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Occhio Magazine

Design and Architecture


Occhio Pi첫


light is evolution In the beginning there was light, and light is evolution. A concept that is with us every day. It is constantly being reborn and will never end. We are fascinated by the concept of allowing people to shape the lightscapes of their personal spaces, using light to enhance their quality of life. Everything is in a state of constant change. Nothing ever remains as it is at a given moment. In order to exist, things must continue to develop. Just like Occhio. Concentrating on one idea and one system gives the product quality a unique depth and level of detail. It is the joy of offering a perfect solution for all spatial circumstances and requirements that inspires us. Constantly – every day.


Pi첫 piano in seamless, piano seamless, piano in, piano

cover matt chrome, chrome, bianco, nero

head matt chrome, chrome, bianco, nero

tube matt white, matt black


Più alto, alto ², alto track, alto ² track

base matt chrome, chrome

head matt chrome, chrome, bianco, nero


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Occhio Magazine

Editorial

Editorial light is evolution.

Dear Reader, As I was realizing my very first »lighting inspirations« in the mid-1980s, I was fascinated by a new technology at the time: low voltage halogen lighting. The dimensions of the light source were smaller, the light itself was more intense, with a precise focus, and the 12 volt technology could be used safely in typical circuit designs. Suddenly new options evolved that impacted lamp and lighting design, and the entire industry experienced a period of rapid change. But then something quite interesting happened: The most successful table lamp of the 1990s was launched, and contained in its large, characteristically shaped head was a traditional light bulb! But the success of Occhio over the past 12 years has been due in large part to the small, bright and easy-to-dim mains voltage halogen light sources used in our products. To this day the seminal coexistence of various technologies continues to influence developments in lighting design. And now the time has come for another innovation as yet another remarkable leap in technology takes place. Everyone is talking about LED. The highest levels of efficiency, long life, minimal heat dissipation, a selection of luminous colors, new options for design: These are just a few of the benefits that this new technology can deliver. We now offer the latest high-performance LEDs, with unrivaled light quality, as options in our Più spotlight series, a lighting system that has been chosen for many impressive applications with great success – as you can see in the new »cases« section of this magazine (see page 58). However, in our feature case study, Titus Bernhard carefully considers all aspects of the lighting he envisioned for a new private home, finally selecting low voltage halogen technology as the appropriate light source for his project: Considering that lamps are switched on for relatively short periods in residential scenarios, the »hard facts« were of secondary importance, whereas the

quality and warmth of the light, especially in dimmed settings, were the decisive factors influencing Titus Bernhard’s ultimate choice. I am convinced that it would be a terrible mistake to employ a new technology merely for its own sake. The real art of lighting design is based on the principle of applying the technologies available so that just the right light source is chosen to match the lighting demands of individual living spaces. And this is done with one goal in mind: Creating quality of life with good light. Our »Smart Source« concept (page 80) represents our unique approach which enables users to choose the right light source for the Occhio system they prefer. And with our »future proof« study (page 52) we make sure that the quality of halogen light will still be available when the next phase of the EnEV (Energy Conservation Directive) takes effect in Germany in 2016. This second issue of our Occhio Magazine introduces you to the world of design, architecture and natural light, also known as the »fourth dimension« of architecture. We would like to give you an impression of how light, architecture and design can be orchestrated to form a holistic ensemble that reflects the desires and imagination of the designer and home owners. Our exclusive case study shows how light can embellish a structure by adding a new dimension. Titus Bernhard’s fascinating villa demonstrates how light can underscore the fluidity of interior spaces and illuminate the home from within. We were involved in the planning from the start so that we could maximize the flexibility of Occhio, which offers a lighting system rather than individual luminaires to achieve just about any lighting effect imaginable.


Editorial

Design and Architecture

Did you know that one of the most spectacular new mosques in Turkey is illuminated with Occhio? In our feature report we take you on a journey to the land where East and West converge – a country that has evolved to become a leading center for design. Our author introduces you to designers, architects and lighting designers from Ankara and Istanbul who have masterfully established a bridge between traditional global cultures. Harald Willenbrock, journalist for brandeins magazine, explains the importance of design and architecture icons. And a portrait of Michael Keller, renowned Munich designer and head of the KMS TEAM agency, completes your tour of the world of design.

I hope you enjoy reading this intriguing issue of our magazine! Sincerely, Axel Meise

PS: Last but not least – we are pleased to announce that multimedia presentations from Occhio can now be seen using one of the most popular technology and design icons of our time: The very first Occhio App is now available for the iPad! Occhio Magazine is published twice a year. We look forward to your feedback, comments and suggestions. Because what would light be without evolution? redaktion@occhio-magazin.de

During his studies in the early 1980s Axel Meise began to make a profession of his hobby: designing lamps and lighting systems. In 1987 this self-taught designer launched his first collection of lamps and continued to successfully enhance his portfolio in the years that followed. Then in the 1990s he acquired a lighting business and focused his attention on planning and lighting design. Together with the physicist Christoph KĂźgler he developed a modular product family of heads and bodies, which was launched to the market in 1999. Occhio has been awarded several design prizes and has become one of the most respected and successful brands of light fittings in Europe.

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List of contents light is evolution.

Design and Architecture 6 – 9 Istancool 10 – 22

  In conversation with designers and decision makers.

  The lights go on in Turkey.

The dreamer who is not in a dream world 24 – 27 The global code 28 – 31 Light is luxury 32 – 36 Case Study 38 – 49

  How architecture and design changed the world.

  Daniel Wingate of Escada in conversation.

  Titus Bernhard re-interpreting classic architecture.

Planning with Occhio 44 – 45 Occhio Più LED 50 – 51 Product News 52 Shortcuts 54 – 55 Imprint 52

Cases 58 – 79

  Professional light concepts – precision in every detail.

  We don’t talk about the future. We live it.

  Future two.

  Occhio news.

  Who is behind the magazine.

  A compilation of exciting Occhio applications.

Smart Source 80 – 81

  Perfect light for every application.

Occhio System 82 – 93 Occhio Più 94 – 100

  The designer Michael Keller and KMS TEAM.

  Product overview Sento, Puro, Divo.

  Product overview.


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Occhio Magazine

Survey

Design and architecture In conversation with designers and decision makers.

Christine Schmid, Head of Department Living, Brigitte Ms Schmid, it is often said that we are being inundated by design. Is that true? Everything that surrounds us is design. Consider industrial, fashion, communication and media design, for example. It is the job of many people to develop ideas and design products. Design surrounds our daily life. And still there are plenty of things that are »not designed«. There is still plenty to discover and to do …

Christine Schmid, Head of Department Living Brigitte www.brigitte.de

Which design pieces have interested you recently? And why? Nothing in particular. However what I do find fascinating are the developments in the area of sustainability and green design. Starting with the materials, the use of technology, production channels, through to marketing. And this is also where the wheat separates from the chaff. After all not everything which has a well-designed tree logo is »green«. Do architects or rather designers currently set trends? In my opinion there is a healthy balance. It makes sense that the architects’ work is not over once they have completed the design of the house, they also give the interior some thought. After all one always notices if a well-designed building was planned down to the last detail. The best thing is to use the synergies between designers and architects. Which contemporary structures did you simply have to see? And why? The Elb Philharmonic Hall designed by the Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron. As I work at the harbor in Hamburg I have the great fortune to be able to witness the development of the structure in the Kaispeicher warehouse on a daily basis. I am fascinated by the unusual glass façade and the roof construction, for example. Progress from the start of construction to now has been very impressive.

The best thing is to use the synergies between designers and architects.


Survey

Design and Architecture

Sebastian Finckh, architect and partner J. MAYER H. Architects, Berlin Mr Finckh, do you envy designers? As an architect I envy the fact that a designer has fewer regulations and standards to deal with when designing. As an artist, nothing.

Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau, designers www.eva-marguerre.de

Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau, designers, Hamburg Ms Marguerre, Mr Besau, can you tell us if you envy architects? We wouldn’t call it envy. There are many areas of design which overlap. Although our tasks are different they include many similar ways of looking at things and challenges: the use of materials, structures and principles – or the relationship between space and object. As young designers we would of course love to have a design become a classic. However the lifespan of products is often much shorter than that of a building, which often dominates the cityscape for decades. Is a chair more difficult to design than a house? That depends on your own aspirations. Both tasks can be very difficult. Whether it is a small product or a large house the challenge lies in the details. The main difference is the feeling of greater responsibility one has for the people who will live and work in it when designing a building. They will find it hard to escape the influence of the architecture, unlike most products. What inspiration do you take from current architecture? We let computer-controlled design processes inspire us. Algorithmic, generative programs are far more common in architecture. A high level of anticipation and abstraction is necessary to develop them. What do architects, in Germany or worldwide, do better than designers? It is difficult to give a general answer: there is good and bad design, just like good and bad architecture. Do designers and architects speak the same language – and does this make it easier for them to overcome barriers? Yes, they do: we speak different dialects, which are mutually enriching.

Is a chair easier to design than a house? Designing is always similarly incalculable, whether it is furniture or a building – but in end effect a chair generally appears to be easier than a house. What inspiration do you take from current design for your work? There is plenty of overlap here, as we repeatedly ask ourselves the question of scale (or lack of it). There are also some designers, who in our opinion work »architecturally«, Konstantin Grcic for example or Arne Quinze. What are designers better at than architects? Partying! Do designers and architects speak the same language? It is like speaking different dialects of the same language and similarly we can understand each other very well if we want to – or use language as a means of dissociation.

Sebastian Finckh, architect www.jmayerh.de

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Occhio Magazine

Survey

Munich. The two of them succeed again and again in daring to try something completely new. Each building is like a prototype where material, form and construction are concerned. Tremendous creativity coupled with curiosity and courage characterizes the two of them. The honeycomb structure, the overall shape and the atmosphere in the arena are absolutely successful: a bowl in which the atmosphere becomes really dense and intensive during a game.

Oliver Holy, CEO of ClassiCon www.classicon.com

Oliver Holy, CEO of ClassiCon, Munich Mr Holy, it is often said that we are being inundated with design. Is that true? Yes, in particular with bad design. The use of the term design has been so much-abused that I can hardly bear to hear it anymore. It should only be used for good design, intelligent solutions, a clear expression of form and responsible use of resources recommended for a product. Of course, this does fortunately still exist, but we are being »inundated« by other things instead. Which design pieces have inspired you recently? Firstly, I am absolutely fascinated by the clear user-friendly design of all Apple products. They are fresh, clearly identifiable, and their use is intuitive almost without instruction manual. In addition, I have discovered the Corallo armchair, designed by the Campana brothers in 2004 for Capellini. This sculpture in space, like lines drawn playfully in the air freehand and then translated into solid material, I find magnificent. Another product I find fascinating: the 132.5 clothing sculptures by Issey Miyake; here three-dimensional Origami is translated in textile materials creating an entirely new optic, which leaves the eye searching. This extremely innovative – and nonetheless tradition-based use of material is simply splendid. And then there’s our Pallas table by Konstantin Grcic. I love the design and simply find it an excellent table with striking proportions. Which contemporary structures did you simply have to see? And why? I simply had to see the building by the architects Herzog and de Meuron for Prada in Tokio. I am enthusiastic about the excitingly new façade of convex and flat sheets of glass. Light is reflected in changing angles and curves – and even some of the inner life filters through to the outside like a kaleidoscope. I also, of course, immediately had to see another building by the same architects Herzog and de Meuron – the Allianz Arena in

Do architects or rather designers currently set trends? That is not so easy to say. What I have noticed is that designers bring themselves into play as architects or vice versa architects bring themselves into play as designers. This leads to interesting new approaches in both disciplines. Each field tries different material or form innovations, which are then tried out in the other metier – and this in turn renews our perception of things. Consider, for example, the design of the British designer Thomas Heatherwick for Great Britain’s pavilion at the Expo in Shanghai or the furniture created by the architect Sauerbruch Hutton for the Brandhorst museum in Munich.

