department of Education is aware of and wants to address. There were about 1,800 emergency certified teachers statewide at the end of November when the department set a goal to reduce the number of emergency teaching certificates to less than 60 by 2025. Price said even as an accomplished teacher herself, she finds it challenging to bring other teachers up to speed who aren’t specifically trained to work in a classroom setting. Spending a day at Arthur Elementary made me realize there are teachers in OKCPS classrooms who will do what it takes to make their students successful regardless of actions from legislators. My best hope is that anyone reading this will find the same passion Price has found for teaching kids at all costs. Regardless of decisions made at the Capitol regarding Oklahoma kids, there are 285 teachers on donorschoose.org right now asking us to step up and help them do their jobs and I pledge to pick one of them to fund today. Who’s with me?


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GROW At St. Mary’s, students are given the opportunity to learn AND play. With quality enrichment programs and nurturing teachers, students can discover and pursue their passions in a safe, supportive environment.

OPEN HOUSE JANUARY 30, 2018 8:30-10:30 a.m. RSVP to the admissions office at 405.341.9541 x103

ST. MARY’S SCHOOL

Since 1977 505 E. Covell Rd. Edmond, OK

• Preschool - 5th Grade • Before & After School Programs • Full STEAM Curriculum • Spanish Beginning in Preschool

Discover the St. Mary’s Difference www.smesedmond.org


HIGHER E D U C AT I O N AHEAD

The power of education

Local immigrant students persist despite hardship Brenda Grant was the first in her family to graduate high school and college, her younger sisters following in her footsteps. A teacher at Santa Fe South High School for the past 11 years, Grant now inspires her students in similar situations. With a high population of first-generation Americans, the journey isn’t always easy, but the lesson Grant imparts to her students is worth it. “You have more options, as opposed to limiting yourself to what was available to your parents,” Grant said of pursuing higher education. “My life has changed completely because I gave myself the opportunity to learn and gain knowledge and experience. That’s a gift I want to give my students.” Grant teaches Senior Seminar at Santa Fe South, where she helps students prepare for the ACT, write essays for college applications, craft resumes and apply for financial aid. For many of her students, English is their second language and despite proficiency, they face challenges like testing anxiety.

12 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

“The language they speak at school is not the language they speak at home,” said Grant. “Even though they are used to speaking English, they are having to translate constantly.” Grant calls her students resilient and hardworking. Janet Gorton, coordinator for English Learners for Norman Public Schools said those students who continue to show up to gain their educations, despite language challenges, are courageous. Many of her students were recipients of DACA before the program was rescinded by the Trump Administration in September 2017. Raul Font, president of the Latino Community Development Agency (LCDA), said it’s challenging for them to concentrate on school when their very futures in the only place most of them have ever called home is uncertain. There are currently more than 800,000 DACA recipients in the United States with nearly 7,000 calling Oklahoma home. They are undocumented immigrants, brought to this country as children, whose application for the program allowed them to receive work permits, apply for driver’s licenses, pursue education, pay taxes and stay exempt from deportation. As time ticks down on Congress’ six-month timeframe to pass

BY ERIN PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHRIS CASTRO

legislative action to continue the program or solidify DACA recipients’ path to citizenship, Grant said fear and anxiety are prevalent among her students. While federal laws and Supreme Court precedent require equal access to public education for all youth, including those who are undocumented, Font, a former OKCPS principal, said Trump’s promises to crack down on deportations have affected school attendance in the metro. “As soon as the president was named in November [2016], we had problems with attendance at [Oklahoma City Public Schools] because people were afraid their kids were going to be profiled,” said Font. “We’ve had to talk to these kids and parents because they were dropping their kids in tears thinking they weren’t going to see each other at the end of the day.” According to the Journal of Adolescent Research, undocumented youth in particular experience high levels of stress from immigration-related issues as they assimilate to the United States. Fear of potential separation from family, detention and deportation can cause depression and anxiety. Although Grant finds it difficult to reassure her senior students to continue to apply for college and scholarships despite the uncertainty surrounding


immigration policies, she encourages them to keep working like they were before the announcement. “They just want the opportunity to make something of themselves,” said Grant. “They want to give back. They don’t want to take anything from anyone.” As immigrant students, both documented and undocumented, navigate their right to a public school education in the state of Oklahoma, they often face challenges above and beyond native students, perhaps making their achievements of their educational goals that much more meaningful.

The challenge:

Learning English Particularly since DACA was rescinded, Norman Public Schools has reassured families that every child is entitled to an education, no matter their citizenship status. “We care about each child and want them to be successful here,” said Gorton of the district’s stance. “That’s helped our families feel safe and secure.” Last year, NPS reported 80 different languages spoken among district families, making the district’s English Learner program an essential piece of many students’ educations. As part of public school enrollment across the state and nation, families answer questions that help district officials determine whether students could benefit from the program. According to the Education Commission of the States, in 2014, 6.7 percent of students in Oklahoma, or more than 44,000 students, were classified English Language Learners. ELL students may have some English proficiency, or may not even know the word “hello.” For students used to school in other cultures or parts of the world, the size of U.S. schools, how to interact with teachers and even cafeteria norms are daunting.

“It’s like being in a world where you wish there were subtitles all day long,” said Gorton. “All they can do [at first] is just follow and model their peers.” At NPS, the English Learner program is part of students’ normal school day. Elementary students often have direct English instruction with a small group of students for a portion of their day, working on listening, speaking, reading and writing

skills, but spend the majority of their school days in their regular classrooms. In middle school and high school, students take an English Learner class, or an English Learner teacher attends class with them to provide support. Gorton said NPS teachers are used to providing differentiated instruction for all their students, not just those in the ELL program, and are committed to determining what support or modifications help meet each students’ specific learning needs.

Saturdays for Kids First Saturday of each month 10:00 a.m. – Noon

“There is no cookie-cutter approach,” said Gorton. “We identify where they are in their skills, knowing where we want them to be and matching what best supports them in achieving that outcome.” Gorton said it takes students an average of two to three years to become proficient in social language, what students use in the classroom, hallways and playground with their peers. But it takes five to seven years for students to become proficient in academic language, which is the vocabulary specific to classroom content, like physics or government. Every student, no matter their native language, has to learn this type of academic language and it’s a process that takes years. “There’s no such thing as a native speaker of academic vocabulary,” said Gorton. “But for English learners, it may take more repetition because they may not even know the words in their native language. They have no background knowledge, so they need more exposure to acquire language conceptually.” Gorton’s goal for students in achieving English proficiency is to be able to function socially and academically in society. When they pass the extremely difficult proficiency test, it’s cause for celebration. “It doesn’t matter if they are 8 or in high school, it shows a great deal of growth and confidence,” said Gorton. “They feel they can participate in their community and get a job. They have the skill set to achieve their goals.”

LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

• January: Beadwork • February: Storybook Read-In and Gallery Hunt

NPS continues to monitor students for four years after they meet the ELL exit criteria for the state of Oklahoma, with classroom teachers and ELL teachers working together to provide support as needed. “How wonderful that these kids can have the opportunity to become bilingual, to maintain abilities in their native language and gain literacy in the English language,” said Grant. “It gives great potential to their futures to have that kind of skill set.”

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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1700 Northeast 63rd Street Oklahoma City, OK 73111 Mon – Sat, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Sun, Noon – 5:00 p.m. (405) 478-2250 nationalcowboymuseum.org/kids


The challenge:

Culture clash

In addition to the challenge of speaking one language at home and another at school, Font said the LCDA sees a lot of clashes in local Latino homes surrounding cultural differences. The strife in such families can cause kids to act out. The National Council of La Raza reports that many undocumented youth don’t learn of their immigration status until high school, not an uncommon experience among undocumented students at Santa Fe South, which can prompt feelings of betrayal and worry, further widening the chasm between youth and their parents. That stress is often exacerbated, causing students to act out as Font suggests, when because of their status, they can’t share experiences like driving a car or holding a job with their peers, according to the American Behavioral Scientist. According to the Migration Policy Institute, many undocumented youth are also from low-income families, lacking access to critical social services, making programs like the LCDA’s Parents as Teachers program invaluable to local families. The program recently received an international award for its work to strengthen parenting and communication skills in Oklahoma. In 2016, counselors engaged with 150 families to help navigate those cultural differences. Funded by the Department of Mental Health, families commit 12 to 16 weeks to the program, which begins with a simple family dinner.

“We take it for granted, but some families have never had dinner together,” said Font. The program encourages family members to leave their phones at the door, and pushes parents to look beyond traditional Latino family roles. Font said oftentimes the dad has no responsibility for raising children or their educations, but by the end of the program a new family perspective usually leads to parents splitting roles evenly. Unfortunately, Font fears what Oklahoma’s current budget deficit means for prevention programs like this supported by DHS and mental health. Gorton says NPS celebrates the diversity and richness of culture immigrants bring, hoping to help students and parents alike understand that rather than an either/or choice of culture, they can choose both. NPS offers facilitators to parents who have limited English

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proficiency, encouraging their involvement with their children’s home behaviors, like study skills, homework and reading logs. “Starting in elementary school, we ask parents to be reading every day to their kids, or have their child read to them in their native language or English,” said Gorton. “All literacy is good literacy.” Gorton believes partnership between the school and parents is a major component of every child’s success, and while that can be challenging for non-English speakers, she and her team are committed to embracing and engaging with all parents.

“Part of it is teaching them how they can be part of their child’s journey in the education world,” said Gorton. Grant encourages her immigrant students to embrace their heritage, despite occasional experiences with natives who shun celebration of other cultures. “People have the misconception that immigrants want to come and force their culture and language, or take away American tradition,” said Grant. “That is not true. We are proud of our heritage and culture, but we’re in a country where we can celebrate and blend both cultures together. I think it’s beautiful.” According to the LCDA, Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic group in the country, accounting for 53 percent of the U.S. population growth since 2000. Currently, Latinos represent 18 percent of the country’s overall population, projected to grow to 30 percent by 2060. Font recalls in 1990 U.S. Grant High School was about 10 percent Latino; now the school is 85 percent Latino, a population mirrored at schools like Capitol Hill and Southeast. Norman Public Schools’ student population is 15 percent Hispanic. “The minority are the mainstream population,” Font says of OKCPS, which is currently 53 percent Latino with Font predicting that population to double in the next 10 to 20 years. “Our future is about learning to live with people who think and live differently.”

with the superintendent to solve the issue. The suspended students were brought to LCDA where they did their school work and engaged in anger management and drug and alcohol programs as needed. Font reports 80 percent of the more than 300 kids who took part in the program never got another referral. Though the program remains funded through LCDA, OKCPS as a district bowed out. Some individual schools and Santa Fe South schools have continued the partnership. Font said since DACA was rescinded, behavior challenges for immigrant students at local schools have increased. According to the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, the most significant stressor by far for undocumented immigrants is the fear of deportation, impacting their daily lives and causing constant concern. “We have seen an escalation of kids getting in trouble at school, shouting at teachers and these are kids who had never done this before,” said Font. “The pressure placed on them by the community and at home [caused them] to act out.” LCDA has provided counseling and therapy for students and parents, teaching them about controlling anger and staying grounded even in turmoil. When Grant’s students struggle with fear and insecurity she tells them to imprint those moments in their brain, so they will always have a heart for others who’ve been where they are. “Don’t forget where you came from; don’t forget how much your parents struggled to put food on the table,” Grant challenges her students. “Once you make it, come back and continue making a difference to those who are following in your footsteps.” Grants sees those former students and members of the surrounding communities doing just that as they volunteer their time and advice to senior students working on their capstone projects. Students experience potential careers by meeting with local professionals.

The challenge:

“If they want to be a doctor or lawyer or teacher or engineer, they see what it’s going to take and that they must work extremely hard,” said Grant. “They see what that career would be like and it motivates them to pursue that degree.”

Three years ago, Font discovered OKCPS suspended more Latino students than any other school district per capita, so he worked

Through this program and required community service hours, Grant said students also learn the importance of giving back to the community.

Channeling fear


HIGHER EDUCATION

The challenge:

Education leads to a beautiful future

In the United States, 82 percent of nativeborn youth receive a high school diploma, but only 54 percent of undocumented immigrant youth will receive theirs, according to the Pew Research Hispanic Trends Project. United We Dream reports that only five to 10 percent of undocumented high school graduates continue to higher education, and even fewer earn a degree.

