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What would it take? •

Use inclusive planning to make general public services more accessible. Continue improving how Metro involves people with disabilities in our planning, to make sure we fully understand the challenges they face in getting around on transit. Recent innovations include passive restraints on our RapidRide coaches, “kneeling coaches“ that make boarding easier, automated and visual stop announcements, low-floor coaches, and improvements in transit zones, where passengers get on and off. Pilot and start new service models to reduce costs and improve service quality. Potential approaches include same-day Access Transportation service and public-private partnerships to expand accessible taxis or TNCs in King County.

Make customer information and support available to customers who have limited English proficiency or disabilities. Strategies include enhanced availability of interpretation services and translated materials, audible announcements on vehicles and at facilities, and tactile wayfinding options.

Partner to provide service. Continue to partner with community organizations to provide cost-effective transportation for people with disabilities. We may build on our existing CAT program, which provides vans and support to community organizations that operate the service themselves. CAT service is less expensive to operate than Access service. At a cost of about $6.50 per boarding, if 100 people took a trip on CAT instead of Access, Metro could save $4,500 per day.

ACCESSIBLE TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS

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Profile for King County Metro Transit

METRO CONNECTS Long-Range Plan  

King County Metro Transit’s vision for bringing you more service, more choices, and one easy-to-use system over the next 25 years.

METRO CONNECTS Long-Range Plan  

King County Metro Transit’s vision for bringing you more service, more choices, and one easy-to-use system over the next 25 years.