Designers increasingly bring themselves into play as architects – and this leads to interesting new approaches.


Survey

Design and Architecture

Sven-Anwar Bibi, product designer www.svenanwarbibi.de

What is good is often only recognized later. Doris Hartwich, fashion designer, Munich Ms Hartwich, it is often said that we are being inundated with design. Is that true? That is a question of definition. These days everything is design. But good design is rare. And what is good will only be recognized in future. Which design pieces have inspired you recently? And why? Three examples of many: the Occhio series by Axel Meise. I have some of these lights in my showroom, functional, puristically beautiful and highly compatible with my men’s fashions. Then the Vitra Lounge Chair by Charles and Ray Eames. The design which dates back to the 1950s is still fresh. Hard shell, soft core, into which one would like to simply sink after a long day. Finally textile creations by the Japanese weaver Chugai Kunishima-Cobo. Produced by a technique inspired by handicraft. It can be used to make exceptional jackets for men. Do architects or rather designers currently set trends? Architects are responsible for the shell, designers for the interior. The one does not work without the other. Both must be creative and able to work in a team. It is a process of give and take, architecture influences design and vice versa. Which contemporary structures did you simply have to see? Peter Zumthor’s Kunsthaus in Bregenz, so clear and puristic, that it is an objet d’art itself. It makes it really hard for the exhibits to meet the aspirations for art set here. Or the ski jump by Zaha Hadid on Bergisel mountain, Innsbruck’s futuristic landmark. We had a fashion shoot there. It provided the perfect setting for my men’s fashion.

Doris Hartwich, fashion designer info@justhartwich.de

Sven-Anwar Bibi, product designer, Bad Tölz Mr Bibi, what do you envy architects? If I envy architects, then it is the scale of their »products« and the often virtually dogmatic formalism in their designs. Is a chair more difficult to design than a house? What sort of chair, what sort of house? A straight chair is easier to design than an elementary school and a double garage easier than an office swivel chair. Complex design questions emerge in both disciplines – and are answered using different tools, methods and technologies. What inspiration do you take from current architecture for your work? On the one hand I perceive architecture as a surface and use this as a source of inspiration for my work with space, volumes and textures. On the other hand current architecture functions as in interface between the actual state and the vision of urban life. That is worth observing. What are architects better at than designers? Driving Saabs. Do designers and architects speak the same language? Basically no, but they often speak about the same things and sometimes the difference between their languages is only a slight accent.

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Occhio Magazine

Turkey

Istancool The lights go on in Turkey.

Young architects and lighting designers from Ankara and Istanbul have made a pact: They want to mix oriental tradition with western modernism to transform their country into a leading design center for Europe. Even in places of prayer and worship they have discovered the beauty of contemporary lighting design – as exemplified by a new mosque.


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Occhio Magazine

Turkey


Turkey

Design and Architecture

A new generation of consumers who recognize and appreciate excellent design has taken root in Turkey. Residents of Istanbul commute between the European and Asian parts of the city by ferry (left).

» Hüzün « is how Orhan Pamuk describes the Turkish sense of life : It is melancholic. In Istanbul there seems to be no distinction between heaven and earth, especially at sunset. It is eight o’clock in the evening, the busiest time for Turkish merchants and shoppers. People swarm through the labyrinth of the city’s Tünel district, seemingly mocked by the flocks of swallows on the rooftops above, as neon signs glow – some in a heavenly blue and others in red, a color that reminds one of the Turkish flag. Here, not far from the C.A.M. gallery, one of the most exciting forums for young Turkish artists, designer and architect Seyhan Özdemir marches through the office of Autoban, the company she founded in 2003 with her partner Sefer Çaglar. The shooting star of the Turkish design scene wanted to meet us here early this evening for an interview – but in line with the motto of her studio, whose name is supposed to stand for freedom, creativity and fast tempo, the attractive »30 and something« hastily passes us by: »Sorry, change of plans, there’s no time.« Is Ms. Özdemir on her way to her private office, where she frequently works on modifications for her new interior series »The Throne,« with which she once again landed on the short-list of the Wallpaper Design Awards? Or is she heading for her new showroom, scheduled to open next week, at a prime harbor location opposite the Istanbul Modern Museum which houses the first private collection of Turkish art? Whatever the case may be, Seyhan Özdemir gives us a sly grin and says »See you later« while brushing imaginary dust from her sleeve – and zooms out the door of Autoban. What is the secret behind the furniture styled by this secondgeneration representative of young Turkish designers? Why do masses of aficionados from all parts of Europe literally stand in line to meet with her trading partner, De La Espada? Rustic, traditional materials such as wood, iron and tin from regional craftsmen, combined with an international design language that is in sync with the times, does not reflect a sense of contradiction in Özdemir’s furniture, but rather a plain and yet surprising unity with playful oriental ornamentation – the result is a signature look that is easily recognizable. »Here in Turkey cultures blend with each other,« says Özdemir later in an e-mail, »and that is a good thing. It is the same for

people and for furnishings: It is the mix that really makes them intriguing.« A mix that has been quite successful to date: Some 40 buildings and 250 projects over eight years, the world-famous restaurant in the Müzedechanga Calligraphy Museum, the Witt Hotel in Cihangir, the meat packing district of Istanbul, which was included in the Condé Nast Traveller Hot List of the world’s most trendy places – and countless requests to manage the interior design for shopping malls, chain cafés, cinemas and hotels in Hong Kong, Milan and around the world, wherever the fast-paced Autoban studio is ready to do business. »I do not want to include any decorative Turkish elements in my designs just for the sake of making them seem oriental,« says Özdemir, who admires the work of Jasper Morrison and Patricia Urquiola, and whose designs would seemingly suggest that Miuccia Prada had taken an overdose of homeopathic globules while assembling a home collection. Then she leaves her office with a strange twinkle in her eye. From Tünel it is not far to the house where Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk was raised in a large family. As Pamuk writes in his very personal book »Istanbul,« there were one or two pianos on each of the five floors in the house in which he was born, but no one ever played them – there were also unused turban holders, closed display cabinets with rose water flacons, incense burners and a few smuggled toy cars. Lighting designer Ayrım Talu is very familiar with the spirit of the socalled »Pamuk Apart-manı.« »Istanbul was the capital of three empires going back thousands of years – and this is reflected today in the pride of this city. Whenever I start redesigning the lighting for an old home, I usually try to imagine how many different kinds of people lived in the dwelling over the centuries. Sometimes I even imagine seeing one of their ghosts.« We are meeting Talu to talk about design and to enjoy a chilled glass of white wine on the waterside promenade of Ortaköy, just below the classy Bebek district with its Gaggenau showrooms and yacht shops. He is wearing an opened shirt collar, a Gauloise in one hand and sunglasses in the other – he is

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Occhio Magazine

Turkey

A luminaire is like a sculpture – it must always have a meaning.

obviously in a good mood. The glamour of the Bosporus and the muezzin’s call to prayer serve as the backdrop for the meeting place of the young elite in Istanbul – the world’s only city situated on two continents. »Modern lighting design is always conscious of the history of the architecture which it illuminates – and interprets with modern methods.« And to prove that you do not need to look far for historical sites in Istanbul, Talu points to the Çıragan Palace, with its view of Yıldız Park, the former palace garden and hunting grounds of extravagant Ottoman sultans. Today private butlers welcome special guests as they arrive at the palace helicopter pad. This is where the elite of Istanbul’s »European districts« meet – a place with a breathtaking view of the oriental city across the river. Driving through Istanbul with Talu, who founded Zeve – which is among the most respected lighting design studios in Turkey – you feel like the city is one huge web that has been spun thread by thread as Talu describes the projects he has realized. The Presidential Palace of Prime Minister Erdogan in Ankara, the mayor’s guest house in Istanbul, which once hosted Barack Obama – the lighting in these buildings and many more exemplifies the signature design of Ayrım Talu. The eyes of this experienced engineer seem to sparkle brightly as he talks about lighting design and light sources, the advantages of halogen, the apparent hype of LED and his new projects underway outside Turkey – in northern Iraq, for example, where he is designing the lighting for the Sulaimania Medical Centre, a complex that is a combination of spa, fivestar hotel and high-end hospital requiring an overall investment of some EUR 100 million. »A luminaire is like a sculpture. It must have a meaning. It would be a terrible mistake to install lighting without giving it a second thought.« A hospital with exquisite lighting in Iraq – isn’t that somewhat unusual? »Not at all!« Talu is quite familiar with Iraq because of his many business ventures there – but he is breaking completely new ground with the hospital project. »But I must admit,« says the talented lighting designer, »that my profession and the philosophy of viewing the appropriate light as an integral part of architecture has been widely accepted in Turkey, but that has

not yet been the case with our neighbors.« And to substantiate this he tells the story of Hasan Tanık, which is both tragic and beautiful in its contradictions, much like the city of Istanbul itself. As evening approaches, Talu heads for his home in the fishing village of Kanlıca, the new real estate dream of the Turkish elite – and then spends the night dancing in clubs named Sortie, Reina and Cafe As¸ k – until dawn, when his silhouette is liberated from the darkness of night by the first gentle rays of morning sunshine. The story of Hasan Tanık is not set in Istanbul. It is a story from Ankara that reflects how design and architecture of the third millennium have captured the imagination of Turkish society.

Seyhan Özdemir und Sefer Caglar, shooting stars in Turkey


Turkey

Design and Architecture

A new clarity seems to blanket the land, much like sparkling light. Links www.autoban212.com www.saltonline.org/en

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Occhio Magazine

Occhio Puro

Turkey


Turkey

Ayr覺m Talu, lighting designer

Design and Architecture

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Occhio Magazine

Turkey

Hasan Tanık’s story: How modern design captured the imagination of Turkey.