Though Grant is hesitant to take credit for the success of her students, the Harvard Educational Review reports that support from family, educators and other caring adults is the most crucial factor in the academic success of undocumented youth. Access to extracurricular activities and advanced coursework, like Grant helps provide her students, boosts resiliency and is correlated with greater educational achievement, according to the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences.

Higher education

Grant said the challenge begins with her English Learner students in achieving high enough ACT scores to get into college. Grant encourages those students to take ACT prep classes, where they can practice the test numerous times. She tells her students the more they take the test, the less anxious they will feel. The LCDA offers an annual scholarship program to any Oklahoma high school student, but Font has seen that even this money, typically presented in $500, $1000 and $2000 scholarships, only goes so far for kids in poverty. “They reach a point where the money is gone,” said Font. “We see juniors dropping out because they have to work. It’s heartbreaking to see a 20-year-old who has done all the right things but who can’t finish school.”

Access to education

poverty

loyalty to family

society

stereotypes

LANGUAGE

Undocumented youth are ineligible for Title IV Federal financial aid, including student loans, work study and grants, and, according to the Center for American Progress, the issue of college affordability has kept many of these students from pursuing and completing postsecondary educations. Font dreams of offering a work study program to local college juniors and seniors where they can continue school and earn a living by being matched with an organization in their field of interest to learn on-the-job skills. For those who beat the odds and graduate from college, Grant said it’s an accomplished feeling, for the students and their former teachers. “They are impacting their own families and their community,” said Grant, who is thrilled to see her first group of students graduating college. “Along with the other teachers here, I planted that seed.” This is the final part of our threepart series about immigrants in OKC. Find the rest of the series at www.metrofamilymagazine. com/okc-news.

Grant said the mainstream Oklahoma City population has no idea what immigrant students endure to earn their educations. “You have to work hard to get what you want and survive,” said Grant. “On a daily basis, we see kids working one or two jobs to help support their families and pay the bills. But they are resilient, they push through and they accomplish things even they never thought were possible.” The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies reports that undocumented immigrant students do in fact demonstrate higher levels of resilience, leadership and civic engagement than their peers. One such former student motivates Grant to keep teaching, encouraging and fighting for her students. “We had a student graduate last year who, in the eighth grade, had a SWAT team come into her home,” said Grant. “She had a gun held to her face as she was trying to protect her little brother.” The girl’s mom was sent to prison, and she and her siblings to foster care. Grant and fellow teachers became her support system, encouraging her to set the tone for the rest of her family. “She continued to show up,” said Grant. Captain of the softball and basketball teams, active in Student Council and with 400 hours of community service, the student was awarded a scholarship to the University of Central Oklahoma, where she decided she wanted to become a family and child attorney. Her siblings have remained in school, and her mom will soon be released, obtaining an education herself while in prison. “She’s one I will never, ever forget,” said Grant. “She could have gone down a negative path, but she’s resilient. She’s taken a negative experience and turned it into something beautiful.”

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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Feb. 1998: Named “Best New Publication” by Parenting Publications of America.

20

YEARS OF #OKCFAMILYFUN July 2006: Our first ever cover model with special needs, Savannah Derry.

Aug. 2012: Our first annual Family Favorites contest.

July 2002: We launch metrofamilymagazine.com, a place where readers can read us online.

Aug. 1998: Hanson cover.

June 1999: Our first cover story about stay-at-home dads.

March 2012: Our first Kids Fest. March 2003: Our first weekly email out to subscribers.

Dec. 2008: Launched a Facebook page.

Feb. 1998 Chuck Foshee and Betty Casey published the first issue of MetroFamily Magazine. There were 30 entries in our first calendar (we now average more than 250 events in each issue!) and we were named “Best New Publication” by Parenting Publications of America. Aug. 1998 As Hanson steals the hearts of every teen girl in the country they also grace our cover. June 1999 We publish our first cover story about stay-at-home dads. Dec. 2000 First issue is published with new owner Sarah Taylor, who still owns the magazine today.

16 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

April 2002 Denise Springer hired as the magazine’s first editor.

Dec. 2008 We establish our presence on social media by launching a Facebook page.

July 2002 We launch metrofamilymagazine.com, a place where readers can read us online.

May 2011 Metrofamilymagazine.com hits 45,000 monthly pageviews (we now have 200,000+ per month!).

March 2003 We send our first weekly email out to subscribers about family fun in Oklahoma City. July 2006 We feature our first ever cover model with special needs, Savannah Derry of Edmond. Jan. 2007 We jump from 25,000 circulation to 35,000 circulation and change to a new size. July 2008 Mari Farthing is hired as the magazine’s second editor.

March 2012 We host our first Kids Fest event with Rumble, Spaghetti Eddie, Extreme Animals & more. The event was such a hit it’s become an annual staple. Our next Kids Fest event is scheduled for Feb. 10. Aug. 2012 We invite readers to vote for their favorite local businesses in our first annual Family Favorites contest.


May 2013: We launch our annual Awesome Moms contest. March 2017: We set a magazine record of winning 11 industry awards from Parenting Media Association.

Oct. 2013 The magazine gets a new logo.

Sept. 2016: Our first Cover Kids Search event.

June 2017: The magazine hosts its first Geekapalooza event.

May 2013 We launch our annual Awesome Moms contest honoring outstanding local mothers nominated by our readers.

March 2017 We set a magazine record of winning 11 industry awards from Parenting Media Association.

July 2013 Brooke Barnett is ushered in as the magazine’s third editor.

June 2017 The magazine hosts its first Geekapalooza event, inviting local families to learn more about STEAM initiatives and activities.

Oct. 2013 The magazine gets a new logo and rebrands as the leader in OKC Family Fun. Aug. 2014 Hannah Schmitt joins the staff as the fourth and current editor. Sept. 2016 We host our first Cover Kids Search event, inviting local children to meet us face-to-face to compete for a coveted spot on our cover.

January 2018 Today, MetroFamily Magazine reaches more than 108,000 readers a month in print and another 110,000 online. We have 33,000 fans on social media, more than 26,000 email subscribers and continue to reach our audience with ideas for local family fun in new ways each month.

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

17


January

Sunday

Monday

1

5 Eagle Watch at Arcadia Lake

Free First Day Hike at Lake Thunderbird State Park at 1 p.m.

13 See You Saturdays at Oklahoma Hall of Fame 15 MLK Jr. Day Celebration at Myriad Gardens 27 Story Time at Commonplace Books

7

8

Oklahoma Winter Gem, Jewelry & Bead Show at State Fair Park from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Free First Mondays for Kids at Sam Noble Museum from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

14

15

OKC RV & Boat Show at State Fair Park from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Free Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade in Oklahoma City at 2 p.m. MLK Jr. Day Celebration at Myriad Gardens from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

13

5

15

21

22

International Finals Rodeo at State Fair Arena at 1:30 p.m.

Kilgen Organ Performance by R. Jelani Eddington at the Oklahoma History Center at 7 p.m.

28

29

Final Day! Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens from 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Moscow Festival Ballet opens at Armstrong Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.

27

perfect for preschoolers

18 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

great for teens

date night idea

fitness


Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

2

3

4

5

6

The Color Purple opens at Civic Center Music Hall at 7:30 p.m.

Early Explorers at Science Museum Oklahoma at 10 a.m.

Free Science Story Time at the Norman West Library at 6:30 p.m.

Free Eagle Watch at Arcadia Lake from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. throughout the weekend

Free Saturdays for Kids at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum from 10 a.m. – noon.

9

10

11

12

13

Free Icy Cold Science Lab at the Edmond Library at 6:30 p.m.

Free Reading Wednesdays Story Time at Myriad Gardens at 10 a.m.

Free Little Hands Art Camp at the Belle Isle Library at 10 a.m.

Free LIVE on the Plaza from 6 – 10 p.m.

Free See You Saturdays at Oklahoma Hall of Fame from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

16

17

18

19

20

Tiny Tuesdays at Oklahoma City Museum of Art at 10 a.m.

Free Minute to Win It! Around the House Edition at the Edmond Library at 6:30 p.m.

Free Robot Coding at the Northwest Library at 4 p.m.

Free Stages, Changes & Ruts: Strategies for a Better Marriage at Metropolitan Baptist Church at 6:30 p.m.

PBR Invitational at Chesapeake Energy Arena at 6:45 p.m.

23

24

25

26

27

Storytime Science at Science Museum Oklahoma at 10:30 a.m.

Free SparkFun Arduino at the Moore Library at 4 p.m.

Free Family Game Night at The Station at Central Park in Moore from 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Cirque Musica presents Heroes & Villains at Civic Center Music Hall at 8 p.m.

Free Kids Story Time at Commonplace Books at 10:30 a.m.

30

31

Free Digital Photography Challenge for Teens at the Moore Library from 6 – 7 p.m.

Peter Pan Jr. opens at Sooner Theatre at 7:30 p.m.

OKC Family Fun sponsored by

Neighborhood crestoneridge.com

Find these events and hundreds more at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/calendar

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

19


©2017 Kumon North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WE MAKE YOUR SMART KID EVEN SMARTER!

CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

JAN 1 • MONDAY

JAN 4 • THURSDAY

FREE First Day Hike at Robbers Cave State Park (HWY 2 North, Wilburton) features a free guided moderate-tostrenuous, two-mile hike along the Belle Starr Loop. This event is in conjunction with the America’s State Parks First Day Hikes initiative that will take place in all 50 states. 9am. 918-465-2562, www.travelok.com

FREE Origami Tsunami at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond). Learn some new folding techniques and meet some new friends. For ages 9 & up. Preregister. 4-5:30pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org

FREE First Day Hike at Lake Thunderbird State Park (13101 Alameda Dr, Norman) features a moderate two-mile hike and complimentary hot chocolate, coffee and healthy snacks. Dress for the weather. 1pm. 360-3572

ES

FOR AG

The unique Kumon Method can give your child an academic advantage.

SCHEDULE A PARENT ORIENTATION TODAY!

Kumon Math & Reading Centers of EDMOND - NORTH • 405-715-1111 775 W. Covell Rd., #150, Edmond, OK 73003 EDMOND - WEST • 405-216-9800 245 South Santa Fe Ave., Edmond, OK 73003 NORMAN • 405-364-1600 1320 N. Interstate Dr., Norman, OK 73072 OKLAHOMA CITY - NORTH • 405-752-2000 9300 N May Ave., Ste. 200, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 OKLAHOMA CITY - NORTHWEST • 405-721-7323 6220 Northwest Expy., Oklahoma City, OK 73132 OKLAHOMA CITY - SOUTH • 405-691-8900 10600 S. Pennsylvania Ave., #5, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 YUKON - SOUTH • 405-265-0075 501 S. Mustang Rd., Yukon, OK 73099

FREE First Day Hike at Greenleaf State Park (Hwy 10, Braggs) features an easy, onemile hike along the paved, accessible Family Fun Trail. Afterwards, join park staff for hot chocolate, coffee and campfire s’mores. 10am. 918-487-7125, www.travelok.com

JAN 2-7 OKC Broadway presents The Color Purple at Civic Center Music Hall (201 N Walker Ave) features a production of the American classic about a young woman’s journey to love and triumph in the American South. $27.09-$92.12. PG-13. TuesdayThursday, 7:30pm; Friday, 8pm; Saturday, 2 & 8pm; Sunday, 7pm. 297-2264, www.okcbroadway.com

JAN 3 • WEDNESDAY FREE Free Throw Contest at the Jackie Cooper Gym (1024 E Main St, Yukon) features a contest open to boys & girls ages 6-13. Competitors will shoot 20 free throws each. Winners of the semi finals will advance to the finals of the Yukon/Mustang Free Throw Challenge. 1-2pm. 350-8937, www.cityofyukonok.gov Repurposed Paintings with Annie Doan at Twisted Spike Brewery and Tap (1 NW 10th St) feature crafting, art making and brews. For ages 21 & older. $10 online; $15 at the door. 951-0000, www.oklahomacontemporary.org University of Oklahoma Men’s Basketball vs Oklahoma State University at Lloyd Noble Center (2900 Jenkins Ave, Norman). Prices vary. 8pm. Also held: 1/9 vs Texas Tech, 1/13 vs TCU, 1/23 vs Kansas, 1/30 vs Baylor, 2/5 vs West Virginia. 325-2424, www.soonersports.com

kumon.com

20 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

FREE Science Story Time at the Norman West Library (300 Norman Center Ct, Norman) features a Cinderella story time. Then, the group will construct a wind-power coach. All materials provided. Preregister. Best suited for ages 3-8. 6:30-7:30pm. 7012644, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org University of Oklahoma Women’s Basketball vs Texas Christian University at Lloyd Noble Center (2900 Jenkins Ave, Norman). Prices vary. 7pm. Also held: 1/14 vs Baylor, 1/20 vs OSU, 1/24 vs Kansas, 1/31 vs Kansas State, 2/3 vs West Virginia. 325-2424, www.soonersports.com

