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10 NATIONAL CHAMPS Men’s soccer brings home 11th title

20 PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY

MESSIAH COLLEGE ALUMNI MAGAZINE WINTER 2018

9 photos, 9 stories

Distress signals

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U.S. college students seek counseling in record numbers


GRANT HALVERSON/NCAA PHOTOS VIA GETTY IMAGES


INSIDE LOOK

Kirby Robbins ’18 and Dakota Rosenberg ’18 celebrate after winning the NCAA Division III Men’s Soccer Championship in Greensboro, N.C., Dec. 2, 2017. The win marks the 11th national championship for men’s soccer in program history.


W I N T E R 2 0 1 8 , VO L . 1 0 9 , N O . 3

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office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

One College Avenue Suite 3020

M E S SMechanicsburg I A H C O L L EPA G E17055 A LU M N I M AG A Z I N E

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Office of Marketing and Communications One College Avenue, Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 717.691.6027 | www.messiah.edu PRESIDENT

Kim S. Phipps V I C E P R E S I D E N T F O R A DVA N C E M E N T

Barry Goodling ’79 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF M A R K E T I N G & C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

Carla E. Gross EDITOR

Anna Seip C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Nancy Soulliard SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Cindy Agoncillo ’09

Jay McClymont ’92 CONTRIBUTORS

Jake Miaczynski ’20, Allyson Patton, Robyn Passante, Liv Ungurean ’16

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The Bridge (ISSN-0279-3938) is published quarterly by the Messiah College Office of Marketing and Communications for alumni and friends of the College, free of charge. Periodicals postage (USPS #342000) paid at Mechanicsburg PA 17055 and additional mailing offices. Please contact us at thebridge@messiah.edu or 717-691-6027. Items for the alumni news section should be identified by class year and sent to the Messiah College Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, One College Avenue Suite 3023, Mechanicsburg PA 17055. You may email them to alumni@messiah.edu or fax them to 717-796-5371. Postmaster: Address corrections should be sent to the Office of Development, One College Avenue, Suite 3013, Mechanicsburg PA 17055.

F E AT U R E S

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As its name suggests, The Bridge connects alumni, parents and donors with Messiah College. It also serves to build the College’s image with these audiences. It does this by publishing accurate news about the College and about alumni and by offering interesting feature articles that are issue- or College-related for readers’ continued education. Messiah College accepts news submissions from alumni and the broader community but reserves the right to edit or decline to print materials at its discretion. Messiah College is a Christian college of the liberal and applied arts and sciences. The College is committed to an embracing evangelical spirit rooted in the Anabaptist, Pietist and Wesleyan traditions of the Christian Church. Our mission is to educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership, and reconciliation in church and society.

DISTRESS SIGNALS As record numbers of college students across the U.S. seek mental health counseling, how does Messiah handle this issue from a medical and faith perspective?

Messiah College does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, disability and national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other Collegeadministered programs. © 2018 Messiah College

The Bridge is printed on recyclable paper: 50/25 PCW EFC

COVE R:

A National Park Service photographer, Brett Seymour ’94 snaps a shot of a single-person “submarine” off the coast of Greece. PHOTO BY BRETT SEYMOUR ’94

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PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY We asked Messiah alums and students with photography skills to send us their favorite pictures. Each shot is worth 1,000 words.

COURTESY OF BRETT SEYMOUR ’94

DIRECTOR OF A L U M N I & PA R E N T R E L AT I O N S


F R O M T H E E D I TO R SOMETIMES, A COLLEAGUE SENDS YOU AN EMAIL AT JUST THE RIGHT TIME, AND IT MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE. FOR THIS ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, THE DESIGN TEAM AND I STRUGGLED TO FIND THE PERFECT COVER SHOT. SOME CAME VERY CLOSE, BUT WE HAD YET TO FIND “THE ONE.”

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D E PAR TM E NT S

ONLINE EXTRAS

4 FROM THE PRESIDENT

MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE

5 OUR CAMPUS 5 Faces and Places 6

Heard Around Campus

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Brain Waves

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Campus News

10 Athletics

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OUR ALUMNI

27 Alumni Profiles 30

Class Notes

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From the Archives

Learn more about the School of Graduate Studies’ M.Ed. program. Watch a video about the School of Graduate Studies’ master’s degree in counseling. Read about Messiah’s #2 ranking for student engagement in the Wall Street Journal.

MESSIAH COLLEGE ARCHIVES

COURTESY OF AMANDA MYLIN ’12

For our feature titled “Distress Signals” on p. 12, our freelancer Robyn Passante details the record numbers of U.S. college students seeking counseling. To protect students’ privacy, I opted for illustrations to go with the story. Our second feature, “Photographic Memory” on p. 20, highlights Messiah’s students and alumni who sent in their favorite photos and the stories behind each picture. In light of the two features, I wanted a cover that would serve both features well. Then Matt Reitnour ’96, associate director of admissions/coordinator of dual enrollment, sent an email to my supervisor asking if we’d heard of Brett Seymour ’94, an alum who just happens to work as a photographer for the National Park Service. Seymour’s underwater photography features stunning shots of coral, shipwrecks, sea turtles and clown fish, but one photo in particular caught my eye: a diver in a single-person submarine. Seymour said the apparatus, capable of diving 1000 feet, was used to explore a 2000-year-old Roman ship called the Antikythera Wreck off the coast of Greece. “Still one of the coolest things I’ve shot underwater,” he said. I looked at the solitary diver, connected to the boat by a lifeline, and thought how perfectly the image captured our counseling feature. And our photography feature. Finally, we had our cover shot. Thank you, Matt and Brett.

View a photo gallery of campus wildlife by Daniel Fliehler ’19. A N N A S E I P, E D I T O R

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

Gen Z college students defy labels and preparing for transformational vocations: I often hear criticism of today’s iGen Brian Gilroy ’19, a business administration major, gains or Generation Z college students for professional experience by researching and analyzing the their “lack of resilience,” “excessive technology sector and its companies to help manage the dependence on technology” and student-run investment portfolio for the Investment Club, “overwhelming cynicism.” While which has grown from its initial generous donor gift of today’s college students certainly face $100,000 in 2003 to a more than $337,000 portfolio of stocks challenges—their world is dominated in early 2018. by technology and increasing Paula Holtzinger ’18, a senior peace and conflict studies numbers of them exhibit anxiety and major, was awarded Messiah College’s Barnabas Award depression—they also report indicators of a more robust for Service for her many pursuits including serving as the work ethic and are more comfortable with diverse people student director of local outreach at the Agapé Center for and perspectives. In my own experience, this generation of Service and Learning, co-leading a spring break trip as well Messiah College students inspires me to be optimistic about as teaching English and serving in a number of countries the future. during her summer breaks. I am encouraged as I witness their many positive Jessica Kline ’18, student director of the Collaboratory, characteristics and attributes: is an electrical and computer engineering major. She has • They are passionate in their desire to connect with served with various Collaboratory projects, including the people, care for their neighbors and our environment; Solar Photovoltaic team that developed and installed a solar • They are creative and entrepreneurial. panel system at the Theological College of Zimbabwe. • They desire to be responsible for their own learning and Arion Dominique, ’19, a history major and Martin believe learning should improve others’ lives; Scholar, is working with David Michael ’19, Professor • They are committed to listening, understanding others Bernardo Michael and the Digital Harrisburg project team and working for justice; and • They love Jesus and want to reflect His love to all people. on an initiative that focuses on “spaces of fear,” for people of color—i.e. policies and unwritten laws that made it difficult Messiah College is ideally positioned to educate and for people of color to pass through, do business or stay actively engage this generation with our Christian faith in particular places in Central and values and our commitment to Pennsylvania. academic excellence. In fact, the Wall I’m thankful for the Street Journal recently ranked Messiah commitment of Generation College #2 for student engagement Z to loving and serving their in the northeastern U.S. The ranking neighbors. At Messiah, we not is based on the results of a national only sharpen intellect – we deepen survey of students, which measures Christian faith and inspire action. students’ “interactions with faculty Thank you for supporting the and other students, the effectiveness of mission of Messiah College and teaching and whether students would our Generation Z students. recommend their school. Engagement also takes into account the breadth of subjects colleges offer.” Our educators and staff encourage K I M S . PH I PPS, PRESIDENT students to deepen their engagement through many different learning opportunities. The following are simply a few representatives of the many Messiah students participate in the MLK Day of Service in students who are actively serving others January, serving local nonprofits in the community. 4 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

