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12 FINANCIAL REPORT Review Messiah’s assets, charitable gifts, scholarships and more

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Love is the foundation of knowledge

Hope for the future while highlighting the past year

PRESIDENT’S REPORT ISSUE

MESSIAH COLLEGE ALUMNI MAGAZINE FALL 2017


ISAIAH SNYDER ’20

INSIDE LOOK

Students carve pumpkins during Fall Fest, an event hosted by the Student Activities Board on a sunny autumn Saturday in October.


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office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

BRIDGE THE

PRESIDENT’S REPORT ISSUE

One College Avenue Suite 3020

M E S SMechanicsburg I A H C O L L EPA G E17055 A LU M N I M AG A Z I N E

717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Office of Marketing and Communications One College Avenue, Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 717.691.6027 | www.messiah.edu PRESIDENT

Kim S. Phipps V I C E P R E S I D E N T F O R A DVA N C E M E N T

Barry Goodling ’79 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF M A R K E T I N G & C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

Carla E. Gross EDITOR

Anna Seip C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Nancy Soulliard SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Cindy Agoncillo ’09 GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Jordan Pereira

Jay McClymont ’92 CONTRIBUTORS

Jake Miaczynski ’20, Robyn Passante, Liv Ungurean ’16

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The Bridge (ISSN-0279-3938) is published quarterly by the Messiah College Office of Marketing and Communications for alumni and friends of the College, free of charge. Periodicals postage (USPS #342000) paid at Mechanicsburg PA 17055 and additional mailing offices. Please contact us at thebridge@messiah.edu or 717-691-6027. Items for the alumni news section should be identified by class year and sent to the Messiah College Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, One College Avenue Suite 3023, Mechanicsburg PA 17055. You may email them to alumni@messiah.edu or fax them to 717-796-5371. Postmaster: Address corrections should be sent to the Office of Development, One College Avenue, Suite 3013, Mechanicsburg PA 17055.

F E AT U R E S

As its name suggests, The Bridge connects alumni, parents and donors with Messiah College. It also serves to build the College’s image with these audiences. It does this by publishing accurate news about the College and about alumni and by offering interesting feature articles that are issue- or College-related for readers’ continued education. Messiah College accepts news submissions from alumni and the broader community but reserves the right to edit or decline to print materials at its discretion.

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Just as love is the foundation of knowledge, the financial report is the heart of the President’s Report issue of The Bridge.

Check out the accomplishments of Messiah’s students, faculty and staff from the 2016-2017 school year.

THE FINANCIALS

Messiah College is a Christian college of the liberal and applied arts and sciences. The College is committed to an embracing evangelical spirit rooted in the Anabaptist, Pietist and Wesleyan traditions of the Christian Church. Our mission is to educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership, and reconciliation in church and society. Messiah College does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, disability and national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic or other Collegeadministered programs. © 2017 Messiah College

COVE R:

David Abraham ’20 The Bridge is printed on recyclable paper: 50/25 PCW EFC

12 PHOTO: RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

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YEAR IN REVIEW

CALEB BORNMAN ’18

DIRECTOR OF A L U M N I & PA R E N T R E L AT I O N S


F R O M T H E E D I TO R WHEN THE BRIDGE STAFF PULLS TOGETHER THE PRESIDENT’S REPORT EACH YEAR, WE WORK FROM THE CENTRAL THEME OF THE STATE OF THE COLLEGE SPEECH THAT PRESIDENT KIM PHIPPS PRESENTS TO FACULTY AND STAFF TO KICK OFF THE ACADEMIC YEAR. THIS YEAR’S THEME, “LOVE IS THE FOUNDATION OF KNOWLEDGE” PROVIDED US WITH A GREAT JUMPING-OFF POINT.

For the cover, Creative Director Nancy Soulliard pitched me a NASA photo from the ’60s, showing a group of workers writing equations on a chalkboard. If you’ve seen the movie or read the book “Hidden Figures,” you know exactly the look we wanted.

JONATHAN ISAAC ’17

Of course, finding a chalkboard on campus proved difficult. But, we wanted to modernize the shot anyway, so we opted for a white board and a sheet of Plexiglass in the basement of Frey Hall.

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D E PAR TM E NT S

4

FROM THE PRESIDENT

5

ON CAMPUS

5

Brain Waves

6

Heard Around Campus

7

Faces and Places

8

Campus News

26

OUR ALUMNI

26

Alumni Profiles

28

Alumni Profiles

31

Class Notes

32

From the Archives

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For the photo shoot, our graphic designers played key roles in the cover concept. Cindy Agoncillo ’09 art directed while Jordan Pereira drew mathematical equations in various colors on the board and the Plexiglass. Our photographer Ryan Smith set up an amazing sequence of pictures. He even wore a NASA T-shirt for the event.

ONLINE EXTRAS

“I didn’t planet,” he assured me. “Get it? Planet?”

MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE

Once the cover came together, so did the rest of the magazine. As you receive this President’s Report issue of The Bridge, we hope the love and knowledge is evident throughout. Much like Messiah’s foundation, we build upon the magazine year by year. This year is no exception. As you read through the 2016-2017 year in review and the financial report, we hope you enjoy this issue of The Bridge.

Learn about the travel business student Tyler Heath ’18 founded. See the 2017 Homecoming video and photo gallery. Read articles by reporter Maddie Crocenzi ’17. Watch Disney artist Tim McCloskey ’01 create wooden sculptures.

A N N A S E I P, E D I T O R

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

Love is the foundation of knowledge Education that promotes civic engagement I believe a Messiah College education—one rooted in the love of God and neighbor—prepares our students for lives of service, leadership and reconciliation at this very turbulent moment in time. We need to educate our students for civic engagement built on the premise of God’s love as the essential foundation for knowledge. Timothy K. Eatman, a dean at Rutgers University, argues that education must be grounded in human connectedness—fortified by five senses of civic engagement: hope, history, passion, empathy and planning—which he compares to our five physical senses in an afterward titled “Reflections on the Center of the Civic.” When empowered by love-based knowledge, these five senses can inform the work of Messiah College students, educators, staff and alumni to promote human flourishing in our communities and world.

Eatman’s Five Senses of Civic Engagement The Sense of Hope Our students and alumni will be wise leaders, advancing the common good, only if they are educated to practice love imbued with the sense of hope. The Sense of History Along with hope, the sense of history provides students with a more robust and nuanced consideration of past events and people who can illuminate their present and future understanding of themselves, others and the world. The Sense of Passion Informed by a sense of history, the sense of passion “allows life’s penetrating questions to penetrate one’s work,” according to Eatman. At Messiah College, the sense of passion refers to the channeling of our talents, abilities and resources for the furthering of God’s kingdom. The Sense of Empathy Our sense of passion naturally inspires us to a deeper sense of empathy, the capacity to understand another’s 4 | FA L L 2 0 1 7 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

“We need to educate our students for civic engagement built on the premise of God’s love as the essential foundation for knowledge.” — President Phipps

perspective with personal feeling. Eatman emphasizes that empathy helps us realize “we’re all connected.” The Sense of Planning Finally, as a community, we need to engage in the sense of planning. Eatman defines planning as “traction for steps toward progress.” Careful and deliberate planning for our institution’s future is essential to making the pursuit of transformative knowledge grounded in love possible. We are committed to envisioning and implementing our institutional strategic plan on an annual basis. James Davison Hunter defines faithful, love-inspired civic engagement as a “faithful presence,” saying in a 2010 interview with Christianity Today, “If there is a possibility for human flourishing in our world, it does not begin when we win the culture wars, but when God’s word of love becomes flesh in us, reaching every sphere of social life.” May we all love and learn in such a generous way that our faithful presence as Christ followers leads to excellence and knowledge; faith and understanding; service and reconciliation; and, ultimately, to human flourishing for all people.

K I M S . PH I PPS, PRESIDENT

Passages have been adapted from President Kim Phipps’ State of the College Address delivered at Community Day August 22, 2017.


