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constructions in which we obstinately take refuge in order to survive and reflect? Habitat and environment, display of power or stronghold of privacy, architecture —which other artistic fields have come to reconsider— has generally aroused considerable interest. And in the specific case of our artist, Enric Mestre, it is, much more than a fleeting symbolic motif. It is, in fact, an extreme obsession and an objective always sought through ceramic language and investigation. But aside from this notable predominance of rationality, the poetry of forms, textures and suggestions of color is unanimously articulated and dwells with clear appeal and intensity in Enric Mestre’s sculptures, always surrounded by a certain amount of mystery and symbolic power.

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Geometry, then, poetic and enigmatic, capable of uniting the architectural roots, the sculptural rotundity and the spectacular expressive power of spaces loaded with silence and open to human reflection. Such would be —in our opinion —a schematic defining outline referring directly to his work, as we can see in the selective show for which this catalog has been made. We shall have to wait, perhaps for some other time, for an exhibition to be organized or a book to be published comparing his paintings and sculptures, meticulously accompanied by his drawings and models; an occasion for his monuments and public works, which characterize our cities and landscapes, to be specifically studied as well. But that is an entirely different temptation, which shall have to wait along with so many other latent projects. III. SECOND REFLECTION: IMAGINARY CONSTRUCTIONS AND GEOMETRIES. Between sight and touch, Enric Mestre’s ceramic sculptures appear to us, in their strict constructivism, perhaps increasingly —with their drastic, deliberate formal simplicity— surrounded by a very mysterious, seductive aura. We might say that we never quite get used to them, because their powerful presence always draws us in and traps us, while respectfully keeping us

at a calculated distance. We might even say that we often have a hard time differentiating / remembering them, beyond the immediate comparative visualization of their forms. Because Enric Mestre doesn’t usually “name” his works, as do most artists, giving them titles and allowing for semantically descriptive or merely suggestive/connotative references through words. The techniques and materials used, along with the dimensions and year produced —noted on exhibition cards or in the captions of book illustrations— are the only clues we have to make the by no means easy identification of his works, when we study and discuss them. This is precisely the bare, solitary distance required by the complicit eye, in an isolationist way, alone with the work, and this is also the ambiguous proximity required by the recalcitrant hand that measures and caresses its skin. How many times have we run our fingers over the surfaces of the fantasy architectures suggested in each of Enric Mestre’s impressive works, running our fingertips over the meticulous, controlled relief of their textures —grogged stoneware and engobe— while our eyes confirm the perfection of their silhouette and the solid solemnity of their volumes? How many times have we walked around them, observing them from as many points of view as possible, as if to verify —more decidedly and carefully— the power of their presence and thus be in a much better position to confirm the scope of the singular mystery that seems to flow, intermittently, from their disquieting spaces? Mestre’s sculptures do not have pedestals. They have no need for them; in fact, they would be superfluous. If the pieces were displayed on a plinth or shared table, it would be a question of building a stage, of calculating the appropriate space and height for the viewer and not so much for the piece, which needs and deserves to be shown in total silence and visual solitude. Each sculpture requires its ritual, its spatiality and its isolation. That’s why Mestre, like so many other contemporary sculptors, has opted to accentuate the powerful presence of his work without any bases / pedestals, which would always be complementary, responding to the demands of the moment. For most 20th-century sculptors, this fundamental reinterpretation / questioning of the

Profile for Javier Mestre

Enric mestre; vint peçes per a un museu  

Catálogo de la exosición "Enric Mestre; vint peçes per a un museu" que tuvo lugar en las tres capitales de la Comunidad Valenciana; Valencia...

Enric mestre; vint peçes per a un museu  

Catálogo de la exosición "Enric Mestre; vint peçes per a un museu" que tuvo lugar en las tres capitales de la Comunidad Valenciana; Valencia...

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