TOP: RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY; BOTTOM: STILL POETRY PHOTOGRAPHY/SARAH HENRY ’19

MESSIAH COLLEGE STUDENTS INSPIRE, ENCOURAGE ME


OUR

FAC E S A N D P L AC E S

MONICA BLAIR ’19 GAINS VALUABLE EXPERIENCE administrative role, meeting with small group leaders weekly for status updates. “She has always been invited into leadership within Koinonia, which I think speaks volumes to how much respect people have for her character and skills,” said Seth Daisey ’18, the ministry’s assistant director. Last fall, she took on the role of director of the ministry, representing Koinonia and facilitating relationships on the leadership boards. She invests more than five hours a week in the ministry. “Monica is deeply committed to Jesus and seeks the Kingdom of God in everything she does,” said Evie Telfer, faculty advisor for Koinonia.

Despite her busy schedule, the junior says she has prioritized finding joy in the one-on-one meetings with other leaders instead of feeling constantly overwhelmed. “To be able to hear that groups are growing and that they are flourishing is a blessing. It is rewarding to know that our hard work is benefiting students and helping them in their friendships and their relationships with God,” Blair said. She says she is confident that the leadership and administrative experience she has gained through Koinonia will prepare her for life after graduation. “I know that these skills will greatly benefit me as I hope to work in youth ministry organizations after I graduate,” Blair said. “Pray that the Koinonia groups will persevere through spiritual dry spells and the busyness of the school year.”

meaning “Christian fellowship” or “communion with God”

— Erin Sytsema ’21

“IT IS REWARDING TO KNOW THAT OUR HARD WORK IS BENEFITING STUDENTS.” — Monica Blair ’19

OWEN McCULLUM ’18

Koinonia, in Greek, means “Christian fellowship” or “communion with God.” In 2007, students at Messiah began a ministry to facilitate small-group Bible studies across campus and aptly named it Koinonia. Now, nine years later, Monica Blair ’19, continues its work for current Messiah students as student director of the ministry. “This fall, we had over 150 students involved with 28 small groups across campus. Ten of these were returning groups,” she said. The structure of Koinonia is laid-back and nonrestrictive, which seems to gain the interest of a wide variety of students on campus. Students can sign up individually or with a group of friends. From here, they are gathered into groups of five to eight other students and a group leader. Then they structure their study however they want. “Group leaders have free range of meeting times, meeting places and even what topics they want to study,” Blair said. She said sometimes her group would simply eat a meal together instead of meeting for Bible study in order to strengthen their friendship. Blair joined the ministry when she first came to Messiah after her resident assistant encouraged her to get involved. After signing up with friends, she led a group and was hooked. Although new to ministry leadership at the time, Blair says she has gained valuable experience while pursuing a degree in Christian ministry. In her sophomore year, she returned to Koinonia in a more

KOINONIA

Koinonia student director leads 150 students, 28 small groups

150 28 5-8 +1 Comprised of:

students

small groups

Each group has:

students

Monica Blair ’19 serves at the director of Koinonia, a ministry made of several, student-led Bible studies across campus.

group leader

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OUR

“Music is my passion. In order to honor God with HOW DID YOU CHOOSE my voice, I chose to YOUR MAJOR? pursue music at Messiah.”

HEARD AROUND CAMPUS

— Mary Roberts ’19, music

“I chose dance, because it’s always been a part of my life. I didn’t want the end of high school to mean the end of dancing. I doubled with PR, because it’s a field that I can take into dance and combine the two.”

“I have a passion and calling for helping the marginalized and the oppressed in our societies.”

— Rachel Hafner ’19, public relations and dance

— Katie Heidenrich ’18, social work

“I chose biomedical engineering after I worked at a hospital in Lynchburg developing a prosthetic hand, and I ended up falling in love with everything pertaining to engineering.” — Thomas Pond ’20, biomedical engineering

“The leadership, management, finance and general business development in the business administration courses provide a great foundation for my future.” — Alex Chen ’20, business administration 6 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

“Being a language major at Messiah means being challenged intellectually while learning about new cultures. Through opportunities such as study abroad, you become a global citizen, and that means everything to me.” – Lissette Acosta ’18, French

“I believe God gave me my artistic gifts so that I can show the world who I am and who He is through my craft.” — Carly Kraihanzel ’18, digital media and design

“A s an international student, international business gave me the best option to work with all different people in all different places, whether in the U.S, Europe or anywhere else in the world.” —N  atalie Robinson ’20, international business

“I believe Jesus calls us to care for one another. I’m fascinated by the medical field, and I love interacting with all different types of people. Plus, scrubs are comfy, so that’s a bonus.” — Zoe Kamin ’20, nursing

“I wanted to find a vocation that combined my calling of service and helping others with my love for science and how the human body works. Applied health science and physical therapy seemed like the best way to couple those two aspects of myself.” —A  nna Mayo ’20, applied health science and pre-physical therapy


MATTHEW TENNISON

B R A I N WAV E S

Emily Deardorff ’20, minoring in speech and language pathology, and education graduate Aaron McKinney ’17 teach communication techniques to a child.

Speech, language pathology minor launches at Messiah STUDENTS PAIR SLP WITH VARIETY OF MAJORS Last fall, Messiah College launched a speech and language pathology (SLP) minor. The program aims to teach students the behind-the-scenes aspects of language—how to process and articulate it. The new minor provides the first building block to becoming a licensed speech and language pathologist. After graduating from Messiah, students then can pursue a master’s in speech and language pathology in graduate school. Once licensed, speech pathologists can work with people of all ages in hospitals, schools, government agencies, private practice and other organizations. “The addition of this minor opens many career doors for students as it allows them the opportunity to prepare for graduate school in speech and language pathology while also allowing

them to pursue an undergraduate degree in a related field,” said Caroline Maurer, dean of the School of Business, Education and Social Sciences at Messiah. Melinda Burchard, associate professor of education, helps students fit this new minor alongside their current majors. “We ensured that our courses are robust and that we’re helping students individually set themselves up for earning their degree,” she said. Students have paired the SLP minor with majors in human development and family sciences (HDFS), psychology, biopsychology, biology, education, and peace and conflict studies. Abby Kazee ’18, an HDFS major, added the minor to bridge gaps in the field of social justice, specifically in working with refugees. “Refugees are expected to do well with no prior knowledge

of our language or our culture,” she said. “Speech and language pathology will help me help people who don’t speak English adjust to being in the U.S. so that they, too, can be successful.” Elementary and special

carefully considers the lives she will impact in her future career. “There is a seamless flow between elementary education, special education and speech pathology,” said Deardorff. “If we can help cure speech

“I BELIEVE THAT IF WE CAN HELP CURE SPEECH ISSUES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN, THEN THEY WILL BECOME MORE SELF-CONFIDENT AND INDEPENDENT AS THEY GROW AND MATURE INTO THE PEOPLE THEY WERE DESTINED TO BE.” —  Emily Deardorff ’20, elementary and special education major

education major Emily Deardorff ’20 says she considered majoring in SLP before coming to Messiah. When the College debuted the minor, she added it to her courseload. She says she

issues for young children, then they will become more self-confident and independent as they grow and mature into the people they were destined to be.” — Jake Miaczynski ’20

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ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF JAN DORMER

CAMPUS NEWS

Jan Dormer (inset), associate professor of TESOL at Messiah, began a partnership with the Christian Bilingual University of Congo to provide training in bilingual education for the school’s faculty.