OUR

B R A I N WAV E S

All the world’s a stage for theatre senior KELSEY KINDALL ’18 READIES FOR NEXT STEPS

A PROFESSOR, A REALITY CHECK Kindall credits her success at Messiah, in part, to the instruction of Associate Professor of Theatre and Dance Dan Inouye. She says when she first came to the College, her “firecracker attitude” needed to be channeled in a constructive way. Cue Inouye. “In taking his classes, I was no longer able to slide through assignments,” said Kindall. “If I didn’t put forth my best, he didn’t put up with it.” With this reality check, she says she learned a valuable lesson: “The world wasn’t going to let me slide through, so he didn’t let me either.” That life lesson clearly yielded results. Inouye says she has grown as a songwriter and performer at Messiah. “Kelsey is a disciplined and driven artist who is not afraid to pursue her passion and go after her dreams,” said Inouye. “She has begun to find her voice as a very talented songwriter.” From one stage to another, opportunities continued to come Kindall’s way. Her talent and expertise took her from Messiah College to the Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center in Waterford, Connecticut, resulting in her greatest networking opportunity yet. CONNECTIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES At the O’Neill, where she spent a semester and a summer, she

worked with Broadway stars such as Kelli O’Hara (“The King and I”). “I couldn’t have put myself in a better network-heavy environment,” said Kindall. As part of her experience there, she worked with Donna Dinovelli, a faculty member at the Graduate Musical Theatre Writing Program at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts. After the two composed a musical together, Dinovelli offered the Messiah student a spot at Tisch. Kindall deferred the offer to finish her Messiah degree, but the opportunity is still on the table. In an official evaluation, Dinovelli wrote to Kindall, “If you ever decide to continue as a musical theater creator, know you have a home at NYU... . Hope to see you there, one day.”

Ultimately, she sees her career as her calling. “Everyone wishes for hope, for a redemptive story,” she said of her theatre work. “And if what I’m doing gives that hope to people, then I know I’m where God wants me to be.” —Jake Miaczynski ’20 No stranger to the stage, Kelsey Kindall ’18 has performed in Messiah productions such as ‘Hot Mikado’ and ‘Children of Eden’ as a Daniel Volmer Scholar.

TODAY MESSIAH, TOMORROW THE WORLD Adding to her résumé, Kindall studied abroad in Dublin, Ireland, her junior year. “Messiah’s study abroad program is essential,” said Kindall. “People who don’t take advantage of it, why are you messing this up?” While in Ireland, Kindall says she performed in a showcase at The Gaiety Theatre. “I think the coolest part of Gaiety was working on grounding myself as an actor,” she explained. “After working with Gaiety ... I don’t feel the need to put on anything or feel stressed with the need to entertain. As long as you believe in what you’re doing and are invested, the audience will be, too.” A PLACE OF ‘YES’ As she prepares for a post-grad life of auditioning for theatre productions, Kindall said she asks herself, “Am I doing this to glorify myself or to glorify God?”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KELSEY KINDALL ’18

With high hopes and big dreams, Kelsey Kindall ’18 enrolled in Messiah College as the recipient of the Daniel Volmer Scholarship, an honor bestowed to only two outstanding first-year theatre majors. As she prepares to gradate this month, she reflects on her past accomplishments.

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OUR

HEARD AROUND CAMPUS

IF YOU COULD CREATE YOUR OWN CLASS AT MESSIAH, WHAT WOULD IT BE? “A class on separating your religion and your humanity, while also integrating it in the correct manner in your daily life.” — Erik Dyrli ’19

“Self-Love and Self-Esteem 101.” — Gabriella Chang ’20

“An international phonetics class.” — Joy Shrader ’20

“I would design an animal behavior and care class, similar to a zoology class, where I could learn about wild and domestic animals and how to care for them properly.” — Abby Estes ’21

“I’d love to have a class about reconciling current events, the media and our faith while focusing on how to speak love.” — Jenny Woolley ’20

“A class on how to listen—to people’s banter, to people’s different perspectives. And how to love well.” — Mason McFee ’18

“Social Justice, Activism and Antiracism. This should be available to the whole campus.” — Gloria Igihozo ‘18

of all majors and their place in the Messiah and global community, creating a better appreciation for each other.” — Lindsay Terry ‘20

“I would like to create a coaching class, because there are many Messiah College students who are interested in coaching. This course could help prepare them to serve, teach and lead faith-centered athletic programs.” — Michael Caswell ’19

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“A class to learn the importance


FAC E S A N D P L AC E S

Student finds perfect combo in ministry, basketball Unsure of what to do after high school, Tyler Heath ’18 took a gap year before college to share the gospel through the sports ministry, Push The Rock. “I became a Christian when I was really young, and I have always loved sports,” said Heath, a business administration major. “I have always felt called to minister, and this was a perfect combination.” With the nonprofit, he spent half the year in Zambia, Costa Rica and Spain and the other half in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He then interned for a summer in Italy. His duties included providing gym classes to homeschooled students; coaching and leading Bible study at basketball camps; offering afterschool ministry; and playing on the prison ministry basketball team in Pennsylvania. “These are human beings,” said Heath of the inmates. “I am just as broken as they are. To really see an inmate as they really are, we have to level up and see the inmate like Jesus.” During basketball season, Heath spends his Saturdays at Pennsylvania state penitentiaries. A crowd of 300+ good-behavior inmates earn the privilege to watch their prison’s all-star team face Push The Rock’s volunteers. “We know we won’t see Tyler again until the game is over. It’s like a game of Where’s Waldo trying to find Tyler among the sea of inmates,” said Kyle Stramara, the Harrisburg district manager for Push The Rock and the overseer of the prison

COURTESY OF TYLER HEATH ’18

FROM GAP TO GOSPEL

Tyler Heath ’18 (with the ball), playing basketball in Venice, Italy, volunteers with sports ministry nonprofit Push The Rock.

ministry program. “When we finally spot him in the crowd, he is sharing his heart and listening compassionately.” At halftime of each game, volunteers share the gospel and a testimony. After the game, they sit down to discuss their lives with the inmates. “Heath’s love for the Lord and his passion to see others experience that deeply personal relationship with Christ was both evident and contagious,” said Chico Schlonecker ’99, vice president of international operations for Push The Rock. “Heath will do whatever it takes with what the Lord has blessed him with to share the gospel.” —Daulton J. Leonard ’18 and Anna Seip

STUDENT OPENS ‘UBER OF TOURISM’ TRAVEL BUSINESS

“The Uber of tourism” is how Tyler Heath ’18 describes Rove International, a company he created to help tourists enjoy the local experience when traveling. “Our tour guides are all people from local churches around the world,” he explained. “Fifteen percent of our revenue goes back to the churches, and tourists get to experience life in another place.” Heath thought of the idea for Rove during a mission trip to Italy, where he learned local churches were closing because of a lack of money. He then compiled a business plan, placing third in Messiah’s Impact Venture Challenge (IVC), a “Shark Tank”- style entrepreneur contest.

Soon, Rove guides in Italy were leading their first tour to a group of Messiah students from the International Business Institute (IBI) last summer. “Rove’s local guides saved our group a great deal of time by helping us navigate,” said Michael Nagel, overseeing professor of IBI. “We traveled non-tourist routes and made our way to cultural sites, authentic eateries and eclectic shops in a fraction of the time. In the process, we had rich conversations about local culture, business climate, history and attitude with the folks who live there.” For more information on Rove International, please visit rovetrips. com.

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CAMPUS OUR

CAMPUS NEWS

FITNESS CENTER DEDICATION

JORDAN LEIGH PHOTOGRAPHY

Lead donors celebrate the Falcon Fitness Center dedication Oct. 19. From Below, from left: Sharon and Rick Jordan, Campaign for Wellness co-chair and naming donor; D. Kelly Phipps, co-chair; President Kim Phipps; Barbara Avery, donor, representing Sawyer Products; and Board Chair George Parmer and Barbara Parmer.

From left: Naming donor and campaign co-chair Rick Jordan cuts the ribbon to dedicate Jordan Court, which seats 1,900 spectators, in Hitchcock Arena and then shoots some hoops with fellow campaign co-chair D. Kelly Phipps. 8 | FA L L 2 0 1 7 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E


LARSEN FINANCE LAB DEDICATION

KAREN GARLINGER PHOTOGRAPHY

The legacy and support of the Larsen family is helping to prepare students for careers in finance. Dorothy and Garret Larsen ’00 cut the ribbon to dedicate the state-of-the-art Ralph S. Larsen Finance Lab in Frey Hall Oct. 19.