JAN 5 • FRIDAY FREE First Friday Gallery Walk in the Paseo District (NW 30th & 27th St, Walker & Hudson Ave) features local artists, special themed exhibits, refreshments, live music and food trucks. 6-10pm. 525-2688, www.thepaseo.com Taste of Ethiopia OKC at Syrup Breakfast Boutique (1501 NW 23rd St) features a night of savory Ethiopian Dishes, live music and art. Includes three-course meal and entertainment. Preregister, space is limited. $30; family, $75. 7-10pm. 802-0182, www.tasteofethiopiaokc.com

JAN 5-7 Eagle Watch at Arcadia Lake (9000 E 2nd, Edmond) features an information display at the park office and majestic eagles in their natural habitat. $3 per vehicle. 8am-4pm. 216-7471, www.arcadialakeok.com Oklahoma Winter Gem, Jewelry & Bead Show at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features fine jewelry, fashion jewelry, beads, beading supplies, findings, pearls, silver, designer cabochons, minerals and tools. $5. Friday & Saturday, 10am-6pm; Sunday, 10am-4pm. 504-265-8830, aksshow.com Babies at the Museum at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Dr) features a complimentary coffee and social time, a 30-minute gallery tour and play time with age-appropriate activities. Members, $5; non-members, $12. 9:30-11am. Also held: Jan. 26 & 27. 278-8213, www.okcmoa.com


FREE MONTHLY FAMILY PROJECTS FREE Fishing Day at OKC Lakes & Ponds (various locations). No city permit required, however a state license is for anyone 16 and older. 297-1426, www.okc.gov Learn to Curl at Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave). Learn the basic rules and etiquette of curling from The Oklahoma Curling Club. Dress warm and wear rubber-soled shoes. Equipment provided. Preregister. For ages 10 & up. Members, $20; nonmembers, $25. 9-10:30am. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org FREE Storybook Hour at Cuppies & Joe (727 NW 23rd St). Children listen to a story while parents enjoy coffee and conversation. Also held Jan. 20. 10-11am. 528-2122, www.cuppiesandjoe.com FREE Saturday for Kids at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (1700 NE 63rd St). Explore the art of beadwork and design themes, and make your very own beadwork samples to take home. For ages 4-12. Free for children and accompanying adults. 10am-noon. 478-2250, www.nationalcowboymuseum.org First Saturday Hands-on History at the Oklahoma History Center (800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr) features a variety of activities throughout the museum including crafts, coloring, hands-on carts and educational trunks. Each month has a specific educational theme. Free with admission. Adults, $7; students, $4; kids (5 & under), free. 1-4pm. Also held Feb. 3. 521-2491, www.okhistory.org FREE Eagle Watch at Lake Thunderbird State Park (1201 Clear Bay Ave, Norman) features a guided tour to catch a glimpse of eagles in their winter home. Preregister, space is limited. Bring your binoculars and dress appropriately. Also held: Jan. 20. 1-4pm. 321-4633 FREE Robotics Class at Sylvan of Edmond (3209 S Broadway Ave, Edmond) features fun, hands-on projects to learn science and engineering concepts. Call to preregister. 1-2pm. 562-5202, www.sylvanlearning.com Oklahoma State University Men’s Basketball vs Iowa State University at Gallagher-Iba Arena (1046 W Hall of Fame Ave, Stillwater). Prices vary. 3pm. Also held: 1/13 vs Texas, 1/20 vs OU, 1/30 vs TCU, 2/6 vs Baylor. 877-ALL-4-OSU, www.okstate.com

Oklahoma City Blue vs South Bay Lakers at Cox Convention Center (2 Myriad Gardens). Prices vary. 7pm. Also held: 1/19 vs Reno; 1/21 vs Memphis, 1/31 vs Iowa, 2/10 vs Salt Lake City. 602-8500, oklahomacity.gleague.nba.com

JAN 7 • SUNDAY Babies OK Expo at The Pavilion at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features products and services for expectant parents through parents with toddlers. $7. Noon-5pm. 760-1999, babiesok.com Jewish Muslim Film Institute presents Dough at the Emuanel Synnagogue (900 NW 47th St) features a free movie screening about a Jewish baker and a Muslim apprentice. Dough is about overcoming prejudice and finding redemption in unexpected places. Film contains some mature themes. Preregister. 1:45-4pm. 3590369, www.jewishmuslimfilminstitute.com Oklahoma State University vs University of Oklahoma at at Gallagher-Iba Arena (1046 W Hall of Fame Ave, Stillwater). Prices vary. 4pm. Also held: 1/17 vs West Virginia, 1/24 vs Iowa State, 1/27 vs Texas Tech, 2/3 vs Kansas. 877-ALL-4-OSU, www.okstate.com

JAN 8 • MONDAY FREE First Mondays for Kids at Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (2401 Chautauqua Ave, Norman) offers complimentary admission for kids 17 & under. General admission does apply to guests 18 and older. Adults, $8; seniors (65+), $6; kids (17 & under), free. 10am5pm. Also held Feb. 5. 325-4712, samnoblemuseum.ou.edu FREE Resilience Documentary Screening at OKC-County Health Department (2600 NE 63rd St) features a screening followed by a panel discussion. Please RSVP for planning purposes to denise_howard@ occhd.org. 1-2:30pm. www.facebook.com/ events/1482040165247601/

JAN 8-29 Kids in the Kitchen: Baking with ToTs at The MAC at Mitch Park (2733 Marilyn Williams Dr, Edmond). Toddlers can explore baking and foods with simple recipes. Preregister. For ages 2-5. Mondays, 4-5:30pm. Also held Feb. 5-26. 359-4630, www.edmondparks.com

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

21

FREE ARTMAKING

JAN 6 • SATURDAY

FREE MAKE + TAKE

Salt Painting 1-4 p.m. | Saturday 1/13

FAMILY FUN

Drop by the FREE family Make + Take Jan. 13 to create your own salt and watercolor paintings. Learn more about Make + Takes at

bit.ly/OCACmt.

oklahomacontemporary.org 3000 General Pershing Blvd. OKC


CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

JAN 9 • TUESDAY FREE Icy Cold Science Lab at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond). Explore the colder side of science with ice-cold experiments. Preregister. For ages 5-12. 6:307:30pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org Oklahoma City Thunder vs Portland Trail Blazers at Chesapeake Energy Arena (100 W Reno Ave). Prices vary. 7pm. Also held:1/5 vs Sacramento, 1/17 vs Los Angeles, 1/23 vs Brooklyn, 1/25 vs Washington, 1/28 vs Philadelphia,2/2 vs New Orleans, 2/4 vs Los Angeles. 602-8661, www.nba.com/thunder

JAN 9 & 10 FREE Monthly Mini Model Build at the LEGO Store in Penn Square Mall (1901 NW Expressway) features a LEGO Walrus build for kids ages 6 -14 who are LEGO VIP members. Membership is free. Preregister, quantities are limited. 5pm. 840-9993, shop.LEGO.com/Minibuild-Registration

JAN 11 • THURSDAY FREE Little Hands Art Camp at the Belle

Isle Library (5501 N Villa Ave) features local artist Heather White. Heather will read stories and guide kids age 2-5 through an art project. Preregister. 10-11am. 843-9601, www.metrolibrary.org FREE Journal Making at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond). Make your own journal, decorate the cover, add some great instant writing prompts and more. Preregister. For ages 9 & up. 4:30-5:30pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org

JAN 12 • FRIDAY FREE 2nd Friday Norman Art Walk in the Norman Arts District (downtown Norman) features a monthly celebration of the arts in Norman. 6-9pm. www.2ndfridaynorman.com FREE Argentine Tango Lesson at the Moore Library (225 S Howard, Moore). Learn the basics of the Argentine tango and practice new skills during a dance social. Preregister, space is limited to 50. Anyone under 18 must have parent/guardian consent and signature. 6-7:30pm. 793-5100, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org

LIVE on the Plaza in the Plaza District (1700 block of NW 16th St) features artists, live music, special events, local shopping and more on the second Friday of the month. 6-10pm. www.plazadistrict.org/live/

JAN 12-14 OKC RV & Boat Show at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features the latest makes and models of all kinds of RVs and boats. $8 & up. Friday 11am-9pm; Saturday, 9am-9pm; Sunday, 10am-5pm. 7870787, www.okcrvandboatshow.com

JAN 13 • SATURDAY FREE See You Saturdays at Oklahoma Hall of Fame (1400 Classen Dr) features themed experiences and learning opportunities including crafts and guided tours. All ages welcome. 10am-5pm. 235-4485, www.oklahomahof.com Ice Princess Party at The MAC at Mitch Park (2733 Marilyn Williams, Edmond) features a winter themed craft and snack time. Crafts include snow dough, snowflakes and snow globes. Preregister. For ages 4 & up. $14. 2-4pm. 359-4630, www.edmondparks.com

WHO INSPIRES YOU? STUDENTS, SUBMIT A CREATIVE PIECE FOR A CHANCE TO WIN!

FIVE WINNERS WILL RECEIVE

okcthunder.com/blackheritage

22 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


Runway Run 5K at the Tulsa International Airport (3624 N 74th East Ave, Tulsa) features a run along the Tulsa International Airport runway. Planes will be parked along the race strip and afterwards participants will receive free admission to the Tulsa Air & Space Museum. Open to all skill levels. Strollers welcome. $25. 10am. 918-834-9900, www.tulsaairandspacemuseum.org FREE Diaper Dash Baby Crawl and Toddler Trot at the Yukon Community Center (2200 S Holly Ave, Yukon). Babies 6-14 months compete to see who can crawl a set distance in a timed event. Toddlers up to 18 months can trot to see which baby can walk the fastest. Prizes awarded. 10:30-noon. 3508937, www.cityofyukonok.gov Indian Taco Sale and Indie Market at the OK Choctaw Tribal Alliance (5320 S Youngs Blvd) features traditional Indian tacos and other native dishes as well as native vendors offering crafts and handmade goods. Proceeds for the OK Choctaw Tribal Alliance. 11am-2:30pm. Also held Feb. 10. 596-9092, www.facebook.com/okchoctawtribalalliance

FREE 2nd Saturday at the OSU Museum of Art (720 S Husband St, Stillwater) features free, hands-on art activities for visitors of all ages and abilities. 11am-3pm. 744-2780, museum.okstate.edu FREE Family Make + Take Art Project at Oklahoma Contemporary (3000 General Pershing Blvd) features an art-making project inspired by works of art on view at the museum. All ages welcome. All children must be accompanied by an adult. 1-4pm. 951-0000, www.oklahomacontemporary.org Winter Olympic Expo at Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave) features ice skating, music from DJ Brian Smith with muttradio.com, face painting, Olympic sports demonstrations and more. Preregister, space is limited. Kids (4-10): members, $12; nonmembers, $15; adults, $8. 4-8pm. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org

JAN 14 • SUNDAY Frozen Nose Series 5K Race at Wiley Post Park (2021 S Robinson Ave) features the first in a three part series of 5K races. Participants can enjoy food, music and more. Preregister.