Imam Mehmet Kara

The day when Hasan Tanık was involved in a high-speed collision with a monster truck that completely demolished his new BMW M3, killing him instantly, will never be forgotten by his father. But instead of losing faith in Allah, building contractor Namık Tanık chose to erect a new mosque – directly opposite the Ministry of Defense, one of the most important and singular buildings representing Kemalist architecture in Ankara. Since its completion in 2010, the Hasan Tanık Mosque has become the focal point for both the rich and poor residing in the diplomatic district of the Turkish capital. »Designing the light for this architectural memorial dedicated to the builder’s son was a great privilege and responsibility,« says Ayrım Talu at the end of our encounter on the Bosporus. »The challenge was to satisfy the wishes of the builder, the architect and the local residents with a concept that would appeal to all.« Mahmut Kirazoglu, the first architect of the mosque, had already designed numerous houses of prayer in Mecca and elsewhere around the world. He imagined a singular building that set contemporary accents while still maintaining a classical touch that would outlast any architectural trends or fashions. Thus he entrusted Zeve with the challenging task of designing light to fulfill his vision. The result was demonstrated to us by Mehmet Kara, imam of the mosque in Ankara, and his technical facility manager Erdal Kavaklı. Regardless of weather conditions, just pressing a button illuminates the mosque with a very special light – so unique that is was awarded an exclusive prize as one of the world’s best new lighting designs at a conference annually held in Spain in early June. »In the past,« explained the imam with soothing gestures of his hands, »a large circle of candles was the source of light in the center of every mosque. I particularly like the way modern technology is used here to create modern accents that remind us of traditional candlelight, but with an overall effect that is timeless, classic and elegant.« Then Mr. Kirazoglu serves some sweet mocha and, with a twinkle in his eyes much like that of Talus, demonstrates the various effects and moods he can lovingly create with the mosque’s lighting system. The strange acquiescence that now overcomes us as beautiful light permeates the mosque, and which we have


Turkey

Design and Architecture

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Turkey

experienced on several occasions in Turkey, is what author Orhan Pamuk has described as »Hüzün«: Melancholy, a »state of pale nebulousness that touches the heart.« But the impetus of good taste, along with modernism and its surprising affinity with the rich and diverse heritage of Turkey, instills in us Europeans a feeling that is exactly the opposite of melancholy: Clarity, lucidity, aesthetics seem to blanket the land, much like the light hovering above the dome of the mosque, which Ayrım Talu described as »sparkling« – scintillating, glistening, shimmering, brilliant and evanescent. In reality this is the light that emanates from all the regions in Turkey. You can see it in the eyes of designer and architect Seyhan Özdemir as she hurries off to an appointment, and it is reflected in the beaming face of lighting designer Talu as he contemplates the synergies possible with orchestrated light and darkness. It is the glistening surface of the Bosporus and the first rays of morning sunshine: There seems to be no distinction between heaven and earth in Turkey. And that is what makes for a most beautiful and enchanting experience.

Design and Architecture

Occhio Puro verticale E

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Occhio Magazine

Turkey

Occhio Puro verticale E

Hasan Tanık Mosque, Ankara Inspired by late Ottoman architecture, the mosque is comprised of the main prayer hall, four wings, an entrance hall and two minarets. The prayer hall can accommodate up to 1,500 people. The mihrab was positioned exactly in line with the entrance so that it can be seen from outside the building. The wall calligraphy represents chapters from the Quran. Builder: Namık Tanık Contractor: Sinan Gökdag, Gökdag Construction Architects: Mahmut Kirazoglu, Can Gökoguz Year of completion: 2010

Text Ingo Mocek Photo Julian Baumann

Lighting design The lighting for the mosque is based on the proven and consistent concept developed by Occhio. Puro lamp heads were installed at various positions to achieve optimal lighting effects. The characteristic illumination created with the lens becomes an integral part of the design itself, and there is absolutely no unpleasant glare. Due to their high intensity, efficiency and long life, CDM light sources were used exclusively in these Occhio lighting systems. Light planning ZEVE Lighting

Occhio lamps on the upper floor / in corridors 15 x Puro verticale E, CDM Entrance level /  m ihrab walls 4 x Puro verticale E, CDM Entrance level /  c olumns 18 x Puro verticale E, NV Occhio lamps in the arcades 8 x Puro verticale D, CDM Corners /  c alligraphy 4 x Puro parete singolo, CDM


Art of living. Art of life. www.parador.de


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Occhio Magazine

Portrait

The dreamer who is not in a dream world The designer Michael Keller and KMS TEAM.

»Design is a dinner – or a good conversation«: How the communications designer Michael Keller searches for what is possible in the impossible – and changes the thinking and actions of people and companies.

Everyone who has not had the luck to become an airline pilot or at least a flight controller would like to have a workplace like this. From the desk you look out over 1,500 square meters of hall, a cathedral of grey steel beams and large windows. On the opposite wall, perhaps 50 meters away, there’s a derrick, a last remnant of heavy industry. The workers of the »Deckel« machine works moved out long ago to make way for designers with their silvery shining Macs. The creative heads sit between anthracite-colored rows of shelves, every now and then a head pops up. KMS TEAM is one of the large German design offices, and this hall embodies their aspirations. The members of the KMS TEAM call this vantage point at a lofty height »Bridge«. From here four managers control the Munich-based brand agency: Knut Maierhofer, Christoph Rohrer, Armin Schlamp and Michael Keller. Keller, 47, wears black. Always, jacket, trousers, shirt, scarf and shoes. »Black even at the beach«, a fellow manager smirks. One could take him for an architect of the old school, had the destinctions between genres in communication design not become fluid long since. »Software beats hardware«, Keller is convinced, »and we are software, most brutal software.« And his eyes light up and his voice rises half an octave. Keller is the born presenter. He needs an audience when he develops ideas. »Are you happy?«, Keller asks a group of young designers, who immediately surround him, »are you in the know?« Three teams have gathered in the kitchen, which with its 400 square meters is as large as a canteen. Five women and five men are preparing the presentation of an exhibition stand. Architects, designers, engineers – KMS TEAM assembles mixed teams to yield the unexpected. A few years ago they created a tailor-made rolling exhibition stand for the communication giant O 2, rod-shaped lights pulsed like a cloud above the visitors heads, bright white messages moved across the blue skies. They have just choreographed an 8,000 square meter emphatically austere presence for MAN for the IAA Nutzfahrzeuge trade fair. The intention was to be clear, crystal clear. »Welcome« hung resplendent over the centrally situated service area, »this

visually strengthens the relationship between products and services«, the homepage explained. Cars, cars and more cars. They are the passion of the selfconfessed sports car driver Michael Keller, for whom things can’t move fast enough. He has been driving his Porsche 911 for ten years now. The KMS TEAM has been working for Lamborghini even slightly longer than that, for twelve years. 1963 was the birth year of the automotive legend – and of Keller. Ferruccio Lamborghini und Michael Keller even share a zodiac sign: Taurus. Keller glances at a wall chart almost in passing. »This must be printed in 4C, he says, »so that the bluish cast of magnesium comes off the right way.« Two employees nod. Keller is a perfectionist, a driven worker. His fountain pen lances the next table like a fencing foil. The designer will have to change this too. »The crazy thing is«, Keller explains later, »that I myself would stand no chance of being taken on by KMS TEAM these days. We only employ highly motivated, specialists.« Keller is an all-rounder, a meta-designer, who enjoys challenging his people to tease the best out of them. And if someone is selected from the pile of unsolicited applications that arrive daily, then the new face has to present themselves to the team, with all their strengths and weaknesses. The individual teams then decide if they want him or her and for which task. In many agencies the kitchen and football table are the real hubs of creative value-adding activities. This is no different at KMS TEAM. But what a kitchen they have here: steel profile as thick as a finger, rolled by a boat builder and so precisely machined as if they were intended for a Swiss watch mechanism. Behind the obligatory professional coffee machine there are piles of thick boards, roughly sawn planks as for a Viking ship. Keller proudly shows us the sweetie drawer. A stainless steel trunk full of goodies, candy bars, chocolate, drops – Keller pulls half a candy store out of the kitchen unit. All employees have a key to the hall. They can come and go


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At the moment Keller is working on the largest and greenest skyscraper in San Francisco.

when they want. »And the candy cash is always correct down to the last cent«, stresses Keller. At the moment they are working at developing the largest and greenest skyscraper for San Francisco. And because they are KMS TEAM they are not only interested what the lobby or penthouse will look like and what material will be used for the façades. They also want to understand how best to integrate the building in the city and if possible make friends of the car drivers who will pass by, and incorporate them in the vision of a zero emission building. Impossible? Michael Keller has done away with this word, together with half a dozen other restrictions. He prefers to say: »Let us conquer the world!« On the KMS TEAM website the Managing Partner Creation, his official title, proclaims: »Design has the power to change the thinking and actions of people and companies.« So Keller seeks the possibilities in the impossible. He makes phone calls, delegates, brings people together. The communications designer with an affinity for architecture is a networker without a notebook. »This is my computer«, is how he introduces his assistant Tatjana Mainka. She reminds us of the »24« TV series heroine and computer expert Chloe O’Brian, as she leads us dynamically to the meeting room. On Keller’s desk there are piles of books, notes and newspaper clippings, sediments of creative spring floods. A telephone surfaces like a submarine, long believed missing. The windowsill is reserved for four figures, gifts from friends and colleagues. On the far left a plastic man with an alien sitting in its breast, an allusion to creative processes? Next to it a knuckle duster with a cookie cutter in star form used for Christmas cookies. On the far right two animals, a pig and a cow. »They are supposed to remind me to eat something«, says Keller. For many years the creative worker didn’t have any breakfast and worked through without any lunch. Luckily there are now people like Tatjana Mainka, who make sure that there is a soup waiting for him somewhere.

»I am like a child«, says Keller, »a maniac.« Before he founded KMS TEAM in 1990 together with Knut Maierhofer he studied art and communication design at the Parsons School of Design in New York and won a scholarship to Cooper Union. Before that Keller had applied to nine German universities unsuccessfuly. But Michael Keller did not give up. As he explained at an event of the Typographical Society in Munich his dream was to become a designer. According to the W&V Ranking (advertising and sales) KMS TEAM is now one of the foremost agencies in the world – with more than three hundred awards. »In fact the Munich company now stands for German design, and they want to communicate this promise to the world«, the usually so down to earth Branchenblatt writes enthusiastically. The KMS TEAM has been around for 27 years. Keller appreciates relationships which become richer and deeper over time. He and his wife have been a couple for 30 years and he met his business partner Knut Maierhofer in the first typo class at the private academy an der Einsteinstraße U5 in Munich. They instantly got on well because they were so different. »We can’t understand each other at all«, says Keller, »and we agree on that.« Again a smile flits across his face, when he flippantly says something amusing. »Knut is tenacious, and he would say the same thing about me.« Maierhofer is the one who remains very serious, and Keller is the dreamer who is not in a dream world. Someone who believes in the power of good design, where others would have declined long ago, a fanatic who has the gift of inspiring. »It is a matter of kindling a fire«, he implores. There’s only one snag to so much passion. If Keller is unable to feel this enthusiasm in others he dies down. Silence is not his thing. He was only able to do this as a child, and did so extensively. »I want the world to be the way it pleases me«, says Keller. Waits a moment to see whether his words have been received and then bubbles on. One key word or two, no matter which, and Keller enters the ring. When he talks about assignments he uses words like hunt or prey. It is a game. One which supports 100 people at KMS TEAM.


Portrait

Can design improve the world? An impish grin flits across Keller’s boyish face. »Of course«, he exclaims, »what isn’t design? Design is a dinner, a good conversation.« And sometimes also a product or an exhibition stand, in which at the will of the creative spirits of KMS TEAM the soul of the company throbs. There are few architects who would ever dream of considering an exhibition stand not as portable architecture but as the consolidated spirit of hundreds of people. But Keller does. »If we were really good we wouldn’t be aware of any architecture any more«, is how he ends our conversation and then he pauses for effect: »We would realize something else.« Probably awesome software.

Michael Keller, Managing Partner Creation at KMS TEAM, believes in the power of good design

Text Dr. Oliver Herwig Photo Matthias Garvelmann

Design and Architecture

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Essay

The Global Code How architecture and design changed the world.

Within a few years design and architecture have attained a remarkable status in the fast-paced world of globalization. What’s more, their »codes« are understood worldwide. But who actually profits from this development? This question deserves further examination.

