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in this ISSUE

connecting our community

features

10

MASTERING THE PROFOUND watie white

18

SERVICE ABOVE SELF

28

rotary international

28

BUSINESS HALL OF FAME

connecting to our calling

greater omaha chamber of commerce

departments/columns

22

26

connecting to our commerce

GAME CHANGERS • KIM MICHELSEN presented by planitomaha

26

VIPS: VERY INSPIRATIONAL PEOPLE our series of continuing inspiring profiles

30

OMAHA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION omaha giving

31

metroSPIRIT with mary vandenack

32

22

connecting to our service

VW LAW planning matters

33

SWARTZBAUGH, FARBER & ASSOC. todays savings

33

18

connecting to our fearlessness

STEPHANIE VONDRAK impact!

events

35

SCENE highlights from recent charity & cultural events

36

HONORING GIVERS The BIG Event 2019!

57

SAVE THE DATE upcoming charity & cultural events

10

connecting to our mastery

connecting to our charities

4

mmag azin e • aPRiL 2019

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CRedits aPRiL 2019 • Vo L. 31 n o . 2 Press releases and other editorial information may be sent to: P.o . Bo x 241611, o maHa, n e 68124 or e-mailed to: editor@s piritofo maha.com Publisher/Editor-in-Chief andrea L. “an dee” Hoig

Creative Collaboration elissa Joy debra s . Kaplan

Editor/Creative Director Rob Killmer

o maha Community Foundation Jim s cholz

Community Engagement Co n n eCt @s piritofo maha.com

Special Thanks Printco g raphics

Kara s chweiss s wartzbaugh-Farber & associates VW Law s tephanie Vondrak d.d.s. m ichael J. Weaver, J.d.

metromag azin e is wholly owned and operated by the publisher and is not affiliated with any other publication, operating solely on subscription and advertising revenues and the good will of the agencies and charities we support; all of which are very important to the continuing growth and quality of this publication. t hank you to all who support this endeavor. OFFICE/SALES

402.932.3522 | sales@s piritofo maha.com MISSION STATEMENT aLH Publications exists to inform, inspire and connect those who give back to the community through volunteerism and philanthropy, recognizing the ongoing efforts of area businesses, organizations and individuals who better our community. Contents of this magazine are copyrighted by aLH Publications, inc. in their entirety. n o part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise - without prior written consent of the publisher. ©Copyright 1990 – 2019 aLH Publications, inc. all rights reserved.

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words FROM MY HEART

mmag azin e • Let t eR FRo m t He Pu BLis HeR

WHAT ELSE IS possible? As I write this publisher’s letter, it is just a week since the winter storms and floods hit Nebraska, Iowa and surrounding areas. With so much devastation in our communities it is easy to feel helpless and hopeless. So many of us can feel other people’s pain and loss and suffering, and at times it can be paralyzing. But during these times of loss and uncertainty it can create incredible opportunities for contribution. It pulls us out of our daily life and daily routines to a place of asking “How can I contribute?”We reach out to friends, family and strangers and offer help. We become highly aware of the needs and desires of others. I have witnessed amazing efforts to rescue families, animals and homes during these devastating floods and blizzards. It’s times like these where we all become very human and our level of compassion and love for others skyrockets. People’s lives have been forever changed and for many it is the beginning of a new way of life with new challenges ahead but also new opportunities. What I would encourage us all to ask is this: “What else is possible?” From times of great devastation and despair, what would it take to create something greater than I had before? Allow God/The Universe to show you things that you never thought possible or couldn’t even imagine for your loved ones, your family and yourself. By asking questions, regardless of what is going on in your life, it allows life to open up to all possibilities. Coming to conclusions that life is over or that there is no hope closes the door on what is possible.

an dRea L. Ho ig ahoig@s piritofo maha.com

Mondays: 2pm Tuesdays: 10am Thursdays: 4pm & 7pm

Some of my favorite questions to ask: • What else is possible? • What would it take to change _________? (fill in the blank) • What would it take to create _________? (fill in the blank) • What contribution can I make—today, tomorrow, this year— that would have the greatest impact?

I am constantly asking questions knowing that doors are being opened or, better yet, space is opening up in my life to allow the right people, opportunities, resources, money flows—all that is good—to come in. It may not happen immediately, but the process of creating a phenomenal life (which we are all deserving of) is taking place. Thank you to everyone is contributing to our community and to the world! What else is possible? Love & blessings, ~ ANDEE

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local ACCLAIM

mastering the profound

HOW amazing WOULD IT BE TO HAVE lived THIS LIFE AND GET TO HAVE MADE A profound THING? ~ WATIE WHITE

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s t o Ry by KARA SCHWEISS • Ph o t o by JIM SCHOLZ

• mmag azin e

Acclaimed artist Watie White is promoting positive social change and mentoring young talent through his unique niche in the o maha art and nonprofit communities. With an impressive body of work already behind him, he’s still looking ahead with the expectation that the best is yet to come.

collaborator watie white

LIFE IMITATES ART

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WATIE WHITE’S life artistry

mastering the profound IN 1996 artist Watie White visited the Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris, Where he saW a Painting called les nyMPhéas: Matin (Water lilies: MOrning) that changed his life. “When I saw it first, I was 24. I wasn’t really a person who had the emotional depth to cry at the time, but I stood in front of this thing for an hour, welling up with tears that never quite fell,” White recalled. “Looking at it, I had a huge sense of awe about it; I had no idea why I was feeling everything I was feeling that day. It was really an amazing experience.” The work by famed French Impressionist painter Claude Monet was part of a series of roughly 250 paintings of his flower garden and created during the last decades of his life. Matin was nearly a century old when White saw it, and although the young artist could relate very little of his life to either the aging painter or the scene depicted, the painting moved him so deeply that he thought about it every day for years and virtually every time he painted. The same year he saw the Monet painting, White made art his full-time occupation. “Three years ago, I went back to Paris and the first thing I did was go straight to l’Orangerie to see this painting for the first time in 20 years. The experience was still very powerful but very different. So many of the things I remembered from that first experience, that ‘I have no idea what I’m seeing,’ was different,’” White said. With two additional decades of artistic experience under his belt, he saw the painting with an enhanced appreciation of its maker’s technique. But he also saw it through the lens of 20 more years of life experience. “Twenty years later, I absolutely remembered everything I was feeling from that day. I’m 24, I’m with this woman I’m in love with and don’t know where it’s going to go, I have all these questions, and I’m feeling so inspired to be an artist. My head was filled with worries and questions and ambiguity about the future,” he said. “For two hours I sat there and cried my ass off because I knew all the answers to all the things I was worried about twentysomething years ago. I sat there playing through everything in my mind: How I married that woman, had kids with her and divorced. How I moved over and over, had more education, had my career. All these things that at 24 were overwhelming, scary

and terrifying; I got to sit there with the most important painting that I’d ever seen and play through the last 20 years of it.”

in regularly so you can support your lifestyle…all the plates are spinning at the same time.”

an interesting path

And also at the same time, White, who said he’s always been close to “mission-driven” people, found the nonprofit and philanthropic culture of Omaha to be quite robust. So, over 13 years, White may still feel like a transplant, but he’s rooted in a unique niche in his adopted city that blends an art career with service to the community.

Now, at 47, White said he hopes his best work is still ahead of him.

“How amazing would it be to have lived this life and get to have made a profound thing?” he said. “If you (classify) artists, either you’re a young genius or you’re an old master. I’m definitely an old master. I “It really has been growing organically out of shared want to think long and hard about things, I’m values with people not in the art world in Omaha,” someone who wants to make a lot of work, who wants to believe in incremental growth and progress he said. “About half the work I do is public art over time…I’m hoping that the growth and projects with Omaha-based nonprofits within trajectory doesn’t slow down.” communities addressing social justice. Lately that’s taken me into a lot of schools to work in a White is on an interesting path to becoming that collaborative way.” old master. The painter and printmaker received his formal art education at Carleton College, The School finding their voices of the Art Institute of Chicago, and American University, but as the son of cultural anthropologists, One recent school-based project took place at his he grew up all over. “I don’t have that same sense of son’s school, Brownell Talbot. The collaborative home that other people have. Like a turtle, I carry it mural called The Greatest Pirate That Ever Lived tells a visual story of the real-life Ching Shih, “a protowith me,” he said. “I’ve lived in Omaha longer than I’ve lived in any other place. But I don’t think I’ll feminist historical figure” from the turn of the 19th ever be something other than a transplant to century, White said. anywhere I am…I’m always a little bit of a visitor, a little bit of a watcher.” Due to legal discrimination which prohibited the Guangzhou Tanka ethnic group from living on land, White came to Omaha with his family in 2006 Ching Shih grew up in a floating city of tiny family because of a career opportunity for his now ex-wife. As a working artist, he sized up the art community as boats. She eventually became a leader—a rare accomplishment for a woman of that time and “still young. Even the older artists here are generally place— of 80,000 pirates; devised a revolutionary young in their work.” code of ethics that supported women; and fought a unified force of Chinese, Portuguese and British He found the Omaha art community to still be fleets. Although she lost that battle, Ching Shih developing in other ways, too. negotiated a pardon from the Chinese emperor that “There are a lot of hurdles to living and working as an facilitated her retirement without sacrificing her artist in Omaha, particularly if you want to be a following or her wealth. gallery artist who’s going to make a lot of your income over the year through gallery representation Brownell Talbot students helped create the mural and dealers, selling the work you make in the studio, and even modeled for its characters. and then finding clients and homes for it. It’s a part of the industry that doesn’t really exist in Omaha “They saw something of what they want to be in because of its size, because Omaha doesn’t really the story,” White said, adding that as a father have a culture or a long tradition for that sort of thing,” he explained. “This means you do lots of other (daughter Eloise is 12, son Simon is 16), he things and you’re constantly trying to figure out how especially enjoys helping young people find— to make five or six or eight streams of income come and preserve—their voices.

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THE ODYSSEY OF HOLLING HEIGHTS

MAURICE 2017 (100 PEOPLE PROJECT)

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local ACCLAIM

WATIE WHITE’S life artistry

mastering the profound “It’s an educational tool. They become more inclusive, and they see greater value in their stories, perspectives and personalities,” he said. “I love to see that in students.” Working with children isn’t without its challenges, he said. “I have to put my own adult ego aside for a minute to hear what they are saying and really listen,” he said.

Make it look like them Another project White has worked on with youth is a mural of Homer’s The Odyssey at Holling Heights Elementary School in the Millard public school district. “It was much the same process…My job was to figure out how to get them to work through this story and make it look like them.” Holling Heights Principal Tracy Logan said the mural, installed in January, goes beyond an opportunity for students to create art under the instruction of a professional artist. “The students and staff who participated were taken through a learning experience that tied together literature, art and inquiry. They will be forever changed from seeing their voice, ideas and creativity captured through the mural; their contributions in the creation of the mural allowed them to create a legacy, one that will be displayed for the community long past their time at Holling Heights,” she explained. “The product itself adds life, beauty and a unique identity to our physical space. Students can see themselves, or their peers, as part of this marvelous creation. This personal connection adds ownership and pride to the space of Holling Heights. Holling is extremely fortunate to house the work of such a talented and influential artist as Watie White.” Children are likely to meet professionals in core curriculum areas (sometimes they are even the instructors), she added, but the chance to work with someone like White is rare.

HOMAGE TO VAN GOGH'S HOMAGE TO HIROSHIGE'S FLOWERING PLUM TREE

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“Not all children get the opportunity to meet and work in collaboration with a ‘real’ artist,” Logan said. “For students whose strengths lie in the area of art, they too need these mentors to inspire and help them see the power of their gifts.”

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addit io n aL aRt Wo Rk an d Ph o t o s c o u Rt es y o f WATIE WHITE

c o n t in u ed

• mmag azin e

I THINK WATIE AS AN ARTIST IS DOING great THINGS FOR THE COMMUNITY. HE’S reaching out AND LEARNING ABOUT PEOPLE AND bridging PEOPLE TOGETHER TO MAKE A MORE inclusive COMMUNITY.

element of humanity

“Watie was part of the board that hired me for this position and he’s a facilitator for Artist INC, an eightweek business skills program. And his studio is nearby,” Saladino said. “We see him a lot.”

White has made art with various nonprofits including Immigrant Legal Center, Refugee Empowerment Center, InCOMMON Community Development, Omaha Housing Authority and Omaha Healthy Kids Alliance. His work, he said, “has evolved Saladino said White freely shares his expertise. over time to be more collaborative.” One project he’s “Watie has been able to put together what we call a in the midst of, a citywide public art installation ‘portfolio career’ of piecing different things together called 100 people, epitomizes that. to sustain himself. He helps these generally younger and emerging artists who come through Artist INC,” “I’m doing these eight-foot-tall woodcut murals of Saladino said. “He’s a great mentor and is trying to 100 artists and advocates around Omaha and installing them throughout the city. I’ve carved 50 of build the younger generation of strong, powerful, sustainable artists. He’s trying to make Omaha a these and installed 30 of them and will hopefully install 20 or 30 more this year,” he said. “Each one of better city for artists.” the portraits is a collaborative artwork I make with the person who’s modeling. They come to my studio White is unusual in his focus on collaborative projects, he added. with an idea of how they’d like to be seen in their mural; my job is to help hone that or just to execute “I respond well to Watie’s work and what I like about it if it’s thoughtful and strong.” him is that he’s great at taking everyone’s ideas and putting them into one big thing, and promoting Shaun Ilahi, an artist friend, was the model for the first 100 people mural, now located in the Blackstone others people’s stories beyond his own. He’s one of the most unique and interesting artists here in neighborhood near Butterfish at 39th and Farnam Streets. He and White first met through service on Omaha,” Saladino said. “Artists are storytellers. Art of the board of Union of Contemporary Art but crossed every medium and discipline out there is about paths socially and eventually bonded in a quest for telling a story. What better way to bring people the best local barbecue. together to highlight important issues than by hearing a story and experiencing it visually or “Watie is open and collaborative; he’ll actually listen through a performance? Watie is all about to his subject’s stories. A lot of his art is about highlighting other people’s stories for positive social invoking thought and feelings and viewing things change. It brings us all closer together.” in a different way,” Ilahi said. “You never feel it’s about him; it’s more about the ideas and giving a White agrees. voice to people. It’s all about connections and the element of humanity.” “Essentially what we have in common is far greater than the tiny little things that differentiate us,” White Through the 100 people project, White is promoting said. “Artists have been dealing with the same, real discussion and bringing light to important issues, issues of how you live a thoughtful, meaningful life Ilahi said. in a world that’s strange and difficult.” “I think Watie as an artist is doing great things for the community. He’s reaching out and learning about people and bridging people together to make a more inclusive community,” he said. “Some people don’t want to have those conversations, but it makes our community stronger.” Andy Saladino, executive director of Amplify Arts (formerly Omaha Creative Institute), similarly praised White’s service to the community.