The Ralph S. Larsen Finance Lab includes 10 Bloomberg Professional terminals and 26 workstations with dual monitors.

COMMUTER LOUNGE DEDICATION

MATTTHEW TENNISON

KAREN GARLINGER PHOTOGRAPHY

Because of the generosity of the Charles Frey and Scott ’89 and Gaye Heintzelman families, Messiah debuted the Charles Frey Commuter Lounge in October, which serves our growing population of commuter students.

Above, left: Family members Patricia Frey, Bea Landis Frey and Linda Frey Barto attended the dedication of the Charles Frey Commuter Lounge. The lounge, housed in what was formerly the South Side Cafe in Mountain View Residence, includes kitchen and study space. M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 9


CAMPUS OUR

CAMPUS NEWS

MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Homecoming by the numbers

3,200

attended Homecoming

699

lunches redeemed in Lottie

121

runners in Live Color 5k

70+

Homecoming weekend events

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MADISON DINGER ’19

CALEB BORNMAN ’18 MARTI AIKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

CALEB BORNMAN ’18

CALEB BORNMAN ’18

CALEB BORNMAN ’18

MADISON DINGER ’19

Clockwise from top left: Ulysse Toussaint ’08 shows families his book ‘Superheroes of Service’ at the Alumni Author Spotlight. The Live Color Run remains a perennial favorite. Students and alumni participate in an art class. The Li’l Falcon Zone featured games and face painting for children. Alumni reconnect in Alumni Plaza outside the Eisenhower Campus Center. Golden Grads share a meal together at the Martin Commons Dining Hall.

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RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

F E AT U R E S T O R Y

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LOVE

IS THE FOUNDATION OF

KNOWLEDGE THE IMPORTANCE OF GIVING BACK

PRESIDENT’S REPORT CONTENTS

14

Scholarships, Financial Aid, Donor Profles

15

Timeline

16

Revenues, Expenditures

18

Net Assets

20

Lifetime Societies

22

New Heritage Society, Board of Trustees

24

Charitable Gift Allocation

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 1 3


FINANCIALS

A President’s Report foreword from Trustee Scott Heintzelman

W

hy do you give to Messiah when you are currently paying your daughter’s tuition – aren’t you giving enough? It is a fair question and something many current parents ask (or graduates ask who may still be paying back loans). For me the answer is simple – it is an investment of love that pays dividends. My wife and I know countless Messiah alums who used their education at Messiah to not only positively change their own life but so often a much broader mission field. Our mission is to educate men and women

toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership and reconciliation in church and society. In our society (and in our churches) we have so much divisiveness and hate. I truly believe what the world needs is Messiah College graduates. As a CPA and current Trustee of the college, I can assure you we operate our finances with fiscal discipline. But costs to educate our students are ever increasing. My dream is to not let Messiah become a school that only a select few can afford to attend, but rather a school that is within reach for many.

In order for this to happen we need to offer scholarships to students and that requires making an investment. I urge everyone reading this to start giving or give more to this vital cause of developing our next generation of leaders who can change the world. Join me in giving back with love! —Scott Heintzelman ’89, Messiah College Trustee

SCHOLARSHIPS THE FOLLOWING SCHOLARSHIPS, ESTABLISHED DURING THE 2016-17 ACADEMIC YEAR, ARE AN INVESTMENT IN THE LIVES OF STUDENTS THAT WILL YIELD FRUITFUL AND LASTING RETURNS.

MARLIN ’76 AND NANCY BENEDICT GENEROSITY OF SPIRIT Marlin and Nancy Benedict met while attending Messiah College. He graduated in 1976, and she finished a nursing degree education at another institution. (Messiah’s nursing program was a few years away from being accredited.) They say they highly appreciate the totality of the Messiah experience in developing the whole person and, in particular, the spiritual growth and faith attributes and opportunities Messiah provided. Following graduation, Marlin served on the Alumni Council from 1981 to 1986, which he also chaired. He also served on the Messiah College Board of Trustees from 1990 to 1998 and chaired the Committee on Finance. They have financially supported the College for more than 40 years. All of their five children graduated from

Messiah: Kevin ’02, Erin ’04 (married to Matthew Bills ’04), Alex ’06, Philip ’10, and Mary Roxanne ’12. The couple recently established two new scholarship endowments at Messiah College—one in accounting (Marlin’s major) and one in nursing (Nancy’s major). We are so grateful they are willing to help students afford the Messiah College experience in a most meaningful way through these scholarships. Marlin said, “We value our relationship with Messiah and the continuing opportunities to support the mission.”

$40 $35 $30 $25 $20 $15

G R OW T H O F F I N A N C I A L- A I D G R A N T S AT MESSIAH

$10 $5 2002

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• E. Morris and D. Leone Sider Grants Program Endowment • E. Morris and D. Leone Sider History Scholarship • W. Edwin & Miriam G. Naugle Endowed Scholarship • David and Ariela Vader Endowment for Collaboratory Disabilities Focused Projects • Eric R. Wenger Endowed Accounting Scholarship

2005

2008

2011

2014

$0 2017

SOURCE: INFO FROM GAAP P&L

in thousands

DONOR PROFILE

• 5 Loaves Scholarship • Finance Major Endowment • Gibson Accounting Leadership Award • Harrington-Root Family Scholarship • Rev. Harry D. & Catherine Hock Scholarship Fund • IBI Travel Endowment Fund • Krimmel/Chilcote Sr. Accounting Award • Christian Lesher Fellows Program • Geoff and Jennifer Rosina Endowed Scholarship Award


2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

2016-2017

YEAR IN REVIEW Take a look at what happened at Messiah the past year.

THE GRANTHAM COMMUNITY GARDEN commemorates its 10th anniversary.

SEPTEMBER 2016 U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT RANKS

AUGUST 2016

2006

CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES ONLINE NAMES MESSIAH COLLEGE

1

#

“Best Business Degree Program for 2017”

4 # 55

#

“Best Regional College” in the northeastern U.S.

3

#

“Best Value” in its region

“Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs” in the U.S.

OCTOBER 2016

THE NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS presents Raeann Hamon, chair of the Department of Human Development and Family Science, with the NCFR Felix Berardo Scholarship Award for her excellence in mentoring.

MORE THAN 2,400 ATTEND HOMECOMING 2016, featuring a Live Color Run and more than 65 additional events. M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 1 5


FINANCIALS

2017

2016

2015

REVENUES (IN 000S)

DONOR PROFILE

Student tuition and fees Less, financial aid Net tuition and fees Governmental grants and appropriations Gifts and grants Capital gifts Endowment return designated for operations Investment income Other sources Auxiliary enterprises Total operating revenues

95,597 (38,959) 56,638 981 3,253 627 7,187 1,145 4,050 20,686 94,567

93,411 (37,894) 55,517 1,118 3,724 1,508 7,148 637 3,946 21,065 94,663

90,254 (36,039) 54,215 982 2,848 2,179 7,075 643 3,516 21,656 93,114

37,585 9,204 19,028 2,330 15,440 14,127 97,714 (3,147)

35,016 9,512 17,718 2,617 15,230 14,148 94,241 422

32,402 9,438 16,944 2,273 16,696 14,191 91,944 1,170

EXPENSES (IN 000S)

Instructional Academic support Student services Public service Auxiliary enterprises General institutional support Total operating expenses Net operating income

N O N O P E R AT I N G R E V E N U E S , E X P E N S E S A N D OT H E R C H A N G E S ( I N 0 0 0 S )

Endowment and life income gifts 1,563 Endowment investment returns, net of amount designated for operations 5,406 Change in value of beneficial interest in perpetual trusts 222 Other non-operating income Investment return on trusts and gift annuities 653 Change in value of split interest agreements (Trusts and CGA’s) 936 Total nonoperating revenues, expenses and other changes 8,780 Total changes in net assets Net assets, beginning of year Net assets, end of year

5,633 238,085 243,718

2,078

1,501

(8,265) (292) (70) (79) (6,628)

(7,824) (174) 17 (364) (6,844)

(6,206) 244,291 238,085

(5,674) 249,965 244,291

DR. MINH NGUYEN ’80 A HEART FOR GIVING In 1975 when widespread warfare broke out in Vietnam, Minh Nguyen was relocated to a refugee camp in Pennsylvania. Unable to speak English, he had no way to prove to U.S. schools that he had already completed most of his high school education. After learning English, Nguyen applied to and enrolled in Messiah College. Out of the 20 colleges he applied to, only Messiah responded. Today, he is a cardiologist at St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. He fondly remembers the professors and fellow students who helped him more than 40 years ago. “My professional career would not have been possible without Messiah College,” he said. “Messiah took a chance on me and gave me the break that I needed.” The College is grateful for Nguyen’s faithful support as a Messiah Partner every year. Such gifts are a vital part of our goal to keep a Christian education within reach of all students who wish to attend here. “Doctors need not only the sciences, but the humanities, especially with a Christian world view,” explained Nguyen. “It’s very important. For this, I am forever grateful.”