Within a few years design and architecture have attained a remarkable status in the fast-paced world of globalization. What’s more, their »codes« are understood worldwide. But who actually profits from this development? This question deserves further examination. That was exactly the plan devised by the German artist 17 years ago as he went from one cabinetmaker to the other in the streets of Yaoundé. He gave the first man a freehand sketch of a Marcel Breuer tubular chair. The second one received a rough drawing of a Donald Judd piece, and the third craftsman was handed a shadowy image of the famous Rietveld chair. Rehberger had done his best to sketch six iconic chair designs from memory. A few days later the craftsmen had finished their work: the chairs seemed to have a »rough« look, and some of the cabinetmakers had added their own »improvements« (like an additional chair leg) – yet all of the objects were unmistakable representations of the renowned original creations Rehberger had sketched. At that moment, thousands of miles from the famed European design centers, Rehberger discovered a phenomenon that would later influence the evolution of design standards worldwide: the global design icon. Within a few years, design and architecture have emerged as a kind of universal language of globalization, whereby it is difficult to say whether they are among the praetors or profiteers of globalization. One thing is sure: Today their »codes« are understood worldwide. A star architect like Norman Foster, the designer of the Commerzbank Tower in Frankfurt and London’s 30 St. Marys Axe ›The Gherkin‹, works on 150 projects in 22 countries worldwide – all at the same time – not to mention the objects the Pritzker Award winner realizes on the side. A success story like Apple, which is currently ranked as the most valuable brand in the world, would be unthinkable without the unspoken global acquiescence that recognizes the uniqueness of designs by Jonathan Ive. And just as an original Rietveld chair is among the prized objects to be found in the collections of wealthy vintage design aficionados, the inspiration of

that chair’s design is universally understood, even by a craftsman in Yaoundé, Cameroon. How is this possible? Two answers are possible, one idealistic, the other rather prosaic. Idealistically speaking, unique and iconic designs are by nature indestructible. They have an inner strength that shields them from the ravages of time, the influence of geography and the semantics of language – they are impervious and enduring – just like Zaha Hadid’s new iconic opera bunker in Guangzhou is resistant to a hail shower. The prosaic answer is somewhat more complicated. It can, however, be reduced to the following formula: Media, Marques and Markets. And no one understands the many facets of this formula better than Sergio Zyman. »In our free-market society consumers just sit there with a glassy-eyed look, listen to what we are saying in our role as vendors or providers of goods and services, and then they simply ask: »Why should I buy your product?« The is both a challenge and an opportunity for marketing people who can come up with the right answer,« says Zyman, former marketing director for Coca-Cola. Of course it was decades before the classic brand from Atlanta was able to penetrate those markets in the most remote places on earth. Today brands can be established in a fraction of that time. On the one hand globalization has phenomenally expanded markets, but in terms of media they have shrunk at the same time. In today’s global village there are more potential buyers than ever before, and the same is true of the offerings available. So the only way for them to find their way through this chaos is to rely on brands. »Today we all share the same media and trends worldwide,« says Ralph Bremenkamp, »and our chances for designing global products are greater than ever before.« Bremenkamp is the creative director at »frog design,« the German design house that shaped the first Apple Macintosh


Essay

Design and Architecture

Brand classics are found in markets around the world.

Literature: Markus Albers: »Meconomy«, epubli 2010 William Gibson: »Pattern Recognition«, Klett-Cotta 2004 Deijan Sujic: »The Edifice Complex. How the rich and powerful shape the world«. Patmos, 2006 Sergio Zyman: »The End of Marketing as we know it«, Harper 2000

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and provides global enterprises such as Disney, Microsoft, Qualkomm and Intel with corporate design and product branding services. Before joining frog design, Bremenkamp was associated with Ross Lovegrove, one of London’s star designers, and he also handled projects for Chinese appliance vendors who wanted to make their refrigerators, microwaves and washing machines appealing to European consumers. In other words, at the age of 38 he is a global design translator. »Product semantics, or what kinds of emotions or feelings a product elicits from people, has many facets ranging from A to Z, depending on your global perspective,« says Bremenkamp. For example, about 12 years ago he noticed how Chinese marketing directors, creative consultants and designers looked upon the VW Polo with awe because the car, as curious as it may sound, was a symbol of dynamic German urbanity in their eyes. Sometime later, the frog designer witnessed how BMW’s new MINI also took the Chinese market by storm. »The MINI is a very interesting case,« notes Bremenkamp. »In Europe the vehicle is a success mainly due to its retro context, which harks back to the design history of the chic and trendy Swinging Sixties.« In China, however, where Mao’s Cultural Revolution was raging at that time, the 1960s context as we know it does not exist. And yet more than 19,000 MINIs have been sold there. Why? »Because China is predominantly a classic follower culture,« explains Bremenkamp, »the Chinese think that the MINI is a great car mainly because the Europeans think it is a great car. They are amazingly fast when it comes to adopting our sense of design.« In other words, the same design can be successful in various regions worldwide, but for very different reasons. Or a design can also fail based on this hypothesis. In principle the global language of design is composed of a host of local dialects. In Asia, for example, the user interfaces for mobile telephones are much more colorful, pictographic and – at least for most Europeans – much more chaotic than their western counterparts. Bremenkamp offers an explanation for this: »Asians are used to thinking in terms of images – their memory patterns are eidetic.« In Israel, however, posters, shop windows and even street planning reflect configurations much different from those in Western Europe because eye movements and perspectives are influenced by Hebrew, a language which is read from right to left. Instead of »one size fits all« concepts, Bremenkamp advocates what he calls »glocal products« featuring global designs which could be adapted to particular local contexts. Designs that succeed in striking this balance will have much better chances of being widely accepted by consumers. »Each of us,« says Darren Brown, a sociologist for the search engine giant Yahoo, »is a mishmash of greatest hits and niche interests.« That sounds schizophrenic, but it is one of our most elemental human desires. The Eames chair in the office, a Birkin handbag and a New Beetle in the garage all serve as symbols of exclusivity and overtures toward common unity at the same time: Design builds brands. Many people have embraced and internalized the brand concept to such a degree that they see themselves as marques having their own brand design and brand strategy requiring constant

and ongoing revision (author Markus Albers calls this phenomenon »Meconomy«). But this does not just apply to people – nations, regions and cities are doing this as well. The most important tool in such place branding strategies is architecture. Bilbao is the best example of this. Just 15 years ago the capital of Spain’s Biscay Province was one of many aging industrial areas that had seen better times and were facing a bleak future. That changed virtually overnight in 1997 when Frank Gehry’s provocative, glitzy and spectacular Guggenheim Museum opened its doors in the city center. Since then the city with a population of 350,000 welcomes double that number of visitors each year, so many that the airlines had to increase service to the city because everyone was talking about the extraordinary museum. Even today cities around the world are still amazed by the »Bilbao Effect.« Furthermore, signature buildings from star architects Frank Gehry, Daniel Libeskind, Herzog de Meuron and Zaha Hadid, among others, are springing up in depressed regions worldwide, as if UN helicopters were dropping them off like relief packages. As a rule, the desire for icons is strongest in soulless areas abandoned by hope. Meinhard von Gerkan and Volkwin Marg also benefit from this global desire for meaning and attention. In China alone these star architects currently have their 650 employees working on 90 projects, including the complete reconstruction of the satellite city of Lingang with a population of 800,000. »In many Asian countries,« explains von Gerkan, who is an admirer of the Bauhaus style and the Ulm School of Design, »people are unhappy with their own architects because they are poorly trained and seldom distinguish themselves aesthetically.« That is why most of the signature buildings under construction in Asia were designed by western architects. »However,« continues von Gerkan, »there is also strong criticism by many who claim that the work of these architects does not reflect a country’s identity and culture.« For the new parliament building in Hanoi, for example, gmp architects submitted a proposal that was first approved by general referendum, only to be put on ice later – it was not characteristic of the country, officials said. »In Vietnam, with the exception of temple and palace structures, there is no established tradition for constructing multistory buildings – they do not have any examples of their own to guide them,« says von Gerkan. Once he asked the Prime Minister of Vietnam if he could show him an example of a design that was a balanced symbiosis of modern architecture and Vietnamese identity. The Prime Minister replied: »There is no such thing, that’s why we need you here.« It was as if two deaf people were telling each other to speak louder and pay attention. But how can you decipher the identity of a place that you hardly know anything about? Where and how can you find it, when both sides are not speaking the same language, literally or figuratively? And if found, how can that identity be translated into a discrete architectural language of its own? These are the daily challenges facing countless architects around the globe today. They are expected to design a heart for hastily built business districts, to provide a soul for dreary satellite communities, and to invent value-added branding for


Essay

Design and Architecture

investor construction projects. Of course this flatters the planners and ensures that they have plenty of contracts and money, but it is rooted in a serious misunderstanding. It explains why the booming cities of the Middle and Far East are defined by brand new, pseudo-representative »misunderstandings,« in effect mammoth edifices that one could really demolish once they are completed. Meinhard von Gerkan compares these unfortunate architectural blunders with a bad cold – something that is unpleasant, but will soon disappear over a period of time. »Thinking in China has already changed,« says the architect, »away from the soulless glass structures reflecting American corporate architecture that was popular in the 1990s – today buildings in that style are no longer under construction.« If every small town can afford its own Gehry building – like Herford with its 65,000 inhabitants in North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany – the concept of superficial uniqueness will fade away on its own, sooner or later. And that’s fine, because that will leave more room for profound inspiration rather than superficial blandness, says frog designer Bremenkamp. »The desire for products that have a history and a design that is far from superficial and embodies values such as functionality, look and feel, plus materiality, is very evident today,« he believes. The German retailer Manufactum has done well for many years by following this trend. And today even discounters offer bio-food products, showing that the demand for sensible products has spilled over from the premium segment to the volume markets. These developments should also mean that the gap between architecture and design should become smaller, since both disciplines are based on the same values. If they want to maintain their status as global languages, they will have to tell more intriguing and compelling stories rather than shallow tales. The vocabulary will have to be more nuanced, the semantics more subtle and their plots more profound. At the same time their centers of creativity will be broader, with fewer hot spots in Milan, London and San Francisco – imaginative minds will participate in a global network supporting design languages with countless dialects and nuances. That would be one of the best stories that globalization could ever tell.

Text Harald Willenbrock, 43, makes calls with an iPhone, types his articles on a MacBook, listens to music on an iPod, and is »probably just as brand-addicted as anybody else«. His latest creation is not a brand product, but rather a handmade replica of a desk lamp designed by Edouard-Wilfred Buquet in the 1920s. The award-winning journalist from Hamburg is a contributor to publications such as brandeins, GEO and NZZ-Folio.

The desire for icons is strongest in soulless areas abandoned by hope.

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Interview

Light is luxury Daniel Wingate of Escada in conversation.

ESCADA, one of the world market leaders in glamorous evening dresses, is following new paths: with the anglophone star designer Daniel Wingate – and with lights by Occhio, which present the new stores of the ESCADA SPORT line in the proper light. Occhio Magazine spoke to Daniel Wingate about effective store concepts, about light as a source of inspiration – and about German police uniforms.

