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November 2018

CITY SCENE pg14

The Issue

Webster City women answer the Big Questions Lindsay Henderson


V.5 ISSUE 4 NOV. ‘18 FEATURES: 4 The Women’s Issue

1 8 Volunteering is second nature by Billie Shelton

EVERY ISSUE: 6 8 1 2 1 4 1 6 2 2 2 5 2 6

Let’s Eat Savvy Senior Landmarks City Scene Kid’s Corner Tidbits by Tiff Picture Perfect Pets Parting Shot

On the Cover PUBLICATION INFORMATION

OURhometown

4

CONTRIBUTORS

MANAGING EDITOR - ANNE BLANKENSHIP WRITERS - BILLIE SHELTON PUBLISHER - TERRY CHRISTENSEN ADVERTISING - DANNY BAESSLER, GLORIA RASMUSSEN GRAPHIC DESIGN - MICHELLE COLSHAN

Direct inquiries to: 720 Second Street, Webster City, Iowa 50595 • 832-4350 Our Hometown is published monthly by The Daily Freeman-Journal, with all rights reserved, Copyright, 2018.

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

3


Tell Usabout YOU lindsay

Henderson

I was born in Stratford but grew up here in Webster City with my parents Jeff and Karen Anderson, and my older brothers, Joe and Shawn. In school, I was active in the fine and performing arts and cheerleading. After graduation, I attended Iowa Central Community College and then La’ James International in Fort Dodge. After working several years as a cosmetologist, I sold my beauty salon in Stratford and returned to school to finish my bachelor’s degree in Sociology at Iowa State University, which was a big challenge for a 30-year-old single mother of two, but the experience truly expanded my horizons. After completing my degree in 2013, I moved back to Webster City and went to work for Iowa Central Community College where I directed several career training grants and programs over the course of four years. During that time, I got remarried and started my graduate program in Community Development, again at ISU. I was very fortunate last November to land this dream career opportunity as the Community Vitality Director for my hometown of Webster City.When not working I enjoy spending time with my husband Scott, and our three kids Brody, Tucker, and Karina.

Q What’s important to you?

Family comes first of course, but I will admit to being a bit of a workaholic, and I spend a lot of time caught up in my own world of ideas and projects. My husband is good at helping me stay grounded and unplugged, which is great because our kids are growing up so fast and becoming such interesting and beautiful people that I don’t want to miss any part of these next few years with them in middle and high school. What drives me in my work is a desire to shape and sustain a high quality of life here in Webster City. What I want for my kids and everyone else’s is that even if they choose to leave for a while and experience other places, eventually they feel the call home and that there are always opportunities waiting here for a happy life.

Q What do you love about Webster City?

I think our resilience and ability to accomplish great things together is something to be proud of. It’s easy to forget and take for granted what we have done and what we have, but collectively we have preserved, expanded, and built the kinds of amenities that many communities large and small would envy. What sets us apart from other towns is that although we are also fortunate to have had very generous philanthropists in our city, many of our projects are done through contributions large and small that come from all corners of the community. The power of the collective here is impressive. It means we don’t have to wait for one hero to save the day, but we all get the chance to be heroes and feel a sense of ownership for those special places in our community.What are you building for our future? I have been reading a book called Palaces for the People by Eric Klinenberg which talks about a community’s social infrastructure which is defined as the shared physical spaces that foster rich civic life, social capital, and a sense of unity within the community (think of our library, churches, parks, even the coffee shop.). So at least a couple of projects I have on the burner are about helping to create more of those spaces that allow people to connect, and in doing so, supporting the social networks that are the foundation of every healthy community. This is going to sound much more pretentious than I want it to but think of me as the social architect or the alchemist behind the scenes, connecting people and resources to help great things happen. I am not here to lead every effort, but rather to empower others to lead and imagine and create the kind of community they want to live in.

Q What are you working hardest on?

There is no shortage of opportunities to effect positive change here, but often projects move painfully slow and I really can’t do everything at once. In reality, I have barely even scratched the surface of what I hope to accomplish during my time here. Right now, I’d say that the partnership with the University of Iowa for the Initiative for Sustainable Communities program is consuming a lot of my time and energy, but for good reason. Throughout this semester and the next, we have students from fifteen different departments in the college working on at least 16 different projects and counting. The partnership is proving to be incredibly useful to our community. We could never have had the capacity to do and explore so many things at once without them!