$30 per race. 2pm. Also held: Jan 28 & Feb 11. 703-0052, www.frozennoseseries.com

JAN 15 • MONDAY School’s Out Break Camps at the Oklahoma City Zoo (2101 NE 50th St) features zoo tours, up-close animal visits, crafts and games. Preregister. For ages 4-11. Half day $25; full day, $45. 8:30am-5:15pm. 424-3344, www.okczoo.org FREE Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration in Oklahoma City (various locations) features a parade, silent march, bell ringing, job fair and more. Activities begin at 9am; parade, 2pm. www.okcmlk.org Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave) features a peace walk, music, public art, crafts, readings and soul food tastings. At 11:30am at the Water Stage, there will be a reading of Dr. King’s famous I Have a Dream speech, followed by a performance from the Oklahoma Collegiate Gospel Choir. Free to attend, $2 donation for art activity; $3 per cup for tasting. 10am-1pm. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org

It’s about momentum, forward movement, growth. While some resolutions are a might-do, swimming lessons are a must-do. Start the new year off right with swim lessons at Goldfish Swim School. Fresh perspectives, healthy habits, necessary skills. The best way to kick off a new year. + LESSONS FOR KIDS 4 MONTHS TO 12 YEARS

healthy habits

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METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

Extended Hours at Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave). $13, $8 without skates; members, $7. 11am-9pm. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org

JAN 16 • TUESDAY Tiny Tuesdays at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Dr) features a monthly themed come-and-go, open-ended artmaking experiences are geared towards children, ages 5 and under, with a parent or caregiver. Dress for a mess! No advance registration is required. 10am-noon. 236-3100, www.okcmoa.com Bela Fleck, Banjo & Brooklyn Rider at Armstrong Auditorium (14400 S Bryant Rd, Edmond) features the banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck and the string quartet Brooklyn Rider. $23 & up. 7:30pm. 285-1010, www.armstrongauditorium.org

JAN 17 • WEDNESDAY FREE Minute to Win It! Around the House Edition at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond) features an action-packed and often hilarious evening of minute-long challenges and games. Preregister. For ages 10-18. 6:30-8pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org

JAN 18 • THURSDAY FREE Robot Coding at the Northwest Library (5600 NW 122nd St). Students will practice coding through an iPad app and program a Code-a-pillar, Ozobot and Sphero. Preregister. For kids in grades 2nd-5th. 4-5pm. 606-3580, www.metrolibrary.org FREE Healthy Snack Demonstrations at the Southwest OKC Library (2201 SW 134th St). Learn how to make snacking part of a healthy diet and get hands-on practice making healthy snacks. Preregister. 6:30-8pm. 979-2200, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org

JAN 19 FRIDAY Family Fun Night at Tot Town (841 SW 119th St) features snacks, drinks, games, free play and a movie. Attendees can add a pizza dinner for an additional purchase. $10. 6-9pm. 650-7560, www.tottownokc.com

JAN 19 & 20 FREE Stages, Changes & Ruts: Strategies for a Better Marriage Conference at Metropolitan Baptist

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Church (7201 W Britton Rd) features Dr. Rod Cooper as he discusses practical strategies for getting out—or staying out—of familiar patterns. Preregister, space is limited. Sessions are identical. Friday, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturday, 9am-noon. 722-2550, mbc-okc.org/marriage-conference-2018/

JAN 19-21 Oklahoma City Home + Garden Show at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features more than 500 exhibitors and experts offering new products, design inspiration and remodeling ideas. $10 online, $12 at the door; kids (under 12), free. Friday, noon-9pm; Saturday, 10am9pm; Sunday, 10am-6pm. 877-871-7469, oklahomacityhomeshow.com International Finals Rodeo at State Fair Arena (333 Gordon Cooper St) features three days of professional rodeo action as cowboys and cowgirls compete for the title of World Champion in eight different events. $10 & up. Friday & Saturday, 7:30pm; Sunday, 1:30pm. 948-6800, www.ifrodeo.com

JAN 20 • SATURDAY Learn to Curl at Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave). Learn the basic rules and etiquette of curling from The Oklahoma Curling Club. Dress warm and wear rubber-soled shoes. Equipment provided. Preregister. For ages 10 & up. Members, $20; nonmembers, $25. 9-10:30am. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org Breakfast in the Bridge at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave) features a scavenger hunt to find familiar fruits growing all around, a discussion about other products we get from the tropics and a healthy breakfast feast. Preregister. For ages 6-10. Members, $10; non-members, $12. 10-11:30am. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org FREE Storybook Hour at Cuppies & Joe (727 NW 23rd St). Children listen to a story while parents enjoy coffee and conversation. 10-11am. 528-2122, www.cuppiesandjoe.com FREE Eagle Watch at Lake Thunderbird State Park (1201 Clear Bay Ave, Norman) features a guide tour to catch a glimpse of eagles in their winter home. Preregister, space is limited. Bring your binoculars and dress appropriately. 1-4pm. 321-4633


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Watch videos, view details, register and discover more! SPECIAL MOBILE ADVERTISING SECTION

Private & Charter Schools; Preschools The Academy of Classical Christian Studies

North OKC; Midtown; South OKC; PreK-12; theacademyok.org

Casady School

9500 N. Pennsylvania Ave. PreK-12; casady.org

Crossings Christian School

Online charter school K-12; ovca.k12.com

King’s Gate Christian School

Hefner Pointe location: 11400 N. Portland; Surrey Hills location: 12421 Mustang Rd., Yukon, 6 months-7th grade, kingsgateschool.com

Oklahoma City Zoo

14400 N. Portland PreK-12; crossingsschool.org

(preschool program) 2000 Remington Way PreK (ages 3-5); okczoo.org

Erna Krouch Preschool

St. Mary’s Episcopal School

4901 N. Pennsylvania PreK (ages 2-5); thetempleokc.org

The Goddard School, Western Ave. 17440 N. Western, Edmond 6 weeks-12 years; goddardschool.com

Holy Trinity Lutheran School St. Philip Neri Catholic School

K12 (Oklahoma Virtual Charter Academy)

308 N.W. 164th St., Edmond PreK-8; holytrinityedmond.org

505 E. Covell Rd., Edmond PreK3-5; smesedmond.org

Trinity School

321 N.W. 36th St. K-12; trinityschoolokc.org

Westminster School

600 N.W. 44th St. PreK3-8; westminsterschool.org

1121 Felix Pl., Midwest City PreK3-8

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METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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EX

TA N O , C con RN is i A E th , L or RE f O ok PL lo

EXPLORE. LEARN. SAVE MONEY.


LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

JAN 20 & 21 PBR Express Employment Professionals Oklahoma City Invitational at Chesapeake Energy Arena (100 W Reno) featuring two days of bull riding action. $15 & up. Saturday, 6:45pm; Sunday, 1:45pm. 602-5800, www.chesapeakearena.com

JAN 21 • SUNDAY

Free First Monday for Kids

Jan. 8

National Theatre Live presents Obsession at OCCC Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater (7777 S May Ave) features Jude Law in a new stage adaptation of Luchino Visconti’s 1943 film. $15. 6pm. 682-7579, tickets.occc.edu

JAN 22 • MONDAY Kilgen Organ Performance at the Oklahoma History Center (800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr) features R. Jelani Eddington. Eddington has been featured at numerous national and regional conventions of the American Theatre Organ Society and has toured extensively. Members, $10; non-members, $20. 7pm. 522-0765, www.okhistory.org

JAN 23 • TUESDAY

Hall of Ancient Life

Open daily

FREE Open House at Holy Trinity Lutheran School (308 NW 164th St, Edmond). Prospective families can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 5-7pm. 844-4000, www.holytrinityedmond.org

JAN 24 • WEDNESDAY FREE SparkFun Arduino at the Moore Library (225 S Howard, Moore). Learn about hardware and programming with the Arduino language. Preregister. For kids in grades 6th - 12th. 4-6pm. 793-5100, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org

JAN 25 • THURSDAY

Spike’s Club

Spring 2018

FREE Escape the Library at the Northwest Library (5600 NW 122nd St). Kids ages 12 & up can use clues and solve puzzles to see if they can escape before the time runs out. 7-8pm. 606-3580, www.metrolibrary.org FREE Family Game Night at The Station at Central Park (700 S Broadway, Moore) features a variety of different games like Monopoly, card games, ping pong and more. All ages welcome. Kids under 6 must be accompanied by an adult. 7:30-9:30pm. 793-5090, centralpark.cityofmoore.com

2401 Chautauqua Ave., Norman, OK 73072-7029 (405) 325-4712 | samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

Special exhibits sponsored by The University of Oklahoma is an equal oppor tunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please call (405) 325-4712.

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METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

FREE Open House at St. Eugene Catholic School (2400 W Hefner Rd). Prospective families with students in 1st-8th grades can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 6-7:30pm. 751-0067, www.steugeneschool.org

JAN 25 & 26 Friends of the Book Bazaar at the Southwest OKC Library (2201 SW 134th St) features books for sale for all ages. Proceeds benefit the SOKC Public Library and support educational, cultural and artistic programming for all ages. Free to attend. 9am-7:30pm. 979-2200, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org

JAN 26 • FRIDAY FREE Snowflake Dance at the Midwest City Library (8143 E Reno Ave) features a winter-themed dance for kids ages 5 & under. 10-11am. 732-4828, www.metrolibrary.org

JAN 26 & 27 Babies at the Museum at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Dr) features a complimentary coffee and social time, a 30-minute gallery tour and play time with age-appropriate activities. Members, $5; non-members, $12. 9:30-11am. 278-8213, www.okcmoa.com Cirque Musica presents Heroes & Villains at Civic Center Music Hall (201 N Walker Ave) features a blend of circus and acrobatic performers with symphonic music that celebrate the world of heroes and villains from movies, comics and television. $19 & up. 8pm. 297-2264, www.okcciviccenter.com

JAN 27 • SATURDAY FREE Run the Maze: Death Cure Movie Release Party at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond) features a variety of themed activities for the film Maze Runner: The Death Cure. Preregister. New groups will be admitted every 10 minutes. Best suited for ages 9 & up. 1-3pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org Fiber Arts Class at Oklahoma History Center (800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr). Learn to make handspun yarn for knitting or weaving and try your hand at knitting so you can use your handspun yarn to make beautiful handmade creations. Preregister. Best suited for ages 10 & up. $10. 1-3pm. 522-0793, www.okhistory.org


WALK BREAKS OVER Smoke Breaks

Plant Science! at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave). Delve into the (almost) magical properties of plants using experiments to discover how water moves in plants, how leaves eat, how sunflowers can stare at the sun and more. Preregister. For ages 6-10. Members, $7; non-members, $9. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org FREE Personalized Mug Craft at the Norman West Library (300 Norman Center Ct, Norman). Use craft stickers and markers to personalize a mug to take home. Preregister. For ages 12 & up. 2-3:30pm. 701-2644, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org Yukon’s Daddy Daughter Dance at Dale Robertson Center (1200 Lakeshore Dr, Yukon) features a special dance for dads and their daughters with music by Ronnie Kaye and light refreshments. Best suited for ages 4-12. Sessions are divided by age of girls. $15 per couple; $20 day of. 3, 5 & 7pm. 350-8937, www.cityofyukonok.gov

EAT Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit

PLAYTIME OVER Screen Time

SKIP Ice Cream

MAKE HEALTHY

SWAPS AFTER THE BALL DROPS.

JAN 27 & 28 Repticon Reptile and Exotic Animal Expo at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features reptile pet vendors offering supplies, feeders, cages and merchandise as well as live animal seminars and raffles. Adults, $10; kids (5-12), $5; kids (4 and under), free. Saturday, 10am5pm; Sunday, 10am-4pm. 863-268-4273, www.repticon.com

Eat better and move more in 2018 by making small, simple swaps every day.

PLAY WITH YOUR KIDS INSTEAD OF Watching Them Play

JAN 28 • SUNDAY FREE Open House at St. Philip Neri Catholic School (1121 Felix Dr). Prospective families with students age 3-8th grade can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 12:15-2pm. 737-4496, www.stphilipnerischool.com

SNACK ON

Carrots & Hummus SKIP Chips & Dip

FREE Open House at Rosary School (1919 NW 18th St). Prospective families can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 1-3pm. 525-9272, www.rosaryschool.com FREE Open House at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School (925 S Boulevard, Edmond). Prospective families can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 1-3pm. 348-5364, www.stelizabethedmond.org  

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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For healthy tips and recipes, visit

.it el o e t ev o .R ph w a w p w na to s o d G an


FACT:

It takes four weeks to go from egg, larva, pupa to adult.

CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

Frozen Nose Series 5K Race at Star & Stripes Park (3701 S Lake Hefner Dr) features the first in a three part series of 5K races. Participants can enjoy food, music and more. Preregister. $30 per race. 2pm. Also held: Feb 11. 703-0052, www.frozennoseseries.com FREE Open House at St. James Catholic School (1224 SW 4th St). Prospective families can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. Noon-2pm. 636-6810, www.stjames-catholic.org FREE Open House at St John Nepomuk Catholic School (600 Garth Brooks Blvd, Yukon). Prospective families can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. Noon-1:30pm. 354-2509, www.sjnok.org/school

JAN 29 & 30 Moscow Festival Ballet at Armstrong Auditorium (14400 S Bryant Rd, Edmond) features a showcase of the great Russian ballet tradition including beloved ballet scenes from Swan Lake. $31 & up. 7:30pm. 285-1010, www.armstrongauditorium.org

JAN 30 • TUESDAY FREE Open House at St. Mary’s Episcopal School (505 E Covell Rd, Edmond). Experience the campus and get to know students, faculty and staff. Preregister at 341-9541 x103 or kguinn@smesedmond. org. Walk-ins welcome. 8:30-10:30am. smesedmond.org BALANCED LEARNING® WAY:

And in one magic moment, a scientist is born. SEE BALANCED LEARNING IN ACTION. CALL FOR A TOUR TODAY!