CONGOLESE PROFS EXCEL IN MESSIAH’S M.ED. TESOL PROGRAM BILINGUAL EDUCATION, EXPERTISE SOUGHT Last year, three male professors enrolled in Messiah’s M.Ed. TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) track. While that fact alone is far from unique, these graduate students happen to live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a country at the center of what some observers call “Africa’s world war.” As faculty members at the Christian Bilingual University of Congo—which, in French, is called the Université Chrétienne Bilingue du Congo (UCBC)— Célestin Mukirania, John Muthambuko and Mashauri Malonga are working to become leaders who are “being

transformed, to transform.” How did they hear about another Christian college 7,000 miles across the Atlantic? It all began in 2015, when Mary Henton, UCBC’s director of faculty development and bilingual affairs, contacted Jan Dormer, Messiah associate professor of TESOL. Since a cutting-edge bilingual program is critical at UCBC—where all students are

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required to learn French and English—Henton sought Dormer’s advice and expertise. A partnership was born. Last October, Dormer traveled to the UCBC to provide training in bilingual education for the school’s faculty. As part of the

required graduate program in education coursework, the three men presented a bilingual program for their institution. Dormer timed their project to coincide with her visit, so she could observe their presentation. “The UCBC faculty saw that our students knew a lot about bilingual education, and when they did group work, or when a professor would ask a question, the others in the room would shout ‘Messiah,’ signifying that those three students would know how to respond,” said Dormer of her training week in the Congo. “Or, when our students would say something relevant, the others would shout, ‘Messiah!’” Through their coursework, the three faculty members discuss Messiah’s impact on their current and future roles as educators. Early in his studies, Muthambuko wrote, “This part of the country has been in trouble of war for so many years. So many people have lost hope, and they no longer believe in positive changes in their life. Hopefully, the university where I am working has focused its vision on restoring that hope. And this is what we as teachers, in any domain, are trying to do for our students and community.” In his initial post for his first online course, Malonga wrote, “This part of the world has been a

“The program at Messiah College has made me a true teacher of students. So I am doing all that relates to my job with the students in mind to help them become all that God created them to become.” —  Célestin Mukirania


theater of war, insecurity, corruption, crimes, massacres, sexual abuse...for almost two decades. Our University has been created to give back hope that people here have lost. I, therefore, teach English to bring hope to the brokenhearted people within my community … .” Now in their fifth course, these three students perform admirably in less than ideal conditions. Though no real-time (synchronous) work is required, students must be able to access the discussion boards and other tools through the internet. Intermittent electricity, a raid on UCBC by bandits and two separate rebel attacks on nearby towns have

HOPE

posed challenges, yet they continue their coursework. Mukirania posted, “The program at Messiah College has made me a true teacher of students. So I am doing all that relates to my job with the students in mind to help them become all that God created them to become.” As a result, Henton says she wants more UCBC faculty enrolled in graduate studies at Messiah. She is working on securing funding for two UCBC professors to enroll in Messiah’s master’s of higher education program. “As we all continue to learn from each other – American

students learning about chalAFRICA lenges and opportunities in the The Democratic Congo, and Republic of the Congolese the Congo students learning about American culture and Western academic discourse – we are all the richer,” said Dormer. — Allyson Patton, assistant to the director of the graduate program in education and to the placement TO LEARN MORE ABOUT MESSIAH’S coordinator of the graduate counselMASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAM, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/EDUCATION ing program

Wall Street Journal ranks Messiah #2 for student engagement

MATTHEW TENNISON

The Wall Street Journal ranks Messiah College #2 for student engagement in the northeastern U.S. in the 2018 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings, released Jan. 3. The ranking is based on the results of a national survey of students, which measures students’ “interactions with faculty and other students, the effectiveness of teaching and whether students would recommend their school. Engagement also takes into account the breadth of subjects colleges offer.” Brown University ranked first while Messiah College—the only Christian college in the top 10— tied with Cornell University at second. TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE AND RANKINGS, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/ 2018WSJRANKING

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AT H L E T I C S

MEN’S SOCCER WINS 11TH NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP FALCONS’ STORY OF EXCELLENCE CONTINUES WITH ANOTHER WIN

GRANT HALVERSON/NCAA PHOTOS VIA GETTY IMAGES

For the 11th time in program history, Messiah men’s soccer qualified for the NCAA Division III National Championship, and for the 11th time they came home as champions. The Falcons faced three separate deficits in Final Four games—twice in the second half of the semifinal and 72 seconds into the final— but rallied each time to earn historic victories. In the semifinal, a 3-2 double-overtime win over Brandeis, Messiah faced two deficits in an NCAA postseason game for the first time in program history—a collection of more than 100 games. Each time Messiah came back, and Justin Brautigam’s golden goal in the 105’ sent Messiah to the title game.

“WE TALK ABOUT EVERY GAME BEING A ‘BIG GAME.’” —  Nick West ’18

Messiah players battle for a header at the Division III Men’s Soccer Championship held at UNC Greensboro Soccer Stadium Dec. 2, 2017, in Greensboro, N.C. Messiah College defeated North Park University 2-1 to win the national title.

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In the final, North Park scored early in the second minute, but Brautigam headed through the equalizer less than four minutes later. The winning goal came just before the halftime horn, with Ben Haines ’19 sending through his first career goal to give

Messiah the lead. For the Falcons, the win was a pinnacle of the season, but it was also the result of a long and cherished process. “Coming to the National Championship is something that every team wants to do, but it’s not something that’s tangible ... throughout your season,” said Nick West ’18. “So, we talk about every game being a ‘big game,’ and something that’s cool about Messiah is the way we train and how we get better and better as the year goes on. It’s awesome to see it through the whole way and for us to play with each other through the final weekend.” Head Coach Brad McCarty, who has now won five national titles since taking over the program in 2009, echoed West’s sentiment. “This is great. Don’t get me wrong. But championships are about success, and we’re more interested in excellence,” said McCarty. “We just want to do the little things really well. We want to be intentional about who we bring into the program, and we want them to care about one another. We want guys that care about their faith, and so that pursuit of excellence, that pursuit of little details—you build that up over time, and there’s times you get to bump up against success.” Messiah’s 11 national titles are the most in Division III history, and the record is second only to the University of North Carolina women’s program (21) for the most in all of NCAA men’s or women’s soccer. —S  teve King, senior associate director of athletics


Field hockey senior gets nod in Sports Illustrated magazine CARISSA GEHMAN ’18 HOLDS SCHOOL RECORDS The December 2017 issue of Sports Illustrated featured the MLB World Series winner Houston Astros on the front cover, but nestled inside on page 24 was another champion: Messiah field hockey player Carissa Gehman ’18. The Falcon standout was included listed with five others in its monthly “Faces in the Crowd” segment, a feature of up-and-coming amateur athletes from around the country. “Faces in the Crowd” first appeared in 1956 and has featured many of the most famous athletes in history including Tiger Woods, Arthur

Ashe, Magic Johnson and Jennie Finch. Gehman was tabbed for the December issue after collecting her third hat trick of the season in a 4-0 win over NCAA Division II defending champion Shippensburg. Prior to that performance, she also notched a school-record five goals in a 5-1 win over Stevenson. At the end of the season Gehman finished with 104 career goals and 232 career points, both second all-time in

Messiah history and top 15 in NCAA Division III history. — Steve King, senior associate director of athletics

FIELD HOCKEY FINISHES OUTSTANDING TWO-YEAR RUN

TIM NWACHUKWU/NCAA PHOTOS VIA GETTY IMAGES

BROOKE GOOD RECEIVES COACHING HONORS

Messiah College finished as national runner-up during the Division III Women’s Field Hockey Championship at Trager Stadium Nov. 19, 2017, in Louisville, Ky.