~ SHAUN ILAHI, ARTIST

others. In 2007, he was commissioned by Opera Omaha to create imagery for an operetta, Blizzard Voices, with Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Paul Moravec and Nebraska native and national poet laureate Ted Kooser. In 2014, his work was selected for an exhibition at the Crystal Bridges Museum of Contemporary Art (Bentonville, Arkansas) called State of the Art. White’s public art project with artist Peter Cales for Habitat for Humanity, All that ever was always is, featured furniture created from material from condemned North Omaha homes; paintings inspired by interviews with people of the neighborhood; and a series of dinner parties bringing together neighbors, artists and nonprofit community leaders. The project garnered White Omaha Entertainment and Arts Award honors, and some of the pieces will be on display at KANEKO this summer.

“There are several really big questions only you can answer as an artist, and nobody else’s answers matter: What are you trying to paint? How can you actually paint that thing? and Why are you doing it in the first place? There are all questions you have to wrestle with every time you’re painting,” he said. “After a certain point we drive our own education. You’re pushed along at the rate you’re supposed to go through it and then in the arts you get to the point where you realize you can’t rely on anybody else to know what your next steps are to be.” And he sees many steps ahead of him still in his journey to become an old master, White said.

More steps ahead White has built an impressive body of work throughout his career. His pieces have been displayed at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Museum of Nebraska Art in Kearney, Joslyn Art Museum, the Telfair Museums (Savannah, Georgia), The Dixon Galleries and Gardens (Memphis), and Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina, among

watie white

LIFE IMITATES ART

“For all artists, for all makers, the motivation for doing what we’re doing is the tangible, physical feeling you get from doing it at all. When I make work, I feel more present, more thoughtful—a smarter, better version of myself,” he said. “I’m always thinking of new ideas I would like to see and the only way I’m able to see it is to make it.”


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COMMUNITY connection

rotary international Since the first Rotary club was formed in 1905, Rotary has become almost ubiquitous. Every state, all major cities, most large towns and many small communities in the U.S. have established clubs over the last 114 years. The 5650 District covering southwestern Iowa and eastern Nebraska has 43 clubs— about a dozen in the Omaha area alone—and membership of more than 2,100 Rotarians who meet regularly.

So what is Rotary, and what do Rotarians do?

AT ITS core

ROTARY INTERNATIONAL IS A SERVICE ORGANIZATION. A CHICAGO ATTORNEY, PAUL HARRIS, FORMED THE FIRST ROTARY CLUB 114 YEARS AGO TO BRING PROFESSIONALS WITH DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS TOGETHER TO EXCHANGE IDEAS, FORM MEANINGFUL FRIENDSHIPS, AND GIVE BACK TO THEIR COMMUNITY. THE FOUNDING MEMBERS, ALL BUSINESSMEN, CHOSE THE NAME “ROTARY” AS A NOD TO THEIR PRACTICE OF ROTATING MEETING SITES BETWEEN THEIR OFFICES. ALTHOUGH THE RAPID GROWTH OF THE CLUB SOON NECESSITATED A REGULAR MEETING SITE, THE NAME STUCK.

The fundamental objective of the organization is to foster service in each Rotarian’s personal, professional and community life. As the organization grew to an international scale, its mission grew as well to advancing “international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.” More than 1.2 million men and women are part of more than 35,600 member clubs around the globe today.

Rotary Four-Way Test, a series of four simple evaluative “I always volunteered, and it’s important to me to give questions: Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will back to my community—especially in a small town— it build goodwill and better friendships? Will it be and to be involved,” she said. “’Service Above Self’ is beneficial to all concerned? the Rotary motto, and even though I had never heard of it before I joined Rotary, it’s kind of how I always

Infinite projects

lived my life.”

All of that leaves individual Rotarians and local clubs with the freedom to coordinate or support an infinite variety of projects that serve humanity, said Frank Goldberg, who’s been with his club, Suburban Rotary, since 1972 and held numerous leadership positions at various levels of the organization through his years of service.

her favorite activities is local: reading with secondgraders at Skinner Elementary in Omaha. She’s proud of the large-scale projects her club has contributed to, too. “We’ve raised money to eradicate polio and repair hearts

“The reason to join Rotary is because you want to do something good for the community, and that community is not just your local community; it’s an international organization,” he said. “There are thousands of projects going on around the world.”

in Belize,” she said. “We as Rotarians have the capacity to change the world. We do amazing things.”

Changing the world The Rotary International fight against polio began in

1979 with a project to immunize six million children in Some projects are very local, like cleaning up a cemetery, the Philippines. In 1985, Rotary launched its PolioPlus stocking a food pantry, planting trees at a school, or program with a goal of immunizing all children against collecting coats for people in need. If Rotarians see a polio, and a total of nearly two billion children need in their communities, they seek solutions. worldwide have since been immunized. Gretchen Bren is

The primary motto of Rotary is “Service Above Self” and a secondary motto is “One profits most who serves best.” “Whatever it is, whatever you can think of to help others Club members are expected to pay club dues, attend meetings and events, and use their professional skills to in need, that’s the beautiful part about being in Rotary,” John Hoich of Suburban Rotary said. His induction was in make a difference. early 1980. “I was 19 years old. To the best of my knowledge, I was the youngest in the world who’s ever On an international scale, Rotary is dedicated to six joined Rotary since 1905.” areas of focus: promoting peace; fighting disease; providing clean water, sanitation and hygiene; saving mothers and children; supporting education; and growing local economies. Local clubs can participate in global projects, focus on local efforts, or do both. Ethics of any planned action are simply gauged against the

Jill Slupe, president of Omaha West Rotary, said one of

part of the Omaha Downtown club, but she’s very involved in the Polio Survivors and Associates Rotarian Action Group (RAG) made up of 500 Rotarians, including polio survivors, from 15 countries. She’s traveled around the world to help administer vaccinations. “There’s a quote by Margaret Mead: ‘Never doubt that a

Julie O’Hara, the district governor for the 5650 District, said one factor in her initial decision to join Rotary was that most of the projects executed by her Shenandoah, Iowa, club are right in the community.

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small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has,’” Bren said. “That really does sum up what you can do in Rotary.”

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STORy by KARA SCHWEISS | Ph OTOg RaPh y c OURTESy Of ROTARY INTERNATIONAL, 5650 DISTRICT

• mmag azINE

service above self CHANGING THE COMMUNITY and the world

AS individuals WE’RE ALL IT TAKES IS SOMEONE NOT EXTRAORDINARY, BUT WHO’S committed TO BE together WE CAN DO ABLE TO MAKE A change. extraordinary THINGS.

~ GRETCHEN BREN ~ FRANK GOLDBERG

ROTARIANS FROM THE OMAHA WEST CLUB VOLUNTEERING AS BELL-RINGERS TO RAISE MONEY FOR THE SALVATION ARMY

rotary international SERVING LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY

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COMMUNITY connection

ROTARY INTERNATIONAL The international scale of Rotary provides opportunities to interact with people from clubs around the world, whether by participating in projects taking place thousands of miles from home, hosting Rotarians from other countries, or serving in leadership roles for Rotary International.

local • global

she began leadership training and working with clubs across the district, she became more aware of the larger scope of the organization.

around the world annually with academic fellowships at Rotary Peace Centers. Rotary Community Corps joins Rotary members with nonmembers to collaborate on

“It really opened my eyes that we weren’t just this smalltown Shenandoah club. We were something that was all over the world making a difference,” she said. “It really “You get to meet people that you wouldn’t otherwise get struck me that I was a southwest Iowa girl making a to meet, and you get to understand the enormity of the difference across the globe.” organization, yet the things you have in common. We all want a better life for our families and our countries and Bren said she’s broadened her horizons not just geographically, but personally as well. “Part of Rotary is to help people in need,” Goldberg said. As an organization that is officially non-political, non-sectarian being able to use your vocation, so I’m very involved with training aspects of it,” she said. “We have a Rotary and open to all people regardless of race, color, creed, Leadership Institute that trains people how to get more religion, gender or political preference, “we want and out of Rotary. I went through the training and am a firm need diversity.” believer in it and am now a facilitator.”

People just like you Rotarians may attend any Rotary club in the U.S. or around the world, and visitors are welcome. Hoich estimated that he’s attended meetings at more than 30 domestic clubs in his travels. “In 39 years I’ve had perfect attendance and I’ve never missed a meeting. I look forward to it all week long, and I’ve never lost the passion,” he said.

Peace Fellowships provide up to 100 professionals from

Next generation Goldberg, who is locally regarded as an unofficial Rotary historian, said over 46 years he’s seen Rotary evolve in many positive ways, including opening membership to women in 1987, lifting strict territory boundaries, opening club membership to multiple people in a single area of business, and allowing a broader scope of people in the community beyond business owners and leaders to be involved. As someone who joined Rotary when he was barely 30, he welcomes the next generation. “You have to engage your members, and you have to

Many ways to serve Rotary is actually made up of three parts: the clubs, Rotary International, and The Rotary Foundation. The Foundation is funded primarily by members. Hoich, who belongs to the organization’s Arch Klumph Society reflecting the highest level of giving, said while funding is certainly needed and important, “You don’t have to give a dollar. You can give your time.” The foundation provides funding to clubs to support humanitarian projects, scholarships and international exchanges.

“I love travel, and I love being part of an international organization where I can go anywhere and meet a Rotarian who is going to take me to a meeting and invite me into their home and treat me as an equal. That’s “There are certain things the foundation will help with pretty amazing,” Bren said. “I feel just as welcome at a grants for, projects in the areas of focus, but that doesn’t meeting in Nigeria or in Pakistan as I do in Nebraska.” mean you can’t do a smaller project on whatever you want to,” Bren said. “All it takes is someone who’s “When traveling, it doesn’t matter where you are. You committed to be able to make a change.” attend a meeting and there are people just like you who want to give back,” Slupe said. There are also opportunities for non-members including Rotaract, Interact, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards, O’Hara said that her original motivation for joining Rotary Youth Exchange, and New Generations Service Rotary was to sharpen her professional communication Exchange that foster leadership skills for youth and skills and connect to more people in the community. As young adults and facilitate service projects. Rotary

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service projects.

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engage your leaders. The club was smart in turning the leadership over to younger members a couple of years ago and young people are now saying ‘we can have an impact,’ Goldberg said. “I love working with the young people because they’re bright and enthusiastic and they have great ideas.” O’Hara said her club also strives to bring in new members of all ages. “We have evolved so much and we’ve really started to draw in a lot of younger people. And we like to have fun. We laugh together and we truly are friends,” O’Hara said. “When you walk into a Rotary meeting, you’re going to feel welcome and you’re going to feel like you belong.” “We welcome anybody to apply and welcome anybody to come as a guest and see what we’re all about,” Hoich said, adding that a desire to serve others is the most important criteria for membership. “It always falls back to those three words: ‘Service Above Self.’”

aPRIL 2019


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c ONTINUED

• mmag azINE

service above self

AS individuals WE’RE NOT EXTRAORDINARY, BUT together WE CAN DO extraordinary THINGS.

Make a difference Rotarians agree that they get as much as they give. “I think Omaha Suburban Rotary Club is a special club. I

think it’s a family in many ways. The club is a pride and joy of mine,” Goldberg said. “I think that’s what Rotary does for me, it makes me feel complete; it circles it all. As

~ FRANK GOLDBERG

individuals we’re not extraordinary, but together we can do extraordinary things.” “There are a lot of movers and shakers within Rotary, people of action. But you are all on a first-name basis, and you feel equal,” Bren said. “You get out of Rotary what you put into it. If you take a look at what you can do and get other people excited about a project, you’re going to make a difference. This has given me a purpose. “ “I have made some really made some great friends in Rotary,” O’Hara said. “I’ve been able to include my kids in Rotary, so they understand what service and volunteering your time means. Rotary has made a huge impact not just on me, but also on my family.” “It’s been good for my business, and it’s been good for me. I have amazing friends all over the United States because of Rotary,” Slupe said, adding that some of her best memories are from typical weekly meetings, like new friendships made over lunch, or gaining insight after listening to an inspiring speaker. “You will expand your business, your knowledge, and your heart. Join us for lunch and check us out.” For more information on Rotary, visit www.Rotary.org

GRETCHEN BREN ADMINISTERING AN ORAL DOSE OF POLIO VACCINE TO A CHILD IN YOLA, NIGERIA (AFRICA) rotary international SERVING LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY


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game CHANGERS

• pr Es En t Ed By

afraid OF hard work FOR SURE. I’M NOT

~ KIM MICKELSEN

Where others see hard work, challenges and risks as obstacles to success, Bozell CEO Kim Mickelsen sees the road to new opportunities. And that approach has paved the way to an amazing career in a challenging industry.