4 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018


Tell Usabout YOU lynn

McKinney

My name is Lynn McKinney and I have lived in Webster City all my life. I’m currently employed at Town & Country Insurance as a Personal/ Life Agent. I have been with Town and Country for 15 years. I have served on Young Agents Board. I started serving on the Webster City Chamber Board in 2016 and currently serving as the board President. I will be serving on the Career & Technical Education advisory committee for the school year 2018-19. I’m married to Marty and have two kids, Taylor who is 17 and Ty who is 14. I love to attend sporting events and enjoy spending time with family and friends.

Q What’s important to you?

What is important to me is making difference for my community and everyone that is close to me. I want to be that person that they rely on and know that I’m doing my best to make a difference.

Q What do you love about Webster City?

I love everything about Webster City. What speaks for the town is I have lived here all my life. Webster City has so much to offer and such a great place to raise a family. We have the conveniences like a bigger city does while still holding that small town feel. The best thing about Webster City is the community.

Q What are you building for our future?

What I’m building for the future is getting a chamber director for our community. The chamber board and I are working hard on finding someone that has the skills to give our members outstanding service. I like to stay active in the community to make sure it stays a place where people can come and raise a family. I enjoy seeing the changes year after year and all the new faces and am proud to offer a helping hand when needed. Whether it would be personally through the Chamber or another organization.

Q What are you working hardest on?

The one thing that I’m working hard on (besides hiring a director) is making sure the daily needs of the chamber is getting taken care of. Thank you to all the volunteers, Chamber Board, B&I board, retailers, and the community for helping us along the way. {continued on page 10}

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

5


LET’S EAT

Our Hometown Recipe Corner

Holiday Turkey Serves 15

1 fresh turkey, about 15 pounds 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 quart apple cider 2 teaspoons dried poultry seasoning Coarse sea salt & freshly ground black pepper 1. Remove the giblets from the turkey and discard (or save for another use). Rinse the turkey inside and out and pat dry with paper towels. Rub it all over with salt and pepper. Refrigerate, uncovered, for at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours. During that time, the surface of the turkey will become visibly dry and the skin will tighten; this encourages a nice crisp skin on the finished bird.

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2. Remove the turkey from the refrigerator 1 hour before you plan to start roasting. Preheat the oven to 450 F. 3. Put the turkey on a rack set in a large, flameproof roasting pan. Drizzle the oil over the top. 4. Roast for 1 hour. Reduce the oven temperature to 175 F. Pour the cider into the roasting pan and sprinkle the poultry seasoning in the liquid. Continue roasting until an instantread thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a thigh (but not touching bone) registers to 170 F. Transfer the turkey to a carving board, tent loosely with aluminum foil, and let rest for about 15 minutes (see tip). 5. Meanwhile, skim the fat from the surface of the liquid in the pan. Put the roasting pan over two burners and bring the pan drippings to a boil over high heat. Cook until the juices reduce and thicken slightly, enough to coat a spoon, about 10 minutes. Taste for seasoning. Carve the turkey and serve with cider pan juices. 6. Resting tip: Slow-roasted meats need far less resting time (pretty much none) than those that are traditionally roasted. The reason for resting meat that has been roasted at a high temperature is to allow juices that have collected in the cooler center time to migrate back into the dryer (hotter) exterior sections after it comes out of the oven. Because slowroasted meats are cooked evenly and a temperature that keeps most of the juices in place, a resting period is largely unnecessary. A brief resting time does allow the meat to become a little firmer as it cools, making it easier to carve.

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NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

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SAVVY SENIOR by Jim Miller

HOW TO CAPTURE YOUR ELDER LOVED ONES’ STORY

Dear Savvy Senior, I am interested in making a video of my 82-year-old parents’ life story/legacy and how they want to be remembered. With the holidays approaching, I thought this could be a neat gift to my older siblings, but I could use some help. What can you tell me?

Youngest of Five

Send your senior ns questio to

?

Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org

Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

8 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018


DEAR YOUNGEST,

A personal recording of your parents’ life story could be a wonderful holiday gift and something you and your family could cherish the rest of your lives. Here are a few tips to help you get started.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

Your first step is to find out if your parents are willing to make a legacy video, which would entail you asking them a number of thoughtful questions about their life in an interview format in front of a video recording device. If they are, all you’ll need is a smartphone or camcorder and a list of questions or prompts to get them talking.

QUESTIONS AND PROMPTS

To help you prepare your list of questions for your parents’ video interview, go to “Have the Talk of a Lifetime” website at TalkofaLifetime.org. This resource, created by the Funeral and Memorial Information Council, offers a free workbook that lists dozens of questions in different categories. Some of these include: earliest memories and childhood; significant people; proudest accomplishments; and most cherished objects. This will help you put together a wide variety of meaningful, open-ended questions. Old photos of your parents, their family members and friends are also great to have on hand to jog your parents’ memory and stimulate conversations. After you select your questions and photos, be sure to share them with your parents ahead of time so they can have some time to think about their answers. This will make the interview go much smoother.

INTERVIEW TIPS

RECORDING EQUIPMENT

If you have a smartphone, making a video of your parents’ story is simple and free. However, you may want to invest a “smartphone tripod” to hold the phone while you conduct the interview, and a “smartphone external microphone,” which would improve the audio quality. You can find these types of products at Amazon.com for under $20. Most smartphones today have good quality cameras and have the ability to edit/trim out the parts you don’t want. Or you can download a free video-editing app like Magisto or Adobe Premiere Clip that can help you customize your video. If you want a higher quality video, consider purchasing a HD camcorder. Sony, Panasonic and Canon are the top-rated brands, according to Consumer Reports. These can run anywhere from a few hundred dollars, up to $1,000 or more.

Memories

Arrange an interview time when your parents are rested and relaxed, and choose a quiet, comfortable place where you won’t be interrupted. You may need several sessions to cover everything you want. When you get started, ask your parents to introduce themselves and ask a warm-up question like “When and where were you born?” Then ease into your selected questions, but use them as a guide, not a script. If your parents go off topic, go with it. You can redirect them to your original question later. Think of it as a conversation; there’s no right or wrong thing to talk about, as long as it’s meaningful to you and your parents. Also, be prepared to ask follow-up questions or diverge from your question list if you’re curious about something. If you’d like to hear more, try “And then what happened?” or “How did that make you feel?” or “What were you thinking in that moment?” And end your interview with some reflective questions, such as “What legacy would you like to leave?” or “How do you want to be remembered?”

of a

Lifetime

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

9


Tell Usabout YOU deb

Brown

Many people in town know me as the former Chamber director. I’ve lived an entire life before that! I grew up in Geneva, Iowa and went to college. I followed my college roommate to Chicago and lived there for almost 25 years. I married, have two stepsons, 6 grandchildren and 1 great granddaughter. My husband and I lived in Thomasville, North Carolina for 5 years and came back to Iowa because my father was very sick and my family needed me. There are many residents of small towns who have ‘come back’ to take care of sick relatives. Like me, many have enjoyed being back in their small town! Truly, small towns offer more opportunities to make a difference in the world, to build your community into a magnificent place and create a better home for our children.

Q What’s important to you?

God, family, work that matters. God is everywhere around us and leads us to greater joy, if we but follow. My brother and his family are still in Geneva, and I spend a lot of time with my great nieces and nephews. Four of the seven have visited the Webster City Fire station and love it here! I get back to Chicago and see my family there 3 or 4 times a year. I’ve had many jobs in my lifetime; foreign casualty insurance underwriter, bartender, reset team member, farm kid, retail management, office work and of course several years of chamber work. For the last decade I’ve written and blogged, organized speaker’s events, learned social media and been a huge fan of small towns. I am now able to say I’m doing work that allows me to help people and their small towns. I travel a lot, stay in towns for several days and meet many new people, and show them idea friendly steps they can take for a brighter future.

Q What do you love about Webster City?

The residents never give up. They really care about this town. I’m having a great time seeing younger people step up and getting things started. It’s their time to shine, to try their ideas out and start new businesses. I’m a huge fan of the movie theater, and how this town worked so hard to save it. It’s a great example of what we can do if we set our minds to it. I love that we have businesses in town where we can get almost everything we need. It’s a big deal!