Messiah field hockey finished as the NCAA Division III National Runner-Up to cap the most accomplished two-year run in program history. The Falcons, who won their first Division III title in 2016, pushed their win streak to a program-record 44 games—a run that spanned the 2016 and 2017 seasons—with the Falcons’ National Semifinal win over College of New Jersey completing the historic streak. Though Messiah fell short of a second-straight title in the championship game against Middlebury, the last two years will long be remembered by players, alumni and fans. “We’ve had a tremendous run, and it’s been a great experience for our players and fans,” said Messiah Head Coach Brooke Good, who was named the

NFHCA Regional Coach of the Year. “Our players gave everything they had to this season, and we were excited to have it end with another appearance in the national championship. The success we’ve had on the field reflects their hard work, and also the support we’ve had from fans and alumni. I’m proud of our program.” In addition to the collective success as a team, Messiah had four players named AllSouth-Atlantic Region, and three players—Kristin Donohue, Carissa Gehman, and Shayna Landis— named NFHCA All-American. — Steve King, senior associate director of athletics

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY SANDRA DIONISI


F E AT U R E S T O R Y

DISTRESS SIGNALS By Robyn Passante

U.S. COLLEGE STUDENTS SEEK HELP IN RECORD NUMBERS AS COUNSELORS WORK TO KEEP UP WITH DEMAND

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COUNSELING

In 35 years of working with distressed students, Eleanor Muir, the director of Messiah College’s Engle Center for Counseling and Health Services, has faced a new reality the past two years: Making students wait. October of 2016—and again by February of 2017—the center’s staff exceeded its capacity for counseling students and began a waiting list. For the 2017-2018 academic year, the center reached that point by September. “It’s anxiety, by far anxiety,” said Muir, a licensed professional counselor, of the biggest issue facing students and, in turn, mental health professionals on campus. “A full threequarters of students we see as clients have anxiety as a significant or the most serious presenting problem.” The trend holds true at colleges across the U.S. According to the Penn State Center for Collegiate Mental Health’s 2016 Annual Report, which compiles data from 400+ colleges and universities, anxiety ranked as the most common reason students sought counseling in the 2015-2016 academic year (the most recent year statistics are available). Messiah faculty and staff say anxiety— and its counterpart depression—can be seen not just at the Engle Center, but also in classrooms, dorms and all facets of college life. “In the 20-plus years I’ve been involved with college students, I’ve seen an increased lack of resilience. They are increasingly unable to handle well stressors that come their way,” said Doug Wood, associate dean of students. “And it’s been vexing for us in the student affairs world.”

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WHY?

What’s causing the jump in anxiety levels for today’s students? It’s a complex issue without a simple explanation. “My guess is ... many cultural and societal and sociological as well as personal and even technological threads are contributing to this,” said Muir. A shift in parenting styles could be one contributing factor. Chuck Jantzi, Messiah professor of psychology and father to four children who all ventured off to college, says many in his generation of parents have tried to be their kids’ friends, which can have positive and negative effects. “We know more about their stressors, so we try to protect more,” he explained. This tightened bond between parent and child has had an interesting effect in his classroom. “I field more calls from parents now about their kids than I ever did in the ’90s,” said Jantzi. The decreased stigma of mental health issues combined with the increased number and availability of psychological drugs also have changed the student body – literally and figuratively. “Many more students are coming to college having a lot of treatment history,” Muir said. “They’ve been identified early, they’ve been getting counseling, they’ve been getting medication. So they arrive at college and have been used to seeing a counselor every week and taking medication every day. So the expectation is, ‘That’s what I need to function in my life.’”

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COUNSELING

HOW MESSIAH IS RESPONDING

The Engle Center added another full-time counselor last fall, increasing the staff to a full-time equivalent of five counselors. Unfortunately, it’s still not possible to meet every counseling request immediately. “[Our counselors] have all stretched themselves beyond their normal capacity to try to meet the need,” said Muir. As a result, the center now prioritizes the highest levels of risk and distress for immediate counseling and refers students with lower levels of distress and dysfunction to outside —  Doug Wood, associate dean of students, discussing the resources. That might mean trend of U.S. college students experiencing increased anxiety suggesting a student find a counselor off-campus or in one’s hometown. Or, referring students to another resource on campus that makes sense for them – the Intercultural Office, the College Ministries Office, even Messiah’s Career and Professional Development Center. Separately, Wood coordinates Care Team meetings on behalf of students who are identified by faculty and staff as struggling in a variety of ways. Those meetings include the student’s “community of care” – a residence director, a coach, an academic adviser, an Engle Center representative and anyone else relevant to the student’s life on campus. They discuss what’s going on with the student and put together a plan for how to best help the individual.

“I’ve seen an increased lack of resilience. They are increasingly unable to handle well stressors that come their way. And it’s been vexing for us in the student affairs world.”

16 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


CAMPUS

CONFIDENTIALITY

As “The College at large is fully supportive of us maintaining that confidentiality; they want students to have that very safe space to talk about anything that’s going on.” — Eleanor Muir, Engle Center director

a student, Jean* sought help from the Engle Center for Counseling and Health Services for varied symptoms that included suicidal ideation, depression, self-harm and anxiety. During her mental health crisis, she ended up getting help from her family doctor. But she says her second round of counseling on campus proved beneficial. “I clicked with my counselor really well, and I think I’ve gotten a lot out of it,” she said. In fact, she believes so strongly in getting the word out about mental health issues and the Engle Center’s resources that she organized a suicidal ideation awareness event on campus for other students. One goal of the event included spreading the word about the center’s strict confidentiality rules. Many students confided in her that they hesitated to reach out to the center or to be fully honest with their counselor because of Messiah’s Community Covenant, which provides a biblical framework and context for campus community life. “So they can only get so much out of counseling because they’re hiding half the stuff [they’re struggling with],” she said. The Engle Center staff used the event to reiterate the center’s confidentiality policy. “[Students] can talk to us about anything they need to. We maintain the same level of confidentiality as all medical and counseling facilities. We do not inform anyone on campus or off campus that the student is coming, let alone what they’re talking about,” said Engle Center Director Eleanor Muir, who stressed that counselors also are prohibited from imposing their own value systems on students. “The College at large is fully supportive of us maintaining that confidentiality; they want students to have that very safe space to talk about anything that’s going on.” *Name changed to protect privacy.