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s t Or y By KARA SCHWEISS | ph Ot Og r Aph y By JIM SCHOLZ

• mMAg Azin E

KIM MICKELSEN

fearless PRESENTS

game changers

• KIM MICKELSEN

COn t in u Ed


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game CHANGERS

• pr Es En t Ed By

fearless AS chief executive “it’s very interesting, because it was founded by men, it was of Bozell, Kim micKelsen today leads a respected from 1985 to 1990, mickelsen served as the director of led by men for most of its history, and today we are 100 puBlic relations and advertising firm with a long client service for galen & nellie, a creative boutique where percent women-owned. it’s a nice history transition,” and distinguished history. But micKelsen certainly she continued to hone her craft under the mentorship of mickelsen said. “we’ll be celebrating 100 years in 2021. it’s owners galen lillethorup and nellie maccallum. did her time in the field. literally in a FIELD. her [extraordinary] that the company has stood the test of time. first joB after graduating with an advertising our founders were phenomenal in their vision and chuck “they were hugely influential, ” she said. “they thought degree from the university of neBrasKa-lincoln peebler—who was also an omaha boy—took over anything was possible and encouraged me to push myself. ” was marKeting director for a seed corn company. leadership back in the ‘70s and really gave the company a strong foothold to grow.” “my career didn’t start in a very prestigious manner,” she said. in 1990, she was recruited to Bozell, jacobs, Kenyon & eckhardt (before the agency shortened its name to Bozell “i did all kinds of stuff that i’d never thought i’d do when i mickelsen names the late, great tim sickinger as another worldwide) as a management supervisor, a senior-level was in school. i set up test plots, i went out with Bozell influencer. photographers to set up pictures,” she said. “i once fell into a account representative position that oversaw multiple accounts. within two years, she became a vice president, hog pen. face first in hog s**t. at another shoot i was “he was an amazing guy and taught me to trust my instinct one of the youngest people ever promoted to that position and to be fearless. he made me comfortable in really pelted by slurry, which is liquefied manure.” and one of only a few women vps at that time. two years following what i thought was the best course,” she said. “he never one to be afraid of getting her hands (or more) dirty, later, mickelsen was elevated to senior partner. she worked was a terrific mentor at Bozell.” with “industry greats” like chuck peebler and david Bell as mickelsen didn’t view the work as menial. instead, she saw she pitched and won regional, national and international Embracing new challenges those early days as a learning experience. accounts for Bozell. although the fundamentals of advertising have remained “i was a city girl and didn’t know much about farming, but i “i tended to gravitate toward the more complex industries learned very quickly how hard farmers work,” the grand and be assigned to technology accounts in particular,” she island native said. “Because i was the company’s very first recalled. with clients including northern natural gas and marketing director i had to kind of learn it all on my own, midamerican energy, mickelsen was the recipient of a Key from creating brochures myself—and i am not an artist— women in energy-americas award. to putting together marketing to buying media.”

Back to independent roots her hard work paid off with new opportunities, she said. “that’s how i was recruited into my first agency.” mickelsen added, with a laugh, “i was young and i was probably pretty inexpensive.”

Starting the trajectory

Bozell went through many changes in the 1990s and Advertising Age named Bozell as the eighth-largest american ad agency in 1997 when it was acquired by true north, a holding company for one of the world’s major global advertising agency networks. another merger took place within a few years.

over the next few years, mickelsen was also able to make an important career shift.

and then Bozell went back to its roots as an independent.

“i went from the media side of the business to much more “i was one of four partners that acquired Bozell back from of the client-facing, strategic side. that really kind of interpublic group in 2001,” mickelsen said. she continues as started the trajectory i continued to follow because my a partner today. background and interests were really on the strategy side of the business,” she explained. “i can’t write great copy in 2013, Bozell was certified by the women’s Business and i certainly can’t design. But i understand the tenets enterprise national council (wBenc) as a business completely owned, controlled and operated by women. of marketing.

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the same, methods of execution and channels have evolved during her time in the field, mickelsen said. she’s embraced new challenges as they come, like creating Bozell’s interactive unit in the 1990s. “i had deep roots in client interaction so i was able to bridge the gap between what the clients didn’t understand about technology and what developers and the technical people knew about technology, and that was a pretty big gap back then,” she said. “it was a great learning experience. very difficult and very challenging because it’s always changing, but i really did enjoy that because it was a constant state of hyper-activity…everything is integrated with technology, and i learned not be fearful.” doubleclick even had its roots at Bozell. “it was visionary people there—i didn’t have anything to do with it—who set up the very first ad network for digital. Bozell helped with seed money and launched doubleclick, now part of google,” she said. mickelsen said she sees the advertising industry changing—or perhaps changing back—in another key way. “i think the biggest switch we’ve made in probably the

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• mMAg Azin E

KIM MICKELSEN

A NEAR AND DEAR AREA TO MY heart AND WHY I’VE BEEN AT BOZELL FOR 28 years…WE work VERY HARD, WE play VERY HARD, AND WE give VERY HARD. ~KIM MICKELSEN

last 15-18 years is has been moving toward a more consultative approach. agencies had notoriously had been more about execution: ‘make me a brochure,’‘make me an ad,’‘make me a tv commercial.’ it had been about the creative side,” she said. “what happened, i think, is that we lost our way in terms of what our real mission was about. our mission is about making clients more successful growing their business. so what we’ve really done is focus on getting back to core strategies and less about bright, shiny objects. the reality is, there are so many agencies out there who think they’ve got the magic bullet, the way to success. my grandmother always said, ‘if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.’ “what happened is that many agencies tried to ride the trend and that ended up doing more harm than good in our industry. they forgot the fundamentals of what is it you’re trying to do and who is it you’re speaking to and what are your objectives…Bozell has always been good this way but we put a lot of emphasis on training our people, we make sure they have the tools, resources and knowledge to do well by clients. we’ve really focused on more smart strategies and how are you going to get to the bottom of what’s really going on in the marketplace.”

Work, play and give as Bozell’s ceo, mickelsen continues to cultivate a culture of caring.

these are things we identify will help our city, or our industry or certain groups of people. it’s important to me. i grew up in a family where my parents were phenomenal about teaching us giving is better than getting and helping is better than taking.” her own board and committee service in the community has served organizations like the united way, love’s jazz & art center, KaneKo, and women’s center for advancement (wca). the list of organizations Bozell has supported is boundless. Both mickelsen and Bozell are also involved with the american marketing association and the american advertising federation. “that’s our responsibility, to be sure that we’re helping guide our own industry in omaha,” she said. with their daughters alyssa and lauren now grown and starting their own careers, mickelsen and her husband jeff shippen (they met through that seed company she worked for right out of college) are opening a small mercantile called the chill squirrel near their mountain home in colorado. the “squirrel” in the name pays homage to a baby squirrel the couple rescued from a long-ago backyard and kept as a pet before releasing him back to the wild. they own just cats and dogs now, but the wildlife enthusiasts envision eventually living in colorado full time on “about 20 acres with some sheep and goats. and i can fall in goat poop instead of pig poop,” she quipped. “i’m not afraid of hard work for sure.”

“that’s a near and dear area to my heart and why i’ve been she’s ready for whatever hard work comes next for her at Bozell for 28 years. we work very hard, we play very hard, career, too. and we give very hard,” she said. “(founder) morris jacobs said, ‘you must pay rent for the space you occupy.’ one of the “that’s just the nature of advertising; no two days are the things that means is that we get to use your powers for same in this crazy business,” she said. “what i want to do good. we donate an enormous amount of hours, almost 10 at Bozell is really cement the vision and help take it into the future.” percent of our agency hours, towards nonprofit causes.

PRESENTS

game changers

• KIM MICKELSEN

This special feature is sponsored by planitomaha. planitomaha is dedicated to honoring women whose influence not only impacts the boardroom but the community.

“Welcome to

one of the largest and most prestigious meeting planning firms in the midwest omaha magazine B2B winners since 2008 national, regional and local meetings and events nationally recognized as a leader in the meetings & event industry supporting our community through our nonprofit work and the boards/organizations we are members of planitomaha has been providing event and meeting management solutions for twenty years. we are a client-centric firm that provides unmatched service and professionalism. while proudly located in the midwest, our crazytalented event team works from new york to la and everywhere in the middle.


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VIP

VERY inspirational PEOPLE

INSPIRATIONAL EXAMPLES

WHEN BC CLARK was still a little girl in Louisiana, she expected to be doing important things one day. “My mom said that when I was about five years old, when she would ask me what I was going to be when I grew up, I would say, ‘I’m going to leave Louisiana.’ I didn’t know what I was going to do, but somehow I knew I wasn’t going to do it there,” Clark recalled. “I used to have these visions, or dreams, where I would see myself doing things. I had one dream that I was walking out of this really tall building and was carrying an attaché case.”

she said. “Whatever I say or whenever I speak, I let it be the words that He wants me to say. So when I prepare a speech I say, ‘Please use my words, my lips and my heart.’ I find comfort in the faith that you can do almost anything as long as He’s right there with you.” Servant-leadership Clark said she describes her style of leadership as one of encouraging people, and she sees helping others as a measure of her own success. She is also a fan of the “a rising tide lifts all boats” theory that not only do one person’s accomplishments not take away from anyone else’s, they actually benefit the community.

Clark eventually ended up in Omaha as a technical support manager with Conagra, then ConAgra. One day in the 1980s as she was walking in front of the former ConAgra headquarters on 15th street (now the Central Park Plaza towers), “I think that’s ‘servant leadership.’ Whatever talents, skills or abilities they have, it was given specifically to them. If I put on their shoes, I still couldn’t Clark had a sudden rush of recognition. do what they do,” she said. “There is no competition, because in my mind, if I can help you see where you’re going, it’s a “I was coming out of the building, I had my attaché case. I win/win. I can also get revelations for myself. If you’re looked back and that was the vision I had seen,” she said. helping someone else, it always comes back to you.” “It blew my mind.” In 2005, Clark retired from her 28-year career with Conagra. But there was still another long-ago vision to realize. “I had another dream where I was talking in front of a sea of women. I couldn’t hear what I was saying, I couldn’t hear the message,” she said. She only knew she was helping them somehow.

“I’m always interested in people’s journeys. Everyone has something to share.”

Clark freely shares the wisdom gained from a long and successful career, but her mentorship and advisement to small-business owners is always given with a spirit of back-and-forth, Clark said. Her facilitative approach tends to surprise people.

“I never go up to someone and start talking; I start asking them questions about themselves. I’m always BC CLARK interested in people’s journeys. Everyone has F What’s most important something to share,” she said. “I’m not on a pedestal. I’m Today, Clark is indeed helping others, especially women, just me. I genuinely care about how I can help people, but I go through multiple roles. “I’ve continued to reinvent,” she said. She into it saying, ‘What can I learn from this person?’ I don’t go into it founded Leading Edge Consulting in 2003, which is now associated with a weekly talk show she’s hosted for five years on community television station thinking I know everything.” KPAO. Her mission for “The Business Connection” (www.thebusinessconnectionne.com) is to promote some of the Omaha Empowering the next generation area’s smaller companies and share information on services and resources Clark’s work supports entrepreneurs and professionals with a focus on women, but she said she has a soft spot for women who have come back from abuse or available to business owners. victimization. In addition, Clark is the director of business development in North Omaha for Nebraska Enterprise Fund, which supports small enterprises. In 2007 she co- “It’s a cause I want to fight for. You want to help show them they don’t have to founded Metro Omaha Women’s Business Center (MOWBC), an organization be a victim,” she said. which empowers women to become economically self-sufficient by providing targeted education, workshops, job training, strong relationships and resources Clark said she also believes in empowering the next generation. A new program for professional and personal growth. On top of that, Clark fosters through MOWBC will offer educational training and mentoring for girls and entrepreneurship as a volunteer counselor/mentor for SCORE’s Omaha chapter. young women 11 to 18 interested in entrepreneurship or a professional career, and will also follow them into adulthood. Clark, a mother of three and Clark insists that everyone has the same 24 hours as anyone else and that she’s grandmother to five, said it’s also important to teach both young women and no superwoman. “I think you make time for what’s most important to you,” she young men to respect each other, strive for self-sufficiency, and recognize their said. “I do take time to rest and recuperate.” Plus, she credits her deep faith with self-worth. helping to sustain and guide her. “I tell people, especially women, that a lot of time we don’t ‘own it.’ We don’t “For me, it’s all just serving. Serving, to me, means listening empathetically to own our achievements, we don’t own our leadership, we don’t own our abilities,” someone and waiting for a download, I would call it, to see how I’m supposed to she explained. “Men, they tell you everything they’ve done. But women always think it’s bragging if we say it. Everyone should ‘own who they are.’” answer. I’m a spiritual person, and I believe our words are guided if we ask,”

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ph o t o g r aph y by DEBRA S. KAPLAN

• mmag azin e

owning WHO SHE IS

bc clark


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business c o r n er

GREATER OMAHA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

daniel j. bishop

gale l. wickersham

gail deboer

founder and chairman of the board, the maids international

chairman and founder, wick’s truck trailer, inc.

president & ceo, cobalt credit union

a successFul entrepreneur For 60 years, Daniel J. Bishop’s ingenuity and passion helped establish Omaha as a hub for franchised service businesses. He is the founder of three Omaha-based companies: Bishop Building Services®, American Security Services® and The Maids International®. Bishop conceived the idea for a national home cleaning service while attending Harvard Business School’s Entrepreneurship Program and collaborated with his brother, Dick, to launch The Maids in 1979. Since then, The Maids franchise network has cleaned 15 million homes, and today operates in 42 states and Canada. It is currently ranked 46th out of the Top 500 franchises nationally by Entrepreneur magazine.

Gale Wickersham is in the business of building employee and customer relationships. Because of those bonds, he and his team have established Wick’s Truck Trailer as a national force in the transportation industry and the largest trailer dealer for Wabash National in total volume. After building two offices and repair shops in Omaha, “Wick” expanded his facilities to Springfield, Missouri, and South Sioux City, Nebraska. He has since added truck dealerships in Omaha and Lincoln. Generous with its time and success, the Wickersham family is especially proud of its role in creating the Gale Wickersham Athletic Complex in Council Bluffs.