Expenses 16% Auxiliary enterprises 14% Supporting services,

2016-2017 fiscal year 20%

institutional support

Student services

9% Academic support 2% Public service

Revenues

2016-2017 fiscal year

8% Endowment return

designated for operations

60%

Net tuition and fees

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22%

Auxiliary enterprises

39%

Instructional

4% Other sources 3% Operational gifts and grants 1% Capital gifts 1% Government grants and appropriations 1% Investment income


2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

NOVEMBER 2016 DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER KEN BURNS delivers the keynote lecture of the High Center’s cultural season to a sold-out audience in Parmer Hall.

DECEMBER 2016

THE FIELD HOCKEY TEAM MAKES HISTORY, winning their first NCAA Division III National Championship, in a snowy PK shootout against Tufts University! PROFESSOR OF ENGINEERING DON PRATT serves as technical consultant and animation designer for the PBS documentary “The Race Underground,” the story of the first U.S. subway system in Boston.

WOMEN’S SOCCER GOES ALL THE WAY TO THE NCAA DIVISION III FINAL FOUR, finishing an outstanding season as second in the nation.

FOR MESSIAH’S 2017 MLK DAY OF SERVICE, the Agape Center partners with Bethesda Youth Center in Harrisburg to host a celebration of unity.

JANUARY 2017 M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 1 7


FINANCIALS

2017

2016

2015

S U M M A R Y S TAT E M E N T O F E N D OW M E N T F U N D S ( I N 0 0 0 S )

Donor endowment Board-designated endowment Total endowed funds Endowment percent change

MESSIAH COLLEGE NET ASSETS

38,904 95,278 134,182 6.45%

34,422 91,627 126,049 -3.87%

33,266 97,858 131,124 -4.12%

12,661 2,016 2,362 194 573 1,245 146,682 2,855 3,925 157,577 330,090

10,464 1,761 4,219 190 546 1,548 144,056 2,854 14,526 3,704 145,320 329,188

13,210 1,687 4,736 163 591 1,360 146,684 2,787 595 3,995 134,981 310,789

8,598 1,671 34 1,442 3,853 510 64,872 2,502 2,899 86,372

8,963 1,595 51 1,243 6,272 819 66,916 2,435 2,809 91,103

6,260 1,613 146 1,109 7,341 1,499 43,372 2,410 2,748 66,498

193,955 13,046 36,717 243,718 330,090 5,633

189,870 13,878 34,337 238,085 329,188 (6,206)

196,812 14,896 32,583 244,291 310,789 (5,674)

$ millions 250

ASSETS (IN 000S)

Cash and cash equivalents Notes and accounts receivable, net Promises to give, net Interest receivable Inventories Prepaid expenses and other assets Investments, gift annuities and trusts Loans receivable - students Deposits with trustee under debt agreements Beneficial interest in perpetual trusts Property and equipment, net Total assets

200

150

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS (IN 000S)

Liabilities: Accounts payable and accrued expenses Student deposits Funds held in custody for others Deferred revenue Annuities payable Funds held in trust for others Long-term debt U.S. government grants refundable Other liabilities Total liabilities Net assets: Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted Total net assets Total liabilities and net assets Total change in net assets

100 Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted

50

0

2009

“Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.”

2011

2 Corinthians 9:7 (NIV)

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2013

2015

2017


2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

RICK VAN PELT, MEN’S BASKETBALL COACH, marks his 200th career win when the Falcons defeat Stevenson University.

DINING SERVICES IMPLEMENTS NET NUTRITION, an online service that details healthy options and nutritional data for those dining on campus.

FEBRUARY 2017 THE CENTER FOR PUBLIC HUMANITIES sponsors its Spring Humanities Symposium on the theme “Slavery and Justice: from Antiquity to the Present,” featuring a keynote lecture by Kelly Brown Douglas.

MESSIAH ACCOUNTING STUDENTS’ CPA EXAM PASS RATE is 84 percent (exceeding the national average of 54 percent)—ranking our accounting program #1 in Pennsylvania, #1 for medium-sized programs in the nation and #10 overall in the U.S.!

1

#

10

#

in overall in Pennsylvania the nation by National Association of State Boards of Accountancy M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 1 9


FINANCIALS

2.8%

Organizations

SU PPORTERS OF MESSIAH COLLEGE

20.5%

Trustees

20.2%

Current and former parents

18.8%

Alumni

17.3%

1.2%

Government

12.1%

Foundations

Community friends

0.2%

Churches

7%

Businesses

LIFETIME SOCIETIES M E S S I A H L E G AC Y

Lifetime cumulative giving totaling $10,000,000 or more Leonard Fry† Calvin G. & Janet C. High* Abram† & Gladys† Mellinger MESSIAH TRUST

Lifetime cumulative giving of $1,000,000 to $9,999,999 Vernon E. & Faye R. Anderson Ernest L.† ’48 & Kathryn G. (Tyson) ’46 Boyer Brethren in Christ - Cooperative Ministries Covenant Fund Conestoga Wood Specialties Norman† & Elizabeth M. Hahn* Charles F.† & Ann E.† Frey* Emerson C.† ’57 & May† Frey* Larry E. & Lois A. Gladfelter* Harry R.† Hitchcock William M.† & Lucille M.† Hollinger David G.† & Beatriz A.† Howe Richard† & Louise K.† Jordan* Josiah W. & Bessie H. Kline Foundation 2 0 | FA L L 2 0 1 7 • T H E B R I D G E • M E S S I A H C O L L E G E

The Kresge Foundation Ralph S.† & Dorothy Larsen* Lilly Endowment Inc. Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe James A. & Donna F. Martin * McCormick Family Foundation W. Edwin† & Miriam† Naugle Galen M. ’48 & Boots L.† (Buckwalter) ’49 Oakes The Parmer Family Foundation George A. & Barbara Parmer* D.S.† & Helen† Poorman Maurice† & Dorothea I.† Shaffer John E.† & Ida† Sollenberger LeRoy M.† ’55 & Eunice (Frey) ’58 Steinbrecher* The Stabler Foundation Donald B. † & Dorothy L.† Stabler The Whitaker Foundation John L.† & C. Jeanette† Witmer World Vision Inc. Anonymous Donors (4) THE PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE

Lifetime cumulative giving of $250,000 to $999,999 Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Pennsylvania M. Louise† Aughinbaugh Frances H.† Berg

Marion† Barker Burr David E.† ’61 & Jean Byer Charlie B. ’56 & Miriam N. (Nissly) ’56 Byers Asa W.† ’16 & Anna E.† (Kipe) ’16 Climenhaga Cumberland County Industrial Development Authority J. Harold ’58 & Ruth† (Eckert) ’58 Engle * Clarence W. † Hottel Sr. Melvin E.† ’48 & Vivian Eyster * Richard F.† Fake ’37 C.J.† & Harriet† Fredricksen S. Johannah† Gearhart General Electric Foundation HARSCO Corporation Scott A. ’89 & Gaye Y. Heintzelman * Evert C.† & Mildred S.† Hokanson Charles B. & Sally Hoober George C.† & Patricia† Hoopy Clyde W. & Barbara A. Horst D. Ray† ’48 & Audrey (Fisher) ’50 Hostetter * Randall B. ’66 & Judy G. Inskip John A. Blessing Foundation John B.† & Mary V.† Sollenberger John Templeton Foundation Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Richard E. ’70 & Sharon N. Jordan W. Wayde† & Glenda Kelly Allen F. Knouse ’68 Leon E.† & Margaret M.† Kocher


2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

ELIZABETH DUBIN, DIRECTOR OF THE AUGHINBAUGH GALLERY, receives the Dissertation of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association.