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 17


COUNSELING

The number of Care Team meetings has risen during the last few years, from one or two per semester in the past to almost a dozen in the fall of 2017, Wood says. The Engle Center staff also started a weekly anxiety management group, to which they refer some students. “It’s a skill-building group,” Muir said. “They train in cognitive responses to anxiety as well as specific behavioral skills such as relaxation and mindfulness.” Amy Slody, director of disability services, says she increasingly helps with similar skill-building in her office. When she started working at Messiah six years ago, about 75 students registered with the Office of Disability Services, which provided academic coaching for 20-25 students and proctored about 25 tests a semester for students with special needs. Today, the office serves 252 registered students, including a handful with physical disabilities. At the end of the fall 2017 semester, the office proctored 320 exams in four days’ time. Also, roughly 100 students with ADHD, learning disabilities, and psychological and other health impairments now take advantage of the office’s academic coaching services. Slody says lately the scope of that coaching has shifted from straight academics to more mindset coaching and troubleshooting the roots of anxiety. “We’re doing a lot of trying just to calm students down,” she said. “I’m not a counselor. I don’t have a counseling degree, but for some of them we just have to do positive behavior discussions. ‘You have to think better, you have to be more confident, you have to be 18 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


M.A.

IN COUNSELING

more optimistic.’ Because they’ll come in so defeated. So it’s more of overcoming what’s in their head.” While there’s no peer counseling at Messiah, peer programming is available through Minds Matter, an undergraduate student organization that works to raise awareness and lower the stigma about mental illness. In addition, resident advisers, who are carefully vetted with a close eye on their own mental health and handling of stress, receive periodic training on those issues, as well. WHAT’S UNIQUE ABOUT MESSIAH’S APPROACH TO THIS NATIONAL ISSUE?

As with all facets of life at Messiah, prayer and Scripture are tools used mindfully across departments and in many contexts, both when a student requests that avenue of support and privately among staff charged with caring for these young adults with such myriad needs and struggles. “I think the faith piece is a pretty crucial tenet behind our approach, and I’d like to think that’s our distinctive from other institutions,” Wood said. “But it’s just part of how we live out our mission as well.” Meanwhile, the Engle Center works tirelessly to meet students’ needs with a multi-pronged approach. “Not all colleges have a unified medical and counseling service,” said Muir, “so I see that as a great advantage to us.” B

In 322 master’s of counseling graduates

303 students currently enrolled in the graduate program

2009, the College added a graduate program in counseling that suited both prospective students’ academic interests and the College’s calling. “I think (the College) saw a need to offer a helping profession,” said Heather Barto, director of the program. “I know they did a lot of research on different programs and what fit with the mission of the College, and what would be something that would be a viable option that students would want.” Since its inception, 322 students graduated from the program. In addition, 303 students currently are working toward either a Master of Arts in counseling or a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in counseling, which is designed for students who have already earned a master’s degree in a counseling-related field. Most of the program’s students work full time and have family obligations, so many take classes online, part-time, Barto says. And many of them are studying for what will be a second or even third career. “A lot of that life experience is very helpful,” she said. “(Counseling) is a mix of having the academics to be successful, but also the right people skills.”

TO WATCH A VIDEO ABOUT MESSIAH’S GRADUATE PROGRAM IN COUNSELING, PLEASE GO TO: MESSIAH.EDU/COUNSELINGVIDEO. MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 19


F E AT U R E S T O R Y

20 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY 9 PICTURES AND THE STORIES BEHIND THEM We asked Messiah’s photographers—students and alumni from a variety of disciplines—to send The Bridge their favorite photos. From underwater landscapes to wedding portraits to book covers, each one is truly worth 1,000 words. ISAIAH SNYDER ’20, COMMERCIAL MUSIC

I always love the combination of a fisheye lens and long exposures, which is exactly what I used and how I captured this image. It was right in the middle of the snowstorm, and I had all my camera gear under an umbrella, holding it over everything to avoid water damage. Risky, but well worth it. The swinging bridge has always been a nighttime spectacle, but the way the snow enhanced its beauty is something I was so blessed to capture in this image.

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 21


MELISSA HESS ’05, STUDIO ART

This photo is one of my favorites from a recent personal project called “inVISIBLE Americans: Making immigrants visible—in a new light—through their own words.” The project features portraits of immigrants in the Lancaster community and their first-person stories. I have been honored to have the opportunity to meet and photograph more than 60 people from all over the world through this collaboration organized by local nonprofit Church World ServiceLancaster. Through one of my courses at Messiah where we taught English to immigrants and newly arrived refugees, I came to care deeply about the issues they face. My first job as a professional photographer for nonprofit Mennonite Central Committee took me to 26 developing countries around the world where I met many incredible, welcoming, resilient people, despite their hardships. Those four years of taking short-term trips led me to spend a year of my life in Nicaragua where I learned what it is like to be vulnerable—to not fully know the language, to be fully immersed in a foreign culture—and, most importantly, where I built trusting, lasting friendships. Being the photographer behind the inVISIBLE Americans project has completed a dream of mine. My hope is that these photos and stories help viewers to connect with and relate to immigrants on a personal, everyday level and see them as the unique individuals that they are. I love this photo of Touna from Sudan because she looks so hopeful, bold, beautiful and strong.

DA N I E L F L I E H L E R ’ 1 9 , E N V I R O N M E N TA L S C I E N C E

This photo of a mink on campus is one of my favorite images I’ve ever taken. I love it not because of any technical perfection (in fact, it is a very simply composed image), but because of the subject and the experience of the encounter. While mink are not rarities in the area, sightings are uncommon on campus. This mink was curious and kept popping in and out of this hole trying to figure out what

was up with me. We observed each other for over five minutes from only 15 feet away. To this day, I feel it was a divine encounter. I’ve been seriously pursuing photography for a little over eight years now. I love nature photography because of how it preserves a moment. Whether stopping to soak in a sunrise at the Grand Canyon or finally

finding a redheaded woodpecker after hours of searching, I can experience a little piece of that moment whenever I look at that image. I also see my photography as an opportunity to point to the Creator and the importance of conservation and protecting these places and species, which were each carefully created by God and called good.

“I ALSO SEE MY PHOTOGRAPHY AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO POINT TO THE CREATOR.” —  Daniel Fliehler ’19

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FOR MORE OF FLIEHLER’S CAMPUS WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/WILDLIFE.


BRIANNA WILBUR ’ 13, NURSING

I think it is really hard to ask a photographer to pick one favorite photo. In the summer, I’m literally shooting hundreds to thousands of images per week for a span of clients. Not to mention images for myself and family! If I had to pick one of my current favorite photos right now, it would be this portrait of this mother and daughter. It’s not wildly exciting; however, what it represents to me is everything. I have mainly shot weddings for the past five years with zero interest in photographing families. However, after becoming a mom myself, I became very interested in photographing motherhood. I think that is the most beautiful thing about my job: that as my place in life changes, my job can, too! The saying “Your art lies where you heart lies” is so true for me. This session was my first time ever photographing a mother, and I did it on film. I had been burning to shoot 100 percent film at a session as well as dive into the motherhood/family world, but I was so nervous simply because that is not what I

do nor what I’m known for. The images made at this session were some of my favorites of the year. It represents pursuing something I’m truly passionate for despite my fears and

shooting for the love of simply creating. I will always treasure the images from this session and what they represent.