Gail DeBoer began her career with Cobalt Credit Union (formerly SAC Federal Credit Union) in 1988, holding several positions before becoming President & CEO in 2007. Under her leadership, Cobalt’s assets have grown from $312 million to over $1 billion and total membership has grown to over 110,000. Heavily involved in the community, DeBoer was the inaugural recipient of the ICAN Leadership Award in 2016 and a Women’s Center for Advancement (WCA) Tribute to Women honoree in 2015. DeBoer’s numerous involvements represent both her commitment to the community and to the credit union philosophy of “people helping people.”

DANIEL J. BISHOP

GALE L. WICKERSHAM

GAIL DEBOER

For more than 25 years, it has been the place of incredible legacies and guaranteed inspiration. The Omaha Business Hall of Fame Gala, which includes an hors d’oeuvre dinner reception, induction ceremony and dessert, was initiated in 1993 as part of the Greater Omaha Chamber’s centennial anniversary. Proceeds support the permanent Omaha Business Hall of Fame exhibit at The Durham Museum and the Greater Omaha Chamber’s efforts to attract and retain young professionals, including the annual YP Summit. The original 1993 gala honored an inaugural class of Business Hall of Fame standouts that included Rose Blumkin, Warren Buffett, John A. Creighton, Robert Daugherty, Peter Kiewit and V.J. Skutt. That tradition of excellence is continued year after year.

greater omaha chamber inducts eight business leaders into business hall of fame

elite eight! 28

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• mmag azin e

omaha business hall of fame lazier kavich, larry kavich jeff kavich, amee zetzman

john w. estabrook president and ceo (retired), methodist health system

all makes

over his DistinGuisheD 41-year career, John W. Estabrook helped shape the delivery of health care in greater Omaha and the nation. He began as an assistant to the administrator of Nebraska Methodist Hospital in 1951 and was appointed president eight years later—at the age of 30. His vision transformed Methodist Hospital from a respected 230-bed community hospital into a regional healthcare leader known for innovation, cost-effectiveness and high-quality medical care. In 1981, he created the region’s first healthcare system – Nebraska Methodist Health System. When he retired in 1992, Nebraska Methodist Health System and its eight affiliate companies employed 3,500 people.

since its launch more than a century aGo, All Makes Office Equipment has remained Omaha-based and family-owned. Lazier Kavich joined the company—then All Makes Typewriter Co.—in 1938, 20 years after his father-in-law, Harry Ferer, founded it. Lazier grew selection to include government surplus and used office furniture, which prompted the 1960 renaming to All Makes Office Equipment Company. When Lazier’s son, Larry Kavich, joined All Makes in 1965, he added new high-end contract furniture. In 2004, Larry turned over the top daily decision-making duties to the fourth generation of leadership: his son, Jeff Kavich, President/CEO of All Makes in Omaha, and daughter, Amee Zetzman, Executive Vice President/CFO of All Makes in Omaha and President/CEO of All Makes in Lincoln and Urbandale, Iowa.

JOHN W. ESTABROOK

they have elevateD some oF omaha’s most iconic companies anD institutions; a group of eight distinguished individuals whose specialties range from finance and education, to office solutions, health care and transportation. The 2019, 26th annual, class of Omaha Business Hall of Fame inductees includes Daniel J. Bishop, Founder and Chairman of the Board – The Maids International; Gail DeBoer, President & CEO – Cobalt Credit Union; John W. Estabrook President and CEO (retired) – Methodist Health System; Jeff Kavich, President/CEO – All Makes; Larry Kavich, Retired Chairman – All Makes.; Lazier Kavich, 2nd Generation Owner – All Makes; Gale L. Wickersham, Chairman and Founder – Wick’s Truck Trailer, Inc.; Amee Zetzman, Executive Vice President/Chief Financial Officer – All Makes. The 2019 class will bring the total number of Business Hall of Fame inductees to 166.

OMAHA BUSINESS HALL OF FAME GALA Incredible Legacies. Guaranteed Inspiration. 2019 Honorees Daniel J. Bishop | Gail DeBoer | John W. Estabrook Jeff Kavich | Larry Kavich | Lazier Kavich Gale L. Wickersham | Amee Zetzman

Wednesday, April 17 Holland Performing Arts Center 6 p.m. Hors d’oeuvres Dinner & Cocktail Hour 7:30 p.m. Induction Ceremony 9 p.m. Dessert Reception

Ticket $250/Member $275/Non-Member ($150 is tax deductible)

Make reservations online by Wednesday, April 10.

OmahaChamber.org/BHOF


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Kali Baker is Vice President of Community Investment

omaha giving

• Omaha COmmunity FOundatiOn

inspiring THE youngest members OF YOUR family TO give There is nothing more important ithan the time we spend with the ones we love. Nothing more precious than the memories we create together. And so, as families—as busy, growing, constantly changing families—we’re always looking for opportunities to truly share our lives with each other. At the Omaha Community Foundation we work with hundreds of families on charitable projects, and we’ve observed something remarkable happen again and again: When families spend time together giving, the quality of the time itself changes. Philanthropy is a sort of alchemy; it makes the hours you spend together feel more real, more personal. It makes them matter. Which makes sense, when you think about it. Coming together to give means coming together to share. When you decide as a family what issues you care about, which causes are closest to your hearts, you can’t help but get to know each other better. It’s immediate, the reward of family philanthropy. For parents of younger children, it’s a way to instill generosity and responsibility. For older children, it’s an opportunity to establish their identities, to assert themselves in the family dynamic. You can teach your children the importance—and rewards—of giving as soon as they’re old enough to have a piggy bank. Try giving them a charitable allowance, money that they get to set aside and save for a cause that they care about. Or allow them to donate their time or small possessions. You might be surprised by the issues that inspire them. Our year-round platform, OmahaGives.org, is an easy way to get started with your kids. There are around 1,000 local nonprofits listed for you and your children to search through. Prompting kids with questions (What are your favorite activities? Where do you like to have fun? Do you want to help other kids?) is a great way to connect them with causes and organizations.

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Maybe the local animal shelter or wildlife rescue inspires children who love animals. Perhaps they spend time at local museums or theaters. Youth who love to read might want to ensure that other kids learn to read and have access to books. On OmahaGives.org, they can read about how an organization helps people or animals or other kids or the community. They kali baker can flip through photos and even watch videos, all in one place, and then donate as little as $10 to that nonprofit through the website. After that initial donation, continuing to stay connected to giving and nonprofits can become a year-round activity. Small events—lemonade stands, garage sales, spring cleaning—can take a charitable turn. Even your leisure time can be spent in a way that contributes to the greater good; purchasing a family membership to a museum, theater or nature area is a contribution you can enjoy together. Last year, we learned about a little girl who set up a lemonade stand during the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting and sold refreshments to visitors in her neighborhood. She then used those funds to donate during Omaha Gives! to her favorite nonprofits. We are so inspired by her entrepreneurship and generosity! Like her, your children’s unique character will express itself through giving. These charitable acts quickly become traditions, an ongoing way for families to connect. Inviting your children to join in our community’s charitable holiday, Omaha Gives!, is a great way to start a new tradition in your family. Celebrate our local nonprofits and let your kids experience one of the most fulfilling parts of life: giving to others. You can give today on OmahaGives.org or wait to join the fun on May 22 during the annual communitywide celebration. For more information on youth giving, contact us at (402) 342-3458 or OmahaFoundation.org.

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maRy E. VandEnaCK Mary Vandenack, while a lawyer by profession, has studied extensively in mind/body areas of fitness and wellness. She is Yoga Alliance RYT-200, Power Pilates certified and ACE certified.

BUILDING resilience VS

digital detox

THERE ARE A LOT OF QUALITIES THAT MAKE GOOD LEADERS. Resilience involves the capacity to recover from difficult times. The resilient PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN CULTIVATE THESE QUALITIES. person makes a comeback from something that knocks another down. Those who have resilience can generally cope with a crisis in a reasonable fashion. ~ William Shakespeare Resilience is something that can be developed. Following are some strategies that can be used to develop the ability to bounce back from life crisis. NURTURE CONNECTIONS. Supportive and positive relationships matter when you are going through a tough time. Those who have resilience have invested in building relationships with those capable of supporting them through life challenges. FIND PURPOSE. Sometimes we get lost in trying to figure out the meaning of life and our purpose in the process. Resilient people find purpose in small ways every day. Perhaps an important purpose in your day is to simply make the time to have coffee with a friend who could use some attention or to make the time to deliver items to a homeless shelter. Life purpose doesn’t have to be earth-shattering, but seeking some meaningful purpose on a daily basis builds resilience.

TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF. The healthy person is likely to be more resilient. It is easy to get caught up in stressful jobs, busy lives, taking care of a parent, or challenging relationships. When there is a lot going on, it can be difficult to take care of ourselves as we should. However, when we are dealing with many life stressors, it is fundamentally important to take care of ourselves no matter what. Schedule time into your calendar to work out, make time for food preparation, connect. BE PROACTIVE. Address little things before they become big. Someone once told me that it’s not the big things that get us because we see them and we deal with them; however, sometimes we let the little things pile up. We throw them into a closet and ignore them. Then, one day, everything comes tumbling out of the closet and we are on the floor beneath the pile. Acknowledge and address regularly what is going on in your life and how you feel about it. Hang out with resilient people. You are more likely to build your own resilience by spending time around others who have the quality.

PRACTICE. I once attended a driver training course at a racetrack. The instructor suggested practicing what one would do in an emergency. He suggested that when you are driving, you think about how you would respond if the car in the left lane suddenly swerved in front of you. His thought was that you can imagine how you will respond and build the skills. The same is true Remember to make time to build resilience. Have you ever heard yourself say, for difficult life experiences. You can practice making positive comments on a “I need to find the time?” It isn’t about finding the time. It is about making the time. day when you are in a bad mood.

ENVISION YOUR FUTURE: PREVENT DISEASE DISCOVER HEALTH! YOU DESERVE A BEAUTIFUL, HEALTHY SMILE!

Dr. Stephanie Vondrak • Dr. Ashley Rainbolt Vondrak Dental (402) 289-2313 info@drvondrak.com

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planning matters

• with Vw law

technology IN THE workplace Much has been written about changes in the modern workplace including the evolution of technological advances that can lead to greater automation and efficiencies. These technologies may be new, but many workplace developments have historically been based on technology. How are these efficiencies being achieved today? One emerging technology is software that employers can use to efficiently manage projects and measure workflows. Companies like Buildertrend or monday.com offer project management tools that enable managers to more effectively develop standardized processes, which will in turn allow employers to appropriately delegate tasks, identify delays or obstacles, adjust in real time if needed, and achieve better results. What are the legal risks? If an employee is working off the clock in order to catch up on a project, electronic data that is available through this software may put the employer on notice that work is being performed, with resulting liability under federal and state obligations to pay wages.

Employees who perform work and incur overtime without employer authorization may be disciplined for that behavior, but they are nevertheless entitled to be paid. How will this technology impact the workplace? Part of the development of project management systems will matt dunning be the ability of employers to use data-driven metrics to measure employee performance, identify training that may be helpful, or take personnel action based on inefficiencies, poor performance or conduct. But, is there a limitation to the advances that technology can provide? The following observations are from a recent Deloitte Center report on redefining work: If you focus efforts on efficiency, each successive round of gains becomes harder to eke out. The view of what is possible is constrained... Even with technology, especially with technology, it is a game of diminishing returns, and competitors are chasing the same efficiencies... The way we’ve been chasing efficiency is less and less effective. We generally seek to reduce cost and increase speed by tightly specifying and standardizing all activities in advance. This approach can leave us scrambling as we encounter situations that weren’t anticipated and customer demand that our “efficient” processes can’t handle. By focusing on cost, you diminish your ability to address new opportunities and risk missing the biggest, and rapidly expanding, opportunities to create more value. The report’s authors assert that all work will be, and needs to be, redefined: the future role of employees may be focused on tasks such as identifying unseen problems and opportunities; developing solutions to solve problems and address opportunities; implementing solutions; and learning by reflecting on what they have experienced. Artificial Intelligence Microsoft has developed AI that will assist people who have legal needs but limited resources. The AI will not replace lawyers, but will enable clients to navigate the judicial system to get a simple divorce; lawyers will be able to focus on more complicated matters. The Deloitte Report suggests that human capabilities should be developed based on uniquely human traits such as curiosity, imagination, intuition, creativity, empathy, and emotional and social intelligence. Performance will need to be measured on a qualitative basis, which may present greater challenges for employers along with the greater opportunities. What’s next? Employers will need to understand legal and nonlegal issues including wage hour compliance. Employers may need to restructure operations and recruit employees with different skill sets.

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• swartzbaugh-farber & associates, inc.

todays savings

impact!

• your dental health

envision YOUR ENVISION

MORE bang FOR YOUR buck mary drueke-collins, fsa

SPRING IS FINALLY HERE! Spring seems to bring an increase in spending: we plan vacations, participate in more activities, purchase new sporting goods and some of us even begin to look for new homes No matter what we buy, most of us shop around for the best deals. We check multiple websites, use shopping apps or negotiate big purchases.

future AND YOUR choose! scaredy

stephanie vondrak d.d.s.

cat! you knew you would suffer from chronicAND disease? WHAT IF A disease that would diminish your ability to chew, destroy your God-given smile, and forever change the way you speak? If you were given this information and the preventative steps to change your future…would you be willing to change? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “One out of every two American adults aged 30 and over has periodontal disease,” a chronic but preventable disease. This is the equivalent of 47.2 percent, or 64.7 million American adults. So, maybe the better question is: Why is prevention of periodontal disease so difficult? Periodontal disease, in the early stages, does not hurt. Symptoms are easily dismissed as normal; for example, constant bad breath (treat with a mint) or bleeding gums (brush a little more). These signs only warrant attention when disease is advanced and symptoms are painful such as swollen, infected gums; loose, mobile teeth; or worse yet, tooth loss. In fact, 178 million Americans are currently missing at least one tooth and about 40 million Americans are missing all of their teeth; i.e., they are “dentally disabled.” Without teeth, a person becomes “prosthesis-dependent,” relying on a denture to eat, speak and smile; a tooth replacement that is incapable of providing more than 20 percent of the chewing function of natural, healthy teeth. My goal: inspire action, change the stats! Dentistry is making exciting advances in the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease. Scientific studies have opened doors previously closed which identify the specific strains of bacteria found within each individual’s disease. By targeting specific strains, treatments are more accurate and effective. Revolutionary! This is how: We obtain a sample of your saliva and test it. Through this test, we identify the precise strain(s) of bacteria attacking the supporting structures of your teeth, i.e., your bones and ligaments. With this information, we prescribe individualized antibiotic regimens while simultaneiously removing disease through professional periodontal cleanings. In a nutshell: Better than ever before, we can prevent tooth loss from gum disease when you choose saliva testing. The steps are simple: see a qualified dentist, complete an exam and provide some spit. By the way, saliva testing can also detect pre-diabetes, HPV and more. The choice is yours. Undiagnosed periodontal disease is affecting approximately half of our population, damaging heart muscle; increasing risk of diabetes; and causing premature births, low-birth weight babies, tooth loss and denture dependence. You are in the “driver’s seat.” Ask yourself: With this information and preventative steps like saliva testing, are you willing to change your behavior and reap the rewards of a healthy, disease-free dental future?