Infants – Private Kindergarten & After School

Primrose School of Edmond 15000 N. Western Ave. Edmond, OK 73013 405.285.6787 PrimroseEdmond.com

FREE Digital Photography Challenge for Teens at the Moore Library (225 S Howard, Moore). Learn about digital photography by taking photos using Samsung tablets. Preregister. For kids in grades 6-12. 6-7pm. 793-5100, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org FREE Acting 101 Series at the Norman Central Library (225 N Webster, Norman) features a free interactive acting workshop for beginners. Best suited for teens. Classes will be taught by Lazara Gonzalez, a television writer and director. 6-8pm. 7012600, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org TobyMac at Chesapeake Energy Arena (100 W Reno Ave) features the Hits Deep Tour with Mandisa, Danny Gokey, Ryan Stevenson and Finding Favour. $10 & up. 7pm. 602-8700, www.chesapeakearena.com

Each Primrose school is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools® and Balanced Learning® are registered trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2017 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for ‘fact’ source and curriculum detail.

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FREE Open House at King’s Gate Christian School (12421 Mustang Rd, Yukon). Prospective parents can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 6pm. 752-2111, www.kingsgateschool.com

JAN 31-FEB 4 Peter Pan Jr. at Sooner Theatre (101 E Main St, Norman) features a community theatre adaption for young performers based on J.M. Barrie’s classic tale. $15. Wednesday-Friday, 7:30pm; Saturday, 2 & 7:30pm; Sunday, 2pm. 321-9600, www.soonertheatre.org

FEB 1 • THURSDAY Chocolate Decadence at Hudson-Essex Loft Offices (825 N Broadway) features smooth jazz, wine and champagne and the ever-popular Valentine auction. Proceeds benefit community projects in Automobile Alley. Guests must be 21 & older. $65; VIP, $100. 6-9pm. 706-7484, www.chocolatedecadenceokc.com FREE Open House at Trinity School (321 NW 36th St). Prospective parents can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 6:30-8pm. 525-5600, www.trinityschoolokc.org FREE Open House at Antioch Christian Academy (3616 SW 119th St). Prospective parents of students age 2-8th grade can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 6:30pm. 691-8012, academy.antiochokc.org

FEB 2-11 Heisenburg at Civic Center Music Hall (201 N Walker Ave) features the romantic tale of two strangers and a life-changing journey of discovery. $40-42. See website for showtimes. 297-2264, www.okcciviccenter.com

FEB 3 • SATURDAY FREE Spring Gardening Workshop at the Norman Central Library (225 N Webster, Norman) features information on basic gardening prep, plant selection, planting and maintenance. There will be time for Q&A with speakers and a plant and seed swap as well. Refreshments provided. 10am-noon. 701-2600, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org


First Saturday Hands-on History at the Oklahoma History Center (800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr) features a variety of activities throughout the museum including crafts, coloring, hands-on carts and educational trunks. Each month has a specific educational theme. Free with admission. Adults, $7; students, $4; kids (5 & under), free. 1-4pm. 521-2491, www.okhistory.org FREE Eagle Watch at Lake Thunderbird State Park (1201 Clear Bay Ave, Norman) features a guide tour to catch a glimpse of eagles in their winter home. Preregister, space is limited. Bring your binoculars and dress appropriately. 1-4pm. 321-4633 Yukon Chocolate Festival at Dale Robertson Center (1200 Lakeshore Dr, Yukon) features a wide variety of chocolate treats served up by local businesses and groups as well as a silent auction consisting of an array of chocolate & Valentine items. Proceeds benefit Yukon Friends of the Park and Ladies Library Club. $10. 1-3pm. 3508937, www.cityofyukonok.gov Victorian Tea at the Rodkey House (410 S Littler, Edmond) features savories, scones, sweets, and of course tea, as well as living history performers and favors. For ladies, mature kindergarten through senior adult. Victorian dress is recommended. $20. 10am & 2pm. Also held Feb. 10. 340-0078, www.edmondhistory.org FREE Saturdays for Kids at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (1700 NE 63rd St) features a Gallery Hunt & Find to discover secret locations for storybook readings. For ages 4-12. Preregister. 10am-noon. 478-2250, www.nationalcowboymuseum.org Taste of OKC at the Chevy Events Center (429 E California Ave) features local restaurants, an open bar, silent and live auctions and live music. All proceeds directly fund Big Brothers Big Sisters. $150. 6:30-9:30pm. www.tasteokc.com Inasmuch Foundation Classic Series Concert at Civic Center Music Hall (201 N Walker Ave) features guest artist Kim Chee-Yun, Dan Schwartz and conductor, Joel Levine. $19 & up. 8pm. 297-2264, www.okcphil.org

for Call Trial E FRE lass C

FEB 4 • SUNDAY FREE Family Day at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art (55 Elm Ave, Norman) features hands-on activities for the whole family highlighting the Generations in Modern Pueblo Painting exhibition. 1-4pm. 325-3272, www.ou.edu/fjjma FREE LOVE Book Release Celebration at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School (925 S Boulevard, Edmond) features Newbery Medalist Matt de la Peña, author of Last Stop on Market Street and illustrator of the Otis the Tractor series Loren Long. 1pm. 340-9202, www.bestofbooksok.com

Lil Kickers Winter Session continues through March 10!

FEB 5 • MONDAY FREE First Mondays for Kids at Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (2401 Chautauqua Ave, Norman) offers complimentary admission for kids 17 & under. General admission does apply to guests 18 and older. Adults, $8; seniors (65+), $6; kids (17 & under), free. 10am- 5pm. 325-4712, samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

FEB 6 • TUESDAY FREE Kids Explore: Oklahoma Animals at the Southwest OKC Library (2201 SW 134th St). Using real artifacts from the Oklahoma City Zoo, kids can explore some unique Oklahoma animals, as well as complete related crafts and activities. Best suited for kids in grades K-5. 4:30-5:30pm. 979-2200, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org Lil Kickers is for ages 18 months to 9 years.

FEB 6-11 School of Rock at Civic Center Music Hall (201 N Walker Ave) features Dewey Finn, a wannabe rock star turned substitute teacher who transforms a class of straight-A students into grade-A rockers. Best suited for ages 8 & up. $43 & up. Tuesday-Thursday, 7:30pm; Friday, 8pm; Saturday, 2 & 8pm; Sunday, 2 & 7pm. 297-2264, www.okcbroadway.com

FEB 8 • THURSDAY FREE Valentine’s Dance Party at the Southwest OKC Library (2201 SW 134th St) features a fun dance party with snacks and more. For kids in grades K-5. 4:30-5:30pm. 979-2200, www.pioneerlibrarysystem.org Little Big Town at Chesapeake Energy Arena (100 W Reno Ave) features a concert by Little Big Town and special guests Kacey Musgraves and Midland. $45 & up. 7:30pm. 602-8700, www.chesapeakearena.com

Open enrollment

Call TODAY!

Birthday Party Packages Indoor Soccer Leagues Rent fields for many different sports/activities

soccercityokcity.com 4520 Old Farm Road, OKC

(west of Meridian, south of 122nd) METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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405-748-3888


CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

FREE Open House at King’s Gate Christian School (11400 N Portland). Prospective parents can see the campus and learn more about the school’s programs. 10am. 752-2111, www.kingsgateschool.com

FEB 9 • FRIDAY School’s Out Break Camps at the Oklahoma City Zoo (2101 NE 50th St) features zoo tours, up-close animal visits, crafts and games. Preregister. For ages 4-11. Half day $25; full day, $45. 8:30am-5:15pm. 424-3344, www.okczoo.org FREE Night to Shine Prom at Putnam City Baptist Church (11401 N Rockwell Ave) features an unforgettable prom night experience for people with special needs, ages 16 and older, featuring a red carpet, VIP treatment including hair and makeup stations, shoe shining stations, corsages and boutonnieres, a karaoke room and, of course, dancing. Parents get a night out too! Preregister, space is limited. 6-9pm. pcbc.tv/nighttoshine/ Humorist Jeanne Robertson at Hudson Performing Hall (2820 N May Ave) features her Rocking Chair tour. At 74 years young, Jeanne Robertson continues to charm audiences with her humorous observations about life around her. $29-$59. 7pm. 840-2176, www.hudsonperformancehall.com

FEB 9-11 An Affair of the Heart at State Fair Park (3001 General Pershing Blvd) features art, clothing, antiques, collectibles, gourmet food and more. Three day pass, $8. Friday & Saturday, 9am-6pm; Sunday, 11am-5pm. 6322652, www.anaffairoftheheart.com/okc/

FEB 10 • SATURDAY Norman Chocolate Festival at Norman North High School (1809 Stubbeman Ave, Norman) features samples of delectable treats from participating restaurants and businesses. Proceeds benefit Norman Public Schools through grants for school PTA projects. $30$50. 10am-2pm. www.normanptacouncil.org Victorian Tea at the Rodkey House (410 S Littler, Edmond) features savories, scones, sweets, and of course tea, as well as living history performers and favors. For ladies, mature kindergarten through senior adult. Victorian dress is recommended. $20. 10am & 2pm. 340-0078, www.edmondhistory.org

Edmond’s Daddy Daughter Dance at The Edmond Conference Center (2833 Conference Dr) features one big dance for daughters ages 3-12 and their dads with dancing, refreshments and a professional photographer. $30; $10 each additional girls. 6-9pm. 359-4630, www.edmondparks.com Midwest City’s Daddy Daughter Dance at Reed Conference Center (5750 Will Rogers Rd, Midwest City) features dancing, music and light snacks. Dads & their little girls can also enjoy carriage rides and professional photographer packages for an additional cost. For ages 3-14. $12. 4-5:30pm, 6-7:30pm & 8-9:30pm. 739-1293, www.midwestcityok.org

Kids Fest hosted by MetroFamily Magazine at Cox Convention Center (1 Myriad Gardens) features hands-on activities at over 60 booths, face painting, roaming characters, door prizes, live music and much more. Adults, $7; Kids, free. 11am-4pm. 601-2081. Info and coupon at metrofamilymagazine.com/kidsfest

Frigid Five Miler at Mitch Park (1501 W Covell Rd, Edmond) features a five mile sanctioned race or the one mile run/walk benefiting St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. Winners of the race will be awarded prizes in each age group. $20-$35. 9am. 708-8589, frigidfive.itsyourrace.com

Harlem Globetrotters at Chesapeake Energy Arena (100 W Reno Ave) features a star-studded roster and ball handling wizardry. After the game, Globetrotter stars will stay for an autograph, photograph and high five session for fans (subject to availability). $26 & up. 2 & 7pm. 602-5800, www.chesapeakearena.com

Frozen Nose Series 5K Race at Wheeler Park (1120 S Western Ave) features the first in a three part series of 5K races. Participants can enjoy food, music and more. Preregister. $30 per race. 2pm. 703-0052, www.frozennoseseries.com

FREE Norman Mardi Gras Parade in Downtown Norman (Main St, Norman) features parade floats, musicians, dancers and a wide array of fun and unusual characters. The parade makes the loop twice. 7-9pm. www.normanmardigrasparade.com

FEB 11 • SUNDAY

Find tons of ideas for ♥ Valentine’s Day ❤ fun at www.metrofamily magazine.com/ valentines. ❤

♥ 30 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


We want your opinions!