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 23


PHOTOGRAPHY

FREDERICK SCHMITT ’88, ENGLISH

“I’VE ALWAYS LOVED HOW THE SHADOW COMES OUT OF THE TREE TO REVEAL THE BRANCHES AND BRICKS. BUT THIS REALLY IS SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST ANOTHER PHOTO TO ME.” —  Frederick Schmitt ’88

A N N I E M I N I C U C I ’ 1 2 , A R T H I S TO R Y

The idea was to choose a favorite image, but I soon found that task to be nearly impossible. For one, my work is constantly changing, growing and evolving; and I am still quite far from reaching my pinnacle. Secondly, the very nature of my work is not meant for me. My main subject is people. Sometimes families, sometimes couples, sometimes individuals, but always people. It is not my goal to simply take a pretty picture. Anyone can do

In my early days as a photographer, I was asked to read a poetry manuscript and shoot a variety of cover photos to match the content. I still remember scribbling the words “trees, shadows, city” in a small notebook before I headed out to a spot along the Hudson River in Hoboken, New Jersey. Later that day, after I developed the film, I knew this image would be on the cover of “Mysticism for Beginners.” I’ve always loved how the shadow comes out of the tree to reveal the branches and bricks. But this really is so much more than just another photo to me. It represents an opportunity to build a business, to take a step when the path isn’t clear, to find a solution when little direction is given, to bring an idea to life, to collaborate, to get paid for doing something I love. The fact that I can still find the book on the shelves at Barnes & Noble is really cool, too. that. It is my goal to capture a single moment of energy, emotion and sentiment—and in that moment to also capture who this person is or might one day be. The great American photographer Imogen Cunningham once said, “Which of my photographs is my favorite? The one I’m going to take tomorrow.” I absolutely believe her sentiment to be true. Tomorrow I will take a photograph that I deem better or more beautiful than any I have taken before. Then I will do it again the next day and the day after that. I will never be done taking my “favorite photograph.”

BRETT SEYMOUR ’94, FILM

Working as an underwater photographer for our nation’s lead preservation agency— the National Park Service— often has equal parts exhilaration and discouragement. While on assignment at Biscayne National Park, located on the southern tip of Miami, I was in search of an image that could tell the submerged story of the park. Dive after dive revealed dead or dying coral, victims of rising ocean temperatures and disease—discouragement. On the last descent of the day, this large outcropping of elk horn coral stood defiantly on the edge of an otherwise dead reef. As I began to photograph this last reef, pondering its future, a stunning queen angelfish swam through the frame as if to offer hope of a healthy, rebounding reef—exhilaration. Most people think the life of an underwater photographer is nonstop adventure. They often overlook the months away from family, tens of thousands of miles logged in a year and the countless hours underwater in search of the next portfolio-worthy shot. Despite the downsides, my 20+ years have provided amazing opportunities to tell the stories that few know exist, much less get to experience.


PHOTOGRAPHY

FPO - need high res

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 25


PHOTOGRAPHY

“I CHERISH THE BEAUTY FOUND IN FLEETING, SIGNIFICANT MOMENTS.” —  Sarah Brookhart ’13 S A R A H B R O O K H A R T ’ 1 3 , E A R LY C H I L D H O O D E D U C AT I O N

This photo is a favorite of mine, because I believe it encompasses exactly what I strive to capture as a professional wedding photographer. I am fascinated by the idea of capturing a still image of an instant, a visual memory that can be experienced. I cherish the beauty found in fleeting, significant moments. This photo is my favorite moment of each wedding day—the moment they’re announced as husband and wife for the first time. You see their abundant joy as well as the joy of their family and friends in the fore- and background. As a photographer, my goal is to always capture my couples’ truest selves in the moments, both ordinary and significant.

BO WILLIAMS ’ 15, STUDIO ART

This film portrait is one of the last photos I took of my father before my wife and I moved to Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2017. Before we left, I made a point of photographing as much of my family as possible because I didn’t—and still don’t—know when I would see them again. These images were all shot on film simply because film photographs last forever. This fact is particularly poignant in regards to my father as he has kidney failure. He makes multiple visits to the dialysis clinic every week to compensate for his disease while he waits on a list for a transplant. Most of my family is going to be visiting me in Scotland but unfortunately, due to my father’s condition, he will not be able to make the trip, and that has been very hard on both of us. However, thanks to modern conveniences, we are able to remain in contact so that he knows that I’m doing okay, and I know that he’s okay. B

26 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE


OUR

ALUMNI NEWS

Senate cybersecurity specialist majored in politics at Messiah EVAN JEWELL ’14 FINDS CAREER IN GOVERNMENT We use phones, tablets and computers every day, but how secure are they? For Evan Jewell ’14, the senior information security services specialist for the cybersecurity branch of the U.S. Senate, knowing that is all in a day’s work. At his job, Jewell uses a variety of systems and tools to defend and protect the Senate’s network, mobile devices and computer systems from unauthorized access. Jewell, who majored in politics, says Messiah provided the political science foundation needed for his work at the Senate. “Messiah’s emphasis on communication skills taught me to convey tasks and their outcomes succinctly,

both verbally and in writing,” he said. “Also, the interpersonal relation skills I acquired are necessary for the teamwork required in the cybersecurity field.” Prior to working for the Senate, Jewell held many other positions in the U.S. government. He interned for the Secretary of the Senate and the Department of Homeland Security Customs and Immigration. He also worked as a government contractor for the Department of Homeland Security. Working in Washington, D.C. has its perks and its challenges. Jewell says his commute, depending on traffic, lasts 30 minutes to an hour or more. “Even on the

CYBERSECURITY TIPS JEWELL OFFERS THE TOP THREE TIPS FOR PROTECTING ONE’S PERSONAL INFORMATION ONLINE: 1. KEEP  YOUR ANTIVIRUS SOFTWARE UP TO DATE.

This field changes constantly. The threats that will harm our computers are always evolving. Be vigilant in making sure that your antivirus software is always up to date. 2. C  REATE STRONG PASSWORDS.

A strong password should be more than 12 characters and contain capital letters, numbers and symbols. The more complex the password, the better. 3. M  ONITOR YOUR CELL PHONE USAGE.

Turn off your Bluetooth and Wi-Fi whenever you are not using them.

longest days, I feel privileged to be a contributor to the workings of the U.S. Senate as I enter the

Capitol with respect and pride in being an American,” he said. —Jake Miaczynski ’20

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 27


OUR

ALUMNI PROFILES

“I WANT TO HELP MAKE POSITIVE

BRE GRIGNANO ’09

Alumna lands game-day gig with Philadelphia Eagles

CHANGES IN THE NFL AND WOULD

SHE WORKS WITH SUPER BOWL CHAMPS

TO BE INVOLVED IN SERVICE AND

Who says you need to pursue only one dream at a time? Messiah alumna Bre Grignano ’09 follows her many passions with a degree in sports and exercise science (now called health and exercise science). Grignano works three jobs: a director at sports performance facility Power Train and Sports Fitness, a game-day media relations assistant to the Philadelphia Eagles and a sponsorship coordinator for the radio show Faith on the Field.

In her professional roles, Grignano says she has found that many of the classes she took at Messiah—such as Sports and Society—challenged her to pursue her love for sports, fitness and faith. After graduation, she moved to New York City to manage corporate wellness for Bank of America. During her time in the city, she connected with sports professionals on LinkedIn and landed a part-time position on game days for the New York

LIKE TO ENCOURAGE PLAYERS SHARE THEIR TESTIMONIES ... .” — Bre Grignano ’09

Jets and the New York Knicks. “I did a lot to get to where I am now,” she said. “Never underestimate the power of networking.” Grignano says LinkedIn has become an essential part of her career, connecting her with people who are in the industry, and

she advises students to do the same. After a few years in New York City, Grignano found her way back home to Pennsylvania. She became the director of Power Train Sports and Fitness in York, Pennsylvania.