MESSIAH COLLEGE’S INAUGURAL GIVING DAY is a success, raising a total of $116,256 (116% of the goal!). Gifts will be directed toward the Messiah Fund, general athletics, the Collaboratory and service/missions.

MARCH 2017 WOMEN’S SWIMMING WINS THEIR FOURTH-STRAIGHT MAC CHAMPIONSHIP. Katie Wingert ’18 is named the MAC Swimmer of the Year and wins the Elite 90 Academic Award, given to the studentathlete with the highest GPA.

MESSIAH WRESTLING WINS THEIR SECONDSTRAIGHT MAC CHAMPIONSHIP— its third in four years. Lucas Malmberg ’16 earns his second-straight national championship, becoming the most decorated wrestler in Falcons history.

MESSIAH ATHLETICS ANNOUNCES the promotion of men’s volleyball to NCAA Division III status for the 2017-18 academic year. Justin Beachy ’13, MA ’15 will serve as the inaugural program coach.

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 2 1


FINANCIALS

L.B. Smith Educational Foundation Inc. Lawrence L. & Julia Z. Hoverter Charitable Foundation Jeffrey F. ’74 & Leslie (Lustig) ’75 Lehman Wayne A. & Martha G. Marcho * Aaron J. ’48 & Jean† Martin Stephen W. ’78 & Jana M. (Shultz) ’77 McBeth Jacob & Ada Miller Trust Kenneth V. & Renee A. Moreland William L.† & Geraldine† Murray Paul W. & Laura† Nisly PBS Coal Inc. Jeannie Pascale Preis Investment Company Harry W.† & Nancy R. Preis

Quentin Berg Trust Marlin & Nancy† Riegsecker Maynard & Carolyn Sauder Sawyer Products Oscar F.† & Pauline M.† Shaffer The Joseph T. and Helen M. Simpson Foundation Jerry T.† & Hilary M. Simpson Robert H.† ’42 & Marilyn L. (Byer) ’51 Smith Ellis R.† & Louise P.† Speakman Stover Family Foundation Matthew E. & Debra Stover Pew Memorial Charitable Trusts The John Frederick Steinman Foundation The Franklin H. & Ruth L. Wells Foundation

Marlin H. & Doris Ann Thomas Kermit† Thomas Turkey Hill Dairy Daniel† Vollmer W.M. Keck Foundation Amelia C.† Winter Leslie K. & Marion H. Witmer Kenneth E.† & Minta Wolfe Anonymous Donors (6) * Messiah College thanks the parents of our current and former students who continue to generously support the College’s ongoing education mission. † Messiah College gratefully acknowledges the generosity of donors who are deceased.

N E W H E R I TAG E S O C I E T Y M E M B E R S

George M. ’64 & Lois Beck Dale R. ’68 & Harriet S. (Sider) ’68 Bicksler Thomas J. & Sandra K. Chilcote Donna B. ’94 Earhart Andrea L. (Perseponko) Farr ’81 Mark D. ’88 & Karen D. (Danusiar) ’88 Gibson Todd L. ’96 & Katrina Harrington Jeffrey N. ’95 & Alicia M. (Godfrey) ’96 Horst James A. ’82 & Jacqueline (Nemeth) ’83 Krimmel Terry & Darlene Leidy Emerson L. ’74 & Ruth (Detweiler) Lesher Steven D. ’87 & Georgia L. S. (Steinbrecher) ’87 Myers S. Kirk & Loretta J. (Gingrich) ’88 Radanovic Paul D. ’07 & Andrea L. (Britton) ’09 Roman Geoffrey S. ’87 & Jennifer A. (Brown) ’86 Rosina Elizabeth B. Shelly Barbara D. Snyder ’72 Walter & Cornelia Van Beers Eric R. ’99 & Kristine R. (Hornberger) ’99 Wenger “5 Loaves Scholarship” (Brock and Swift families)

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OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

Thank you to those who became members of the Heritage Society, now with 565 members, during the 2016-2017 fiscal year. The Heritage Society was established to appropriately thank those who have included Messiah College in their wills, created a deferred gift arrangement or established an endowed fund. Their dedication is greatly appreciated.

B OA R D O F T R U S T E E S | 2 0 1 7–2 0 1 8

George A. Parmer chair Harrisburg, Pa. Dr. Craig E. Sider vice chair West New York, N.J. Heidi G. Bingaman ’80 secretary Kreamer, Pa. Rim A. Hinckley ’83 treasurer New York, N.Y. Barbara Avery Safety Harbor, Fla. Larry Bashore Mechanicsburg, Pa. Wendy L. Cole Winfield, Pa.

Linda D. Eremita Pittsburgh, Pa. Richard L. Godshall Souderton, Pa. Anthony H. Hahn ’93 East Earl, Pa. Scott A. Heintzelman ’89 Mechanicsburg, Pa. Joachim J. Huerter Annville, Pa. Linden K. Hustedt Placida, Fla. Richard E. Jordan II ’70 Mechanicsburg, Pa. J. Gary Langmuir Manheim, Pa.

Dr. Emerson L. Lesher ’74 Mechanicsburg, Pa. James A. Martin Chambersburg, Pa. Kenneth V. Moreland West Friendship, Md. Barbara G. Moses Sicklerville, N.J. Rodney L. Musser ’83 Pomona, Calif. Edward Nevin Finksburg, Md. Linda R. Pheasant Wormleysburg, Pa. Marlin Riegsecker Upland, Calif.

Dr. Alan Robinson Dillsburg, Pa. Anthony J. Schiano Duck, N.C. Eunice F. Steinbrecher ’58, Greenville, Ohio Dr. Kimberly C. Thornbury ’93 New York, N.Y. John C. Wagner Jr. Phoenix, Md. Dr. Jerry L. Wenger Bird in Hand, Pa.


2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

THE MESSIAH COLLEGE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, under conductor Timothy Dixon, performs with violinist David Kim, concertmaster of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES ONLINE names Messiah the #1 Best Christian University in the North for 2017 and a Top 50 Best Christian Graduate School.

THE COLLEGE ANNOUNCES THE APPROVAL OF NEW UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS in actuarial science and finance and new minors in speech and language pathology and digital humanities— launching in fall 2017.

APRIL 2017

1,752

FOR SERVICE DAY, 1,752 Messiah volunteers participate in more than 32 projects on campus and throughout the region.

MAY 2017 MESSIAH ANNOUNCES THAT THE RALPH S. LARSEN FINANCE LAB, named for Messiah friend and parent/former CEO of Johnson & Johnson, will open for fall semester as a state-of-the-art educational facility to support the new finance major.

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FINANCIALS

A LU M N I C O U N C I L | 2 0 1 6 –2 0 1 7

DONOR PROFILE

LOU AND DONNA RHEA WALTERS A FAITHFUL LEGACY We are always grateful when parents send one of their children to Messiah College. For Lou and Donna Rhea Walters, they ended up sending all four of their daughters—Vanessa ’03, Devon ’06, Leah ’08 and Melanie ’11. The three younger sisters even married Messiah alums—Adam Duryea ’06, Michael Ortiz ’07 and Justin Erb ’09, respectively. The Walterses say they are very grateful for the education their daughters received, both academically and spiritually. The images of the opening candlelight ceremony and the concluding Baccalaureate service remain vivid in their memories.

“We are very honored to work with Messiah,” said Lou Walters. “They have given our daughters a great education and, more importantly, a solid foundation for the rest of their lives and those of their growing families. We give to the College because God has blessed us, and we want others to receive this opportunity for a wonderful start to their lives as adults.” Messiah College thanks the Walters not only for their generous annual support, but also for including Messiah in their estate plans. Over the years, estate gifts have had a significant impact on the financial health of Messiah College, and we are deeply grateful to the Walters family. Who knows? Maybe their six grandchildren all will consider Messiah someday in the future, as well!