Whichever method you use, we all budget shop—at least we do for most things in our lives. What do shopping for spring purchases and health insurance have in common? Historically, not a lot…but they should. Saving money should not only apply to regular spending but should definitely be considered when we receive medical care. Most of us covered by health insurance don’t typically ask about the cost of medical services. If we all were as budget-conscious with our healthcare spending as we are with our other purchases, we could save a lot of money. Here are a few suggestions to consider the next time you need to utilize your health insurance: • Ensure your medical providers are in-network with your health insurance plan. This is especially important with the increase in narrow network plans (plans that include a select number of providers in-network). In addition, a narrow network in itself aids you in paying a lower cost for medical care by passing on larger negotiated discounts for medical services. • Did you know that a prescription drug is priced differently at every retailer? Next time you need a refill, research the retail price for your prescription; you may be surprised. Several tools are available to help you with this research. Most insurance companies provide the costs of prescription drugs by pharmacy on the member website. GoodRx.com is also a great resource. GoodRx is a discount program and it allows you to search nearby pharmacies to find the lowest cost for specific drugs. One drawback of GoodRx.com is you cannot use the discounts offered by that website in combination with your health insurance. • Drug manufacturers may offer coupons lowering your cost at the pharmacy. Usually, manufacturer coupons can be used with your insurance plan. Check out the website of your prescription’s manufacturer for more information. • Utilize care at the most appropriate setting. Don’t go to the emergency room for something your primary care doctor should be handling. Also consider telemedicine services. Most health plans provide you an opportunity to communicate with a doctor online, over the phone or through a videoconferencing application for a lower cost than in-person visits. • Check out the cost of surgery before the procedure. Ask your surgeon how many surgeries he or she has done and the outcomes. Shop around for the prices of outpatient x-ray or lab tests. Price differences of an MRI vary considerably. Most insurance companies offer cost estimator tools on their member websites, allowing you to search the average cost of a procedure or test in your area. • Take advantage of any tax savings opportunities your employer provides such as a flexible spending account (FSA) or a health savings account (HSA). By utilizing either of these vehicles, you can stretch your medical dollar by 30 percent immediately.

With the increase in medical costs we are experiencing, we all need to be stretching our health care dollars. Just as it’s important to be mindful of cost and budget when shopping for spring fun, it’s even more important when it comes to your health care spending. For more information, please contact your trusted advisor at Swartzbaugh-Farber – ‘Client Centered – Client Advocates™’. This material is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal or tax advice and is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified attorney, tax advisor or plan provider. Securities Offered through M Holdings Securities, Inc., a Registered Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Swartzbaugh-Farber & Associates, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

*Look for our ad in this issue of metroMAGAZINE Dr. Stephanie Vondrak is board certified by the American Academy of Craniofacial Dental Sleep Medicine to treat patients suffering from sleep apnea with sleep apnea appliances. 33

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LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2019!

MIDLANDS COMMUNITY FOUNDATION REFLECTION BALL

BUSINESS4BUSINESS B4B 5 YEAR BASH!

HEARTLAND FAMILY SERVICE 2019 “CARNIVAL OF LOVE” GALA

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION OMAHA HEART & STROKE BALL

OMAHA FASHION WEEK SURVIVOR SHOW

MARIAN HIGH SCHOOL MARIANFEST 2019

DUCHESNE ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART CONGÉ 2019

JDRF OMAHA-COUNCIL BLUFFS CHAPTER JDRF PROMISE GALA – INVEST IN A CURE

splendid 2019 Purchase photos from these events online or from your smartphone, charitable events! and metroMAGAZINE will donate 10% back to that organization. Join us in giving back! Enter the code “GIVE10” on the checkout page of your shopping cart. • please remember to trade with our advertisers, whose support helps make our promotion of these important events possible 35

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f eat u r ed eVeNt

spotlight

metroMAGAZINE PHOTOGRAPHY BY DEBRA S. KAPLAN AND MONICA SEMPEK

2019

honoring givers THE BIG EVENT HONORS NONPROFITS AND THE GIVING COMMUNITY BY RECOGNIZING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS DOING AMAZING THINGS

In 2005, metroMAGAZINE publisher Andee Hoig created the first editon of The Giving Guide and Event Book to serve as a much-needed comprehensive guide to local nonprofit organizations and events. But she felt there still was more that could be done to bring attention to the giving community. So the next year, she organized the first production of The BIG Event. “I had the idea of launching, in conjunction with The Giving Guide, this Academy Award-type of red carpet event where we would honor—in a fun way—nonprofits for putting on outstanding events,” Hoig said. “We wanted to put on an event for them, so they could just come and have fun. It’s a big party to say ‘thank you.’” The name “The BIG Event” is about as simple as it gets, but it’s self-evident, she added. “It encompasses all the events in the community with one big event to celebrate them.” Showcasing the industry Various locations including Joslyn Art Museum, the Henry Doorly Zoo’s Lozier IMAX Theater, the Holland Center and the Durham Museum have hosted The BIG Event, which showcases the venue along with multiple catering companies, event and meeting planners and other industry vendors. Diverse award categories allow nonprofits of all sizes and in various service areas to receive recognition, and a voting process encourages community engagement.

“Ultimately, it’s a celebration of the giving spirit of the community,” Hoig said. And it continues to evolve. “For a long time, the awards were focused just on charity events. But in the past few years we’ve expanded them out to recognize some great businesses, individuals and networking groups that are giving back. We’re still recognizing the people in the community that are doing great things,” Hoig said. “In recent years, we’ve held the event at the Omaha Design Center. Rachel Richards with STEP Group has helped us for the last few years and in 2018 we added the whole EXTRAVAGANZA piece to it with details like a photo booth, sketch artists and fire performers and other event-related vendors.”

ULTIMATELY, IT’S A celebration OF THE giving spirit OF THE COMMUNITY.

~ ANDEE HOIG

Hoig also invited SHARE Omaha to the stage to launch the new organization’s giving platform. “For decades, metroMAGAZINE’s mission has been about connecting nonprofits to individuals and businesses in the giving community, and it was nice to support SHARE Omaha in our common mission,” Hoig said. Sharing the stories The BIG Event 2019 on January 17 was particularly poignant for Hoig. “This year it was 10 days after my dad passed away, but there was no way this event wasn’t going to happen,” she said.

“That first event really set the stage. We continued to Bob Hoig was publisher of the Midlands Business follow the same concept and the same structure of Journal and started the predecessor publication to honoring charity events,” Hoig said. The awards metroMAGAZINE, she explained. portion of the event has expanded over time to include nonprofit executives, guilds, businesses and “The beautiful thing about it for me was really being community partners. In 2015, Hoig added THE able to honor him in a way I hadn’t before in front $10,000 BIG CONNECTION, a package of marketing of people I know loved me and loved him. and promotional support. 36

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I remember a moment where I made the statement that I was in front of them because of him. I wouldn’t be standing here, they wouldn’t be sitting here, we wouldn’t be doing this at all if it wasn’t for him and his vision and his dream to start a weekly business newspaper.” Like her father, Hoig said it all comes down to sharing the stories of people making a difference. “As more people are doing amazing things in the community, The Giving Guide and Event Book and The BIG Event go hand in hand as an opportunity to recognize them,” she said. “This is an incredible community and I look forward to watching everything continue to unfold in the philanthropic arena.”


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2019

TO THIS YEAR’S EVENT PARTNERS: Bergman Incentives Catering Creations Dog & Pony Productions Paramount Parking STEP//Group VIP Limousine AND TO THIS YEAR’S EXTRAVAGANZA PARTNERS:

FlowTricks • FUN Services Omaha Musicians Live • SCRAW Art


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Photos courtesy of Midlands Community Foundation

event galleries

DEDICATION TO

Community

Midlands Community Foundation Reflection Ball When: January 19, 2019 MARTIE AND SARA CORDARO WITH TERRI AND TIM BURKE

TONEE GAY, TERRI AND TIM BURKE AND PATRICK SULLIVAN

Where: Embassy Suites, La Vista Why: Fundraising event for Midlands Community Foundation. Net proceeds will support the needs of nonprofit organization that provide programs and services in Sarpy and Cass counties in the areas of art, community, economic development, education, health and human services. At the event, the 2019 Reflection Award was presented to Terri and Tim Burke for their dedication to community service and their countless hours of volunteerism.

FRONT ROW: KRIS ZEY, KARLA RUPIPER, DIANE KNICKY, BRANDY JOHNSON, BINDY FREDERICK, DONNA WILCOX, KATHY WENDLANDT AND KEN SUMMERFIELD BACK ROW: JILL GOVIER, CATHIE PAJNIGAR, MARTHA SOPINSKI, JAN DAVIS, BRENDA CARLSON, TAMI FIELD, MARY GAWECKI, CARRIE KRIST, JACKIE DAVIS AND PATTIE ISKE

Honorary Chairs: Sara and Martie Cordaro and 2019 Reflection Ball Committee Attendance: 450 Amount Raised: More than $143,000 Mission: The mission of Midlands Community Foundation is to benefit the diverse needs of the Sarpy and Cass county communities by providing financial support, involvement and service. For more Information: 402.991.8027 | www.midlandscommunity.org

LEE POLIKOV, KATHY SANIUK AND TERRY CALEK

MELISSA AND DAVID KLUG

DAVID AND SENATOR SUE CRAWFORD WITH SENATOR JOHN AND BRENDA ARCH

JOE AND ERIN KOESTERS WITH TAYLOR JO AND EMILY KOESTERS

DR. MICHAEL WESTCOTT WITH DONNA AND DR. CHUCK WILCOX AND DR. SUSAN WESTCOTT

Thank You! Midlands Community Foundation 2019 Reflection Ball Sponsors DIAMOND SPONSORS ♦ The Burke Family ♦ NextEra Energy Resources ♦ Omaha Public Power District GOLD SPONSORS ♦ Adams & Sullivan, P.C., L.L.O. ♦ CHI Health and Midlands Medical Staff ♦ Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O. ♦ Northern Natural Gas ♦ Pinnacle Bank ♦ Securities America

WINE SPONSOR

♦ American Family Insurance

(Dan Grzywa, Terri Scholting, Ken Summerfield)

SILVER SPONSORS

♦ Five Points Bank ♦ Metropolitan Utilities District ♦ Nebraska Medicine/UNMC ♦ Roloff Construction ♦ Valmont Industries, Inc.

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CORPORATE SPONSORS ♦ Aon ♦ Baxter Auto Group ♦ Black Hills Energy ♦ Bellevue Community Foundation ♦ Borsheims ♦ Catalyst Public Affairs ♦ Cox ♦ DLR Group ♦ Energy Resources ♦ First National Bank ♦ Frederick Brothers Rentals ♦ HDR ♦ Kuehl Capital ♦ Mutual of Omaha ♦ OMNE Partners ♦ Premier Family Medicine ♦ Republic National Distributing ♦ Rick Iske Insurance, Inc. ♦ Sarpy County Sports Commission ♦ Werner Enterprises ♦ Dr. Chuck and Donna Wilcox ♦ Yahoo!