Family Favorites You can help determine our Family Favorites for 2018! Tell us what you think are the BEST family-friendly local places to go, businesses and services in the OKC area. Nominate your "faves" from Jan. 9-26 then be ready to help determine the winners in the second round of voting in Feb. Food • Places & Events • Camps • Birthday Parties Shopping • Medical • After School Activities Education • Child Care • Community Support

www.metrofamilymagazine.com/ nominate-favorites


CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

WEEKLY EVENTS FREE Art Moves in Downtown Oklahoma City (various locations) features live art like musical and theater performances, demonstrations and short film selections. Weekdays, noon-1pm. 270-4848, www.artscouncilokc.com FREE Art Adventures at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art (555 Elm, Norman) for ages 3-5. Young artists are invited to experience art through books. Tuesdays, 10:30am. 325-3272, www.ou.edu/fjjma Tuesday Night Classics at Harkins Theatre (150 E Reno Ave) features special presentations of classic films on the big screen including Back to the Future. $5. Tuesdays, 7pm. 231-4747, www.harkins.com Storytime Science at Science Museum Oklahoma (2100 NE 52nd St) features a story and corresponding hands-on science activity in various locations throughout the museum. Best suited for kids ages 6 & under. Free with admission. Tuesdays, 10:30-11:30am. 602-6664, www.sciencemuseumok.org FREE Mother Goose Story Time at the Mustang Public Library (1201 N Mustang Rd) features singing, dancing, finger plays and more. For ages 2 & under with caregiver. Wednesdays, 10-10:45am & 11-11:45am. 376-2226, www.mustanglibrary.org/library FREE Reading Wednesdays Story Time at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave) features a nature-themed story time and craft activity. Best suited for ages 2-5. Walkups welcome. Wednesdays, 10-11am. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org

See masterworks by Rembrandt, Rubens, van Dyck and other artists from the Golden Age.

LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

Early Explorers at Science Museum Oklahoma (2020 Remington Pl) features come & go, hands-on science activities for kids ages 6 & under. No registration required. Free with admission. Wednesdays, 10-11am. 602-6664, www.sciencemuseumok.org Toddler Story & Craft Time at Unpluggits Playstudio (575 Enterprise Dr Ste 110) features a short story time and age appropriate craft with lots of gluing and coloring. Free with admission. Wednesdsays & Thursdays, 11-11:30am. 340-7584, www.unpluggits.com FREE Whole Kids Club Story Time at Whole Foods Café (6001 N Western Ave). Best suited for ages 5 & under. Thursdays, 10-11am. 879-3500, www.wholefoodsmarket.com FREE Rhythm and Rhyme at Yukon Community Center (2200 S Holly Ave,

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Yukon) features dancing and singing to develop literacy and motor and verbal skills. Best suited to ages 4 & under with caregiver. Thursdays, 10:30am. 354-8442, www.cityofyukonok.gov Family Skate Night at Skate Galaxy (5800 NW 36th St). Admission includes basic skate rental. (Family package coupon available at www.metrofamilymagazine. com/coupons). $6. Thursdays, 7-10pm; Sundays, 6-8pm. 605-2758, www.skategalaxyokc.com FREE Family Story Time at the Edmond Library (10 S Boulevard, Edmond). Pajamas welcome. Preregister, best suited for families with kids ages 1-5. Thursdays, 6:30-7:15pm. 341-9282, www.metrolibrary.org FREE Children’s Story Time at Full Circle Books (1900 NW Expressway). Saturdays, 10:15am. 842-2900, www.fullcirclebooks.com FREE Story Time at Commonplace Books (1325 N Walker Ave). Saturdays, 10:30am. 551-1715, www.commonplacebooksokc.com Mommy & Me Yoga at Tot Town (841 SW 119th St) features a kid and parent friendly yoga session with a certified instructor. Kids can try poses or play during the workout. Best suited for ages 0-6 and pre- & postnatal moms are welcome too. $5. Saturdays, 1010:30am. 650-7560, www.tottownokc.com FREE Children’s Story Time at Edmond’s Best of Books (1313 E Danforth, Edmond). Saturdays, 11am. 340-9202, www.bestofbooksedmond.com FREE Crafts for Kids at Lakeshore Learning (6300 N May Ave) features a different kid-friendly craft each week. For ages 3 & up. No reservations necessary. Saturdays, 11am-3pm. 858-8778, www.lakeshorelearning.com FREE Storytime with Mr. Steve at Barnes & Noble (540 Ed Noble Parkway, Norman). Saturdays, 11am. 579-8800. Drop-In Art at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Dr) is an art-making session open to all ages and skill levels. Free with admission. 1pm-4pm on Saturdays. 236-3100, www.okcmoa.com All Star Bowling at Bronco Bowl (133 N Mustang Rd, Mustang) features noncompetitive bowling for the differentlyabled in a safe and fun environment. Ramps and bumpers are available. Saturdays, 11am & 1pm. 256-5515, www.autismoklahoma.org


CALENDAR #OKCFAMILYFUN

ONGOING EVENTS THROUGH JAN 13 24 Works on Paper at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame (1400 Classen Dr) features works of art created in a variety of media including printmaking, drawing and photography by contemporary Oklahoman artists. Free with admission. Adults, $7; kids (6-17), $5; kids (5 & under), free. Tuesday-Friday, 9am5pm; Saturday, 10am-5pm. 235-4458, www.oklahomahof.com

Museum of Art (555 Elm Ave, Norman) features rarely exhibited European and American posters in the museum’s permanent collection that were produced between the fin-de-siècle French poster movement of the 1890s and the 1972 Olympics. Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-5pm; Thursday, until 9pm; Sunday, 1-5pm. 3253272, www.ou.edu/fjjma

Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness at Sam Noble Museum (2401 Chautauqua, Norman) explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Adults, $8; kids (4-17), $5; kids (3 & under), free. Monday-Saturday, 10am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm. 325-4712, samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

THROUGH JAN 19

THROUGH FEB 25

FREE Art Now 2018 at Oklahoma Contemporary (3000 General Pershing Blvd) celebrates Oklahoma’s vibrant contemporary art community, providing a snapshot of Oklahoma’s diverse art scene. The exhibition includes 25 artists across many media, from jewelry and sculpture to printmaking and painting. Monday-Thursday, 9am-10pm; Friday & Saturday, 9am-5pm. 951-0000, www.oklahomacontemporary.org

FREE Factory Obscura presents SHIFT at Current Studio (1218 N Penn Ave). SHIFT a fully-immersive, experiential art installation that challenges the participant to physically explore the full-sensory environment. Thursday-Sunday, noon-6pm. 673-1218, www.currentstudio.org

THROUGH APRIL 1

Master Strokes at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Dr) features masterworks by Rembrandt, Rubens, van Dyck and other artists from the Golden Age. Adults, $12; kids (6-18), $10; kids, (5 & under), free. Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-5pm; Thursday, until 9pm; Sunday, noon-5pm. 236-3100, www.okcmoa.com

Cartoons & Comics: The Early Art of Tom Ryan at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (1700 NE 63rd St) features small drawings provide a snapshot of Ryan’s high school and Coast Guard years. Original characters Dan the Cop and Joe Campion Jr. spring from his teenage imagination. Adults, $12.50; kids (6-12), $5.75; kids (5 & under), free. MondaySaturday, 10am-5pm; Sunday, noon-5pm. 478-2250, www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

THROUGH JAN 28

THROUGH MAY 13

THROUGH JAN 21

Devon Ice Rink at Myriad Gardens (301 W Reno Ave). Enjoy another winter of outdoor ice skating. $13, $8 without skates; members, $7. Monday-Thursday 3-9pm; Friday 3-11pm; Saturday, 11am-11pm; Sunday 11am–7pm. See website for extended hours of operation and special events. 445-7080, www.myriadgardens.org

OPENING JAN 26 FREE Fine Print! Posters from the Permanent Collection at Fred Jones Jr

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THROUGH JAN 28 Saints and Sinners II: Prints from the 16th through the 20th Centuries at MabeeGerrer Museum of Art (190 W MacArthur, Shawnee) features prints from the 16th through the 20th centuries highlighting the stories of the saints and how they overcame their struggles and persecution. Adults, $5; students & kids (6-17), $3; kids (5 & under), free. Tuesday-Saturday. 10am-5pm; Sunday, 1-4pm. 878-5300, www.mgmoa.org

THROUGH JAN 17

Christmas puppy driving you nuts?

Life and Legacy: The Art of Jerome Tiger at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (1700 NE 63rd St). Recognized as one of the greatest Native American artists, Jerome Tiger produced hundreds of works of art and won numerous awards throughout the country. Adults, $12.50; kids (6-12), $5.75; kids (5 & under). Free. MondaySaturday, 10am-5pm; Sunday, noon-5pm. 478-2250, www.nationalcowboymuseum.org Discover more at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/museums.

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

33

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2018 OKC Bucket List BY LINDSAY CUOMO

Let’s make a resolution to have some fun and make some memories together this year! Each month, Oklahoma is bustling with fun activities for families. So it was easy to put together an Ultimate 2018 Family Bucket List.

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1. Play tourist in your own town and visit favorite locations to take outof-town guests like RIVERSPORT Adventures, Bricktown and the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. 2. Oklahoma is peppered with fun, educational museums. Visit one you’ve never been to before.

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3. Take a dip into some local pools! Oklahoma City has plenty of indoor and outdoor options so you can squeeze in some splash time, no matter the weather.

34 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

4. Plan a weekend getaway and explore our great state. 5. Explore a local family festival like Edmond’s LibertyFest or Norman’s Medieval Fair or hit the road for an iconic Oklahoma festival like Porter’s Peach Festival. 6. Commit to spending some individual time with your little ones at a local Mommy & Me class. 7. Get tickets to a can’t-miss performance like School of Rock or Finding Neverland.


8. This spring, explore a local farmer’s market or visit a local farm and make something fresh and homemade. 9. Plan a family campout. 10. Take some time to slow down and game together at a local gaming café or check out cutting-edge gaming technology in a virtual reality arcade. 11. Look off the beaten path for family fun at a surprising hidden gem like the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, 99s Museum of Women Pilots or the American Banjo Museum. 12. Add some nostalgia to your summer at a drive-in movie. 13. Explore nature at one of Oklahoma’s beautiful state parks.

14. This fall, head to a county fair for some old-school family fun. Play some classic games, ride some wild rides and enjoy some tasty fair treats together. 15. Relive your favorite childhood memories with your kids.

Find more family fun on our web calendar at www.metrofamilymagazine. com/calendar.

16. Plan your own “tour around the world” by visiting restaurants owned and operated by immigrants sharing their love of their culture and food. 17. Volunteer together. 18. Challenge your family to try something new. Our searchable calendar is packed with family fun every day all year long! Want to know more? Find details about these bucket list ideas through our clickable version at www. metrofamilymagazine.com/2018.

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

35


Mark your calendar for

Feb. 10, 2018 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cox Convention Center

Don’t miss the fun as we celebrate our 20th birthday!

Forever After Parties

Your business should be at Kids Fest, interacting with 8,000 engaged attendees. Contact us today about being a sponsor or booth vendor at this fun and lively event!

405-601-2081 • sarah@metrofamilymagazine.com www.metrofamilymagazine.com/kidsfest


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SPECIAL MOBILE ADVERTISING SECTION

Education Guide Learn more with Reveel.it 1. Go to www.Reveel.it 2. Snap a photo of these pages 3. Explore. Learn. Contact. Get smart on the go. No App to Download!