Q What are you building for our future?

I look for ways I can be involved. Small ways like helping wrap lights around the trees downtown, connecting people to each other, sharing the news and opportunities I hear. I shop local, and frankly, we all need to. Spending our money in our town goes a long way to create the kind of town we want to live in. My work involves small towns, and the way we can bring practical ideas to them for a brighter future. That includes my own town! Each week I write a blog post relating to small towns. Each month Becky McCray and I host a video series on topics that small towns want to know more about. I speak all over the US on these subjects too. I believe in rural, and there’s something we all can do to make it better. Big ideas, small steps, gathering our crowd, building connections - creating magic. (www.saveyour.town for info)

Q What are you working hardest on?

Bringing the Idea Friendly method to small towns. Too often we get stopped by BIG ideas and don’t know how to make them happen. The Idea Friendly method lets those big ideas, and small ones, to get accomplished. It’s a process, and it is so much fun to work with communities who want to get things done! We are no longer waiting on six people in a backroom making decisions for our communities. We are crowdsourcing our own future. The power to make change is in the hands of everyday people. {continued on page 20}

10 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018


NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

11


LANDMARKS

DO YOU

How well know Hamilton County?

Look at the photos and see if you can identify these local landmarks.

Photo #1

Submit your entry. Correct answers will be entered into a drawing for 2 MOVIE PASSES to the Webster Theater Please include the name of the building icon on which the Landmark is located, your name & phone number. Submit your entry at lifestyles@freemanjournal.net or deliver to The Daily Freeman Journal at 720 Second St., Webster City, IA 12 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018

Photo #2 October Answers: Photo # 1 New shelter house at Little Wall Lake Photo # 2 Bell at the corner of the Stanhope City Park

WINNER-WINNER: No winner in October


Jamaican Punch

Greet guests with a homemade concoction

Adults tasked with hosting friends and family at home may want to serve up a homemade concoction for their adult guests. The following recipe for “Jamaican Punch” from Elise Petersen-Schepelern’s “Cool Smoothies” (Ryland, Peters & Small) can be just the thing to set parties apart.

Serves about 16 to 20 6 limes (3 juiced, 3 sliced) 1⁄2 bottle ginger wine 1 bottle wine rum or vodka Sugar, to taste 3 lemons, sliced 1 starfruit (carambola), sliced (optional) 1 pineapple, cut lengthwise into long wedges, then crosswise into triangles Sprigs of mint, to serve Put the lime juice, ginger wine, rum or vodka, and sugar into a pitcher and stir until the sugar dissolves. Fill a punch bowl with ice, add the sliced fruit, and pour the ginger wine mixture over. Stir well and serve with sprigs of mint.

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NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

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CITY SCENE Fall is definitely upon us with the crisp air and the changing colors. It won’t be long before winter sets in and leaves most of us longing for spring and summer again. As I get older, I really don’t care for the frigid temperatures that winter brings. Don’t get me wrong, I love that we experience all four seasons here in Iowa, but I would be fine with a much shorter winter and only seeing the white stuff a week before to a week after Christmas. There is a lot happening in and around Webster City right now. The intersection work at Fair Meadow Drive and Superior Street is nearing completion, they are in full construction mode working on the new Kwik Star convenience store and the new Dollar Tree store, and multiple new homes are being built in the community to name just a few of the positive things occurring around town right now. On a sad note, it was recently announced that after many years serving the people of Webster City and the surrounding communities, the Webster City K-Mart store will be closing by the end of December of this year. I empathize for the men and women who are losing their jobs due to this closure and wish the best for all of them as they move forward with whatever their future holds. This is a time when I reflect on how lucky we are to have local merchants to provide goods and services so that we do not have to go out of town for many of the things we need. I encourage everyone to do all that they can to support our local businesses so that they can be successful and continue to serve the Webster City community for many years to come. Lastly, as winter is coming and as much as I would like not to see the ice and snow that comes with it, it is inevitable. The transition to winter defensive driving will be necessary before we know it. My hope is that everyone will take the extra time to slow down and stay safe while traveling in the upcoming winter months!