New chief designer, new light: Escada, still the sixth largest couturier of glamorous evening dresses


Interview

Design and Architecture

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How Occhio and Escada are lighting up Osaka

Daniel Wingate ironically refers to himself as a country bumpkin. Although Escada’s Design Director could hardly make a more cosmopolitain impression, flitting between three continents (Europe, Asia and America) and with four international collections a year. The American was born in Florida in 1970 and grew up with parents who were appreciative of art, Wingate’s mother was an interior designer and his father taught singing at the State University of Florida. As the youngest of four siblings his mother always took him along shopping. One

Divo sospeso, store area in Osaka: Escada Sport in a new light

day, Wingate remembers, he held out a blouse to her: »How about this one, Mom?« Wingate now inspires half of Hollywood with his exclusive evening dresses. Before he joined Escada eight years ago he worked as Chief Designer for J. Crew, Marc O’Polo and Hugo Boss. Wingate appeared for the interview casually dressed in a dark leather jacket and jeans, a grey cotton scarf slung around his neck. Time and again he inserted a fragment of English into his almost accent-free German … you know … .


Interview

Daniel Wingate

The new Escada Sport stores in Osaka and Seoul have just been equipped with Occhio lights; collaboration with other stores of the luxury manufacturer is planned. How important is correct illumination for your presentation, for the staging of fashion in the luxury segment? The right light is extremely important. It is a question of staging the Escada brand and this includes perfect window decoration and store fixtures and the correct promotional films. A coherent beam of light, artistic use of lighting – our customers simply expect this. So in this sense we could say light is luxury – the correct light, purposefully used to stage fashion fittingly, to meet the taste of an indulged clientele exactly. What is essential for an excellent store or shop-in-shop concept apart from effective lighting accents? Local color. Let’s say a store in Beverly Hills should have Oscars in the window when the Oscars are being awarded. And in Munich one has to remember that many tourists come from Saudi Arabia or Dubai – and the store concept should take this into account. But over and above all of these things one should never forget to always include the heart, a good idea or a thought. Pure abstraction is not enough to thrill people, to inspire them. Mr Wingate, what do you find personally inspiring? Light, lightness, colors, materials, prints. I am enthusiastic about Art Basel Miami and at the moment totally furniture-orientated. Furniture, furniture, furniture from the 1940s. At work I always say: conscious creativity. Your hand can be free, but your hand has to know what works and what doesn’t. And your eyes must know what your customers look like, they must always look forward. This would explain how fashion works. But can you look in the future? No, but I think I can relate to people well. I enjoy talking to customers, I’m not a snob. As Coco Chanel said: »Fashion comes from the streets.« And how about that, I just quoted a French designer, we are talking to each other in German

Design and Architecture

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and I am an American. That is exactly what I love so much about Escada: that it is a truly international company. At our presentations there are Japanese, Iranians, New Yorkers and Italians. And they all have different opinions, different eyes. Their skies are different, their light. They even grow up differently. Light and color belong together, they are inseparable. And Escada has always been characterized by its will to courageous colors ... I love colors. That probably comes from growing up in Flo­ rida. The women wear coral, russet or yellow. My current boss says she would like to meet people in those colors on Munich’s Maximilianstraße, but then there is also Rodeo Drive and Miami. People there have an entirely different lifestyle, a different light in which the colors work. How would you describe your fashion style? Classic, but detail-oriented. »Timeless« is very important. »Ageless«, if possible, that is the most difficult thing. A colleague once said, as a designer you must ensure that a mature woman feels young and a young woman »sophisticated«. But with the young woman this sometimes goes wrong because she is a bit too young. Escada still records half of its sales in the USA. Is it an advantage that you as an American understand American women better? Absolutely. Also that I have lived in New York City and grew up in Florida. And it is also an advantage that I can travel,

see people on the streets and in planes. I always bring something back from my travels, an idea of what every woman wants. She certainly wants lightness. When women travel they need slacks, leggings, knitwear, jersey – these all have something to do with lightness. Every woman wants that. Have you ever considered living in France or Italy? Of course, but Germany is great. Sometimes it would perhaps be better to be in France. But Munich is a dream, a bit boring sometimes. But perfectly situated for excursions to Italy, Switzerland, Vienna, Paris and London, whatever. You can be anywhere in two hours. On the weekend I go to Bad Tölz or Dietramszell by racing bike. It’s all so clean, so beautiful and so idyllic. And that is also why I wanted to get away from New York City. Did you already own a racing bike when you worked for Strenesse in Nördlingen? No, unfortunately not. Once the police even followed me to the company grounds because I forgot to do up my seat belt. I said: »Sorry, I can’t speak any German«. And the patrolman was totally out of his depth. Should the German police have new uniforms? Yes, they are awful, the color is so awful. How long would a collection like that take you? Me!? For the police? Two days, I could do that in one day. Five parts. Shirt, trousers, something for winter … What ideas do you have? A different color. Are there still great differences in color between the nations? Colors, one learns in Sweden for example, are extremely complex. Even the basic color is difficult, as it determines what the people in the streets wear and how they react to colors. Think of Swedish red or manor house yellow. Did you know that lilac or purple is a cemetery color in Italy? But regional differences are blurring, the world is increasingly moving closer together thanks to the computer and the plane. Everyone wants the same, but to nonetheless remain individual, and that is very difficult. Mr Wingate, thank you very much for the interview.

Interview Susanne Herrmann, Dr. Oliver Herwig


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Case Study Titus Bernhard re-interpreting classic architecture.


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Case Study

Ground floor living area, Pi첫 piano C, NV, recessed ceiling spotlights, Sento terra E floor lamps


Case Study

Design and Architecture

Titus Bernhard Behind a curtain of light.

Thanks to modern CAD programs, designs are no longer subject to limitations of time or material; more and more buildings can be visualized, discussed and marketed before they have even been completed. To seemingly defy the force of gravity, architect Titus Bernhard also employs computer-supported swiftness, chameleon-like transformations and unbridled playfulness. One year before its completion, a private home in Germany’s Baden-Württemberg designed by Bernhard is already permeated by seemingly realistic light.

»Right here.« Titus Bernhard unrolls his drawing to reveal a truly grand home. »The magnolia tree is here.« You would think that this architect, 48 years of age with a hairstyle resembling Will Ferrell’s, has planned everything around this tree as it stands precisely within the perimeter of home. It seems as if the house is reaching out to embrace the tree. Indeed, explains Bernhard, that is why the old magnolia was replanted there. The builders of the baroque period loved such touches: perfectly staged nature. Then the architect from Augsburg grins: Yes, the owner does plan to have a baroque garden a short distance below the site. Or should one say: below the villa. Because that is what Bernhard has envisioned. The house is shaped like a giant U, in a clear greige, with huge glass walls serving as windows for a panoramic view of the surrounding landscape. Titus Bernhard, a specialist in exclusive residential architecture, shapes his homes as if they were sculptures. Along every step of the way the perspectives playfully transform themselves into new angles and shapes. And the architecture always responds to the environment surrounding it. Bernhard has built a stone house with gabions that seem to encircle a series of houses within, some blending into the landscape, while others appear to form an orchestrated composition of open and protected spaces. The majestic villa sits high upon a hill, with an aura much like a second Bayreuth. The grounds slope downward to the north, east and south. Thus the sun has ample opportunity to illuminate the structure’s corners, edges, protrusions and recesses with dramatic natural light. The house literally absorbs warm sunlight from early dawn until sunset. If this light is too intense, Bernhard has suspended an enormous exterior curtain from a floating beam to form a protective semicircle around the house. With this translucent veil one can precisely choreograph the view from within the house or, conversely, safeguard the inhabitants’ privacy from curious onlookers. The square peg in the round hole Another meeting, just one of many. The casually dressed Bernhard leans over his drawings and starts explaining. He

has half a dozen exclusive projects on his desk – upscale villas in the vicinity of Munich, all commissioned by prominent builders. The architectural features are representative: unpretentious with reserved elegance. Modest, yet incorporating premium, high-value materials as appropriate. »You could call it minimalist,« says the architect, who has a predilection for details. Bernhard is an ardent student of architectural history and never loses sight of its importance for his creative designs. »This house is derived from classical modernism,« says Bernhard, but it actually represents a »further development of the neomodern.« He tries to concentrate on pure form – as much as possible. Every house needs its own theme. And in this particular case it involves the combination of contrasts in Bernhard’s design. The spa and fitness area, hidden underground, represents strength and solidity. The ground level is a reflection of modernism, graced with the flowing curtain. A perfectly illuminated scene, a simulation. If you take a close look at the current architectural world, it seems that this field of design has reached a new level of »techno-creativity.« It has become dematerialized and transformed into virtual images that can be transmitted instantly in the form of bits and bytes to any location in the world. But that is not all: That which was once static is now in constant motion. Landscapes can be fashioned at the push of a button, and cities can suddenly appear from nowhere. Again and again we see perfect images of buildings that have yet to be constructed. These images are so perfect that the actual building itself can only lead to some disappointment when completed. We recognize Hamburg’s Philharmonic Hall with its gleaming serrated style before construction has begun, and the same is true for the Stadtschloß in Berlin. This kind of perfect staging is what gives us a constant and uncanny sense of déjà vu. Virtual architecture offers designers and builders a great and unique opportunity by allowing them to present their ideas and visions precisely – as if they existed in real life. But this technological approach can also pose a huge problem. Images are initially celebrated, but then they tend to fade away and lose their inspiring magic. Thanks to CAD applications, the art of building seems to have

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Occhio Magazine

Case Study

Entrance ground floor, Divo stilo Fw floor lamps, Divo coro sospeso sette H suspended lamps


Case Study

Virtual Architecture – an advantage for clients.

Design and Architecture

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Occhio Magazine

Case Study

freed itself from temporal or material bonds; the computer instantly delivers breathtaking images that can be modified or enhanced at will, without regard for real-world limitations. This was a great advantage in Bernhard’s design, which is a vision of a home that is a stage for its occupants.

Ground floor Scale 1: 400

N

Simple and yet complex »I expect that my architect is capable of designing something that is truly special.« Bernhard, who has been a visiting professor of design and architecture since October 2005 at the HTWG Konstanz, needs that kind of client. He enjoys working for demanding people who want a home that »is made for a particular site« and which can be described as a house that is »something out of the ordinary.« With this in mind Bernhard envisioned a house that resembles a theater stage, a composition of light and space. Brightness must permeate the house. Without light there is no architecture, which is why the architect treats light so carefully, it is a treasure. »We consciously orchestrate the natural light in accordance with the time of day and the season,« says Bernhard. Artificial light also plays a role in these compositions. Bernhard concentrates on special qualities to achieve »good light, to which luminaires can contribute, but as objects in themselves they should not become the center of attention in the scenario.« Which lighting system is qualified to fill this low-profile role? Just ask those designers and builders who discovered Occhio and have been inspired ever since. In the evening the house metamorphoses one final time. The huge exterior curtain now seems like a movie projection screen for a private showing. Light penetrates from the interior, shadows float across the curtain. And there it is again, the magnolia tree with its succulent blossoms, in the subdued light of the evening sky. Who knows, maybe it was this mighty tree that convinced the builder to select this property with its 4,500 square meters as the site for this home. Of course, the simulations which showed what could be realized on a hill graced by a single majestic magnolia were probably quite convincing, too.