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As she became more comfortable with her career path, Grignano applied her interests and knowledge for the greater good of God’s kingdom. Through networking, she came across Faith on the Field, a Monday night radio show (on 610 Sports ESPN Radio) about the impact of faith on the sports world. In this role, she seeks out sponsorships and partnerships with organizations in the Philadelphia area, creating and supporting live player events. “I want to help make positive changes in the NFL,” Grignano said, “and would like to encourage players to be involved in service and share their testimonies with others.” —Liv Ungurean ’16 and Anna Seip

COURTESY OF BRE GRIGANO ’09

“What I studied in school directly applies to what I am doing now,” she said, using her exercise science degree to train athletes and clients, all while promoting the brand of the company. With her past experience helping to run game days in the NFL, Grignano also transitioned into the part-time role with the Eagles. On game days, she helps the public relations staff assist the media in the press box. Those duties only grew as the Eagles advanced through the playoffs and won the Super Bowl. “It was so awesome to see ... players pray together on the field before these big games and use their post-game press conferences giving credit to the Lord and showing humility,” she said.

Working with the Super Bowl-winning Philadelphia Eagles is just one of three jobs for Bre Grignano ’09. She’s also a director at a sports performance facility and a sponsorship coordinator for Faith on the Field, a radio show.

YOUR LEGACY... THEIR FUTURE As a child in Peru, Renee loved animals and wanted to study biology.

renee altez-nunez ‘18 School of Science, Engineering and Health

Creating a legacy at Messiah College – Planning a gift through your will or trust is a simple way to make a difference. A gift in your will does not affect your current cash flow or assets, but you will have the benefit of knowing your legacy gift will provide a lasting impact to future students. How can I make a legacy gift to Messiah College? • Make a provision through your will or trust • Add a codicil to an existing will • Name Messiah as beneficiary in a qualified retirement plan • Designate Messiah College as beneficiary of a life insurance policy • Sample language to add Messiah to your will: I, [name], of [city, state, zip] give, devise and bequeath to Messiah College (Federal Tax ID# 23-1352661), situated in Grantham, Pennsylvania (with a mailing address of: One College Avenue, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055) [written amount, description of property or percentage of the estate] for its unrestricted use and purposes. Have you already included Messiah College in your estate plans? If so, please contact Mark Templeton at 717-796-5069 or mtempleton@messiah.edu. We would love to thank you for remembering Messiah in this way and include you in our list of Heritage Society Members! For more information, visit www.messiah.edu/createalegacy.

MESSIAH COLLEGE • THE BRIDGE • WINTER 2018 | 29


OUR

CLASS NOTES

“SHE EMBODIES THE MISSION OF THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT IN EVERY WAY.”

A M A N DA M Y L I N F I S H E R ’ 1 2

ARCHIVING TEXAS’ HISTORY ALUM CATALOGS POLITICAL PAPERS Amanda Mylin Fisher ’12 gets paid to catalog time. As a history major and archivist at Baylor University, she preserves moments of Texas history for future generations of researchers. At the Baylor Collections of Political Materials in the W. R. Poage Legislative Library, she processes the papers of former Texas congress members. Everything from constituent correspondence to legislation gets filed and coded in acid-free boxes. Her Messiah thesis advisor— Messiah’s Chair and Professor of History John Fea—encouraged her to consider Baylor’s graduate program in history. “I loved the program and the people, so I came,” said Fisher. “I worked as a graduate assistant at The Texas Collection, another archive on campus that collects anything related to the history of Texas. I enjoyed processing collections so much that I decided to make a career out of it.” Fea gives her high praise. “Amanda is one of the best history majors to ever pass through

1970s Henry (Lamar) Renn ’73 retired as a marriage and family therapist in 2016.

1990s Chi King Edwin Lun ’90 works as a group chief operations officer at One Horizon Group Inc.

the doors of Boyer Hall,” he said. “I can think of few students who displayed such intellectual and spiritual growth during her four years at Messiah. She embodies the mission of the history department in every way.” Fisher says her undergraduate education—which included studying in Rome, Italy—provided formative educational and character-building experiences. “My excellent education at Messiah, especially within the history department, taught me to think deeply, write well and see the world through others’ eyes,” said Fisher. “My Messiah education also deepened my Christian faith convictions, inspiring me to see the world and those I encounter in my work with compassion.” — Anna Seip

Robert Mott ’91 works as an associate professor at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va. Lynette (Mellinger) Nisly ’90 works as a clinical therapist for Pressley Ridge in Lancaster, Pa.

2000s Craig Aiello ’01 was

30 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

COURTESY OF AMANDA MYLIN FISHER ’12

— John Fea, professor of history and chair

At Baylor University, Amanda Mylin Fisher ’12 archives Texas’ political history.

named one of Central Penn Business Journal’s 2017 Forty Under 40 designees.

Lydia Hope, March 23, 2015, and James Robert, Sept. 19, 2016.

Larry Hannon ’06 published “Racing the Hands of Time” in 2017.

Traci Hanna ’09 works as the executive assistant at Johns Hopkins HealthCare in Glen Burnie, Md. She is enrolled in the MBA program at Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School.

Allison Pra ’07 works as a nurse practitioner at Hershey Kidney Specialists Inc. She and her husband Jesse Maurer announce the birth of

Kelsey Yoncha ’09 and

Jordan Thebner married July 30, 2016.

2010s Rachel (Frysztacki) Clutz ’10 and her husband Michael announce the birth of Hosanna Ruth, June 23, 2017. Katrina (Miller) Messimer ’10 and her husband Derek


announce the birth of Kortlyn Jade, Sept. 29, 2017. Jamie Gardner ’13 works as the senior art director at Area23 in New York, N.Y. Kira Maier ’13 works as an English teacher at West Essex Regional High School District in North Caldwell, N.J. Katlyn Tyrpak ’15 and Michael Stephan ’15 married May 27, 2017.

Amanda (Baker) DeWees ’18 married Jacob DeWees August 26, 2017. She works as a teacher at Li’l Einsteins Learning Academy in Bear, Del.

Service Notes. Aftan Francis ’09 became a primary literacy volunteer for the U.S. Peace Corps in Samoa in 2016 and will continue through December 2018.

IN MEMORIAM

DOROTHY (WITTER) SCHRAG ’38 19182017 Messiah College mourns the passing of Dorothy (Witter) Schrag,

Assistant Professor Emerita of Music, who died Nov. 30. Dorothy, a 1938 graduate of Messiah Junior College, served Messiah from 1953 through 1956 and again from 1959 through 1983 as Assistant Professor of Music. She also taught music at Upland College. Dorothy was the widow of Dr. Martin H. Schrag, former Messiah College Professor of History

of Christianity. Both Dorothy and Martin were also active leaders in the Brethren in Christ Church and advocates of Anabaptism. The annual Schrag Lecture hosted by the Morris and Leone Sider Institute at Messiah College is named in their honor. We are deeply grateful for Dorothy’s many years of service at Messiah and for her legacy.

