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CULTURE

HOW AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN ARE OVERLOOKED IN TODAY'S SOCIETY BY JUDITH KYEI-POKU

F

rom the day black women are born, they are devalued no matter the socio-economic conditions they inhabit. The systems implemented to uphold justice continue to disregard and discount their experiences. This is further highlighted by the Breonna Taylor case.

women being made to feel invisible.

Breonna Taylor was a 26-year-old unarmed African American woman who was fatally shot in her Louisville, Kentucky apartment by officers Jonathan Mattingly, Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove.

Junior sports management major Nuria Lane was disappointed to see the outcome of the Taylor case.

After the verdict, which said that the police officers would not face charges directly related to the killing of Taylor, many people took to social media to express their feelings on the outcome. Among those people were black women, who expressed how they felt in this country. These feelings go back to a long history of black

When talking about events like the fight for African American freedom we hear of men like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. But you probably have not heard of women freedom fighters.

“I found the verdict unjust and inhumane. I think that we often forget that a policeman's job is to help people, killing someone should never be the first option, especially someone who was sleeping in their own residence who did not pose any kind of threat,” Lane said. “Even though being a police officer is an extremely challenging vocation, killing people is always something that should not be the first instinct, but you also can’t blame people who have six months of training.”

Lane has also been very disappointed in the way women of color have been treated throughout generations and still to this day. “Women of color have been treated horribly in this country for generations. Currently, women of color are still experiencing discrimination in many forms,” she said. “It is easy to recognize discriminatory actions when they are physical and verbal; like calling someone a racial slur or assault. What is not so easy to see is subtle discrimination.” As a black woman it’s hard to not constantly think about your race. However, laws have been put in place for protection from segregation and discrimination. “In the 20th century, many laws have been put in place to protect black women specifically, from traumatic experiences over simple pleasure their white counterparts have taken for granted. For example, the Crown Act (Creat

THE SWINGING BRIDGE

24

Profile for Messiah Pulse

Swinging Bridge Magazine: November 2020  

Read about soccer players and dancers switching sports to experience something new; what this fall has been like through the eyes of our fre...

Swinging Bridge Magazine: November 2020  

Read about soccer players and dancers switching sports to experience something new; what this fall has been like through the eyes of our fre...

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