Councilman Matt McKinney

14 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018

It Starts with Gratitude A few weeks ago, all I could think about was the water streaming into my basement from every direction. By that time my husband and I were already deeply invested in adding a finished bedroom and bath down there. In fact, we were in the home stretch, with the rooms already framed and ready for drywall, but then, for the first time ever, we had a wet basement. I was spitting mad and prepared to walk away. It didn’t matter that it had been an extraordinary amount of rain and that many others were having the same trouble or worse. In those moments, we try to justify our feelings by finding more reasons to be mad, so in my mind, the to-do list for our house grew while my patience shrunk. It no longer mattered how much work we had already put into making this house our home. I WANTED OUT. It can be like this for our community sometimes too. A perceived setback like the loss of a business or two, while worth mourning, can cause us to lose perspective completely. How many times have you seen a Facebook comment saying it is time to pack it up and give up on our town at any hint of bad news? So, how do we turn this thinking around? For me, it starts with gratitude. I am grateful that the water came before the drywall was up and flooring was down and that my husband then installed a sump pump giving us some piece of mind for the future. You bet we probably should have taken that step first, but we learned a soft lesson instead of a hard one, and for that I am also thankful. I am also grateful to see signs of healthy growth in our community, with new development in every corner, and I’m thankful for the wonderful people that make this a great place to live. It’s not that we don’t still have a long to-do list, of that there is no doubt, but we have too much invested, and there is far too much to love about this place. We are going to have our ups and downs, but we should all try hard to stay focused on our many blessings and stand firm and committed together for a brighter tomorrow.

Happy Thanksgiving, Webster City!

Lindsay Henderson, Community Vitality Director

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

15


CITY SCENE Fall is definitely upon us with the crisp air and the changing colors. It won’t be long before winter sets in and leaves most of us longing for spring and summer again. As I get older, I really don’t care for the frigid temperatures that winter brings. Don’t get me wrong, I love that we experience all four seasons here in Iowa, but I would be fine with a much shorter winter and only seeing the white stuff a week before to a week after Christmas. There is a lot happening in and around Webster City right now. The intersection work at Fair Meadow Drive and Superior Street is nearing completion, they are in full construction mode working on the new Kwik Star convenience store and the new Dollar Tree store, and multiple new homes are being built in the community to name just a few of the positive things occurring around town right now. On a sad note, it was recently announced that after many years serving the people of Webster City and the surrounding communities, the Webster City K-Mart store will be closing by the end of December of this year. I empathize for the men and women who are losing their jobs due to this closure and wish the best for all of them as they move forward with whatever their future holds. This is a time when I reflect on how lucky we are to have local merchants to provide goods and services so that we do not have to go out of town for many of the things we need. I encourage everyone to do all that they can to support our local businesses so that they can be successful and continue to serve the Webster City community for many years to come. Lastly, as winter is coming and as much as I would like not to see the ice and snow that comes with it, it is inevitable. The transition to winter defensive driving will be necessary before we know it. My hope is that everyone will take the extra time to slow down and stay safe while traveling in the upcoming winter months!

Councilman Matt McKinney

14 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018

It Starts with Gratitude A few weeks ago, all I could think about was the water streaming into my basement from every direction. By that time my husband and I were already deeply invested in adding a finished bedroom and bath down there. In fact, we were in the home stretch, with the rooms already framed and ready for drywall, but then, for the first time ever, we had a wet basement. I was spitting mad and prepared to walk away. It didn’t matter that it had been an extraordinary amount of rain and that many others were having the same trouble or worse. In those moments, we try to justify our feelings by finding more reasons to be mad, so in my mind, the to-do list for our house grew while my patience shrunk. It no longer mattered how much work we had already put into making this house our home. I WANTED OUT. It can be like this for our community sometimes too. A perceived setback like the loss of a business or two, while worth mourning, can cause us to lose perspective completely. How many times have you seen a Facebook comment saying it is time to pack it up and give up on our town at any hint of bad news? So, how do we turn this thinking around? For me, it starts with gratitude. I am grateful that the water came before the drywall was up and flooring was down and that my husband then installed a sump pump giving us some piece of mind for the future. You bet we probably should have taken that step first, but we learned a soft lesson instead of a hard one, and for that I am also thankful. I am also grateful to see signs of healthy growth in our community, with new development in every corner, and I’m thankful for the wonderful people that make this a great place to live. It’s not that we don’t still have a long to-do list, of that there is no doubt, but we have too much invested, and there is far too much to love about this place. We are going to have our ups and downs, but we should all try hard to stay focused on our many blessings and stand firm and committed together for a brighter tomorrow.