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Photos courtesy of Business4BusinessÂ

CELEBRATING A

Milestone

Business4Business B4B 5 Year Bash! When: January 31, 2019 Where: Champions Run Why: We celebrated our five-year journey and raised money and awareness for our two nonprofits that we are going to concentrate on this year: Rejuvenating Women and Chariots4Hope. Special Guests: Andee Hoig, Van Deeb and Aaron Davis Sponsors: Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, The Good Life Group Caterer: Brickway Distillery and Champions Run Attendance: 290 Amount Raised: $750 for RW and $750 for C4H Mission: B4B focuses on bringing the right people together at dozens of events throughout the year and providing resources that create lasting relationships, insights and experiences. At our events, we aim to offer ideas and inspiration that help push our team members further and strive for greater and more meaningful accomplishments. We tap into the potential of our community and its people, creating experiences throughout the year that are unique, impactful, empowering and exciting. For more Information: Facebook.com/Business4Business | b4bsociety.com

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Photos courtesy of Heartland Family Service

FLOWER

Power

Heartland Family Service 2019 “Carnival of Love” Gala When: February 8, 2019 Where: Hilton Omaha Why: The “Carnival of Love” Gala is the largest fundraiser of the year for Heartland Family Service, with all proceeds supporting our 50-plus life-saving programs and services. This year’s theme was “Peace, Love, and Understanding,” and the event featured silent and live auctions; live entertainment provided by Peace, Love, Etc. band; a raffle; and games. Sponsors: American National Bank, Kiewit, OPPD, Pinnacle Bank, Lockton, PenFed Credit Union, Ann and Ken Stinson Family Event Planner: Mary Brown Attendance: 525 Amount Raised: $306,266 Mission: The mission of Heartland Family Service is to strengthen individuals and families in our community through counseling, education and support services. About: Founded in 1875, Heartland Family Service currently serves more than 52,000 individuals of all ages each year from more than 15 locations in east central Nebraska and southwest Iowa. Our 50 programs provide critical human services to the individuals and families who ultimately shape the future of our community in the following focus areas: Child & Family Well-Being, Counseling & Prevention, and Housing, Safety & Financial Stability. For more Information: 402.552.7400 | HeartlandFamilyService.org

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Photos courtesy of Duchesne academy

JOURNEY OF

Amour

Duchesne Academy of the Sacred Heart Congé 2019 With Love from Joigny: Where It All Began When: January 26, 2019 MINDY AND BILL GEIS, MINDY AND TIM REED WITH CATHERINE AND JEFF MAHONEY Where: Hilton Omaha Why: Each year, the Duchesne community gathers to celebrate Congé, a French word for “holiday.” The event is a dinner-auction co-chaired by parents of current Duchesne students. The funds raised support the school’s operating budget as well as tuition assistance. Multimedia: Dog and Pony Productions (lighting and sound); United Rental provided toile napkins KIM AND ANDY KREIS

JIM AND MEG BRUDNEY Attendance: 453 Amount Raised: Net amount $525,000

LISA AND ROB WELLENDORF WITH TODD AND ANGIE TRAUTMAN

ABIGAIL REED, KELLY MAHONEY WITH TORI AND SOPHIE GEIS

Mission: Duchesne Academy of the Sacred Heart, a Catholic college-preparatory high school for girls of all faiths and backgrounds, is a member of the Network of Sacred Heart Schools in the United States and Canada. The schools of the Sacred Heart Network share five goals which commit them to educate to: a personal and active faith in God, a deep respect for intellectual values, a social awareness which impels to action, the building of community as a Christian value and a personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom. For more Information: 402.558.3800 | www.duchesneacademy.org

ANNE ECKERT, ANISA LUCIA, BAILEY DORFMEYER, MOLLY DONAHOE AND ALEX KULA

TRAVIS AND AMBER RINEHART WITH KERRY AND ALEXANDER BERNAL

LORENZO TRUJILLO AND ELIZABETH BALTZELL TRUJILLO, JAY WEINGARTEN AND LAURA FOLEY WEINGARTEN WITH PETER AND JENNIFER MANHART 45

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Photos courtesy of american Heart association

event galleries

LIFESAVING

Mission American Heart Association Omaha Heart & Stroke Ball When: February 9, 2019 LORI HOGAN AND HER DAUGHTER, LAKELYN

ABEL FALCON PROTIVA AND HIS DONOR FAMILY

Where: CHI Health Center Omaha Why: The Omaha Heart & Stroke Ball, with presenting sponsors Renaissance Financial, CQuence Health Group and the Cassling Family Foundation, is the annual black-tie gala benefiting the American Heart Association’s lifesaving mission of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Nearly 1,000 individuals from Omaha’s business, medical and social communities attended the gala.

DENNY AND SUNNY LUNDGREN WITH LAURETTE AND RANDY HESS

Presenting Sponsors: Renaissance Financial, CQuence Health Group and the Cassling Family Foundation Royalty Sponsor: Children’s Hospital & Medical Center Media Sponsors: KMTV 3 News Now and metroMAGAZINE Multimedia: Sonburst Communication Attendance: More than 900 HEART PRINCESS: HARPER SCHMOLDT

Amount Raised: Nearly $800,000 Mission: To be a relentless force for a world of longer, stronger lives. About: Keeping hearts beating gets our hearts pumping. For more Information: www.heart.org/omahaheartball

DR. SPICER

COURTNEY JOHNS 46

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Photos courtesy of Omaha Fashion Week

LOOKING

Strong

Omaha Fashion Week Survivor Show Omaha Fashion Week truly used its “fashion for good” this season during its most emotionally charged showcase of the year, the Methodist & Xenon Survivor Show presented by American National Bank! The day started earlier than most showcases for these models, with 100-plus cancer survivors getting runway-ready offsite thanks to Xenon Academy and Surface Hair. The building was bustling with activity as Xenon stylists generously volunteered their time and expertise to make sure every model felt pampered and beautiful. The room buzzed with conversation, laughter, and admiration as survivors caught glimpses of themselves in the mirrors. Each cancer survivor left their styling session with a set of Awaken products to promote hair growth, thanks to Surface Hair! Back at Omaha Design Center, doors opened to a crowd of attendees for a sold-out show. Guests quickly bustled in out of the cold for the Pretty in Patina Pre-Party, with live entertainment from DJ Shor-T that had every foot tapping, and plenty of retail therapy in the Pop-Up Shop Market! With so many pre-party perks to choose from, it was hard to decide where to start! From delicious hors d’oeuvres in the Village Pointe Aesthetic Surgery | Dreams MedSpa VIP Lounge, to delicious Abolut Elyx cocktails and shots on the Omaha Fashion Week Red Carpet, every corner of the venue was filled with energy. Some lucky ticket holders even managed to snag appointments at the Surface Styling Bar powered by Xenon Academy, for complimentary on-site updos before the show! Every seat in the house was full as the clock struck 8:00pm. A hush slowly fell over the crowd as lights dimmed and a spotlight hit the Allure Med Spa Runway to Beauty. The silence was quickly filled with bright music as American Midwest Ballet kicked off the show! As the sea of ballerinas in red exited the stage, Michelle Bandur of KETV NewsWatch7 took their place to usher attendees through the rest of the evening. Over 100 cancer survivors hit the stage over the course of the night, modeling looks provided by generous local boutiques: Dillard’s, Little Mango, Old Navy, Bliss Boutique, Christopher & Banks, Skyz Boutique, Chico’s, Hush la Boutique, Mainstream, Dress Barn, Soft Surroundings, and Christian Nobel! There wasn’t a moment without applause during the whole show, as survivors from 3 to 81 years old danced, spun, and highfived their way down the runway. In partnership with Methodist Hospital, half of proceeds from the show went to support the Inner Beauty Salon at Methodist Estabrook Cancer Center, which works with cancer survivors to deal with changes to their image while undergoing treatment. For more Information: www.omahafashionweek.com | 402.937.1061

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Photos courtesy of Visiting n urse association

ART OF

Healing

Visiting Nurse Association Art & Soup When: February 24, 2019 Where: Embassy Suites La Vista Why: Art & Soup benefits VNA’s shelter nursing program, which allows VNA to have a nurse in every homeless and domestic violence shelter in Omaha and Council Bluffs. VNA is able to offer these services free of charge thanks to the generous support of the community. Honorary Chairs: Roger and Karen Thompson Sponsors: Rhonda and Howard Hawks, Nebraska Medicine, Methodist Hospital, Omaha Track, Bland Cares Foundation, Betsy & Chris Murphy, CQuence Health Group, First National Bank, Heafey-Heafey-Hoffmann-Dworak-Cutler Funeral Chapels, Kiewit Corporation Foundation, Millard and Scott Seldin, Scoular Foundation, Seim Johnson, LLP, SilverStone Group Incorporated, The Maids International, Valmont Industries, Esther and Daniel Brabec, Mutual of Omaha, Immanuel, American National Bank, Ramona & Deryl Hamann, Cindy & Scott Heider, Roger and Karen Thompson, Murray H. & Sharon C. Newman Foundation, Inc., Shirley Young, Signature Performance, The Fred & Sally Bekins Foundation, Werner Enterprises, Advanced Surgery Center, LLC, Ann Hosford, Emspace + Lovgren Group, George Kleine, HDR Architecture, Inc., Slate Architecture, AON Risk Services, Casey’s General Stores, Inc., Karen & Charles Olsen, Hoich Enterprises, Anne & Jim Carroll, McKesson Medical-Surgical Midwest Laboratories, The LUND Company Event Planner: planitomaha Attendance: 1,000 Amount Raised: $131,584 Mission: Delivering community-based care that provides peace of mind, quality of life, and independence. About: VNA provides the highest quality home-based healthcare and hospice in the Omaha community. As a community mainstay (over 120 years), VNA impacts the local economy and invests excess revenue by providing uncompensated care for vulnerable individuals and families. For more information: 402.342.5566 | www.vnatoday.org

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CURE, TREAT

Prevent JDRF Omaha-Council Bluffs Chapter JDRF Promise Gala – Invest in a Cure When: February 23, 2019 JDRF BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Where: CHI Health Center Omaha Why: The JDRF Promise Gala funds type 1 diabetes (T1D) research initiatives to cure, treat and prevent the disease as well as strengthens the fiber of the T1D community Honorary Chairs: Stephanie & Robb Pantano Event Chairs: Carolyn & Chase Sutton Live Entertainment: Platinum-selling artist Dennis DeYoung: The Music of STYX

JULIE AND LARRY JOBEUN

Presenting Sponsor: Renaissance Financial; Securian Financial; Wells Fargo & Michael Robino, CFP; Ries Orthodontics; Aviture; Deloitte with Robert & Addie Hollingsworth; Gottsch Cattle & Indian Creek; Kiewit; 3 News Now & Z-92 The Rock Station; Motion Content House

SYDNEY AUMAN, LAUREN SCHLATTER AND KRISTIN WORDEKEMPER

Caterer: Levy Multimedia: Sonburst Communication & Bouquet Attendance: 1,100 guests RSVP’d with approximately 600-700 in attendance due to blizzard weather conditions. Amount Raised: More than $1.6 million

CHASE AND CAROLYN SUTTON, LACI NABER, JOEL FALK, SOFIA PANTANO WITH STEPHANIE AND ROBB PANTANO

Mission: JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Our mission is to improve lives today and tomorrow by accelerating life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat T1D and its complications. About: JDRF works every day to change the reality of this disease for millions of people—and to prevent anyone else from ever knowing it—by funding research, advocating for government support of research and new therapies, ensuring new therapies come to market and connecting and engaging the T1D community. We’ve funded more than$2 billion in research to date and made significant progress in understanding and fighting the disease. Our efforts will not stop until we turn Type One into Type None.

THE PANTANO FAMILY

JACKSON ALLRED

For more Information: 402.397.2873 | jdrf.org/omaha

Thank you to our sponsors, donors, and volunteers for your dedica on and generosity! TOGETHER, WE ARE CREATING A WORLD WITHOUT TYPE 1 DIABETES!

Presenting Sponsor

Honorary Chairs

Stephanie & Robb Pantano

Bank Sponsor

Smile Sponsor

Media Partners

$10,000 Sponsors

Video Sponsor

Event Chairs

Carolyn & Chase Su on 49

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Photos courtesy of Debra S. Kaplan and Marian High School

THE BIG

ShinDIG

Marian High School MarianFEST 2019

ANGIE CRAFT AND PAM MORTENSON

STACY MOFFENBIER ROHLOFF AND KAREN ROWEDE

Over 600 gathered to celebrate the 37th annual MarianFEST (Funding Education in the Servite Tradition) Friday, February 8, at Omaha Marriott Downtown at the Capitol District. MarianFEST is Marian’s largest fundraising event of the year, with proceeds benefiting tuition assistance and scholarships for students. This year’s event raised nearly $550,000. The theme, the Big ShinDIG – Constructing the Next Generation of Leaders, was chosen to celebrate a major building project at Marian. The school has been a construction zone since May 2018. However, by August 2019 all projects will be complete, including the Haddix Academic Center, modeled after a college library with a focus on collaborative learning.

BARB LAMOUREUX WITH GEORGE AND SUE HADDIX Although the theme was lighthearted, the purpose was serious. FEST (Funding Education in the Servite Tradition) supports tuition assistance for nearly 50 percent of the student body. Students also supported the event by serving as essential volunteers. A Marian choral ensemble sang the blessing and provided entertainment. A student speaker, a first-generation student, shared how tuition assistance made it possible for to attend Marian and pursue her dreams for college and medical school. SUSIE SPETHMAN, FR. TOM FANGMAN AND MARY HIGGINS

CALI D’AGOSTO WITH ANDY AND SUSIE D’AGOSTO

LIBBY PALLESEN, INDIA ZIER AND ZOEY ZIER

Parents serve as executive chairs of the event. This year’s chairs were: • Scott and Becky Carrico, parents of Macey, a sophomore • Patrick and Sharon Flanery, parents of Mo, a junior, and Mallori, a 2005 alumna • John and Katie McClellan, parents of Emma, a junior, and Erin, a 2014 alumna • Mike and Kathleen Pallesen, parents of Libby and Maggie, sophomores, and Katie, a 2015 alumna. • Robb and Melissa Steffes, parents of Sophi, a sophomore • Corey and Cali Watton, parents of Gabrielle, a junior • Larry and Peggy Zier, parents of Zoe, a senior, and India, a freshman. About Marian: Founded by the Servants of Mary in 1955, Marian is a Catholic, all-girl college preparatory school twice recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. As Nebraska’s only Class A girls’ high school, Marian provides the opportunities of a large high school in a smaller setting. Marian welcomes students of all cultural, economic and spiritual backgrounds. For more Information: 402.571.2618 Ext. 1137 | www.marianhighschool.net

SUSAN HEIM, MARY GORDON AND BRIT SHOTKOSKI

ROW 1: COREY AND CALI WATTON, SHARON AND PATRICK FLANERY ROW 2: MIKE AND KATHLEEN PALLESEN, PEGGY AND LARRY ZIER ROW 3: KATIE MCCLELLAN, MELISSA AND ROBB STEFFES ROW 4: JOHN MCCLELLAN, BECKY AND SCOTT CARRICO 51

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www.onedrakeplacesalon.com


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Photos courtesy of n FViC

SING FOR

Sight NFVIC Nebraska Foundation for Visually Impaired Children CD Release Benefit Show THE SINGERS: ANDREW BROOKS, PEGI GEORGESON, ANDREW LEWANDOWSKI, JOYCE TORCHIA, GENE KLOSNER AND KAREN SOKOLOF JAVITCH NOT PICTURED: MIKE KELLY

When: February 23, 2019 Where: Ware House Recording Studio Why: Karen Sokolof Javitch released a new CD in memory of Chuck Penington and to raise money for visually impaired children in Nebraska.