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9

Titus Bernhard, founded his own studio in 1995 in Augsburg and has earned numerous distinctions, awards and teaching fellowships in Germany and abroad: Stipend from the Stu-­ dienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes, 1988 DAAD Stipend for the Politecnico di Milano, 1988 Participation in the Internationales Bau­forum in Hamburg, 1998 Kunstförderpreis der Stadt Augsburg, 2004 Participation in »Reserve der Form« in Vienna, 2004 Biennale di architettura di Venezia, 2004 / 2005 AEDES in Berlin, 2005 galerie d`architecture in Paris, 2006 Erich Schelling Medal, 2007 Nomination for the European Putz Award. www.titusbernhardarchitekten.com Links http://www.welt.de/print/wams/wirtschaft/ article12597667/Traeume-aus-Natursteinund-Glas.html

Interview Dr. Oliver Herwig


Case Study

Design and Architecture

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2

1

5

3

Single family home in Baden-Württemberg Gross volume 5.112 m ³ Floor space 954,7 m ² Living space 617,6 m ² The house is comprised of two full stories, a basement, pool, whirlpool, wellness area, sauna, fireplaces, wine cellar, a six-car garage and an elevator from the basement to the upper floors. The heating system is based on geothermal technology. Ground floor 1 Entrance area 2 Library 3 Living area 4 Dining area 5 Kitchen 6 Family room 7 Entrance to underground garage 8 Magnolia 9 Outdoor pool

4

Lighting design The spacious and consistent architecture concept is based on flowing spaces and is accented by the lighting systems, whereby the luminaires themselves play a visually subdued role. The builder selected Occhio Più recessed and surface-mounted spotlights with energy-saving IRC low voltage halogen technology. Decisive factors in this choice were the creation of a warm lighting atmosphere combined with dimming functionality. The concept is enhanced with floor lamps and suspended lamps from the Occhio Sento and Divo series to ensure that the illuminated house design and the light quality is consistent on all floors. Light planning Occhio GmbH with Föll lichtdesign, 89077 Ulm / Söflingen

6

Occhio lamps ground floor 2 1 x recessed spotlight Più piano C, NV 1 7 x recessed spotlight Più piano S40, NV 5 x recessed spotlight Più piano in C, NV 20 x surface mounted spotlight Più alto C, NV Occhio lamps basement (not shown) 48 x recessed spotlight Più piano C, NV 4 x surface mounted spotlight Più alto ² track C, NV 4 x surface mounted spotlight Più alto S40, LED 1 x suspended lamp Divo coro sospeso sette Occhio lamps top floor (not shown) 32 x recessed spotlight Più piano C, NV 22 x recessed spotlight Più piano C, NV 11 x surface mounted spotlight Più alto C, NV

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Occhio Magazine

Case Study

Planning with Occhio Professional light concepts – precision in every detail.

Relux calculation The geometry and light distribution of all Occhio lights can be accessed in Relux. With the help of this light calculation program you can calculate the distribution of light in rooms in only a few steps and then render it for visual presentation. Occhio will be pleased to provide support in the light calculation with Relux at any time. E-mail: projects@occhio.de

General Calculation algorithm used Height of evaluation surface Maintenance factor Total luminous flux of all light bulbs Total output Total output per area (277.96 m²)

High indirect component 0.75 m 0.80 127670 lm 7022 W 25.26 W / m² (10.64 W / m² / 100 lx)

Intensity of illumination Average intensity Minimum intensity Maximum intensity Regularity g1 Regularity g2

Em 255 lx Emin 0 lx Emax 1690 lx Emin / Em 1:--- (---) Emin / Emax 1:--- (---)

Planning data Planning data (polar diagrams, cone diagrams, Dialux and Relux lighting data, and GDL library) for each Occhio lamp / light can be downloaded at: www.occhio.de/en/information/download-area/

120°

150°

180°

150°

W CRI cd K lm

output color rendering index luminosity color temperature luminous flux efficiency

120°

Polar diagrams of Più C HV / NV / CDM 90°

90°

100 60°

60°

HV mains voltage

NV low voltage

CDM metal halide

CRI 100 2800 K 60 W 580 lm* 390 cd

CRI 100 3000 K 60 W 970 lm 660 cd

CRI 85 3000 K 20 W 1000 lm 680 cd

200

300

400

30°

30° cd / 1000 lm

CRI 85 3000 K 35 W 1950 lm 1320 cd

* luminous flux per lamp

Cone diagrams of Più C HV / NV / CDM

1.0 m

2.0 m

3.0 m

Ø 1.7 m

Ø 3.4 m

Ø 5.1 m = 59 %

390 lx

660 lx

680 lx

1320 lx

98 lx

165 lx

170 lx

330 lx

43 lx

73 lx

76 lx

147 lx


Case Study

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Design and Architecture

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5

3

6

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Distribution of Occhio lights / lamps on GF 1 Entrance area: Divo coro sette H suspended lights NV Divo stilo Fw standing lamps NV 2 Library: recessed ceiling spotlights Più piano C, NV Table lamp Sento tavolo C 60cm, NV Standing lamp Sento letturo C, NV 3 Living area: Sento letturo C standing lamps, NV Più piano C recessed ceiling lights, NV 4 Dining area: Più alto C surface-mounted ceiling spotlights, NV Divo soffito sistema cinque G suspended light, HV 5 Kitchen: Più piano C recessed ceiling spotlights, NV 6 Family room: Più piano C recessed ceiling lights, NV; Sento soffito singolo E 100cm ceiling light, NV

light intensity [lx]

100

150

200

300

500

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Occhio Magazine

Living area, Sento lettura E, Sento terra E

Case Study


Case Study

Passage top floor, Più piano C recessed ceiling spots NV, Più alto ² C surface mounted ceiling spots NV

Bathroom top floor, Più piano doppio C NV, Sento verticale E wall lamps HV

Design and Architecture

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Occhio Magazine

Occhio Più LED

Occhio Più LED  We don’t talk about the future.  We live it.

Occhio Più spotlights in LED versions are characterized by an unprecedented quality of light (CRI 95). The high output LEDs are available in four different light colors and their high light output, low consumption and minimal generation of heat are impressive. The for Occhio typical lens optics ensure an extremely high light output ratio. An extremely long service life of the LEDs of more than 20 000 hours supports the high cost efficiency.


Occhio Più LED

Design and Architecture

Evolution Helix in the Occhio store Cologne, dramatically lit from the outside by Più LED spotlights in 4000 K, from the inside in 3000 K color temperature.

Occhio Più LED spotlights Output: Light colors: Color rendering: Service life: Efficiency: Effiziency class: Dimmability:

13 W 2700 K, 3000 K, 3500 K, 4000 K high color CRI 95, high flux CRI 85 > 20 000 Std. High color 55-65 lm / W, High flux 74 lm /  W A with suitable dimmers

Color temperatures With a choice of color temperatures Occhio Più spotlights in LED technology offer a new, innovative option in lighting design. The high color versions (CRI 95) in warm, halogen-style 2700 or 3000 Kelvin are predestined for private environments and representative public environments. Cooler versions in 3500 and 4000 Kelvin are ideal for use in museums, offices and shops and for daylight, artificial light and mixed situations. Color rendering The quality of light perceived is determined by the quality of the visible light spectrum rendered. The unit of measurement is the so-called »Color Rendering Index«, natural sunlight is the reference with a CRI of 100. The latest LED light bulbs used for Occhio come very close to this optimal value with a CRI of 95 and so ensure unprecedented light quality for LEDs. Occhio has thus made LED the light bulb of the future – with unrivaled high quality for all life situations. Exchangeability LED technology is known for its exceptional longevity. It is however evolving extremely rapidly. Occhio Più for the first time a functional and at the same time a sustainable solution was realized: the LED chip can be easily replaced at any time and so always updated thanks to a special retention mechanism (patent pending), which is similar to that of a SIM card.

2700 K

3000 K

3500 K

4000 K

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Occhio Magazine

Product News

Product News Future Two.

soft edge glass The new soft edge glass insert offers an important lighting design expansion. In conjunction with the Occhio lens it still enables a clearly defined cone of light but now with a soft transition. So it provides an important alternative to pure lens optics with sharp contours and the very soft light of the lens with satini­ sed glass. Can also be used in spotlights.

future proof 2016  In this study we introduce you to our innovative adapter solutions (patent pending). With the B15d  adaption of the G9 and R7s eco halogen light bulbs which will also be permitted after 2016, we are ensuring that you and your clients will continue to be able to use the Occhio mains voltage halogen lights without problems alongside the low voltage, LED and CDM versions in future too and will be able to enjoy the unique light quality of these light sources – we call this »future proof«.

Più C lens 80°

Più C lens 80° + soft edge glass

Più C lens 80° + satinised glass

LED CDM NV HV

today

2016 

More information at: www.occhio.de / futureproof

Imprint The Occhio Magazine is issued twice a year and is published by: Occhio GmbH Wiener Platz 7, 81667 Munich

Edited by Martin et Karczinski GmbH Nymphenburgerstr. 125, 80636 Munich Phone +49 (0)89 74 64 69 0 Advertisements +49 (0)89 74 64 69 183

Publisher and responsible for the editorial part Axel Meise Chief Editor and CD Peter Martin Editorial advisor Ingo Mocek Coordination Susanne Herrmann AD Simon Maier-Rahmer Deputy AD Eva Maria Friebel Editor at Large Dr. Oliver Herwig Online editorial management Chris Begusch Contributors to this issue Julian Baumann, Matthias Garvelmann, Andreas Schradin, Harald Willenbrock Advertising Susanne Herrmann Print Color-Gruppe München

Your opinion counts! What do you think of the new Occhio magazine? How about the choice of topics? Are the articles stimulating? What is your favorite column?

We look forward to your opinion: redaktion@occhio-magazin.de www.occhio-magazin.de


Add room for new standards to your kitchen.

The Vario cooling 200 series. The Vario cooling 200 series meets the highest of standards – and creates space for new ones: fully extendable shelves guarantee perfect use of space. The innovative stepped shelf integrates Gastronorm inserts, making efficient preparation, cooking and storage like in a professional kitchen possible for the first time. In combination with exceptionally low energy consumption, the series creates a class of its own. The difference is Gaggenau. Find out more at www.gaggenau.com.


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Occhio Magazine

Shortcuts

Shortcuts Occhio news.

11| 01 One year Occhio store CGN Within the scope of Passagen 2011 more than 400 guests spent a whole evening celebrating the first anniversary of the Occhio store in Rheinauhafen Cologne. As of now the flagship store is dominated by »Smart Source« – Occhio’s answer to the question: »What effects does technological change have on architecture and interior design?«

Occhio at The ARC Show For the first time the award-winning recessed and surface-mounted Occhio Più spotlight series were presented to a specialist audience in Great Britain. Lighting planners and architectural offices were enthusiastic about the exceptional design of the exhibition stand concept at the ARC Show in London.

11| 02 Occhio at EuroShop in Düsseldorf Every three years the most important manufacturers of shop fittings and exhibition stands from all over Europe and the rest of the world present themselves at Euroshop, the innovative large trade fair in Düsseldorf. Occhio was represen­ ted for the first time in 2011 with an impressive stand. Its sophisticated Più family enjoyed great interest from the international expert audience. On the stand which measured sixty square meters the Occhio Helix was for the first time presented exclusively in the latest high color LEDs in different light colors. The unique combination of design and forward-thinking technology underlines the unique status of Occhio in the sector of professional lighting.

