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Angela Rottering hugs her black cat, Ivan. The Webster City woman collects vintage Halloween decorations and art. She wears the colorful witch hat that she often dons on Halloween night as she greets trick-or-treaters.

www.freemanjournal.net Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013


Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Spooktacular surprise Story and photos by ANNE BLANKENSHIP Halloween has been Angela Rottering's favorite holiday since she was a little girl. And each year on Halloween, she shares her love of the holiday with children of the community. Often in costume, she greets them all at her door with treats. To those who are family friends or the children of people she knows, there is a little something extra they receive. That all started when her husband worked for Beam Industries. His co-workers would bring their children to the neighborhood to trick-ortreat. “I wanted to do something special for them. So the first year I had a little plastic pumpkin with a candy bar inside,” she said. “Then I'd invite them choose something special to take with them,” she said. Sometimes it's a little plastic spider ring or a coloring book, stickers or a decoration. Her

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Rottering shares her love of Halloween with the children of the community

A wall in Angela Rottering's garage is filled with street signs, decorations and paintings relating to Halloween. One of her favorites items is the “Angela's Parking” sign above the straw broom.


Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

dining room table is usually covered with little Halloween tokens on trick or treat night. “The ones who know me, know to tell me who they are,” she said. “I can't always recognize the kids in costumes and masks.” Since that first Halloween, her efforts have grown each year. “I think I've been doing that for about 20 years now,” she said. Rottering tries to keep track of how many children come to her door each Halloween night. Last year it

was about 230 kids. “I usually warn anybody new to the neighborhood that there could quite a bit of traffic coming past our house,” she said. The trick or treat patterns have changed through the years. There are fewer on foot and more come by the van load, she said. Her passion for the holiday started when she was young. “I always enjoyed dressing up and going trick or treating when I was young,” she said. “My sister, Veronica, always made sure I had a costume.”

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Angela Rottering displays an antique noisemaker, part of her collection of Halloween items. The Webster City woman says her love of Halloween started when she was a child.

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Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Her favorite costume was always a witch. “I loved dressing up as a witch. I've always felt that in another life, that was a part of me,” she said. Rottering admitted she considers herself a witch, but she's quick to point out not in the way many people may think. She's a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, believes in God and doesn't practice Wicca or any of the “dark arts. “I tell people I'm a witch and they often don't know what to make of that,” she said. “To me, witch means wisdom.” A collector of Halloween art, her affection for holiday is evident in her home. A curio cabinet in her living room is filled with collectibles — many from the early part the century and along with some more recent creations. Her collection contains everything from vintage noisemakers to papier mache pumpkins. “The early stuff can be pretty expensive to buy,” she said. Newer Halloween items seem to be more cartoonish for children or more gory for shock value, she said. Rottering tends to stay away from those pieces. “I tend to like the older things, like from Germany and older style witches and die cuts,” she said. Her walls display original artpage

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work with witch and Halloween themes. In her garage, another wall displays street signs reading “Wicked Witch Way” and “Witch's Castle, 1 mile.” In a humorous nod to her Halloween addiction, there's even a sign that reads “Angela's Parking” with a straw broom mounted prominently below. She said brooms have played into some interesting neighborhood humor as well. “One time, Quinton (my husband) had been working on the roof and he forgot a broom up there. A neighbor came over to tell him the broom was on the roof, and Q said, 'Well, Angela flew in last night and left it up there,'” she said.

The orange hat pictured here is part of Rottering’s collection of Halloween items.


Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

United Way, Foster Grandparents band together It’s United Way campaign time in our community. The United Way is something that most of us hear about through our workplace or appreciate while we are raising our families and seeing some of the results of our donations to programs that our children participate in. But how does the United Way fit into the lives of the target audience of this publication, those readers who are over the age of 50? If we are still working, we may see workplace campaigns for the United Way. We likely have an invitation to donate stapled to our pay stub or have opportunities to do simple activities to support this important community fund drive. Many of us will make a donation and then forget about the United Way until next year. Have you ever wondered how the donation you make to the United Way annual campaign gets to the local organizations who are working to make our area a better place to live, work and hopefully retire in? United Way staff and board members have the task of setting priorities for using your donations to make a difference throughout the year. Once they know how much money that they have to award to local organizations, they issue an invitation to apply for a United