GENE KLOSNER

GARY JAVITCH AND MIKE KELLY

Special Guests: Former Omaha World-Herald columnist Mike Kelly, who sang on the CD, also sang during the program. Omaha icon Elaine Jabenis, 98 years old, came to the event despite a blizzard. She also sang on the CD. Karen Sokolof Javitch sang along with a video of her late father Phil Sokolof ("America’s #1 cholesterol fighter") from a yearsago Omaha Press Club performance. Tom Ware, who owns the recording studio, is a recording engineer who worked with Lady Gaga on a Grammy-nominated song. Karen Sokolof Javitch is an award-winning songwriter whose musical about Princess Diana was just produced off-off Broadway in New York City. Sponsors: JMR Productions, Javitch’s music company, sponsored the event. Multimedia: Omaha Trans Video

RACHEL JACOBSON AND CLEO

ELAINE JABENIS AND KAREN SOKOLOF JAVITCH

Attendance: only 50 because of the blizzard! Amount Raised: $3,000

CHUCK PENINGTON AND KAREN SOKOLOF JAVITCH WITH THE MAYNARD TRIPLETS

Mission: This was a two-part fundraiser. Javitch wanted to do this show because of her dear friend and mentor, Chuck Penington, who passed away late November. He was a multitalented musician, orchestrator, and music conductor who was with Mannheim Steamroller for more than 30 years. He also started The Omaha Intergeneration Orchestra more than 30 years ago. Javitch's other reason for the show was to raise funds for NFVIC - Nebraska Foundation for Visually Impaired Children About: There are 15 Nebraska celebrities singing on the CD. Some of them include actor John Beasley, Heisman trophy winner Eric Crouch and Broadway singer Joanna Young. It’s a benefit CD for NFVIC - Its mission is to provide visually impaired children in Nebraska the resources necessary to have long-term success in life. For more information: JMRProductions.com and NFVIC

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event galleries

Photos courtesy of Wel l COM

GOING

Vertical

WELLCOM

Trek Up the Tower

When: February 16, 2019 Where: First National Bank Tower, downtown Omaha Why: Community event that raises funds to support WELLCOM’s mission. THE REAL MCTREKKERS

Attendance: 1,700 Amount Raised: $55,000 Mission: WELLCOM partners with employers to deliver wellness programming that impacts employee wellbeing and wellness, strengthens the culture and drives business results. About: WELLCOM is your leading wellness partner. Members benefit from cutting-edge education, high-level training programs, extensive networking opportunities and expert advice. We provide a one-stop resource for employers of all sizes and stages of a wellness program. Our members are a network of employers who are focused on doing what is right for their employees. For more Information: 402.934.5795 www.elevatingwellness.org | www.trekupthetower.org

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STEPPING

Up

American Red Cross: Omaha Council Bluffs Metro Chapter Red Cross Heroes in the Heartland

When: March 7, 2019 Where: Hilton Omaha Why: Heroes in the Heartland honors individuals who live the Red Cross mission by acting when someone else needs assistance or making service to others an important part of their lives. Attendance: 350 Amount Raised: More than $106,000 About: The American Red Cross, through its strong network of volunteers, donors and partners, is always there in times of need. We aspire to turn compassion into action so that all people affected by disaster across the country and around the world receive care, shelter and hope; our communities are ready and prepared for disasters; everyone in our country has access to safe, lifesaving blood and blood products; all members of our armed services and their families find support and comfort whenever needed; and in an emergency, there are always trained individuals nearby, ready to use their Red Cross skills to save lives. For more Information: redcross.org/neia For more Information: 402.341.4673 | www.hopecenterforkids.com

Savor the experience Voted Best of Omaha eight Years in a Row

402.558.3202 cateringcreations.com 55

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THE power OF COMMUNITY SERVICE

andee hoig

A SPEAKER WITH inspiration AND impact!

TAKE YOUR ORGANIZATION’S community service EFFORTS TO the next level!

ANDEE IS AN enthusiastic AND knowledgeable SPEAKER. ANDEE’S EXPERIENCE IN WORKING WITH BOTH THE NONPROFIT AND CORPORATE SECTORS OVER THE past 25 years WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN HELPING OUR AGENTS LEARN innovative WAYS TO TAKE THEIR COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITIES TO THE next level. GIVING BACK IS A must FOR EVERY BUSINESS AND ANDEE delivers WHEN IT COMES TO HELPING ORGANIZATIONS CREATE AND implement STRATEGIC GIVING PLANS AND NONPROFIT PARTNERSHIPS.

~ MIKE RIEDMANN Pr eSiDen T, n P DODg e r eSiDen Tial Sal eS DiViSiOn

• Devise a fresh new approach to step up your community involvement and impact • Create and implement a powerful giving strategy • Connect with the community with greater purpose and impact Andee will show you how to connect with the community on a deeper level, and create greater impact in the community while creating an exceptional giving culture that engages employees and clients through THE power OF COMMUNITY SERVICE!

I believe THAT BUSINESSES & ORGANIZATIONS (BOTH LARGE AND SMALL) HAVE AN incredible OPPORTUNITY TO create THE GREATEST impact IN BUILDING STRONG COMMUNITIES THROUGH GIVING BACK. I LOOK FORWARD TO serving YOU AS YOU SERVE OTHERS .

~ ANDREA ‘ANDEE’ HOIG Pr eSiDen T & CeO, al H PUBl iCaTiOn S, in C.

to speak to both large and small audiences or provide one-on-one consulting. • AndeeTois available learn more or to schedule your event with Andee call: 402-706-8260 or Email: ahoig@spiritofomaha.com Request a full bio with all of Andee’s speaking topics


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The information in this section appears as supplied to us by the organizations presented. ALH Publications, Inc. accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or integrity of any of the information provided.  Please double-check for updated details with event organizers.

• mmag azin e community CALENDAR

save the date

Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at metroMAGAZINE’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

FROM THE GIVING GUIDE & EVENT BOOK 2019!

featured

VENTS

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2019 today at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

May 7 • 11:45 AM

Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

FEATurED EvENT: D.J.’S HErO AWArDS LuNCHEON The Salvation Army

Now thru April 14

CHI Health Center, Omaha $150 Individual | $1,500 Table Sponsorship | salarmyomaha.org

2019 ONE FESTIvAL Opera Omaha

May 11 • 6 PM

Centered around downtown Omaha. Events will take place in a variety of traditional and non-traditional settings including the Orpheum Theater, Joslyn Art Museum, and Archetype Coffee in Blackstone. www.operaomaha.org | www.ONEfestival.org

April TBD • 6 PM – 9 PM

MAN & WOMAN OF THE yEAr GrAND FINALE Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Embassy Suites Conference Center, La Vista $150/person (tables of 10 available) | www.mwoy.org/nebraska/mwoy-omaha

May 18 • Morning (exact time TBD)

BATS OvEr OMAHA 10TH ANNuAL BAT rELEASE Nebraska Wildlife Rehab, Inc.

21ST ANNuAL rEMEMBrANCE WALK Grief’s Journey

Joslyn Art Museum, 22nd & Dodge St., Omaha Free and family-friendly | www.nebraskawildliferehab.org

Miller’s Landing, TBD www.griefsjourney.org

April 24 • 11:30 AM

June 10 • 11:30 AM – 1 PM

FuSION 2019: A BLEND OF FuN & PHILANTHrOPy Nebraska Medicine Guild

CHANCE LuNCHEON Children’s Scholarship Fund of Omaha

Omaha Design Center $75 per person Sponsorship opportunities available | guild@nebraskamed.com

Embassy Suites Conference Center, La Vista Individual Seats, Table and Corporate Sponsorships are available | csfomaha.org June 13 • Times: 11:30 AM – 1 PM

April 26 • 6:30 PM

TrIBuTE TO WOMEN Women’s Center for Advancement (WCA)

METHODIST HOSPITAL BArNEFIT Methodist Hospital Foundation The Barn at the Ackerhurst Dairy Farm $150 per person | $250 per person for Patron reservation | MethodistHospitalFoundation.org

The Marriott Downtown at the Capitol District TBD | wcaomaha.org June 17 • Times: 12 PM – 5 PM

April 27 • 12 PM – 5 PM

SWING FOr HEALTH GOLF OuTING CHI Health Foundation

“SEArCH FOr THE CurE” SCAvENGEr HuNT Lolo’s Angels, Inc.

The Players Club at Deer Creek, 12101 Deer Creek Dr. Omaha $1,500 for a Foursome | www.CHIhealthfoundation.com

Film Streams Dundee $50 per person/Teams are of 4-6 people | lolosangels.org

July 8 • 10:30 AM BLAND CArES/ANGELS AMONG uS CHArITy GOLF OuTING Angels Among Us

April 27 • 6 PM

Champions Run Golf Club, 13800 Eagle Run Dr. Omaha $200 per player | $800 per team Hole sponsorships | www.myangelsamongus.org

BLuE JEAN BALL: LIGHTS, CAMErA, WISHES Make-A-Wish® Nebraska Hilton Downtown 1001 Cass St., Omaha $150 per person | $1,500 corporate table | www.nebraska.wish.org

July 29 • 11:30 AM – Free Lunch; 1 PM – Shotgun Start

May 2 • 5:30 PM

Champions Run, 13800 Eagle Run Dr. Omaha $150 per golfer | $1,000 Hole Sponsor with Foursome | www.gesuhousing.com

2019 HELP BuILD A HOuSE GOLF EvENT Gesu Housing, Inc.

GO GrEEN! GALA Cross Training Center

August 1 • Times: 6 PM

TBD find out at www.crosstc.com $100 per person | $1,000 per table | www.crosstc.com

DANCE FOr A CHANCE Youth Emergency Services

May 4 • 5 PM – 9 PM

Omaha Design Center TBD | www.yesomaha.org

FOr THE KIDS BENEFIT Omaha Children’s Museum

August 1 • 5:30 PM – 9:30 PM HOLy SMOKES Heart Ministry Center

Omaha Children’s Museum $150 per person | www.ocm.org

TBA | www.heartministrycenter.org 57

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community CALENDAR

save the date Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at metroMAGAZINE’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

FROM OUR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PARTNERS!

more

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2019 today at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

VENTS

April 6 • 6 PM – 10 PM

Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

PINK rIBBON AFFAIr  Susan G. Komen Great Plains

April 1 - 2 • 8 AM – 5 PM

Hilton Omaha, 1001 Cass St., Omaha $125 Individual | $200 Patron | 402-502-2979 | www.komengreatplains.org

AIM INFOTEC 2019 AIM Institute

April 6 - 7 • 10 AM – 4 PM vISION rESOurCE FAIr Outlook Nebraska

Embassy Suites La Vista Conference Center, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista $0 - $200 | 402-345-5025 | http://careerlink.com/infotec/

Baxter Arena, 2425 S. 67th St., Omaha Free

April 5 • 6:30 PM – 10 PM WINE WOMEN & SHOES Children’s Hospital & Medical Center

April 7 • 5:30 PM – 8 PM AuTISM NIGHT AT THE OMAHA CHILDrEN’S MuSEuM Autism Action Partnership

Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cuming St., Omaha $120+ | 402-955-6852 | WineWomenandShoes.com/Omaha

Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 South 20th St., Omaha 402-763-8830 | https://autismaction.z2systems.com/event.jsp?event=41

April 10 • 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM COMPLETELy KIDS AuTHOr LuNCHEON Completely KIDS Hilton Omaha, 1001 Cass St., Omaha Patron | $100; Individual | $75 | 402-397-5809 www.completelykids.org/news-events/author-luncheon.html

April 13 • 5:30 PM – 10 PM OMAHA SyMPHONy GALA FEATurING WAyNE BrADy Omaha Symphony Holland Performing Arts Center, 1200 Douglas St., Omaha $500 for gala dinner and concert | 402-661-8575 | www.omahasymphony.org

April 18 • 11:30 AM – 1 PM CAN DO LuNCHEON Kids Can Omaha Marriott Downtown at the Capitol District, 222 N 10th St., Omaha $75 | 402-733-6988 | www.kidscanomaha.org

April 19 • 7:30 AM – 4:30 PM 2019 DEMENTIA CArE CONFErENCE Alzheimer’s Association Embassy Suites Conference Center, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista Fees variable | 402-502-4301 | https://alz.org/nebraska

April 19 • 7 PM – 10 PM rIvALZ: BLONDES vS. BruNETTES FLAG FOOTBALL GAME Alzheimer’s Association Omaha Sports Complex, 14706 Giles Rd, Omaha Pricing varies | 402-260-7911 | act.alz.org/site/TR/BvB/NE-Nebraska?pg=entry&fr_id=12015

April 26 • 7 PM – 10 PM GuNS N HOSES BOxING CHALLENGE First Responders Foundation Baxter Arena, 2425 S 67th St., Omaha $20 GA | 402-917-6452 | gunsnhosesomaha.com/ 58

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featured

LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2019!

April 26 • 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM NIGHT OF CELEBrATION CHI Health Immanuel Auxiliary Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cumings St., Omaha $100 | 402-572-2722 http://GIVE.CHIhealth.com/NightOfCelebration

April 27 • 6 PM – 9 PM DINING WITH DOGS  Nebraska Humane Society Baxter Subaru, 17130 Burt St., Omaha $100 Ticket | $150 Patron Ticket 402-905-3483 | www.nehumanesociety.org

April 28 • 11 AM – 2 PM LADLE OF LOvE FESTIvAL Open Door Mission Garland Thompson Men’s Center, 2705 N 20th St. E, Omaha 402-829-1503 | www.opendoormission.org/

April 30 • 5:30 PM – 9 PM 52ND ANNuAL BOyS TOWN BOOSTEr BANquET Boys Town Embassy Suites, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista $100 Per Ticket | $1000 per Table (10 seats)

May 4 • 5 PM – 8 PM BIG HATS FOr BIG DrEAMS: A SOuTHErN SOIréE FOr THE KIDS BENEFIT 2019 Omaha Children’s Museum Omaha Children’s Museum, 500 S 20th St., Omaha $150 | 402-930-2349 https://ocmsecure.waveinteractive.com/forms/form5.aspx

May 4 • 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM AMErICAN MIDWEST BALLET PrESENTS  THE WIZArD OF OZ American Midwest Ballet Orpheum Theater, 409 S 16 St., Omaha $27 | 402-345-0606 https://ticketomaha.com/Productions/the-wizard-of-oz

May 10 • 11:30 AM – 1 PM 2019 WOMEN’S POWEr LuNCH Habitat Omaha Hilton Omaha, 1001 Cass St., Omaha $75 | 402-884-5957 https://habitatomaha.org/womenspowerlunch/

May 10 • 5:30 PM – 10 PM BrOWNELL TALBOT GALA Brownell Talbot School Brownell Talbot School, 400 N Happy Hollow Blvd, Omaha $150 | 402-556-3772 | brownell.edu 59

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community CALENDAR

FROM OUR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PARTNERS!