Occhio store CGN Anna-Schneider-Steig 8–10, 50678 Cologne-Rheinauhafen Phone +49-221-277297-0 www.occhiostore.de  / cgn opening hours: Tue – Fri 10 – 19, Sat 10 – 16

11| 03 Occhio at Wohnen & Interieur in Vienna Occhio presented its spotlight series Più for the first time at a consumer fair. The exceptional stand design fascinated the expert audience and the extremely interested consumers, who were able to obtain comprehensive information about the modular lighting system on an area of about 40 m  ² . With about 80,000 visitors Wohnen & Interieur is Austria’s largest con­ su­m er fair for the latest home furnishing trends. Exhibition stand at Wohnen & Interieur in Vienna: exceptional stand design for a contemporary product.

The new Più Product Book The Più Product Book presents all of the facts about the multifunctional spotlight series for private and professional environments in over ninety pages: all of the important news on light colors, color rendering, replaceability and the »Smart Source« concept: Plus a compendium which includes efficiency comparisons, cost model calculations, wiring diagrams and all possible configurations of Occhio Più.

Occhio stand at Wohnen & Interieur in Vienna: exceptional stand design – exceptional products


Shortcuts

Design and Architecture

New Occhio Points of Sale in the first half of 2011.

11| 05 Architect @ Work 2011 A@W is an impulse-giving total event exclusively for architects, engineering offices, interior designers, furnishers and other clients with a focus on product innovations. Occhio will of course be present here, too, with its own impressive exhibition stand: 2011 in Kortrijk and Liège, Belgium and Lyon, France. Awards for Occhio The Occhio fair presence at Light +  Building 2010, which visualized »One Source – One System« using an integrated waterfall, won the coveted iF Communication Design Award 2011. In addition the Occhio Magazine won the BCP Award, Best of Corporate Publishing, in silver for the current calendar year.

11| 06 The Occhio iPad app The world of Occhio in an app: Interested in navigating easily through the complete portfolio of Occhio – anywhere in the world? Looking for inspiration or information on product specifications and our innovative »Smart Source« system? Then the new iPad app offers you unlimited multimedia and interactive options. You will always have the latest ­Occhio technology to hand and will be able to navigate intuitively through the world of good light. Product movies, high-quality ima­ gery and all the options of vertical and horizontal navigation round off the product. Occhio – because only a highly innovative and contemporary presentation matches the future-proof and really well thought out lighting system.

» Occhio lounge volume three « The »Occhio lounge volume three« CD will be available from your Occhio retailer at the end of July. 14 songs for relaxation and wellbeing await you. Enjoy it with all your senses and look forward to summer. As long as stocks last.

Germany Beckhoff, Verl Detlef Coldewey, Westerstede Held Wohnkomfort, Krefeld Inform Einrichtungen, Lübeck IQ Licht + Lichthaus, Oberhaching Lampenfieber, Aachen Lichtbogen Wohn- u. Objektbeleuchtung, Wuppertal Lichtmanufactur, München Lucente – Die Lichtidee, Sittensen Lumoplan, Berlin Magazin Klaus Wolter, Köln MM Leuchtenland, Gelsenkirchen Molitors Einrichtungshaus, Ratingen Novalicht, Grünwald Objekte Licht & Raum, Hamburg Tendenza, Fürth TK 33, München Wilhelm van Dorp, Bonn Wohnform, Konstanz Worldwide Cilo Design, Zutphen Helle, Novara Le Vele, Tortona Lumidee, Sint-Truiden Lichtfactor, Feldkirch Lichthuis 't Spectrum, Ieper Light-Unit, Heeverlee Limone Illuminazione, Lecce Luceled Pro, Palermo Nanu Licht nach Maß, Wien Puntoluce, Bergamo Rossi, Lugagnano Toen Verlichting, Rotterdam Versteeg Licht & Interieurstudio, Haarlem XAL, Graz

Occhio studio of one of our Occhio retailers.

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Cases 58 – 79  

A compilation of exciting Occhio projects.

   

Smart Source 80 – 81  

Perfect light for every application.

   

Occhio System   82 – 93

Product overview Sento, Puro, Divo.

   

Occhio Più 94 – 100  

Product overview.


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Occhio Magalog

Cases

Private Private apartment, Munich

Sento verticale E,

HV


Cases

Pi첫 piano C,

HV

Occhio Magalog

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60

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Private Private apartment, Munich

Divo sospeso G / H,

HV


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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62

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Private  Penthouse, Munich

Più piano C,

LED  Sento lettura C,

NV


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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64

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Private  Impressions

Sento verticale D,

HV  Sento terra E,

HV


Cases

Divo stilo Fn,

Divo sospeso G,

NV  Divo verticale Fw,

HV

NV  Più piano doppio C,

NV

Occhio Magalog

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Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public  Nektar Grill, Munich

Divo sospeso G,

HV


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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68

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public  Jeans Only, Salzburg

Più piano doppio C,

LED


Cases

Pi첫 piano doppio C,

Pi첫 alto C,

CDM

LED

Occhio Magalog

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70

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public Wasserkirche, Zurich

Sento verticale E,

CDM (customized bodies)


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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72

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public University, Zurich

Puro soffitto due E,

CDM


Cases

Puro parete singolo E,

Puro soffitto due E,

CDM

CDM

Occhio Magalog

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74

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public  Hotel »Innside«, Dresden

Divo sospeso G,

HV


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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76

Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public Porsche Design kitchen showroom, Luxembourg

Più piano C,

LED

Sento filo singolo E,

HV  Più piano in C,

LED  Più alto C,

LED


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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Occhio Magalog

Cases

Public Impuls Arena, Augsburg

Sento faro doppio C,

CDM  Sento faro C,

CDM  Sento filo singolo C,

HV


Cases

Occhio Magalog

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Smart Source Concept

Occhio Magalog

Smart Source perfect light for every application Occhio stands for intelligent lighting design, which can be perfectly harmonized to meet individual needs and spatial requirements. With the »Smart Source« concept Occhio offers the optimal light source for almost any application taking qualitative aspects like quality of light, luminosity, color temperature and controllability into account. Thanks to the use of the latest technologies these no longer conflict with quantitative aspects like efficiency, service life and costs. For us intelligent lighting design means combining the highest quality of light with the lowest possible use of energy. You will find more information and animations on our »Smart Source« concept in our new Occhio App for the iPad (available from the App  Store).

  HV

  LED

Mains voltage halogen light sources G 9 and B15 d in different output ratings in the latest energy- saving Xenon technology. To achieve a warm, dimmable light atmosphere these bulbs are particularly suitable for general and accent lighting in a private environment (approx. 17 Lumen / Watt, 2800 Kelvin, 2 000 hours service life, dimmable, energy class C).

The replaceable high output LEDs used in Occhio Più combine   the highest quality of light and light output with best efficiency and service life. The high color versions with a CRI of 95 are available in four color temperatures (2700 K, 3000 K, 3500 K, 4000 K). A high flux version (CRI 85, 3000 K) with approxima­ tely 25 % higher light output is also available (13 W, 700 mA, high color 55 – 65 lm / W, high flux 74 lm / W, > 20 000 hours service life, dimmable with suitable driver, energy class A).

  NV

  CDM

Low voltage halogen light sources GY 6.35 in IRC technology are perfectly suited for targeted lighting in private and professional environments thanks to their brilliant, but warm light (approx. 28 Lumen / Watt, 3000 Kelvin, 4 000 hours service life, dimmable, energy class B).

CDM metal halide light sources GU 6.5 / G 8.5 are ideal for professional environments thanks to their brilliant, perfectly focusable light, their high light yield, efficiency and service life (approx. 90 Lumen / Watt, 3000 Kelvin, 12 000 hours service life, not dimmable, energy class A).

Efficiency

Lifetime

HV

HV

NV

NV

  not dimmable   dimmable 

LED HC CDM LED HF

CDM

lm / W

LED

20

40

60

80

100

hrs m

5.000

10.000

15.000

20.000

25.000

30.000

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Occhio Magalog

Occhio System

Occhio System product overview Our mission: To enable people to create the › lightscapes ‹ of their personal spaces. Our tool: a modular lighting system consisting of head and body. Thanks to its wide range of options the Occhio concept enables comprehensive design in terms of material esthetics, design and quality of light. From the accentuation of individual objects to the atmosphere in the rooms of a whole building: The Occhio system with its three product lines Puro, Sento and Divo is conceived as a multifunctional lighting tool. It combines light, interior design and architecture at the highest level.

Sento

body

head

Occhio Sento offers the unique option of changing lighting effects thanks to the use of different light components.   A well conceived mechanism makes changing the inserts as easy as changing a CD. Five different color filters enable   you to create atmospheric mood lighting.


Occhio System

Puro

Occhio Puro creates impressive lighting solutions thanks to its unique modularity. Nine rotatable reflector heads, which can be easily replaced thanks to our simple plug-in mechanism, enabling special lighting effects to be created with a minimum of fuss. The glare-free lens optics and the individually determinable control of the ratio of direct to indirect lighting ensure perfect lighting comfort.

Occhio Magalog

Divo

Occhio Divo (Italian »the divine«) stems from the idea of creating a new form of sensuality. A glass ball – in brilliant, clear optics or with a satinised surface – ensures an   effortless floating lightness. Eight exchangeable reflectors determine the lighting effects. Occhio Divo defines a new quality of the interplay of functionality, lighting comfort and design.

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Occhio Magalog

Floor and table lamps

floor and   table lamps Occhio floor and table lamps unite the highest quality of light with independent optics. The changeable tilt of their bodies is characteristic. Control is easy via the elegant Occhio controller, on request supplemented by the innovative sensor pad. Occhio terra offers even greater control comfort: the two lighting heads can be independently switched or dimmed. Floor and table lamps are available in chrome or chrome matt, the Sento heads also in bianco (white) or nero (black). The bases are available in a choice of colors with optional rotating function. All lights are dimmable via the Occhio controller. surfaces  

head body base

matt matt chrome black 

chrome bianco nero

 *

 *

* o nly available for Sento

Sento

Sento tavolo

Sento lettura

Sento terra

60 W, NV   60 / 80 cm

60 W, NV 125 / 160 cm

150 W, HV   180 cm

additional images p. 25

additional images p. 62

additional images p. 64


Floor and table lamps

Sento terra E

Occhio Magalog

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84

Occhio Magalog

Puro lettura E

Divo sogno H

Floor and table lamps


Floor and table lamps

Puro

Divo

Occhio Magalog

Puro tavolo

Puro lettura

Puro terra

60 W, NV   60 / 80 cm

60 W, NV 125 / 160 cm

100 / 150 W, HV 180 cm

Divo sogno

Divo tavolo

Divo stilo

Divo lettura

Divo terra

60 W, HV 45 cm

60 W, NV 60 / 80 cm

60 W, NV 135 / 160 / 185 cm

60 W, NV 125 / 160 cm

70 W, HV 180 cm

additional images p. 65

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Occhio Magalog

Wall lamps

wall lamps

Occhio wall lamps are a diverse and at the same time unique interpretation of the Occhio idea. Occhio parete is available in singolo or doppio versions depending on the amount of light required. Occhio verticale embodies the Occhio principle in a minimalist form. Here the focus is on the lighting effect, the   lamp creates spectacular effects on the wall. In Occhio letto the   body is horizontally pivotable which increases the individual flexibility of the light. Wall lamps are available in chrome or chrome matt, the Sento heads also in bianco (white) or nero (black). Equipping with Eco mains voltage halogen bulbs (class C) ensures a pleasant   color of light; the lamps are easily dimmable and efficient.   All models are alternatively available as low voltage (class B) or CDM  metal halide (class A) versions. surfaces  

