Page 15

90°W

120°W

60°W 30°N

16. Habitats and areas of cultivation of cochineal in the Americas, from the 16th to the 19th century

Havana Mexico City Tlaxcala Veracruz Puebla Acapulco

Mérida

Atlantic Ocean

Oaxaca

Cartagena

Bogotá

Quito

n Amazo

Pacific Ocean

Trujillo Huánuco Lima

Ayacucho Cuzco Arequipa

La Paz Sucre

Rio de Janeiro Tucumán

Córdoba

30°S

Santiago Buenos Aires

Río de

la Plata

Cochineal distribution Spanish Viceroyalty border Primary cultivation site 0 0

cochineal (see figs. 21, 22): The Mixtec people of the region called Coaixtlahuacan, northeast of Oaxaca, were to give 40 sacks (indicated by the two flagged bags) of cochineal every year, along with more than 2,000 mantles and 400 cloths of various types, 20 jade belts, 800 quetzal feathers, and bags of gold and other goods. The Zapotec people of the region of Coyolapan, in the central Oaxaca Valley, were to contribute 20 bags of grana cochinilla every eighty days, along with 400 woven covers, 800 plain mantles, and 20 gold disks.

1000 mi 1000 km

Sometime after the manuscript was created, the folios of the Matrícula were annotated by another hand to indicate the Spanish equivalents of the tribute amounts, now due to the Spanish administrators. Next to the cochineal sack on the Coyolapan page (fig. 22), for example, is written “Un Zurron de Grana,” zurrón being the term for the leather bags that were used for shipping the dyestuff to Spain. Each zurrón held approximately 125 pounds. To sell and transport cochineal, the Aztecs made flattened cakes of dried insects held together with clay or flour that they called nocheztlaxcalli (from 13

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Cochineal Red: The Art History of a Color  

Elena Phipps The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Winter 2010 Volume LXVII, Number 3 Copyright © 2010 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art,...

Cochineal Red: The Art History of a Color  

Elena Phipps The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Winter 2010 Volume LXVII, Number 3 Copyright © 2010 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art,...

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