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72. Textile fragment with a pattern of columns of alternating scenes and Persian inscriptions (detail). Iran, Safavid period, 16th – 17th century. Double-cloth woven dyed silk (the red cochineal), metal-wrapped thread; 25¾ x 14⅜ in. (65.4 x 36.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1946 (46.156.7)

73. Pieced fragments of brocade. Iran, ­Safavid period, 17th century. Compound twill weave silk, metal thread; 19¾ x 19 in. (50.2 x 48.3 cm). The ­Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Friedsam Collection, Bequest of Michael Friedsam, 1931 (32.100.461). Two red dyes were used in the textile: the nightingales’ heads and flowers were dyed with safflower to produce a pink color, which has faded, while the wings of the birds were dyed with cochineal, which has by contrast remained bright red.

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Cochineal Red: The Art History of a Color  

Elena Phipps The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Winter 2010 Volume LXVII, Number 3 Copyright © 2010 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art,...

Cochineal Red: The Art History of a Color  

Elena Phipps The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Winter 2010 Volume LXVII, Number 3 Copyright © 2010 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art,...

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