head body

matt chrome bianco nero chrome 

 *

 *

* o nly available for Sento

Sento

Sento verticale

Sento letto

Sento parete singolo

Sento parete doppio

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV   20 / 30 cm

60 / 70 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

additional images p. 58, 64


Wall lamps

Sento parete doppio E

Occhio Magalog

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86

Occhio Magalog

Puro letto E, Puro verticale E

Divo letto C

Wall lamps


Wall lamps

Puro

Puro verticale

Puro letto

Puro parete singolo

Puro parete doppio

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV, 20 / 30 cm

60 / 70 W, HV 20 / 30 /   40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

additional images p. 20, 73

additional images p. 19 –  22

Divo

Occhio Magalog

Divo verticale

Divo letto

Divo parete singolo

Divo parete doppio

60 / 70 W, HV   20 / 30 cm

60 / 70 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 W, HV 20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

additional images p. 65

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Occhio Magalog

Ceiling lamps

ceiling lamps

Occhio soffitto ceiling lamps offer individual lighting solutions for a wide range of applications. Graded lengths and the pivotability of the bodies enable the ideal positioning of light sources. The 360° rotatability of the Occhio faro ceiling spotlights is most impressive and enables them to reach any point in the room. Occhio soffitto ceiling lamps are available in chrome or chrome matt, the Sento heads also in bianco (white) or nero (black). The bodies equipping with Eco mains voltage halogen light bulbs (class C) ensures a pleasant color of light, which is easily dimmable and efficient. All models are alternatively available as low voltage (class B) or CDM metal halide (class A) versions. surfaces  

head body

matt chrome bianco nero chrome 

 *

 *

* o nly available for Sento

Sento

Sento faro

Sento soffitto singolo

Sento soffitto doppio

Sento soffitto due

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  10 / 20 / 30 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 cm

additional images p. 78


Ceiling lamps

Sento soffitto singolo E

Occhio Magalog

89


88

Occhio Magalog

Puro faro singolo C, Puro lettura C

Divo verticale A, Divo sogno A

Ceiling lamps


Ceiling lamps

Puro

Divo

Occhio Magalog

Puro faro

Puro soffitto singolo

Puro soffitto doppio

Puro soffitto due

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  10 / 20 / 30 / 60 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 /   150 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 cm

Divo verticale

Divo faro

Divo soffitto singolo

Divo soffitto doppio

Divo soffitto due

60 W, HV  20 / 30 / 40 / 60 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  10 / 20 / 30 / 60 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 cm

89


90

Occhio Magalog

Suspended lamps

suspended lamps

Occhio suspended lamps are intended for table lighting and   for rooms with high ceilings. Occhio filo appears to float in the room thanks to the minimalistic design of the light body. Occhio soffitto due is ideal for long and extendable tables. Occhio sistema translates the Occhio idea for a new dimension. Suspended lamps are available in chrome or chrome matt,   the Sento heads also in bianco (white) or nero (black). Equipping with Eco mains voltage halogen light bulbs (class C)   ensures a pleasant color of light, which is easily dimmable   and efficient. All models are alternatively available as low voltage (class B) or CDM  metal halide (class A) versions. surfaces  

head body

matt chrome bianco nero chrome 

 *

 *

* o nly available for Sento

Sento

Sento soffitto due

Sento filo singolo

Sento filo doppio

Sento sistema

60 / 70 / 100 / 150 W   HV, 80 / 100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W   up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W   up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV 125 / 200 cm

additional images p. 76, 78


Suspended lamps

Sento verticale D, Sento filo singolo E

Occhio Magalog

91


90

Occhio Magalog

Puro faro singolo C, Puro sistema quattro C

Divo sospeso H

Suspended lamps


Suspended lamps

Puro

Puro soffitto due

Puro filo singolo

Puro filo doppio

Puro sistema

60 / 70 / 100 / 150 W   HV, 80 / 100 / 125 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV   up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV   up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 / 100 W, HV   125 / 200 cm

Divo soffitto due

Divo sospeso

Divo filo doppio

Divo sistema

60 / 70 W, HV  30 / 40 / 60 / 80 /   100 / 125 cm

60 W, HV  up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  up to 350 / 700 cm

60 / 70 W, HV  125 / 200 cm

additional images p. 73

Divo

additional images p. 34 –  36,   60, 65, 66, 74,

Occhio Magalog

91


92

Occhio Magalog

Lighting effects Occhio System

Occhio System lighting effects Occhio lamps offer impressive lighting solutions thanks to their unique modularity. Occhio Puro alone offers a choice of nine different rotatable reflector heads which are very easy   to exchange. The glare-free lens optics and the individually determinable control of the ratio of direct to indirect lighting ensure powerful, effective and fully flexible lighting comfort. In addition Occhio Sento offers the option of equipping the re­ flec­tor head with different light components and color filters. These inserts can be exchanged at any time – a virtual »system within a system«. In Occhio Divo, the »divine«, eight interchangeable reflectors determine the effect of the light and in interplay with either a brilliantly clear or a satinised surface of the glass ball redefining floating lightness and classic design.

body

Sento

head

insert

Sento inserts

color filter

satinised   glass

soft edge glass

Sento A

Sento B

Sento C

Sento D

Sento E

filter red

filter green

filter blue

filter yellow

filter magenta


Lighting effects Occhio System

body

Puro

Divo

head

Puro A

Puro B

Puro C

Puro D

Puro P

Puro Q

Puro T

Puro U

body

Occhio Magalog

head

Puro E

reflector

Divo A

Divo B

Divo C

Divo D

Divo E

Divo A

Divo F w

Divo G

Divo H

Divo Fn

93


94

Occhio Magalog

Occhio Più

Occhio Più product overview The external form communicates the inner values. The love of detail and the delight in perfect functionality are immediately apparent when one comes into contact with Occhio Più. Occhio Più lights are manufactured from selected surface-processed materials like aluminum, brass and steel. The lighting components used are high quality optical lenses and specially treated glass. All working toward the great objective: a unique quality experience.

Più piano in seamless

The Più piano in spotlight, which is seamlessly recessed in   the ceiling, can pivot up to 20 degrees and is freely rotatable which enables precise lighting for each environment and the actual light source remains almost invisible. Choose between black and white tubes according to ceiling color to support this impression.

Più piano

There are several options in the surface of flush-mounted Più piano spotlights (chrome matt, chrome, white or black). They can be perfectly integrated in any environment – even under challenging structural conditions. The spotlights are of course freely rotatable and can pivot up to 30 degrees.


Occhio Più

Più alto

The Più alto surface-mounted spotlights, fully rotatable and can pivot up to 45 degrees, can be used as small ceiling spotlights in mains voltage halogen directly connected to the power supply. With a ballast integrated in the ceiling the   other lighting technologies can also be used.

Occhio Magalog

Più alto ²

If only one ceiling outlet is available for the connection of   a light Più alto ² with LED technology, for example, it is nonetheless possible thanks to surface-mounted spotlights in a high-quality and compact casing with an integrated ballast. In other respects Più alto ² convinces thanks to the same product features as Più alto.

95


96

Occhio Magalog

Recessed spotlights

recessed spotlights

The unique modular concept and wide range of applications of the multifunctional recessed spotlight series Occhio Più piano for private and professional environments are most impressive. In particular for Più piano different versions are available for almost any recessed lighting situation. The seamless versions are recessed flush with the ceiling and their height can be precisely adjusted. Exchangeable cover rings offer exciting combination options in Più piano. All Più spotlights can pivot up to 45 ° (Più piano: 30 °; Più piano in: 20 °) and are freely rotatable, which enables exact positioning of the lighting effect. You can of course choose from four light sources: mains voltage halogen, low voltage halogen, metal halide halogen and LED. surfaces  

matt chrome bianco nero chrome

head tube cover *

matt white

matt black 

* o nly available for Sento

Più piano seamless

Più piano in seamless

Più piano seamless

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø tube 132 mm

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø tube 132 mm ø head 124 mm

additional images p. 77

additional images p. 62


Recessed spotlights

Pi첫 piano C

Occhio Magalog

97


96

Occhio Magalog

Più piano C

Più piano alto C doppio S10 / S40

Recessed spotlights


Recessed spotlights

Più piano

Occhio Magalog

Più piano in

Più piano

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø tube 132 mm

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø tube 132 mm ø head 124 mm additional images p. 59, 76

97


98

Occhio Magalog

Surface mounted spotlights

surface mounted   spotlights The Più lighting system in the alto mounting version consists of surface-mounted spotlights and and track spotlights. The flat Più alto spotlights in the mains voltage version can be connected directly to 230 volt mains voltage. External ballasts   must be installed nearby for the LED, low voltage and CDM versions; for the high Più alto ² spotlights the ballast is already integrated in the one box design. But no matter which version you choose – you can always be sure of one thing: Più alto enables a suitable mounting solution for all possible applications of holistic lighting design from an individual room to an entire building. surfaces  

head base

Più alto

matt chrome bianco nero chrome 

Più alto

Più alto ²

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø head 124 mm   ø base 83 mm

HV / NV / CDM / LED  ø head 124 mm   ø base 83 mm

additional images p. 50, 69, 77


Surface mounted spotlights

Pi첫 alto C, Divo lettura C

Occhio Magalog

99


98

Occhio Magalog

Più alto ² track S40

Surface mounted spotlights


Surface mounted spotlights

Più alto track

Occhio Magalog

Più alto track

Più alto ² track

HV  ø head 124 mm

NV / CDM / LED  ø head 124 mm

99


filter red green blue yellow magenta

glass satinised soft edge

Occhio tool for an easy exchange of the inserts


spot reflector reflector 10 º reflector 20 º reflector 40 º soft edge glass anti glare ring

optical lenses spot lens lens

version B satinised glass HV / NV /  CDM / LED

C

S40 LED

S10 / S20 / S40

lens

double lens

HV / NV /  CDM / LED

LED

spot reflector/ soft edge glass / anti glare ring NV / CDM

optional B / C / S color filter

C

C

satinised glass

soft edge glass


100 Occhio Magalog

Lighting effects Più

Occhio Più lighting effects Occhio Più recessed and surface-mounted spotlights feature components that can be combined and interchanged to offer maximum light quality along with the greatest possible flexibility. In version B satinised diffusing glass ensures consistent light distribution. The characteristic optical lens (version C) is completely glare-free and sets clearly contoured accents. In the LED version an additional internal lens can be used to concentrate the light to 40° (S 40 LED). Spot reflectors are available for the halogen and CDM light sources in angles of 10°, 20° or 40°. All versions can be optionally fitted with interchangeable diachronic color filters. In the C and S version a soft edge insert can be used for softer transitions, or satinised glass to expand the light beam (not in combination with color filters).

Più C  lens 80°

Più C  lens 80° + soft edge glass

Più C  lens 80° + satinised glass

Più S 20  reflector 20°

Più S 10  reflector 10°

Più S 40 LED  double lens 40° Più S 40  reflector 40°

Più B  satinised glass

filter red

filter green

filter blue

filter yellow

filter magenta


www.occhio.com


EUR 8,–


Occhio Magazine Issue 02