The Catholic Schools of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City Bishop John Carroll Cathedral School

Mount St. Mary Catholic High School 2801 S. Shartel Ave. Grades 9-12

925 S. Boulevard, Edmond PreK3-8

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School

Rosary Catholic School

The Catholic School of St. Eugene

Christ the King Catholic School

Sacred Heart Catholic School/OKC

St. James Catholic School

Cristo Rey Oklahoma City Catholic High School

St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School

St. John Nepomuk Catholic School

1100 N.W. 32nd St. PreK-8

801 N.W. 50th St. Grades 9-12

1905 Elmhurst Ave. PreK3-8

900 N. Portland Grades 9-12

38 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

1919 N.W. 18th St. PreK3-8

2700 S. Shartel PreK4-8

5000 N. Grove St. PreK-8

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School

2400 W. Hefner Rd. PreK3-8

1224 S.W. 41st PreK3-8

600 Garth Brooks Blvd., Yukon PreK3-8


SPECIAL MOBILE ADVERTISING SECTION

Private & Charter Schools; Preschools The Academy of Classical Christian Studies

K12 (Oklahoma Virtual Charter Academy)

Casady School

King’s Gate Christian School

North OKC; Midtown; South OKC; PreK-12; theacademyok.org

9500 N. Pennsylvania Ave. PreK-12; casady.org

Hefner Pointe location: 11400 N. Portland; Surrey Hills location: 12421 Mustang Rd., Yukon, 6 months-7th grade, kingsgateschool.com

Crossings Christian School

Oklahoma City Zoo

14400 N. Portland PreK-12; crossingsschool.org

(preschool program) 2000 Remington Way PreK (ages 3-5); okczoo.org

Erna Krouch Preschool

St. Mary’s Episcopal School

4901 N. Pennsylvania PreK (ages 2-5); thetempleokc.org

The Goddard School, Western Ave. 17440 N. Western, Edmond

St. Philip Neri Catholic School

Online charter school K-12; ovca.k12.com

505 E. Covell Rd., Edmond PreK3-5; smesedmond.org

Trinity School

6 weeks-12 years; goddardschool.com

321 N.W. 36th St. K-12; trinityschoolokc.org

Holy Trinity Lutheran School

Westminster School

308 N.W. 164th St., Edmond PreK-8; holytrinityedmond.org

600 N.W. 44th St. PreK3-8; westminsterschool.org

1121 Felix Pl., Midwest City PreK3-8

CT

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METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

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SPECIAL MOBILE ADVERTISING SECTION

Field Trips Harn Homestead

Chickasaw Cultural Center

National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Oklahoma Hall of Fame

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

1721 N. Lincoln Blvd. harnhomestead.com

1700 N.E. 63rd St. nationalcowboymuseum.org

1400 Classen Dr. oklahomahof.com/field-trips

Oklahoma History Center

800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr. okhistory.org/historycenter/ education

40 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

867 Cooper Memorial Rd., Sulphur chickasawculturalcenter.com

415 Couch Dr. okcmoa.com/tours

2401 Chautauqua Ave., Norman samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden 2000 Remington Way okczoo.org


SPECIAL MOBILE ADVERTISING SECTION

Educational Outreach, Programs & Miscellaneous Akasha Skye Math Tutoring, OKC Math tutoring,

Goldfish Swim School

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W.A.T.E.R. safety program for schools, day cares & more 10 N.W. 146th St., Edmond goldfishswimschool.com/edmond

Artsy Rose Academy

Kumon Math and Reading

Edmond Fine Arts Institute

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especially for students with different abilities

Art instruction 7739 W. Hefner Rd. artsyrose.com

Art, music and theater instruction 27 E. Edwards, Edmond edmondfinearts.com

Math & reading enrichment 7 locations in the OKC area kumon.com

Opportunity Scholarship Fund Scholarships for Oklahoma students, educational choice for Oklahoma families osfkids.org

Sylvan Learning Center

Tutoring, enrichment, camps 3209 S. Broadway, Edmond; 9634 N. May Ave. sylvanlearning.com

Art programs 3000 General Pershing Blvd. oklahomacontemporary.org

Ginger’s Music

Music enrichment 6008 N.W. 120th Ct. gingersmusic.com

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LET THE

#OKCFamilyFun

BEGIN!

Where are they now?

Cover Kids Austin Payne & Madison Payne Robertson Austin Payne and Madison Payne Robertson were just 10 and 8 years old, respectively, when the brother-sister duo graced the June 2004 cover of MetroFamily Magazine along with their parents. Graduates of Edmond Memorial High School, they now each own homes in Edmond, and each has married their high school sweetheart. Austin is pursuing his dream to become a firefighter and Madison works for a group of doctors. One of the most memorable parts of their childhood was when their parents decided to foster local kids. The family opened their home to around 15 children and adopted two. Austin and Madison share how their lives have changed since they were cover kids.

Download our FREE, convenient app today and you’ll have easy access to MetroFamily's best family fun information.

ABOVE: ORIGINAL COVER, AUSTIN AND RACHEL PAYNE. BELOW: KALEB AND MADISON ROBERTSON

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42 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


Do you remember anything about being on the cover of the magazine? Austin: I don’t really remember it! Madison: My face doesn’t look too happy. I was excited to match my Mom and then she put me in a cheetah headband and that made me mad!

What’s the most positive change you’ve seen in the Oklahoma City metro since you were on the cover? Austin: Getting the OKC Thunder. That’s a given. Madison: Oklahoma City is more familyoriented and people are a lot more accepting now. This picture was taken two years before we became a foster family. As soon as we had brown babies in our family, people started judging us. Now it’s so common that people don’t notice.

What was it like to be a foster family? Austin: I always wanted a little brother. I thought it would be really cool, and though our mom cautioned us not to get too attached, I enjoyed it. When I was in sixth or seventh grade, [my adopted brother] was an infant, and I would wake up before school, get him out of bed and change and feed him. When I was 16, I would be out with my buddies and would need to stop by my house. They’d say ‘we’re going to be there forever’ because I would get caught up playing with my little brother. Madison: I loved to play with babies, so when the idea got brought up, I said, ‘yes, I want to take care of babies!’ I liked knowing we were helping these kids. It was a good experience. I think it’s really easy and people make it more complicated than it should be. I wish more people were open to it.

What made you want to stay in Oklahoma? Austin: It’s where I’m from and where my family is.

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Madison: My plan hasn’t always been to stay here. I had a lot of anger for how people treated us [as a foster family]. My job stability was the first step to keep me here. Because my husband and I want to have a family together, we want to be close to our family. The low prices here are great, too, and we were able to buy a house this year.

What do you like to do for fun? Austin: I like going to Thunder games. And my wife and I just bought a house, so we’re constantly doing things to it. Madison: My husband and I like to go hiking and exploring. Our favorite place in Oklahoma is the Wichita Mountains.

What’s your proudest moment since you were on the cover? Austin: Becoming family for my little brother and sister. Madison: I tried going to college and it just wasn’t for me. I’m proud that I stuck with that decision and have learned you can succeed doing your own thing.

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METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

43


EXPLORING OKLAHOMA WITH CHILDREN

Exploring Prehistoric Oklahoma BY MAE KIGGINS

CONTRIBUTED BY SAM NOBLE MUSEUM

Do you ever wonder what Oklahoma was like before our time? What kinds of dinosaurs roamed the forests and plains? What kinds of plants did the Apatosaurus munch on? If your kids have a fascination with all things prehistoric, Oklahoma is a great place to feed that passion. Here are four must-see attractions for dinosaur lovers and ancient history lovers. SAM NOBLE MUSEUM BY MAE KIGGINS

Sam Noble Museum in Norman The first stop on your prehistoric adventure in Oklahoma should definitely be the Sam Noble Museum in Norman. This museum explores both natural and human history in creative ways. The Hall of Ancient Life takes visitors on a journey through natural history and introduces kids to ancient life in Oklahoma. Don’t miss the world’s largest Apatosaurus (a long-neck herbivore) and the Guinness Book of World Record holder Pentaceratops skull. This area has a plethora of other fossils, many of them from Oklahoma, along with interactive exhibits. Don’t be afraid to ask museum employees questions; they offer a wealth of information. The Hall of the People of Oklahoma explores nearly 30,000 years of human history in Oklahoma. This exhibits boasts the oldest painted object in North America; a nowextinct bison skull painted with a red zigzag pattern. There are several life-size recreations of dwellings and a wooden canoe and plenty of maps and artifacts.

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SPIRO MOUNDS BY MAE KIGGINS

Spiro Mounds in Spiro As you continue exploring prehistoric life in Oklahoma, make a stop at Spiro Mounds, the only American Indian archaeological site open to the public in the entire state. The site preserves 150 acres of living history along the Arkansas River. Mounds were created by prehistoric people for various reasons; some were burial mounds and some were house mounds. The visitor’s center offers an in-depth look at the amazing civilization behind these mounds, which at its height is thought to have covered two-thirds of the current United States. There are multiple reconstructions of dwellings, tools and a canoe. These bring to life for kids what life was like for these people.

Dinosaur Tracks in Kenton What could be better for a true dinosaur enthusiast than seeing real dinosaur tracks? It’s an extremely rare occurrence but these tracks were discovered at Black Mesa State

Park in the 1980s and are believed to be the created by a Theropod, which are bipedal dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus Rex. There were originally 47 footprints preserved in a sandstone strata but only about a third of the tracks remain due to erosion. So a trip is certainly in order to take advantage of this sight before the tracks disappear. The prints are on the east end of the state park at Carrizo Creek. As you traverse the unique terrain of the area, young visitors can experience a bit of living history as they consider how prehistoric life might have been sustained on the grassy plains surrounded by towering mesas.

Fossil Spotting at Lake Texoma This area is well-known to “rock hounds” and fossil hunters. That’s because of an abundance of Ammonites, spiral-shaped fossils that represent an extinct group of cephalopods (also known as squid) whose bodies were contained in spiral shells.


The best time to look for fossils is during the dry season when the water is low. Although most of these fossils can fit in your palm, some can be 50 pounds or more. Lake Texoma staff reports the Denison Dam near Eisenhower Park is a great place to spot these pieces of history. It’s illegal to remove fossils from state, federal or private property so have your camera handy to snap photos.

Information: Sam Noble Museum 2401 Chautauqua Ave. in Norman 405-325-4712 www.samnoblemuseum.ou.edu Admission: Adult, $8; child (4-17), $5; senior (65+), $6 Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center 18154 First St. in Spiro 918-962-2062 www.okhistory.org/sites/spiromounds.php

Admission: Adult, $7; children (6-18), $4; children (0-5), free; senior (62+), $5 Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday–Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday Black Mesa State Park County Rd. 325 in Kenton (take the first dirt road on the right after the Black Mesa Nature Preserve parking lot. Drive about 100 yards and park. Walk to the bottom of the dry riverbed.) 580-426-2222 Admission: Free

SPIRO MOUNDS BY MAE KIGGINS

Community Sponsor of Exploring Oklahoma:

Lake Texoma Hwy. 70 E. in Kingston (head toward Kingston and follow signs to any Lake Texoma marina. Fossils will be found along the shoreline and as far up as the tree line.) Admission: Free

Love. Live. Explore.

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Bob Moore Subaru

13010 N. Kelley, Oklahoma City, OK 73114 405-749-9049 www.bobmooresubaru.com Purchase or lease any new (previously untitled) Subaru and receive a complimentary factory scheduled maintenance plan for 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever comes first.) Customer must take delivery before 12-31-2018 and reside within the promotional area. At participating dealers only. See retailer for the Subaru Added Security Maintenance Plan for intervals, coverages and limitations, program details and eligibility.

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

45


REAL DAD OF OKC

Philharmonic Conductor

Alexander Mickelthwate BY HANNAH SCHMITT, PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Alexander Mickelthwate has some big shoes to fill. The 46-year-old father of two starts this month as the new conductor of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. He’s taking the baton from the orchestra’s retiring founding music director and conductor, Joel Levine. We had a chance to chat with Mickelthwate about moving to Oklahoma City, how his role as a dad impacts his work and how he encourages his own kids to take an interest in the arts. Tell us about your background. Did you ever think you’d take a job in OKC? Conductors generally move around a bit. I was born in Germany and did my education there but my entire career has been in North America. I’ve worked in Los Angeles and Atlanta and just finished up my 12th season at the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra in Canada. I started looking around for a new job a couple years ago and had a chance to conduct in Oklahoma City last November. It was just a great experience. It was like going on a blind date but with 80 people instead of one. But everyone was so kind and I had a great time. Tell us about your family. My wife, Abigail, works as a fashion designer. We have two kids: Jacob is 9 and Jack is 14. We bought a house in Crestwood over the summer but have been going back and forth to let them finish their school and activities in Canada. Oklahoma City will be a very different life for them. Our house has a Jacuzzi and a backyard and they’re like, ‘wow, we don’t

46 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

have this in Winnipeg.’ Canada still feels like home to them because that’s where their friends are but Oklahoma City is so friendly so I’m sure that will change. They play ice hockey because that’s just what boys do in Canada. But we went to Stillwater for an Oklahoma State University Cowboys game in August and my oldest has suddenly decided he’s into football. That would be so different for me because I’m used to standing around with coffee and foot warmers watching them play ice hockey when it’s minus 20 outside. Are your kids into music like you are? My oldest has music in his bones. He’s constantly singing and dancing but he doesn’t do anything formally with it. When he was 4, I was totally determined to have him love music. I signed him up for piano and would practice with him every day. But when he was 6 or 7, I had to realize everyone is an individual. He didn’t like it and that’s fine. Their interest in music and all activities goes in waves. My oldest actually ended up getting interested in music again a few years ago and he recorded a song. He’s played guitar off and on for the past six months. My youngest has been playing piano for the past few years, too. Of course I’d love them to take an interest in it but I have learned not to push it and I just go with the flow. Did you get into music at a young age? When I was 4, I started with kindermusik. Then when I was 6, I started piano. I just loved it. At 8, I started playing Beethoven and slowly worked myself up to harder things without anyone even prompting it. When I was 11, I started the cello because I wanted to play in the orchestra at school. I didn’t like sports or anything like that; my real passion was music.