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OUR

FROM THE ARCHIVES

The Engle Center: From home to health services facility STUDENTS’ WELL-BEING REMAINS PARAMOUNT

Later, the center was named in honor of Dr. Harold and Mary Elizabeth Engle in recognition for their many years of service in the medical field and to Messiah College. Dr. Engle, as a physician and Mrs. Engle, as a nurse, served in private medical practice, at Hershey Medical Center and throughout Taiwan, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Dr. Engle served on the Board of Trustees and as Board Chair for 20 years. In its early years, the center hosted an off-campus doctor who came in three mornings per week for students. Today, however, you’ll see the center as a bustling hotspot for students who need medical help or counseling during the school year. At the center, the emotional

MESSIAH COLLEGE ARCHIVES

The Engle Center for Health and Counseling Services has served Messiah students and faculty for years. Now equipped with a self-care room, counseling offices, laboratory services, treatment rooms and an EKG machine, the facility has come a long way since its dedication in 1996. There’s even a therapy dog named Adi, a golden retriever “on call” to help students de-stress after a tough day. Did you know the Engle Center used to serve a completely different purpose? Formerly called Hillcrest Apartments, the building housed married couples and their families, including then-President Ray Hostetter and his wife Audrey. well-being of students is just as important as the physical. Students have the option to meet with Messiah’s on-campus nurse practitioner or to attend sessions with mental health counselors. Eleanor Muir, director of the Engle Center, said, “As a smaller campus that focuses on equipping students for success, Messiah College provides a variety of resources at the Engle Center and elsewhere on campus.” From housing a college president to caring for students, the facility has transformed to meet the College’s needs. And with a golden retriever as a fellow employee, how could the Engle Center go wrong? —  Jake Miaczynski ’20

“As a smaller campus that focuses on equipping students for success, Messiah College provides a variety of resources at the Engle Center and elsewhere on campus.” —  Eleanor Muir, Engle Center director

32 | WINTER 2018 • THE BRIDGE • MESSIAH COLLEGE

The Engle Center used to serve as housing for married couples. In 1996, the builidng became known as the Engle Center for Counseling and Heath Services, dedicated to caring for students’ physical and emotional well-being.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 2018–JUNE 2018

APRIL 6 Messiah College Percussion Ensemble

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 10 Jazz Combo

TUES.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 12 Jazz Fusion

THURS.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 13 Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra with the Susquehanna Chorale, Messiah College Concert Choir and Choral Arts Society

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 16 Messiah College Chamber Ensemble

MON.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 22 Messiah College Concert Choir

SUN.

3 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 24 Messiah College Brass Choir/Brass Studio with Messiah College Symphonic Winds

TUES.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 25 Messiah College Choral Ensembles

WED.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

Joey Tartell, trumpet APRIL 20 with Messiah College Jazz Band

FRI.

APRIL 26 “A Night of Opera”

THURS.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

8 p.m. Poorman Black Box Theatre Climenhaga Building

APRIL 21 with Messiah College Wind Ensemble

SAT.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

Ticket prices are $5. To purchase, contact the Messiah College Ticket Office at 717-691-6036 or at messiah.edu/tickets

APRIL 28 One College Ave

SAT.

4 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

APRIL 29 United Voices of Praise

SUN.

3 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MAY 4, 5 “Culmination” GiViM Dance Performance Ensemble 8 p.m. Miller Theatre Climenhaga Building To purchase tickets, contact the Ticket Office at 717-691-6036 or online at messiah.edu/tickets.

MAY 4 Messiah College Symphony Orchestra

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MAY 7 Messiah College Handbell Choir

MON.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MAY 12 Susquehanna Chorale Spring Concert, “Roots and Wings”

SAT.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MAY 12 School of Graduate Studies Commencement

SAT.

11 a.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MAY 18–19 Undergraduate Commencement Weekend 10a.m.-12 p.m. Starry Athletic Complex and Shoemaker Field

FOR A FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/EVENTS


office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

One College Avenue Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg PA 17055 717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

generosity furthering generations Messiah College’s Corporation, Foundation and Organization Partners Messiah College THANKS the corporations, foundations and organizations that chose to partner financially by providing gifts of $1,000 or more this past year. This support enables our students, employees and alumni to make a positive difference in our region, nation and world. 3M Company 5 Loaves Family Association AAC&U Access Development LLC The Isaac Family Foundation Ahold Financial Services LLC American Endowment Foundation Amsted Industries American Society of Mechanical Engineers Atlantic Insurance Group, LLC Baker Tilly Virchow Krause LLP Baker’s Restaurant Bank of America Corporation Bingaman & Son Lumber Co. Boustead Family Foundation Bream Orchards Inc Brethren in Christ Foundation Calvary Baptist Church Camp Hill U M Church Capital Blue Cross Capital One Services Cardone Family Foundation Century Engineering Charles Schwab Corporation Chipotle Mexican Grill Christian & Missionary Alliance Church of Chicora Citizens Charitable Foundation Community Foundation for The National Capital Region Compass Ion Advisors LLC Conestoga Wood Specialties Council of Independent Colleges Crabtree, Rohrbaugh & Associates Inc. C.S. Davidson, Inc. CURE International David Miller Associates, Inc.

Deloitte & Touche Dillsburg Brethren in Christ Church Doorstep Ministry Foundation Dun & Bradstreet Corporation Eden Bridge Foundation Edward R Norford Charitable Foundation Inc. Edwin L. Heim Company Eli Lilly and Company Engineering Ministries International Esbenshade Foundation Event Central Rental & Sales Exxon Education Foundation Feeser’s Inc. Fellowship of Christian Athletes Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Four Seasons Produce Inc. Fulton Bank Furmano’s Foods General Electric Foundation Genesis Engineering Solutions, Inc. Genworth Financial Grace Connection Fellowship Greenfield Architects LTD Growfund backed by Global Impact Guardian Life Insurance Guernsey Office Products Inc. Hahn Family Foundation Hamilton & Musser, PC CPAs Highmark Blue Shield Hope for Others Foundation Horst Foundation IBM Corporation Iglesia Cristiana Discipulando Las Naciones Inc. Impactassets Inc In His Steps Foundation

Intel Corporation John E. Fullerton Inc. John Templeton Foundation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Josiah W. & Bessie H. Kline Foundation Kelosky Masonry John Crain Kunkel Foundation L.B. Smith Estate Foundation Inc. Lacher & Associates Insurance Lacher Family Ltd Partnership Larsen Foundation Lawrence L. & Julia Z. Hoverter Charitable Foundation Lebo & Reed Real Estate Partnership Lilly Endowment Lockheed Martin Corporation Marketechs Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe Martin’s Flooring Inc Master’s Advisors Inc. McCormick Family Foundation McKonly & Asbury LLP McMahon Associates Inc. Mountaineer Farms LLC Mulberry Foundation National Christian Foundation National Philanthropic Trust Northeastern Dental Associates LLC NTM Engineering Inc. Park Street Church Pennsylvania State University Performance Nutrition, a division of Lidochem, Inc. Peters Creek Baptist Church Petra Church

Pfizer Piedmont Truck Center, Inc. Pinnacle Health Pollock Foundation Pompton Plains Reformed Bible Church Presbyterian Church in America Property Management Inc. Pennsylvania State Employees Federal Credit Union R. S. Mowery & Sons Radnor Benefits Group Raytheon Company Residential Warranty Corporation Salzmann Hughes, P.C. Sanofi Pasteur Inc. Sawyer Products Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving Select Asset Management & Trust Company Select Rehabilitation Hospital – Hershey Inc. The Joseph T. and Helen M. Simpson Foundation Speedwell Corporation Inc. Spillman Farmer Architects Stanley Black & Decker Corporation Stover Family Foundation Stuckey Family Foundation T. Rowe Price Associates The Clemens Family Corporation The Chatlos Foundation The Clark Associates Charitable Foundation The Community Foundation of Dickinson County The Foundation for Enhancing Communities

The Hershey Company The Horst Foundation The Mennonite Foundation Inc. The Merck Company Foundation The Pennsylvania Trust Company The Philadelphia Foundation The Presser Foundation The Stabler Foundation The Standard The Vanguard Group The White Horse Group Foundation Inc. The William and Valeria Gaillard Foundation Inc. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Tires Incorporated Tricon Construction LLC Tyco International U.S. Department of Justice – Office of OVW U.S. Department of Energy United Service Foundation Universal Media Inc. Univest Foundation US Department of Commerce Verizon Verizon Foundation Warrell Foundation West Shore Evangelical Free Church Witmer Charitable Foundation Witmer Foundation Wohlsen Construction Company World Vision Inc. York County Community Foundation

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine - Winter 2018  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine - Winter 2018  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...