Happy Thanksgiving, Webster City!

Lindsay Henderson, Community Vitality Director

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

15


16 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018


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NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

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Volunteering is second nature for Ellsworth couple

Barquists pitch in to help neighbors, community in many ways

By Billie Shelton

editor@freemanjournal.net

ELLSWORTH — “If you want something done, ask Larry and Linda,” is something you’re likely to hear around town about the Barquists, long-time Ellsworth residents who have contributed to their community in a myriad of ways since they moved to town 28 years ago. Volunteering for the Barquists has taken numerous forms. There’s Trinity Lutheran Church, where for more than twenty years Larry has been head usher and assistant head usher. Linda taught Sunday School at Trinity for 21 years and served on the board of education and the board of mission and outreach. She also picks up church members in town to drive them to church on Sundays that are wet, snowy, or windy. In addition to their church work, Linda is involved in the community, where she’s taken on a variety of tasks over the years. For two years she was vice-president of the Ellsworth Community Association and then served as its president for three years. Since the community association serves food at the long-standing Bingo games held every week at the Ellsworth gym, the couple was regulars there on Saturday evenings. Linda baked pies and prepared and served other staples such as biscuits and gravy to the hungry gamers plus

18 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018

other townspeople who came by for some good food. On the municipal level, Linda has served two terms on the Ellsworth planning and zoning committee. And she was secretary for Ellsworth Horizons, a volunteer group which through a grant sponsored several programs in the late 1990s and early 2000s to benefit local residents. One was called Plant to Plate, where Linda was active helping local folks till their gardens and plant vegetables for their tables. She also spearheaded and coordinated a program to deliver meals to homes where they were needed in Ellsworth. When Ellsworth Extravaganza is held on alternating years, the Barquists are right there in the middle of it, doing what they can to assure the success of the event. Together they serve on the parade committee. And, thanks to her love of working with kids, that afternoon Linda leads the games in the park for kids—old-fashioned ones like a balloon toss, tug of war, and egg- on-a-spoon race. The couple also helps with the annual Ellsworth School alumni banquet. With all this going on, it’s no surprise, perhaps, that Linda


earned the Governor’s Award in 1992 for her volunteer efforts in her community. Those volunteer tasks are worked around the seasonal job the Barquists have done together for a decade now— mowing the Homewood Cemetery as well as several area acreages and apartment buildings. Linda takes care of the lawns at the church and parsonage, too. A native of Radcliffe where she graduated from high school in 1970, Linda attended beauty school and had a beauty shop on main street in Ellsworth for six years. “I liked being in business in a small town,” remarked Linda, who still finds time to fix hair regularly for several local women in their homes in addition to working part time now in another small-town business, Heartland Market in Jewell. The couple, married 47 years, makes sure there’s enough time to spend with their family, too. Now the family circle includes not only their two grown sons, but also two daughters-in-law and five grandchildren, the oldest an ISU student and the youngest a newborn. “We’re thankful to live so close,” Linda remarked about their family. “It’s good to be here for them when we’re needed. And we like to attend the grandkids’ sports and activities.” One son and his family live in Jewell, the other son and family are in North Liberty.

I n her down time, a few years back Linda completed her Associates degree online. While the standard refrain of “nobody wants to get involved” and “the same people always volunteer” is a common thread when talking about the state of small towns in these times, Linda has her own approach to getting people involved. “Be open-minded about things that could happen in your town to make it better,” she recommends. “You have to have an open mind to accept other ideas.” The best way to recruit new volunteers, she believes, is to be prepared. “And you have to let them know what you’re looking for,” Linda noted. “If you work well and they know it, they’ll say yes.”

NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

19


Tell Usabout YOU maureen

Seamonds

Q What’s important to you?