George M. Book ’97, MA ’16 Ray Chung ’04 Doris (Heisey) Crider ’60 Rudyard L. Crider ’71 Ethan J. Eshbach ’14 Craig C. Flemmens ’93 Elizabeth S. Gallo ’16 Gina (Blyther) Gilliam ’83 Mark D. Hopkins ’94 Bryan Ji Yang Leong ’16 Scott D. Martin ’91 Louisa T. MfumMensah ’12 Michael B. Miller ’68

Kurt S. Shook ’92 Sean R. Sims ’08 Jacob P. Specht ’11 Charles R. Starr ’68 Martha L. (Brubaker) Starr ’68 A. Kenneth Stern ’68 Lois E. (Brandt) Stern ’70 Kathleen J. (Winger) Stuebing ’59 Ulysse Toussaint ’08 Gerald N. Wingert ’47 Gerald F. Wolgemuth ’58 Ruth A. (Bryan) Wolgemuth ’60

“In their hearts humans plan their course, but the Lord establishes their steps.” Proverbs 16:9 (NIV)

C H A R I TA B L E G I F T S A L LO C AT E D BY P U R P O S E F O R 2 0 1 5 ( F I S C A L Y E A R)

6.2%

Designated budget

39.4%

Building projects

2.2% 21.5%

Restricted gifts and grants

Government grants

20.2%

1.3%

Endowment

Deferred gifts

1.3%

Unrestricted bequests

0.2%

Budgeted restricted

7.8%

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2016 -2017 YEAR IN REVIEW

MESSIAH EXCEEDS THE FUNDRAISING GOAL FOR THE CAMPAIGN FOR WELLNESS, and the Falcon Fitness Center, a 29,750-square-foot fitness and wellness center, opens for the first day of classes! Additional facilities from the campaign include Sawyer Products Gymnasium, an auxiliary gym, along with the renovation of Hitchcock Arena, including the addition of Jordan Court, now serving as the new home court for basketball and volleyball.

MESSIAH COLLEGE CELEBRATES ITS 108TH COMMENCEMENT —at its first indoor ceremony in two decades— conferring degrees on 616 graduating seniors. Commencement speaker Bryan Stevenson reminds students to seek justice and to “be proximate” to the marginalized as followers of Christ.

AT THE INAUGURAL GRADUATE COMMENCEMENT ceremony held one week later in Parmer Hall, 104 graduate students receive degrees.

JUNE 2017 THE FIRST MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY COHORT begins student orientation at Winding Hill. TO VIEW THE COMMUNITY DAY VIDEO, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/THE_BRIDGE M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 2 5


ALUMNI OUR

ALUMNI PROFILES

“MADDIE IS A GOOD EXAMPLE OF SOMEONE WHO TAKES THE THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF JOURNALISM AND FINDS PRACTICAL WAYS TO APPLY THEM.” — Ed Arke, professor of communication at Messiah

MADDIE CROCENZI ’ 17

Local daily newspaper hires former Swinging Bridge editor Journalism grad Maddie Crocenzi ’17 says she wanted to be a reporter her entire life. Only months after graduation, her dream came true. The York Daily Record newspaper in York, Pennsylvania, hired her to work as the outdoors and healthy lifestyles reporter. Although a typical week involves writing about events in York County, she has found multimedia to be a key aspect of her job. “Shooting video and photography has really challenged me in a good way,” she said, “because it has caused me to be intentional about what I am producing and how I am telling stories.” The York County native says she finds joy conveying information to her neighbors through her hometown newspaper. “Look at all the negative news that we are surrounded with every day, and I’m trying to give you a piece of something to hold on to,” she said. “I’m trying to give you a place that you can go hiking over the weekend. I get to bring something new to the people of the community every day.” Crocenzi says she eventually wants to cover the atrocities in Africa or Syria.

“One day I was reading a story in The New York Times about Syrian refugees. I just started crying, and I knew that that was why I was a journalist,” she said. Covering controversial topics is something Crocenzi learned as the editor-in-chief of the student-run publication, The Swinging Bridge, at Messiah. Ed Arke, professor of communication at the College, provided support. “I think there were a lot of times where I was writing something, and both Dr. Arke and I experienced pushback,” she explained. “It would have been easier for him to say, ‘You know Maddie, let’s just let this one go. We will just write something else.’ But he was always there on the front lines fighting for me.” Her Messiah education provided her with the tools to equip her to work in a daily newsroom. “Maddie is a good example of someone who takes the theoretical aspects of journalism and finds practical ways to apply them,” said Arke. Crocenzi says she is incredibly happy in her reporting position. “I love the grind of journalism. That is where I belong,” she said. — Daulton J. Leonard ’18

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CINDY AGONCILLO ’09

YORK NATIVE WORKS AT YORK DAILY RECORD

Returning to campus recently to serve on a class panel, Maddie Crocenzi ’17 works as a reporter at the York Daily Record in York, Pennsylvania.

“ONE DAY I WAS READING A STORY IN THE NEW YORK TIMES ABOUT SYRIAN REFUGEES. I JUST STARTED CRYING, AND I KNEW THAT THAT WAS WHY I WAS A JOURNALIST.” —Maddie Crocenzi ’17


A N D R E W VO G E L ’ 0 3

ALUM COACHES AT GETTYSBURG Andrew Vogel ’03, an engineering graduate and a former Messiah wrestler, had a change of plans after graduation. “I worked for a little bit as an electrical engineer, but I missed the sport too much to stay away,” said Vogel. “I was fortunate to be able to change careers and become a wrestling coach.” Vogel joined Gettysburg College as head wrestling coach in 2007. Since then, he has coached three All-Americans, eight national qualifiers, six Centennial Conference champions and two conference Most Outstanding Performers. Promoted to assistant athletic director in 2010, Vogel says he has noticed a trend at smaller Division III schools lately: offering more sports to recruit more students. “A lot of schools are focusing on adding new sports that they did not have before,” he explained. “This is helping admissions and providing new

IN MEMORIAM

Norman Hahn 1936–2017 Messiah College is saddened by the loss of Norman Hahn, a former Trustee and longtime supporter. Hahn first served on the Board of Associates and then joined the Board of Trustees – lending more than a decade of wisdom, sound counsel and generous financial support. Both

COURTESY OF ANDREW VOGEL ’03

ENGINEERING GRAD FINDS JOY IN SPORTS

Andrew Vogel ’03 works as the head wrestling coach and assistant athletic director at Gettysburg College.

“Our goal is to have them leave as men prepared to make a difference in society.” — Andrew Vogel ’03 students who would not have attended the college before. It is growing schools.” The increasing numbers of student athletes provide more work for Vogel as assistant athletic director. Each day, he plans his practices while simultaneously coordinating with the athletic director in planning, setting up and executing athletic events. “What makes being the head wrestling coach so enjoyable is the student athletes,” said Vogel.

“I enjoy constantly working with them to help them improve as young men. Our goal is to have them leave as men prepared to make a difference in society.” Vogel says developing better athletes with brighter futures is something he learned from Messiah College’s former wrestling coach, Neil Turner. “Coach Turner was the type of coach who demanded excellence of his guys. He really showed me how impactful being a coach can

be, and he is part of the reason why I wanted to coach,” Vogel said. As an athlete-turned-coach, Vogel has followed in Turner’s footsteps. “Andy has a passion to learn and master the art of wrestling. He was and is a model for what athletes should do, and his competitive nature is what developed his program’s success,” said Turner. — Daulton J. Leonard ’18

he and his wife Elizabeth have invested in the lives of Messiah students, helping to build a legacy that will echo far beyond the boundaries of our campus. Indeed, the Hahn legacy continues at Messiah with son Anthony ’93—now serving on the Board of Trustees—and grandsons Michael ’12 and Ryan ’17. The Hahns established the Conestoga Wood Endowed Scholarship Fund to help make a Messiah education possible for

the children of employees at their company. In doing so, they have provided outstanding educational opportunities for employees’ children. Moreover, they have invested in many building projects on campus, most recently providing generous support for the Campaign for Wellness. The Hahns have replicated their giving hearts to many other community organizations and to those less fortunate through the Norman and Elizabeth Hahn

Family Foundation. Service is clearly one of their core values, and, no matter where they have served, they have done so with humility and faithfulness. President Kim Phipps recently commented, “We thank Norman for his leadership and service, not only at Messiah College, but also in their community. His passion for the College is evidenced by the many ways he helped to advance our mission. He will be dearly missed.”