What is a typical day like balancing fatherhood and your career? As a conductor, my schedule changes all the time. Some weeks are really busy and others I am more relaxed. I never have a regular 9-5 routine. My family knows on concert days my routine starts at around 2 p.m. I have a big, big lunch with lots of carbs and then everybody knows I am resting or sleeping for about two hours and I’m not available to them. My wife is wonderful and she steps in and everyone just knows she is taking over. I drive to the concert hall very early and go through the entire program. The tradeoff of being busy during concert times is that I have a flexible schedule other times. I’m usually the one dropping them off and picking them up from school. I can take them to doctor appointments between the times I’m learning and memorizing the music. You’ve lived a lot of places. How does Oklahoma City compare? The people make it such a great place to be. In general, it seems like a cool, vibrant place with lots of things happening and we’re excited to be part of that.

Your kids can see the Oklahoma City Philharmonic in action at the second Discovery Series concert of the season at 2 p.m. Feb. 25 at Civic Center Music Hall. The show is developed for children ages 4-13 and their families with a preconcert celebration starting at 1 p.m. featuring an instrument playground and a chance to meet performers.


Looking for family resources? MetroFamily has you covered! Find everything from a birthday party venue perfect for a kid interested in science to attractions that offer drop-in craft making—and more! • Check out the Resource Directory advertisers in the following pages. • Discover searchable directories at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/directories • Download our app today to have one-click access to these great resources: www.metrofamilymagazine.com/app (Popular Pages tab)

After-School Activities

Special Needs

Foster Care

Party

Family Fun

Education

Helping parents find local businesses and resources since 1998

Resource Directory Index 48 Education

51 Foster Care

52 After-School Activities

50 Party Guide

51 Special Needs

51 Home Services

51 Family Fun

53 Restaurants & Shopping

Find more at www.metrofamilymagazine.com/directories 47 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


EDUCATION

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PRESCHOOL TWELFTH GRADE COLLEGE PREPARATORY CHRISTCENTERED

Partner with us as we move towards 12th grade!

CROSSINGS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 14400 N PORTLAND AVE | WWW.CROSSINGSSCHOOL.ORG

Now accepting applications for the 2018-2019 school year.

NEW! Affordable Monthly Membership Programs

Personalized Tutoring

Academic Coaching

Advancement & Test Prep

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Christ-Centered Education at TWO Locations

CALL TODAY! Programs for EVERY need and budget! • STEM courses in Robotics and Coding • Traditional Tutoring Courses in Reading, Writing & Math • Study Skills, Test Prep, & ACT/SAT Courses

PreK - College welcome! We have something for everyone!

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3209 S. Broadway - Edmond 562.5202 / 9634 N. May - OKC 842.7323

Sylvanlearning.com Tisha Clay - Center Director

KING’S GATE

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL SURREY HILLS

NW Express. & Mustang Rd. Toddlers & Preschool, 2nd – 7th Grades Surrey Hills Open House: January 30th, 6:30 pm–7:30 pm

HEFNER POINTE

Hefner Pkwy & Hefner Rd. Toddlers, Preschool, Pre-K, Kdg. & First Grade Hefner Pointe Open House: February 8th, 6:30 pm–7:30 pm LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

HEFNER POINTE SUPER SUMMER Day Camp Age 3–3rd Grade Tues. & Thurs. in June & July

Embrace • Empower • Engage Average Ratio 8:1 • Unique Science Program • STEM • Outdoor Classroom • Integrated Technology • Science • Art • Spanish

48 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018


EDUCATION

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Family Favorites 2016 WINNER

Experience the Best Childhood Preparation for Social and Academic Success. We offer

• Foreign Language Program • Full or Part Time Care • Before and/or After School Transportation • School Age Summer Program • STEAM and Chess Curriculum • Organic Produce • Gardening • Certified Safe Room • Indoor Gym and so much more!

Our field trips are a blast! • Oklahoma history comes to life • Ages 6-10 • Available Tues.-Fri. all year • Perfect for schools, day cares & homeschool groups.

Schedule your fun tour & program today!

If your child struggles to read, write, or pay attention, it could be a learning difference. Trinity serves students with mild to moderate learning differences including: Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia, ADHD, and Auditory Processing, among others.

Open House

Thurs., February 1 6:30-8pm LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

Free Quarterly Dyslexia Screenings

The Goddard School, Western Ave. 17440 N. Western Avenue, Edmond, OK 73012

405-348-4442, goddardschool.com

1721 N. Lincoln Boulevard, OKC

The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2015

405-235-4058

321 N.W. 36th, OKC

dsapper@harnhomestead.com

www.trinityschoolokc.org

www.harnhomestead.com

405-525-5600

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

49


EDUCATION

Two hours of private access to Goldfish Swim School Invitations & envelopes Balloons, tropical decorations & centerpieces Cupcakes & beverages for the children

EDMOND | 405.696.7500 www.goldfishswimschool.com

Meet our new sloth Flash!

Extreme Animals We bring the zoo to you!

Birthday Parties Educational Programs • Church Events & more! • •

Contact us for a wildly unique experience!

405-413-3174 • www.extremeanimals.org

Birthdays are a blast at Chester’s Party Barn & Farm! Party packages for up to 15 children include all this and more: • Unlimited pony rides • Petting zoo

• Party barn games • Hayride

Ask about our “party comes to you” entertainment options for celebrations, corporate parties, school functions, etc.

Schedule your child’s special celebration TODAY! 5201 Cimarron Rd NW, Piedmont, Ok 405-373-1595 • office@chesterandcrew.com

Find Us on Facebook @ Chester’s Party Barn & Farm

50 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

421 NW 10th • 405.609.3302 dustbowlok.com

PARTY GUIDE

IT’S COOL TO

PARTY AT THE POOL!


HOME SERVICES

my sister?”

Experts in Sinking Concrete Bowing Walls Nasty Crawl Spaces CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE! 405-698-1109 | vestafamily.com

“Will we be able to

Give hope. stay together?” Change a life. Become a foster parent.

FOSTER CARE

“What about

Learn more at www.fostercare-ok.org www.fostercare-ok.org 1-877-263-1890 or call 877-263-1890

Play • Learn • Thrive

is an Open Door! Services Include: Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy & Speech-Language Therapy for Children of All Ages & Abilities In-network providers for the following insurance companies: BC/BS Tricare United Healthcare Health Choice Soonercare Oklahoma Health Network

Warm up with a BIG CHILI MUG!

(405) 840-1686 Two locations to serve you

14715 Bristol Park Blvd., Edmond 5701 SE 74th St., OKC

Open Paint & Play All Day Indoor Playground Paint & Takes Ceramics Clay Workshops Grown-ups Paint Nights 405-340-PLUG • www.unpluggits.com • 575 Enterprise Drive, Edmond (South of 15th, off Kelly)

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

51

FAMILY FUN

SPECIAL NEEDS

www.SensationalKidsOKC.com


AFTER-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

Art Enrichment Mondays! Students work with all mediums and methods throughout the semester. Enroll for one class or multiple classes. Each week is a new adventure! Class Schedule for January 2018 For Ages 5-15 Jan. 8, 22 & 29, 4:15-5:15 pm, $15/class Register: www.artsyrose.com/events/ art-enrichment-mondays-january-2018

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Art Classes Camps Parties For All Ages Ladies' Night Out

Big Dreams Start Here!

New classes star t Jan. 15

Artsy Rose Academy

405.603.8550 www.artsyrose.com 7739 W. Hefner Rd. / OKC

11122 N Rockwell Ave Ste A-11 OKC

405-721-8807

admin@oklahomacitydancestudio.com

www.oklahomacitydancestudio.com

Follow us on Instagram!

Entering our 36th year serving OKC and Edmond children and youth with award-winning recreational & gymnastics classes, training and fun!

Search metrofamilyokc

Come for the Fun

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stay for the Education

Lets shake together mommy

can we start in january?

www.GingersMusic.com

hey can I join the fun?

722-2379

Enroll today! Spring Music and Movement AGES 0-6 years start in January

52

METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

• Parent-Tot Classes • Preschool Gymnastics (boys & girls) • Recreational Classes • Home School Classes • Tumbling Classes (boys & girls) • Competitive Team • Toddler Open Gym • NEW: Youth & Adult Aerial Silks • Play Group Outings • Easy online enrollment • Birthday Parties • Private Lessons

848-5308

www.metrogymokc.com

7420 Broadway Ext., Suite A, OKC, OK 73116 AAU Competitive Team Training Center (Suite F) email: metrogymokc@sbcglobal.net Co-Owners: Sarah Blackledge Brawley, Carol Blackledge Lee


Download the MetroFamily app today! Learn more at metrofamilymagazine.com/app

GOT LAYERS? ADD SOMETHING WARM BETWEEN THEM AND THEIR COAT. SHOP OUR LATEST ARRIVALS AND SAVE UP TO 70% OFF RETAIL!

13801 N. PENNSYLVANIA AVE, N. OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73134 405-286-3114 | ONCEUPONACHILDOKCNORTH.COM

RESTAURANT & SHOPPING

Help children learn about their world!

LEARN MORE Go to www.Reveel.it and snap a photo

7638 N. Western, OKC 405-848-1415 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

53


Goldfish Swim School Kid Review Reviewer’s name: Isaac Roldán Age: 5

What made the experience stand out? I’ve been to swimming lessons before but the water was too cold. I felt too upset to learn when I was cold. I didn’t feel like I was freezing this time. Also, the teachers give you ribbons when you get better at doing something you don’t want to do, like putting your face in the water or kicking with straight legs. What was the best part? Going more than once! I go to swim class every Thursday after school. The water doesn’t sting my eyes. I also really love the ribbons. What was the worst part? I still don’t like to put my face in the water or get my head very wet.

54 METROFAMILYMAGAZINE.COM / JANUARY 2018

Will other kids like Goldfish Swim School? Yes, they will like that it’s not the same as other pools. The water doesn’t smell the same or feel cold. Would this venue be enjoyed by your siblings? Why or why not? I think so. My baby brother also takes lessons and he’s learning to get out of the pool and swim a little. My oldest brothers, Sam, is 10 and he really wants to come swim too. If you could do this again, knowing what you know now about the pool, what would you do differently? I would take my goggles to the first lesson. It’s much easier to swim with those on and my Mom says I have to take them every time. I have some new swim trunks with flames on them that are cool. I would use those more instead of my old ones with red flowers.

Does anything you’re learning at Goldfish match up with what you’re doing in school or have seen on TV, in a book or somewhere else before? I’ve been swimming outside before but not really indoors. We went to a hotel with an indoor pool but it wasn’t for lessons. If I learn to swim better now, maybe I can see starfish or some cool rocks at the beach. What do you think you’ll remember most about Goldfish Swim School? I’ll remember that I learned to swim there and that the water wasn’t too cold even when it was cold outside. [Editor’s Note: Find more kid reviews from Isaac’s older brother, Sam, at www. metrofamilymagazine.com/kid-reviews.]


THE ULTIMATE PRESCHOOL. Where else is petting a stingray a class activity? Nature Explorers Preschool at the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden develops young minds with cognitive physical, social, emotional, and creative activities using the entire Zoo as a classroom! With a 2 or 3 day a week curriculum, your child will explore the Zoo, interact with animal ambassadors, and develop skills to prepare them for kindergarten and beyond. 2018-2019 open enrollment begins April 13. ENROLL NOW at okczoo.org/preschool Must be 3 - 5 years on or before September 1, 2018. Classes run September 3, 2018 - May 24, 2019.

2000 REMINGTON PL ACE , OKC , OK 73111

•

405.425.0218


Book Your FREE Trip Today!

e e Fr

d l e i F

s p i Tr

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Book your FREE Field Trip to the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, home of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

Free

Free

Chick-fil-A Lunch or Fuel Stipend

Field Trip for Pre-K to 12th grade

Open

Apply Today Website:

Tuesday-Friday 9am-5pm Saturday 10am-5pm

OklahomaHoF.com/Field-Trips

Questions? Contact Emma Fritz Email: ef@oklahomahof.com Phone: (405) 523-3211

Oklahoma Hall of Fame | Gaylord-Pickens Museum 1400 Classen Drive (N.W. 13th and Shartel) Oklahoma City, OK, 73106

OklahomaHoF.com (405)235-4458

MetroFamily Magazine January 2018  
MetroFamily Magazine January 2018