Actually everything is important to me! Family, community, country. I really want to work to be part of a community known for creative problem solving. As an artist/designer, I like to approach situations as design activities. Designers like to see what is already there and find creative ways to enhance something or develop ideas from that. Our community has a legacy of entrepreneurship from its earliest settlements. One of my favorite photos is one that was published in the FJ in a story by Nancye Kayser with a group standing out west of town discussing the need for drainage/sewer tiles and their plans to invest themselves to make it happen because the community needed that source. It just has such a spirit of “get it done�!

Q What do you love about Webster City?

I love that is has a history of giving back to the community. As a child, I grew up using Kendall Young Library and Fuller Hall because someone in another generation cared enough to provide for the children of the future. Those gifts also ensured that the children would be able to be educated and active.

Q What are you building for our future?

I work at my studio, which is the Produce Station Pottery, almost every day and I try to provide creative work and learning activities on a daily basis. I still love having students around. I am also always trying to build a future that provides a home and loving care for our son who has high medical needs and lives at Elm Street House. We are so grateful to all the caregivers who have been part of our life with Nick. We are so fortunate to have a place here in our town where we can see him everyday. Over the past twelve years, that house has generated approximately 3.5 million dollars in payroll revenue that stays in this area. My dream is to have a community where we understand that we can meet the needs of all our citizens, no matter what they are, in a way that is also beneficial to our community.

Q What are you working hardest on?

I am working with Legacy Learning Boone River Valley to create opportunities for life long learning celebrating art and nature. My dream is to create a destination learning center that would attract visitors to come and stay and for locals to find peace and contentment and balance for their busy lives. We are blessed with a beautiful river and scenic land throughout the county and we think we can create an economic paradigm that provides economic growth by capitalizing on these natural resources.

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NOVEMBER WILD GATHERINGS Holiday Wreath Making Kevin Rubash November 10, 2018

Saturday, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm Location: Interior Spaces, 631 2nd St, Webster City, IA Tuition: $20 Materials Fee: $10 Paid to Instructor The Holidays are coming, and so are those out of town guests. Why not impress your family and friends with items you’ve made yourself. Kevin is the owner of “Interior Spaces” and is a designer with many years of experience creating interior landscapes

Holiday Ornaments Jessica Furman November 17 and 24, 2018

Two Saturday, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm or 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Location: Produce Station Pottery, 723 Seneca St, Webser City, IA Tuition: $35, no materials fee Create hand-made porcelain ornaments for that special tree. Legacy Learning and Jessica will be holding an ornament making class using piped paper clay; a technique Jessica used in college to build a large delicate sculpture. In this class, we will use the same technique, but on a smaller scale to make lightweight, lacy ornaments. We will also make some ornaments using rolled clay and stamps. Jessica Furman is a great example of a dabbler. She enjoys anything creative like paining, sculpting, pottery, metal working, photography, carpentry, and stained glass. If you enjoy a fun-loving, relaxing, and social time, then you’ll love Jessica’s classes.

Flavored Vinegar Susan Schmitz November 19, 2018

Monday, 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm Location: Produce Station Pottery, 723 Seneca St, Webster City, IA Tuition: $20 Come and join the fun! Enjoy some relaxing adult beverages, while you create! You know cranberries make a great sauce for Turkey. Join us for un-traditional holiday use in flavored vinegar. Goes well to enhance the flavor of any white meat. Make your own bottle of flavored vinegar to cook or give as a gift. The result is a bottle full of red holiday liquid that is a dream to cook with and display on a shelf. Bring your own clean decorative bottle, or purchase one at the workshop.

DECEMBER WILD GATHERINGS Snowman Guided Painting Diane Sinclair December 1, 2018

Monday, 20:00 pm - 4:00 pm Location: Backcountry Winery, 3533 Fenton Ave, Stratford, IA Tuition: $45 Enjoy a fun, relaxing afternoon at the Backcountry Winery near Stratford, Iowa making a holiday Snowman painting. Follow easy instructions and learn some basic techniques that will help you interpret your favorite snowman and take home a holiday decoration or gift. The class will be fun for moth beginners and advanced students. Come with a desire to create something beautiful! You will have fun exploring this medium and you will be very surprised with how easy it is to complete a beautiful painting! Diane has been teaching art to children and adults for many years. She works in many different mediums, but acrylic and oils are her favorites.