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ALUMNI

OUR

ALUMNI PROFILES

JILLIAN GANDSEY | BEMIDJI PIONEER

WE HEARD YOU!

Play-by-play announcer Joel Hoover ’15 broadcasts from the Bemidji High School girls’ hockey team game in Minnesota.

J O E L H O OV E R ’ 1 5

Messiah College values feedback from our alumni. And we’ve heard from many of you that you would like us to do a better job of streamlining the amount of email that you receive from the College. In response, we’re launching a new way of connecting with you.

In 2018, we’ll consolidate college news into one monthly e-blast—designed to keep you informed about campus happenings—while reducing the amount of Messiah messages in your email box. You will also be able to customize the types of news you would like to receive from us.

Look for your first issue of the new monthly e-blast in January 2018.

Not sure we have your most recent email address? Contact us at alumni@messiah.edu.

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ALUM SERVES AS ‘VOICE OF THE LUMBERJACKS’ FOR MINNESOTA NEW JOURNALISM GRAD WORKS AS SPORTS DIRECTOR AND PLAY-BY-PLAY ANNOUNCER More than 1,300 miles from where he grew up in Paradise, Pennsylvania, journalism graduate Joel Hoover ’15 works as the sports director for Paul Bunyan Broadcasting in Bemidji, Minnesota. Part of his duties include working as the play-by-play announcer for the Lumberjack Radio Network for the Bemidji High School games. Since radio is a competitive field, Hoover says he wondered if he could compete with more experienced candidates. “When I applied to Paul Bunyan Broadcasting to cover the Lumberjacks … I later found out that they just loved my energy and what I brought to the table,” he said. He’d honed his radio play-byplay skills as a student under the tutelage of Messiah College soccer announcers Patrick Wolfkill and Todd Suessmuth ’90. “They showed me what it is

like to have a love for the team that you cover,” said Hoover. “I prepare my broadcasts to be just as informative as theirs.” Because he covers high school sports year-round, Hoover prepares for games a few days in advance, updating stats and overall records. On game days, he arrives at the field an hour before the show goes live. For away games, he travels with the team on the bus. “There are times when I don’t get home until 1 a.m. if I have a road game,” he explained. Wolfkill says he’s not surprised by Hoover’s commitment to excellence on the job. “Joel is always prepared and professional, and his enthusiasm in unparalleled,” said Wolfkill. “I always would say, ‘We need to get this kid out of here, or I am going to be out of a job.’” — Daulton J. Leonard ’18 and Anna Seip


Mapping out the magic ALUM PAIRS ART, APPS AT DISNEY COMPANY When one works for The Walt Disney Company long enough, a job title seems to fade into the background. Multi-talented “cast members” (employees) can carve out their own niche at the “Happiest Place on Earth.” Tim McCloskey ’01 combines a software engineering title with unique artistic abilities, creating multiple magical experiences for Disney Parks & Resorts guests. While at Messiah College, he pursued a degree in studio art, where he says he grasped a passion for art and a work ethic. “They work you hard there [at Messiah], and they had a sense of work ethic they instilled in you,” he said. McCloskey takes that passion for art and incorporates it into his work at Disney. He equates his computer to a physical tool, much like a paintbrush or sculptor’s knife, combining code, Web-based tools and visual applications to create works of art viewed all over the world by Disney guests. He first started in graphic design at Disney then transitioned to Web-based animation and, eventually, to complex Web interactivity. He developed virtual tours to strengthen the interactivity between Disney Parks and its guests, especially those who could not be there in person. One such virtual tour includes a place most people will never see: the Cinderella Suite in the Cinderella Castle, which once used to be a storage closet. “What I’ve been doing is merging where software engineering and art meet,” he explained. “I

develop applications using maps, or what I like to call ‘mapplications.’ The Walt Disney World Resort is enormous—about 40 square miles. My part is creating tools to try to help guests locate their specific interests and vice versa.” But McCloskey says what really gets him excited are his intricately designed wooden Disney character sculptures. This Messiah alum Typically measuring 3 feet creates wooden by 3 feet, the sculptures are sculptures for The featured throughout the Walt Walt Disney Company. Disney Parks & Resorts’ “Art of Disney” art galleries. Each piece contains thousands of wood blocks, all varying in height, shades and tints, that form a digital representation of a Disney character. He uses the same concepts of software mapping to turn the characters into physical, 3-D art. You’ll often find McCloskey doing meet-and-greets with guests in the art stores, festivals or special events held throughout Walt Disney World. Reflecting back on his journey starting at Messiah College, McCloskey highlights the importance of following “IT’S IMPORTANT TO EXPLORE WHAT YOU LIKE AND your dreams. “It’s important to explore WHAT YOU DON’T LIKE, NOT JUST WHAT YOU’RE what you like and GOOD AT. BEGIN BY FINDING SOMETHING YOU what you don’t REALLY LOVE TO DO.” — Tim McCloskey ’01 like, not just what you’re good at,” he said. “Begin by finding something issue.” Like the old adage goes, if you really love to CHECK OUT MCCLOSKEY’S WORK IN THIS VIDEO: BIT.LY/2XBKTBU you’re lucky enough to love what do. When I was younger, I didn’t you do, you’ll never work a day in know what I wanted to do, and I your life! thought it was an issue. But, that wasn’t it. Trying to force it is the — Livia Ungurean ’16 M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 2 9

COURTESY OF TIM MCCLOSKEY ’01

T I M M C C LO S K E Y ’ 0 1


BRIAN SCHNEIDER PHOTOGRAPHY

“Messiah really helped me grow and struggle in a good way with my faith. I believe it prepared me for all that I am currently facing now, and I owe that to Messiah.” — Rachel Taylor ’17

R AC H E L TAY LO R ’ 1 7

GROWTH IN FAITH, EDUCATION: ‘I OWE THAT TO MESSIAH COLLEGE’ ALUM HEADS TO HOWARD LAW SCHOOL, REFLECTS ON UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE The former president of the Messiah College Black Student Union (BSU), Rachel Taylor ’17 entered Howard University School of Law this fall. She credits Messiah with teaching her who she needs to be to further the kingdom of God. She says as an AfricanAmerican woman at Messiah, she had many conversations about race with her peers as an undergraduate. “I love Messiah and thoroughly enjoyed my time,” she said. “Although I had no problem sitting in a position of a teacher and educator, sometimes you want to just be a regular student. Messiah showed me how to give

gracious answers when I was asked unconventional or uncomfortable questions.” In her senior year at Messiah, she launched the BSU Education Initiative to advance the goal of ensuring that the College continues its work toward becoming a diverse place of learning for students from many demographics Through the initiative, the club partnered with SciTech Academy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to host its own admissions day for all high school students of color, highlighting the importance and value of a Messiah education. While encouraging high school students to consider attending Messiah, Taylor wrestled with the

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next step in her own education. When applying to law schools, she says she considered several factors: community, demographics, opportunities and, obviously, academics. She also faced the challenge of deciding whether to apply to HBCUs (historically black colleges) or PWIs (predominantly white institutions). “I wanted to make the best choice for the woman I was seeking to become,” she said. As a result, she ultimately chose Howard, an HBCU. At the same time, however, she says she worried if law school could come close to replicating Messiah’s sense of community and inclusivity. “[Messiah] always worked to make sure you felt like family,” said Taylor. “From getting to know your professors on a personal level to Bible studies, the Lottie experience, late nights at the Union and even knowing your college president on a real level.”

She need not have worried. “When we were officially inducted as Howard Law students, the dean looked us all in the eye and said, ‘Welcome home.’ A warm sensation came over me and I felt as though I was complete,” said Taylor. At Howard, Taylor says she’s building on all the support Messiah provided toward the establishment of her advocacy, reconciliation and faith. “Messiah really helped me grow and struggle in a good way with my faith,” she said. “I believe it prepared me for all that I am currently facing now, and I owe that to Messiah.” Taylor also says Messiah helped her develop a level of patience she didn’t know she had. “Messiah taught me how to be compassionate to people I didn’t think I could extend that to,” she said. “But above all, Messiah also taught me that there is still so much work to be done.” — Jake Miaczynski ’20


CLASS NOTES

Becky (Evans) Hackett ’04 and husband Matt announce the birth of Liberty Grace, Feb. 20, 2017.