June 10 • 11:30 AM – 1 PM

more

CHILDrEN’S SCHOLArSHIP FuND OF OMAHA 2019 CHANCE LuNCHEON Children’s Scholarship Fund of Omaha

VENTS

Embassy Suites La Vista Conference Center, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista $75 per person ($50 tax deductible) | 402-819-4990 | www.csfomaha.org

Complete information for the following events is available at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com CALENDAR PAGE or each organization’s website.

June 14 • 6 PM – 9 PM

Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at metroMAGAZINE’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

May 10 • 7 PM – 9:30 PM

STrIKE A CHOrD GALA Heartland Family Service

DuELING PIANOS Nebraska Children’s Home Society

Mid-America Center, 1 Arena Way, Council Bluffs $80 per ticket | 402-552-7475 | HeartlandFamilyService.org

Empire Room, 200 S 31st Ave, Ste 4107, Omaha $75 per person; Sponsorship opportunities available for | $1,000 - $5,000 402-819-8792 | www.facebook.com/events/379110435977376/

July 13 • 5 PM – 10 PM

May 11 • 6 PM – 10 PM

Stinson Park, 2285 S 67th St., Omaha Free | 402-415-5751 | http://relay.acsevents.org/

rELAy FOr LIFE OF GrEATEr OMAHA  American Cancer Society

CABArET Child Saving Institute Omaha Marriott Downtown at the Capitol District, 222 N. 10th St., Omaha $175 | 402-504-3664 | www.childsaving.org

FROM OUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

May 11 • 7 AM – 12 PM

DON’T MISS these!

HEArT WALK American Heart Association Stinson Park, 67th and Center, Omaha Free | 402-810-6870 | www.OmagaHeartWalk.com

April 6 • 4 PM – 10 PM BIG BASKETBALL BASH Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Midlands

May 11 • 10 AM – 1 PM HOPE & HEALING ExPANSION OPEN HOuSE Ronald McDonald House Charities in Omaha

UNO’s Scott Conference Center, 6450 Pine St., Omaha $50

Ronald McDonald House Charities in Omaha, 620 S. 38th Ave., Omaha Free | 402-346-9377

April 6 • 5 PM – 9 PM

May 16 • 6 PM – 10 PM

THE HEArT OF CAMP GALA  Carol Joy Holling Camp

PINOT, PIGS & POETS Completely KIDS

La Vista Conference Center, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista $100 | 402-944-2544 | www.caroljoyholling.org/gala

Happy Hollow Club, 1701 S. 105th St., Omaha Patron, $300; Individual, $150 | 402-397-5809 | www.completelykids.org/news-events/pinot-pigs-poets/

April 7 • 12 PM – 2:15 PM

June 1 • 6 PM – 12 AM

2019 INCLuSIvE COMMuNITIES HuMANITArIAN BruNCH Inclusive Communities

JOSLyN ArT MuSEuM GALA  Joslyn Art Museum

Scott Conference Center, 6450 Pine St., Omaha $75 | $100 | www.inclusive-communities.org/

Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St., Omaha $250 individual

April 12 - 13 • 5:30 PM KICKS FOr A CurE Liz’s Legacy Fund

June 1 • 6:30 PM – 10 PM OLLIE’S DrEAM GALA 2019 Ollie Webb Center, Inc.

Marriott Downtown, 222 North 10th St., Omaha Kick-off Party: $125 & $75 All games: | FREE | 402-880-8153 | kicksforacure.org

Hilton Downtown, 1001 Cass St., Omaha $100 per person | 402-346-5220 | www.olliewebbinc.org

April 26 • 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

OMAHA SuMMEr ArTS FESTIvAL

NIGHT OF CELEBrATION CHI Health Immanuel Auxiliary

Downtown Omaha, Mike Fahey St between 10th and 14th, Omaha Free | 402-345-5401 | summerarts.org

Omaha Design Center, 1502 Cumings St., Omaha $100 | 402-572-2722 | http://GIVE.CHIhealth.com/NightOfCelebration

June 7 - 9 • 11 AM – 8 PM

60

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LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GIVING GUIDE 2019!

April 26 • 6 PM – 9:30 PM TASTES & TrEASurES 2019 The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary Field Club of Omaha, 3615 Woolworth Avenue, Omaha

Employee Benefits Executive Benefits ▪ Wealth Management Business Succession and Estate Planning

$100 | 402-898-7536

April 27 • 2 PM – 4 PM CONCEIvE NEBrASKA WALK FOr INFErTILITy AWArENESS

Financial Plaza, Suite 418 9140 West Dodge Road Omaha, NE 68114 402.397.5800 www.swartzbaugh.com

Conceive Nebraska Midtown Crossing at Turner Park, 3110 Farnam St., Omaha $10 | 402-216-1418 | conceivenebraska.org/

May 1 • 11 AM – 1 PM

Our Employees and Our National Alliances – They’re What Set Us Apart.

MEMOrIES FOr KIDS LuNCHEON Memories for Kids Champions Run $75 regular | $125 patron | 402-889-5797 | www.memoriesforkids.org

Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through M Holdings Securities, Inc., a Registered Broker/Dealer and Investment Advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. Swartzbaugh-Farber & Associates, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

May 9 • 6 PM – 9 PM NIGHT OF INSPIrING HOPE GALA Fresh Hope for Mental Health

Make your event a delicious success.

Embassy Suites, 12520 Westport Pkwy, La Vista $100 | 402-932-3089 | www.nightofinspiringhope.com

May 10 • 11:45 AM – 1 PM

Leave all the event planning details to us so you can enjoy spending time with your guests.

AT EASE uSA 10TH ANNuAL LuNCHEON

· Premiere space for up to 500 · Central location with free parking · Exceptional catering that will impress · Professional, experienced sta · In-house audio/visual services audi

At Ease USA CHI Health Center, 455 N. 10th St., Omaha $60, 402-689-7750 | www.ateaseusa.org

Your details are our specialty.

May 11 • 7 AM – 2 PM 16TH ANNuAL WEAr yELLOW rIDE, ruN & WALK

6450 Pine Street 402.778.6313 scottcenter.com

Wear Yellow Nebraska

New Look, New Facilities, Same Great Service

Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum, 28210 W Park Hwy, Ashland $35/40/45 | 402-965-1699 | https://supportwyn.org/16

June 12 • 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM HOPS FOr HArMONy Papillion Lions Club Werner Park, 12356 Ballpark Way, Papillion $50 at door 61

mmag azin e • aPRiL 2019

c o n t in u ed


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The information in this section appears as supplied to us by the organizations presented. ALH Publications, Inc. accepts no responsibility for the accuracy or integrity of any of the information provided.  Please double-check for updated details with event organizers.

community CALENDAR

Learn more details about any of these events by searching our extensive Community Calendar  at metroMAGAZINE’s website:   http://www.SpiritofOmaha.com/Metro-Magazine/Community/Calendar/

save the date

CONNECT with over 100 nonprofits and learn more about their mission and how you can help! Order your copy of The Giving Guide & Event Book 2019 today at metroMAGAZINE’s SpiritofOmaha.com.

June 2 • 8 AM – 12 PM

FROM OUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR AT SPIRITOFOMAHA.COM

OMAHA BIATHLON Omaha Bike Events

WALKS & runs!

Lewis & Clark Riverfront Landing, 345 Riverfront drive, Omaha Pricing varies | 402-346-8003 | www.omahaBiathlon.com

April 20 • 8:30 AM – 11:30 AM

June 2 • 8 AM – 1 PM

uNO CLAuSSEN-LEAHy MAvErICK ruN UNO Athletic Department

OMAHA BIKE EvENTS TO THE TASTE OF OMAHA Omaha Bike Events

Baxter Arena, 2425 S. 67th St., Omaha $25

Lewis & Clark Riverfront Landing, 345 Riverfront Drive, Omaha Pricing varies | see web site for more info | 402-346-8003 | www.OmahaBike.info

April 20 • 10 AM – 1 PM

June 8 • 8:30 AM – 12:30 AM

STrIDES FOr SENIOrS - 5K CHArITy EvENT Home Team

HEALTH WALK FOr EDuCATION ESU #3 - Gifford Farm Education Center

Freedom Park, 51 Freedom Park Rd, Omaha $35 | 402-212-3419 https://runsignup.com/Race/NE/Omaha/StridesforSeniors5KCharityEvent

700 Camp Gifford Road, Bellevue $25/person or $20/each for team of 4 | 402-597-4920 www.facebook.com/events/367067960490036/

April 27 • 9 AM – 10:30 AM

June 22 • 9 AM – 12 PM

D-DAy MEMOrIAL ruN Omaha Schools Foundation

TAKE STEPS WALK OMAHA Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation

Lake Zorinsky, 156th F St., Omaha $25 | 402-980-0554 | https://omahapublicschoolsfoundation.org/

Werner Park, 12356 Ballpark Way, Papillion

July 21 • 8 AM – 11 AM

May 4 • 11 AM – 2 PM

6TH HEAD FOr THE CurE 5K - OMAHA Head for the Cure Foundation

SPrING HONOrS WALK NE Cancer Specialist

Lewis and Clark Landing, 345 Riverfront Dr, Omaha Varies - see website | 314-681-9164 | www.headforthecure.org/omaha

Benson Park Pavilion, 7028 Military Ave, Omaha $25 per registrant / includes a t-shirt or create a team | 402-955-2685 | www.nebraskamed.com/CancerCenter

GOLF outings!

May 11 • 7 AM – 10 AM KEEP KIDS ALIvE DrIvE 25 LIvE FOrWArD! ruN-WALK TO rEMEMBEr Keep Kids Alive Drive 25

May 6 

Skutt Catholic High School Stadium, 3131 S. 156th St., Omaha 35, 402-334-1391 | https://secure.getmeregistered.com/get_information.php?event_id=130814

GOLF OuTING Youth Emergency Services

May 18 • 8 AM – 11:30 AM

FOrE! THE KIDS Children’s Hospital & Medical Center

May 13 

ANNuAL rEMEMBrANCE WALK & 5K rACE Grief’s Journey

May 20 • 11 AM – 7 PM

Miller’s Landing, 151, freedom Park Rd, Omaha 5K Race Early Bird pricing: $28 for adults (ages 19+) | $23 for youth (ages 3-18)

CHILDrEN’S CHArITy CLASSIC Children’s Hospital & Medical Center

June 1 • 8 AM – 12 PM

May 20 • 12 PM – 6 PM

2019 NEBrASKA WALK TO CurE ArTHrITIS Arthritis Foundation

MIDLANDS COMMuNITy FOuNDATION 2019 GOLF TOurNAMENT Midlands Community Foundation

Werner Park, 12356 Ballpark Way, Suite 348, Papillion Free | 402-262-0144 | http://walktocurearthritis.org/nebraska

May 20 • 12 PM – 6 PM

June 2 • 8 AM – 12 PM

rONALD MCDONALD HOuSE CHArITIES IN OMAHA GOLF TOurNAMENT Ronald McDonald House Charities in Omaha

MIDWEST GrAN FONDO Omaha Bike Events

May 31 • 12 PM

Lewis & Clark Riverfront Landing, 345 Riverfront Drive, Omaha Pricing varies. | 402-346-8003 | www.midwestgranfondo.com

BETHLEHEM HOuSE CHArITy GOLF SCrAMBLE Bethlehem House 62

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Cinderella's Rentals Has Dresses at a fraction of the Price! Open for appointments: Wed: 2-6, Thurs: 2-6 Fri: 2-6 Sat: 10-2

E

Taking Clean To The Next Level • Water Damage:

Everything from a major flood to backed up pipes.

• Mold Remediation Services:

Your indoor air quality and your respiratory health are at stake. We’ll get you on your way back to normal and you’ll be extremely satisfied. Serving the Omaha area since 2004.

To book your appointment go to: https://squareup.com/appointments/book/1V3ZZYE67VEWY Dress Rentals for Prom, Homecoming,Weddings, Balls, Gala & More. Plus Sizes 16-28 7631Main St. Ralston, NE 68127

The sooner we get there, the better. Call Extremely Clean 24/7.

Extremely Clean | www.ExtremelyClean.Com | 402.932.3257


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CONNECTING AREA BUSINESSES FOR OVER 40 YEARS

• • • •

ANDY SALADINO EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF AMPLIFY ARTS

CEO NICHOLE TURGEON AT BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE MIDLANDS

TONY AND KATIE DESANTIS, OWNERS OF VITALITY BOWLS AT AKSARBEN VILLAGE

DANNA KEHM, CEO OF POTTAWATTAMIE ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

A YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS:

More than 200 feature stories spotlighting unique local businesses 52 weeks of focus sections with insights from area experts

National columns on trending business and financial topics Profiles of MBJ's 40 Under 40 Award winners

402-330-1760

1 year ONLY $75 SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

1324 S. 119th St.

www.MBJ.com

Omaha, NE 68144


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metroMAGAZINE APRIL 2019  

metroMAGAZINE presents our APRIL 2019 issue online now! metroMAGAZINE is published quarterly by ALH Publications, serving the Omaha/Lincoln/...

metroMAGAZINE APRIL 2019  

metroMAGAZINE presents our APRIL 2019 issue online now! metroMAGAZINE is published quarterly by ALH Publications, serving the Omaha/Lincoln/...

Profile for metmago