Way grant. The Foster Grandparent Program has been the beneficiary of those grants for the past two years. We like to say that we use your donation twice, once to assist in running a program that recruits, trains, and places people age 55 and older in a new career as an educational mentor; and the second way we use your donation is to pair those caring foster grandparents with children who benefit from one to one assistance with school work or social skills. The money that the Foster Grandparent Program receives from United Way helps us to meet our required matching funds in order to receive the federal grant to operate the program; however, those dollars do much more than just serve as match. Some of the other ways the United Way funds help in the operation of the program include: ∫ The federal award requires the program to assist with getting our Grandparents to their assignments each day. The United Way funds are used to help with DART bus transportation for those who do not drive or have any other means to get to school. Grandparents who drive themselves to school receive a modest daily allowance to assist with the cost of gas.

∫ Grandparents come to our program from many different types of former careers. We provide them with training to help them become the best educational tutors and mentors as is possible. That training includes information on learning disabilities, child abuse, reading strategies, classroom and program policies, as well as community information. The United Way funds help us to bring those learning opportunities to our Grandparents both prior to service and every month during the school year. ∫ Background Checks. Both the United Way and the Foster Grandparent Program believe that the safety of children should be foremost in our minds. It is for that reason that every Foster Grandparent must agree to and pass a background check that includes an FBI fingerprint clearance. The cost of the full background check is just over $50.00 for each person placed as a Foster Grandparent. The United Way grant helps us to pay for that important service. ∫ The Foster Grandparents spend just over 40,000 hours every school year with local children. The total cost of each hour of service is just under $5.00. United Way funding pays twenty cents of every hour

Jeanine Nemitz, Coordinator Fort Dodge 55+ Volunteer Initiatives

The Foster Grandparent Program 617 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 576-5401

of service in local schools, nonprofit day care centers, Head Start classrooms, and Youth Shelter. We are in Fort Dodge, Dayton, and Barnum schools. United Way staff, board members, and donors know that a vibrant community needs to offer opportunities for people of all ages and skills. Their commitment to the Foster Grandparent program comes from a belief that we are dedicated to providing those opportunities for seasoned citizens as well as children. Your donation to United Way helps to make this possible. For more information on becoming a Foster Grandparent please contact our office at 515576-5401, or check out our Facebook page at Fort Dodge Foster Grandparents.

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Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Veteran Affairs offices offer services Webster and Hamilton County Veteran Affairs offer assistance for veterans, service members and their families. This includes federal and state benefits as well as temporary county benefits to qualifying indigent veterans and their families. County benefits include rent, utilities, transportation for medical care and burial expenses. Eligibility for county benefits: ∫ The individuals must be a legal resident of the county in which they apply ∫ Have been discharged from the US Armed Forces under “Honorable Conditions”

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∫ Served during a “War Time Period” Application must be made in person. Webster County: 723 First Avenue South, Fort Dodge Hours: Monday and Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hamilton County: 500 Fairmeadow Drive, Webster City Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Tuesday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Wednesday.


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Oct./Nov.

Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

October Thursday — 10

500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 11 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 12 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 13 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove

Senior Center

City.

Monday — 14 Columbus Day Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Thursday — 17 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic.

Tuesday — 15 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 16 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster

Friday — 18 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 19 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, 11 Walnut St., Webster City. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 20 Monday — 21 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Calendar Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 22 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 23 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 24 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Friday — 25 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

Tuesday — 29 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Saturday — 26 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 27 Monday — 28 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Wednesday — 30 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central

Thursday — 31 Halloween 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

November Friday — 1 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 2 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m.,

regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 3 Monday — 4 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 5 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 6 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior

Retirement • New Beginnings • Old Traditions Giving You The Assurance To Make It All Happen! page

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Senior Living Apartments.

Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 7 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

n

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 12 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Friday — 8 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

n

Wednesday — 13 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central.

Saturday — 9 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center.

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Second Ave. N.

n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

n

Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

n

n

RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center.

Sunday — 10 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

Monday — 11 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

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118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA 515-955-8500 • 800-383-8500 JCAHO Accredited

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Oct./Nov.

Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

October Thursday — 10

500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 11 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 12 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 13 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove

Senior Center

City.

Monday — 14 Columbus Day Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Thursday — 17 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic.

Tuesday — 15 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 16 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster

Friday — 18 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 19 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, 11 Walnut St., Webster City. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 20 Monday — 21 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

Calendar Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 22 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 23 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 24 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m.

Friday — 25 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

Tuesday — 29 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

Saturday — 26 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 27 Monday — 28 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments.

Wednesday — 30 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central

Thursday — 31 Halloween 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

November Friday — 1 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 2 Webster County Museum, Otho, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m.,

regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 3 Monday — 4 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 5 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 6 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center. n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior

Retirement • New Beginnings • Old Traditions Giving You The Assurance To Make It All Happen! page

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Senior Living Apartments.

Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 7 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

n

Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n

500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n

Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 12 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n

River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n

Friday — 8 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Health and Rehabilitation (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center.

n

Wednesday — 13 Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central.

Saturday — 9 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center.

Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134

Second Ave. N.

n

Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N.

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Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n

Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center.

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n

RSVP Workday, 1 p.m., Webster City Community and Senior Center.

Sunday — 10 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center

500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center.

Monday — 11 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview

Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City.

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118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA 515-955-8500 • 800-383-8500 JCAHO Accredited

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Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Medicare made easy Questions about Medicare? The Senior Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP) is a valuable service offering an important opportunity for people on Medicare to review and choose what coverage they want for 2014. Every year Medicare drug plans and Medicare Advantage plans can change their premiums, deductibles, co-payments., benefits and the drugs they cover. You could be surprised on January 1 if you stay with your current plan and find it doesn’t provide the coverage you want or need. “SHIIP is a free, confidential, and objective service of the State of Iowa that helps Iowans make informed decisions about Medicare and other health coverage,” said Dick Michael, a SHIIP coun-

selor. Earlier this year, SHIIP announced that Friendship Haven has been named an official regional sponsor moving the office from the Unity Point Fort Dodge hospital location to Friendship Haven’s Tompkins Health Center. You can call 515-573-6764 to make an appointment with Dick Michael or Rick Maehl, SHIIP counselors at the Friendship Haven location. Maehl, from Fort Dodge, recently completed the extensive training program conducted by the State of Iowa Insurance Division. These volunteer counselors can assist you with Medicare Part D & MedicareAdvantage open enrollment which is between Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, along with other health coverage-related questions.

We can make understanding your Medicare Supplement options easier.

Call us today about plans from The Blues®. 130 N 25th St., Fort Dodge, IA 50501 www.khisolutions.com 515-576-1800 800-657-8033

Brenda Lastine

Doreen Coppinger

Sherri Dolecheck

This is a solicitation of insurance. Wellmark Medicare supplement insurance plans are not affiliated with any government agency. To be eligible, you must reside in the service area of the plan. Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross a nd Blue Shield Association. 32P004-2013-IA

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In addition, additional SHIIP counselors will be available during an enrollment event on Nov. 7 and 8 at Tompkins Health Center. Three work stations will be set up on the first floor to accommodate onehour appointments. “We don’t want people on Medicare to miss their chance to choose a plan for next year or end up in a plan that doesn’t work well for them,” Dick said. “We’re available to answer questions, and we encourage people to get in touch with us.” Plans can change annually -- a plan comparison may save money or reveal how you may qualify for extra help with drug costs. SHIIP, the Senior Health Insurance Information Program, was created in 1990 in response to the statewide

need for senior health insurance information. SHIIP provides free informational materials as well as one-to-one assistance with questions and problems related to Medicare benefits, Medicare supplement insurance, Medicare and insurance claims and other related issues. SHIIP does not recommend insurance companies, plans or agents; the volunteers answer questions and provide impartial information to help Iowans on Medicare make well-informed decisions. For more information and an appointment on SHIIP services at Friendship Haven, 420 Kenyon Road, Fort Dodge, call 515-573-6764. For general information on SHIIP, log onto www.shiip.state.ia.us.

Give Linda Lauver or Rollie Peterson a call at (515) 573-6000 to learn more about town home or apartment living.

420 Kenyon Road Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501 Friendship H Haven www.friendshiphaven.org

Friendship Circle and Kenyon Place openings, now!


Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Changes of address Why did your ancestors move there? That question may be easy or difficult to answer. Were the ancestors leaving something behind, like a potato famine or oppressive government? Were they drawn to a new location by promises of free land for homesteading, or following in

the footsteps of relatives who had gone before? One attraction to many families was the land provided by the Homestead Act of 1862 and similar laws that offered free land to adults in the United States. The homesteader had to be at least 21 years old, live on the land for five years and

Carol Foltz

President, Webster County Genealogical Society

make improvements Fort Dodge Public to the land. Library, Room 134 Oftentimes, a fam424 Central Ave. ily group or group of Fort Dodge, IA 50501 people from the same village or area in their homeland would settle in the same area in servant. William apparently the U.S. Whether this group did well for himself on this side settled in the same neighbor- of the ocean. He lived to about hood in a city (Chicago has 94, married 3 times and had 13 Chinatown, Greektown and lit- children. The benefit of indentle Italy neighborhoods, for tured servitude was that in theexample) or started a town of ory, the person could work off its own, settlers from the same his debt and become a free citiarea found community in zen. I think that some people just being with familiar people. liked to keep movin’ on. If you Still others had little choice in the matter. You have proba- have ever read the “Little bly heard that the origin of House” books by Laura Ingalls English settlement of Australia Wilder, you know that her Pa was as a penal colony. People had a case of wanderlust. The would be sent there for crimes family kept moving — living in such as passing forged checks Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, or speaking against the govern- Minnesota, Iowa and South ment. The practice of trans- Dakota. Taking wanderlust to a portation was used to send microcosm, I have a couple in criminals and prisoners of war to the American colonies, as my family tree who wandered quite a bit just within the Fort well. One such person in my fami- Dodge city limits. Walter and Augusta Meyn ly tree is William Munro, who was captured at the Battle of married in 1895 and had 10 Worcester and sent to See FOLTZ, Page 13 Massachusetts as an indentured

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Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

A spooky experience Halloween has never been a favorite of mine. Even as a kid, the only things I really liked about it was having special treats like popcorn balls and frosted cookies and caramel apples. But that does not mean

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I don’t believe in spirits roaming about the world,. I have always harbored in the back of my mind the possibility of ghost like figures This belief could account for an over active imagination that I freely

admit to having. Here is a story I wrote in 1992 for a contest I read about and entered in Parade Magazine. I did not win any of the prizes, but the tale was included in a compilation of 100 stories about spooky happenings. I thought I would share it with you in order to give you a head start on Halloween. CAUTION! Maybe you shouldn’t read this when you are alone ... and it is dark. It was late on a stormy October night. The wind howled, the rain pelted against the windows. Jagged swords of lightening stabbed menacingly at the ground, making brief bursts of day out of night. Rolling thunder caused the house and its sole occupant to shudder. That occupant was me. A supposedly level headed person, I knew I shouldn’t be nervous, that the storm would soon pass and peace would return, yet, there is uneasiness, being alone at night in this nasty weather. Like candles in a draft, the lights flickered and dimmed, making reading difficult so I put the book I was

SIxty & then Some mary Feldman

is a freelance writer living in emmetsburg

reading aside. Yawning and stretching, I went upstairs to retire for the night. I entered my bedroom and noticed that the clock on the nightstand was not working due to the storm. The bright red digits blinked like stoplights in the wee hours. Over and over they flashed, spreading their crimson reflection on the wall and ceiling. As I went down the hall to the bathroom, the lights were steady, the storm quieting as I turned on the faucet and began my nocturnal ritual . Remove make up, wash face, brush teeth. Now the house was peaceful. Only a distant roll of thunder or an occasional creaking in the eaves broke the silence. I was no longer apprehensive but relaxed and ready for sleep. I was blotting the last vestige of makeup from my face when I heard it. I stopped what I was doing to listen. Plop, plop, plop. The noise was See FELDMAN, Page 13


Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Feldman

Continued from Page 12

coming from the area directly behind me. I turned around, a little leery of the unexpected noise. What was that? I wasn’t sure I wanted to know. I stared for a moment, examining the built in linen closet that housed towels, extra bedding and a trap door to the attic. I was a little bit nervous as I opened one of the two doors. I examined the shelf directly in front of me. Nothing there. I was relived and a bit ashamed of myself for being such a coward. Plop, plop, plop. There it was again. I moved my eyes upward toward the top shelf where extra pillows were stored. An exclamation of shock escaped my lips as I watched drops of coppery red fluid drip from the trap door. I stared as the red stain spreading over the absorbent cloth of the pillows . Was that blood? Of course not! It couldn’t be. Or could it? Common sense finally took control. Reason overcame terror. The dripping red stuff surely was not blood. The wind driven rain must have caused water to seep

under the shingles into the attic. As for the reddish color, the water most likely ran over a rusty pipe or something. Still, the lateness of the hour, the storm and being alone in this big empty house supplied all the ingredients to activate my imagination. “Silly childish woman!” I said to myself. ”It’s only rusty water. A perfectly natural phenomenon in a house nearly 100 years old in a rain storm. No boogey man is going to jump out at me.” I took a deep breath to relieve the tension. Calmer, I removed the pillows and placed an old towel under the drip to absorb the moisture. The Plop was irregular now and soon would stop altogether. I turned out the bathroom light and went down the hall to the bedroom. I crawled under the covers and reached over to turn off the light. I lay there in the dark , eyes wide open looking at the bright red digital numbers on the digital clock. 12:33. 12:33? No blinking? Did the clock correct itself? Had I only imagined it had

stopped? Or, perhaps in my nervousness I reset it and forgot. I turned over on my side and closed my eyes and willed myself to sleep. “I can’t think about it now. I’ll figure it out in the morning.” At 7:15 a.m., a weak autumn sun lit the east window. I threw back the covers and made my way to the bathroom. The terror of the previous night was gone. The pillows were on the floor in the corner where I left them a few hours ago. I looked up at the ceiling and froze. The red globs were no longer dripping but the trap door to the attic was open, leaving a gaping rectangular blackness. What really happened on that stormy October night? The plop. plop of the rust colored liquid dripping from the attic. The electric digital clock that set itself, The open trap door. Surely there is a rational explanation, but I never found one. God bless America and God bless you.

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Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013

Foltz

Continued from Page 11

children. (My grandfather Arthur Burrell was No. 6.) I have found them in the Fort Dodge city directories with different addresses every couple of years or so. I’m not sure exactly why they moved around so often. One story is that if the children were causing problems with the neighbors (or vice versa?) that Augusta would pack up everything in a day and move to a different house and send a kid to “tell Daddy where we live now.” That’s quite an amusing story, but I can’t verify it, so it has to stay in the realm of legend. There were many factors that brought people from the land of their forefathers to various parts of the U.S. We have an opportunity to hear about some of the reasons people settled in this area in particular. Local historian Al Nelson will present “History of the Des Moines River” at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Fort Dodge Public Library. The program will cover some of the factors in settling this area. Maps from the 1600s up to 1850 will illustrate the prominence of the Des Moines River for hundreds of years. Some Indian treaties

pertinent to our area will be discussed, along with the impact of the Des Moines River Navigation Act. It’s a great chance to hear a bit of what led people to settle here, including many of our ancestors. The Webster County Genealogical Society would like to hear your ideas for future programs. Contact us by email at webcoiagenies@gmail.com or by mail at Webster County Genealogical Society, Room 134, 424 Central Ave., Fort Dodge, IA 50501. The next meeting of the Webster County Genealogical Society is 1 p.m. on Nov. 4 at the society’s room at the public library. Anyone with an interest in family history, especially — but not limited to — Webster County, is welcome to join us. If you go: WHAT: History of the Des Moines River WHEN: 1 p.m. Saturday WHERE: Large meeting room at the Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave.

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Urban farmers Thomas and Lena Merrill of 1118 N. Fourth St. have had ncredible success growing tomato plants. Thomas Merrill does not claim to have a green thumb. He says he waters the plant occasionally and that is all he does. "The tomato has done the rest," he said. The Merrills have harvested hundreds of marble sized yellow tomatoes which they package and donate toraise funds for mission work. Thomas Merrill celebrated his 92nd birthday on Sept. 27.

-Submitted photo

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October 2013 Active Living  
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