1970s Beth (Doyle) Barlett ’77 works as a mentor at the Central Florida YMCA in Leesburg, Fla.

Adam Brock ’07 performed in “The Bold and the Sanctified ll” Oct. 21, 2017, at The Forum in Harrisburg, Pa.

2000s Shane Lehman ’01 and Katie (Dempsey) Lehman ’04 announce the birth of Nathaniel William, Aug. 14, 2017.

Ginny (Heidel) Masterson ’08 works a communication specialist at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Sandie ’08 and Dan

Custer ’09 announce the birth of Ethan Daniel, June 16, 2017. Dillon Keeks ’09 and Ashley Harrington married June 18, 2017. Dillon works as a humanities instructor at the Goodwill Excel Center in Washington, D.C. Ashley works as a singing sergeant in the U.S. Air Force.

2010s Lindsay ’10 and Michael

Hojnacki ’11 announce the birth of Addison Hope. Michael works the director of wrestling at the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

Mennonite Academy.

Morgan Lister ’12 and Cody Powis ’12 married June 28, 2014. Morgan graduated from Temple University with a Doctorate of Physical Therapy and works as a physical therapist for NovaCare Rehabilitation. Cody manages Landis Supermarkets and coaches high school tennis for Dock

Elizabeth Gallo ’16 works as an associate for Maverick Finance in Harrisburg, Pa.

Rebekah Sabo ’13 and Jeremy Hilfiger married Oct. 16, 2016 in Rochester, N.Y.

Leah Wagner ’17 works as the records specialist for the School of Graduate Studies at Messiah College.

Messiah College graduate programs make it possible.

Offering advanced degrees in • Business and leadership* (MBA, M.A. in strategic leadership) • Counseling (M.A.)* • Education (M.Ed.)* • Higher education (M.A.) • Music conducting (M.M.)* • Nursing (DNP, MSN)* • Occupational therapy (MOT)** • Physical therapy (DPT) ** *Also offers graduate-level certificate programs **Full-time, traditional program

Experience the academic distinction of a nationally ranked Christian college.

APPLY TODAY

see anew

717.796.5061 messiah.edu/gradprograms Online | Flexible | Affordable

M E S S I A H C O L L E G E • T H E B R I D G E • FA L L 2 0 1 7 | 3 1


ALUMNI

OUR

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Mystery of Wittenberg doors finally solved ‘TWITTER OF THE 1960S’ MAKES SUDDEN RETURN TO CAMPUS

1960

JORDAN PEREIRA

The post office recently delivered a piece of Messiah folklore to campus. The Wittenberg Door—one of three in existence and long thought to be stolen as a prank in 1986—had returned as suddenly as it had vanished all those years ago. So, what’s a Wittenberg Door? “It was the Twitter of the 1960s,” explained Glen Pierce, director of the Brethren in Christ Historical Library and Archives and Archives of Messiah College. The first door, installed in 1964 in Old Mainserved as a bulletin board where students could post their thoughts. The idea was a nod to theologian Martin Luther, who posted the pages of his 95 theses on the church door at Wittenberg University in Germany Oct. 31, 1517. As a prank, the door was stolen in the 1980s (and returned in 2003, where it is now housed in the Archives). So, a second door was installed—first in Old Main and then moved to Eisenhower Campus Center (ECC). On Jan. 26, 1986, a student manager making his security rounds passed by the door at midnight. When he returned 30 minutes later, the door was gone. A third was installed but also mysteriously disappeared in 1989. Decades later, Student Body President Jamie-Claire Chau ’18 unwrapped the long-lost

MESSIAH COLLEGE ARCHIVES

door #2, and received an email from Jeff Kramer ’89. He stated his roommate J.T. Long ’89 had stolen the door as an act of civil disobedience, because the postings on the door had become “insipid” and “banal.” In an email to Chau, Kramer wrote, “I never knew [Long] had it until recently. It was apparently in his garage all this time. We thought returning it on the 500th anniversary of Luther’s theses would be appropriate.” Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Jay McClymont said of the recent delivery, “I am not sure what is more impressive: that a college prank lasted 25 plus years or that this alum is so confident the statute of limitations has run out. He has no idea we have sent the Department of Safety to his house to issue him a fine.” But, the story wasn’t over. Soon, the third door returned to campus. Tim Fenchel ’96 emailed McClymont to admit he and a classmate took door #3 to “put an end to the anonymous insults and negative environment this was causing. I would be more than happy to ... drop off the door if you would have interest in receiving it.” Not only did McClymont have an interest, he scheduled an “unveiling” of the two reclaimed doors at the alumni office Oct. 31, 2017, the quincentennial of Luther’s theses posting. “I want to encourage everyone here to use social media channels to help share a sort of homecoming,” said McClymont during the unveiling, “a reunion of two inanimate objects back to Messiah College.” —Jake Miaczynski ’20 and Anna Seip

2017

A timeline of the Wittenberg doors 1964

WITTENBERG DOOR #1 INSTALLED

1986

1980s

DOOR #1 STOLEN

DOOR #2 INSTALLED (AND STOLEN)

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1989

DOOR #3 INSTALLED (AND STOLEN)

2017

DOOR #2 AND #3 RETURNED BY ALUMNI

OCT. 31, 2017

ALUMNI OFFICE UNVEILS DOORS #2 AND #3


CALENDAR OF EVENTS DEC EM B ER 2017– MARC H 2018

DEC. 1 & 2 Fall Senior Productions Grace Pollock Dance Studio Climenhaga Building

DEC. 1 Reception & Artist Talk, Rosalyn Richards

FRI.

4:15 p.m. Aughinbaugh Gallery Climenhaga Building

DEC. 3 Messiah College Christmas Concert

SUN.

7 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 4 United Voices of Praise Concert

MON.

7 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 5 Damian Savarino Studio Recital “Canzoni da camera”

TUES.

8 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 8 Tim Warfield AllStar Jazzy Christmas, Performing Arts Series

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 9 Guitar Ensemble Concert

SAT.

1:30 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 9 One College Ave Concert

SAT.

4 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 15 Susquehanna Chorale Holiday Concert

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

JAN. 27 Art Education Senior Show Reception

SAT.

6:30 p.m. Upper Gallery Climenhaga Building

DEC. 6 Music Nova Concert

WED.

7:30 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

DEC. 8 & 9 Fall Senior Productions Poorman Black Box Theatre Climenhaga Building

FEB. 8-11, 15-18 “The Boyfriend” Miller Theatre Climenhega Building Directed by Ed Cohn

FEB. 9 Kathryn Lewek and Patrick Ewoldt

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

FEB. 22 Humanities Symposium Edwidge Danticat, keynote lecturer

MARCH 23 & 24 Spring Senior Production Poorman Black Box Theater Climenhaga Building An evening of entertainment created and presented by department seniors

THURS.

FOR A FULL CALENDAR OF EVENTS, VISIT MESSIAH.EDU/EVENTS

7:30 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts Author Edwidge Danticat delivers a lecture on the symposium’s theme of home.

FEB. 23 UPROOTED: Inner Experiences of Exile

FRI.

4 p.m. Poorman Blackbox Theatre Climenhaga Building

FEB. 25 Tromba Mundi

SUN.

3 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MARCH 1 Cello Faculty Recital

THURS.

7 p.m. Recital Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts

MARCH 2 Messiah College Symphony Orchestra

FRI.

8 p.m. Parmer Hall Calvin and Janet High Center for Worship and Performing Arts Tim Warfield


office of Marketing and COMMUNICATIONS

“The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes. The Lord has done it this very day; let us rejoice today and be glad.”

Psalm 118:22-24 (NIV)

RYAN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

One College Avenue Suite 3020 Mechanicsburg PA 17055 717.691.6027 www.messiah.edu

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine: President's Report issue - Fall 2017  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...

Messiah College's The Bridge magazine: President's Report issue - Fall 2017  

The Bridge is the quarterly magazine of Messiah College. As the name conveys, The Bridge magazine connects alumni, parents, donors and frien...