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Our blogger Tiffany Larson’s latest blog post is in! Read Tidbits by Tiff every month at:

www.freemanjournal.net

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Tell Usabout YOU tiffanyLarson

I was born and raised, and currently live in, Webster City. I graduated from Webster City High School in 1998, and graduated with a BS in Child, Adult, and Family Services from Iowa State University in 2005. I have served as the Community Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (CAPP) Coordinator for the Bee Inspired CAPP Program through Building Families since 2008. My position allows me to work with local service providers, community and faith organizations, parents and other trusted adults, school districts, businesses, and youth aged 13-19 in Hamilton, Humboldt, and Wright Counties (as well as the GarnerHayfield-Ventura School District in Hancock/Cerro Gordo Counties). Over the last decade, I have been active in providing a variety of age-appropriate, medically accurate, evidence-based comprehensive services and supports to help reduce the rates of adolescent pregnancy, STDs, and additional pregnancies to young people. I enjoy spending time with family and friends, volunteering in the community for various causes and activities, attending Trinity Lutheran Church, listening to music, cheering on the ISU Cyclones, and spoiling my nephew rotten! I was elected as a Webster City Area Chamber Board member and joined Rotary After Hours as a Charter Member. I was presented the 2014 Service Key Award by the Iowa State University Alumni Association Club of Hamilton County. I also enjoy sharing my “Tidbits by Tiff” blog with readers in the Daily Freeman Journal.

Q What’s important to you?

Spending as much time with my family as I can is probably one of the most important things. When my nephew came along, I didn’t know how much love I could possibly have in my heart for one small tiny human being. He makes me want to be better, do better, and encourage others to be better. Being a positive role model in his life helps drive me. My job is extremely important to me. I am constantly looking at professional development opportunities so that I can provide the best programming and services in the communities in which I serve. My community is very important, as well. I want to be involved, share ideas, see those ideas put into action, and volunteer. Faith is also an important part of my life. I enjoy attending church, being a part of our Council, and partaking in the intergenerational activities.

Q What do you love about Webster City?

I love that I feel safe and at home here. The size is just right for me. It has the perfect small-town charm. I love being able to go into Mornin’ Glory and strike up a conversation with anyone; from the youth, to the tourists, to the Veterans enjoying their morning brew. The Kendall Young Library is amazing, and we have so many opportunities to explore the outdoors. The sense of pride for our school and community is something I get to witness each and every time I get involved and buzz around the town. I love how our community takes pride in rallying together in times of need; whether the loss of a loved one, someone battling an illness, or sharing support for those going through hard times. I love that our community rallied to restore the local Webster Theater, execute the RVTV trifecta, host the downtown block party, and offer other community events. Webster City is truly a hidden gem in the heart of Iowa.

Q What are you building for our future?

Youth are our future mentors and leaders. In order for them to go out in the world they need to be healthy and have the skills and resources they need to succeed. I am most looking forward to increasing awareness of health-related topics and positive youth developmental opportunities in schools and alternative settings throughout the tri-county area. I have a passion for education, prevention, and awareness. I want to sprinkle that passion around like confetti.

Q What are you working hardest on?

As Coordinator for the Bee Inspired CAPP Program, I have the pleasure of providing youth and adults programming and resources on sexual health topics. My two favorite times of the year are Let’s Talk Month in October and Teen Empowerment Month in May. These initiatives help youth gain the skills they need to be successful in life, and at the same time help provide tools for adults to be more approachable on these sensitive topics.

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Take your DFJ or Our Hometown on your next getaway, snap a picture and send it to us! You could be featured here in Readers On Location. Send photos to:

lifestyles@freemanjournal.net

City Scene pg.18

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FLOWER CART “Your Complete Florist” www.flocart.net

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t c e f r e p e r u t c i p

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NOVEMBER 2018 | OUR HOMETOWN

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26 OUR HOMETOWN | NOVEMBER 2018

November Our Hometown  

Published by The Daily Freeman Journal

November Our Hometown  

Published by The Daily Freeman Journal

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