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what percentage of the current RFA riders does Metro calculate would continue to ride in the RFA once the RFA disappears, given as a percentage from zero to 100%? How is your figure arrived at? Thanks, John S 709. Hi, I need to transfer to the 203 shuttle on Mercer Island to reach Herzl Ner Tamid conservative congregation on East Mercer Way by 6:00 PM on Fridays for religious services. I currently leave work at 5:00 PM, and am unable to move it any earlier. Currently, I am able to catch the 5:06 PM 550 bus and transfer to the 5:34 203 shuttle. However, even now this occasionally doesn't work. Will the 203 schedule be adjusted to accommodate for the later arrival times of buses from Seattle? Thank you. Cheers, Brian Matt 710. Dear Metro, Thank you for holding the open house regarding the impending elimination of the Ride Free Area. I’ll respond to various elements of the current plan in a separate letter, and focus this letter on the transit agencies around the country that use a different fare for cash boardings and RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) card boardings in order to disincentivize change fumbling at the bus door. First, let me point out that this sort of differential fare is not a hardship on anyone, beyond the cost of getting an ORCA card. Once someone gets a card, it would pay for itself within a certain number of rides. Right now, the incentive is to not get a card, and continue to use cash, since there is no disincentive to cash fumbling, other than monthly passes and lack of inter-agency paper transfers, and the disapproving moans of fellow riders wanting to get somewhere faster. But using cash is a hardship on the whole system and on all the riders who have to put up with slower buses. It also results in less service. Having a differential fare requires no new technology, nor even having to reset the ORCA readers. It can be achieved by voting to raise cash fares, voting to lower ORCA fares, or a combination of the two – whatever it takes to get the votes. Note that raising cash fares requires no inter-agency agreements, other than possibly for the Reduced Regional Fare Permit. Differential fares needs to happen in order to keep buses moving downtown when the RFA goes away. Six transit agencies around the country that I”ve looked at use different fares between cash and card boardings. I’ve attached links to the fare charts of each agency, showing the differential fare. They are: Chicago Transit Authority http://www.transitchicago.com/fares/ Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority http://www.mbta.com/fares_and_passes/bus/ Port Authority of Allegheny County (Pittsburgh) http://www.portauthority.org/paac/FaresPasses/Fares.aspx Note that PAPC is the other transit agency that uses a free ride area. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority http://www.wmata.com/fares/Metrobus.cfm Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County (Houston) http://www.rideMetro.org/FareInfo/Default.aspx In this case, the differential is five free rides for every 50 rides paid for on each card, which is a more convoluted way to administer the differential, requiring fancier programming. Gold Coast Transit (Ventura, CA) http://www.goldcoasttransit.org/fares-eff-aug-2011.html Besides the multi-ride discount, Go-Ventura card users get a 10% discount on every ride, which does not require fancier programming. http://www.goventura.org/?q=travel-ventura/vista/go-ventura-bus-pass These agencies can provide data showing the effects of differential fare rates between cash and cards. I hope you will talk with them, and follow their lead in making transit faster, with the net result of being able to provide more service using the same service hours. I also want to point out the local precedent for differential cash fares on transit: the King County Ferry District: http://www.kingcounty.gov/transportation/kcdot/WaterTaxi/VashonRoute/Fares.aspx http://www.kingcounty.gov/transportation/kcdot/WaterTaxi/WestSeattleRoute/Fares.aspx If it is

Ride Free Area - Public Engagement Report  

King County Metro Transit Implementation plan for Ride Free Area elimination and transition to pay-on-entry

Ride Free Area - Public Engagement Report  

King County Metro Transit Implementation plan for Ride Free Area elimination and transition to pay-on-entry