Fort Dodge Today Magazine

Page 1

FORTDODGE today SEPTEMBER 2017

Also inside

WELCOM HOME E Justin Mik

os

A Look back AT THE HISTORY of Webster County


Cabinets‌.Your Way Choose from our amazing line of cabinets including custom designs and colors. Whether you’re updating your kitchen, bath, laundry room, office, or entertainment center, we have a terrific array of options for any budget.

plus call for a FREE pre-measure and take an extra

$50 OFF your purchase Come meet with one of our designers Kelsie, Wendy, and Ashley

3026 5th Ave. South Fort Dodge, IA 50501

(515) 576-4176

OPEN Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Sunday

www.carpetworld-flooringamerica.com Photos are representational only. Actual merchandise may not exactly match photos shown. Although we make every effort to ensure that our advertising is accurate, we cannot be held liable for typographical errors or misprints. See store for complete details. 1297-41540.


PIZZA OR ICE CREAM

HAVE YOUR CHOICE OF

WHEN YOU OPEN A NEW CHECKING ACCOUNT, CHOOSE A PRESTO® PIZZAZZ® OR CUISINART® ICE CREAM MAKER. OFFER ENDS 9.16.17 Ask us about our new Smart Choice Checking powered by BaZing!

Cuisinart® Ice Cream Maker

Presto® Pizzazz® Plus Pizza Oven

HOT CHECK OUT OUR

CONSUMER

LOAN RATES!

Fort Dodge 1608 1st Ave 515-576-5111

Member FDIC

Receive your free gift when you open a new UBI checking account by September 16, 2017. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is effective as of June 26, 2017 and subject to change after account opening. Preferred checking account: $2,500 - $9,999: .15% APY; $10,000 or more: .25% APY. The Business Analysis account: $10,000 $49,999: .15% APY; $50,000 - $99,999: .20% APY; $100,000 and up: .25% APY. Fees may reduce earnings. One free gift per customer. Subject to account approval. Gift given at account opening with $200 minimum balance requirement. The value of the gift may be added as interest for IRS 1099-INT reporting purposes.


Meeting Rooms Available Lower level accommodates up to 100 people Eilers Room accommodates up to 35 people

Melissa Wilson, Bar Manager and Samantha McMahon, Restaurant Manager

515-576-2010

Jct Hwys 169 & 20 • Fort Dodge

Check out Facebook for our September Dinner Specials Dining Room Menu: M - TH 4-10PM • F - SAT 4-11PM Lounge: M - SAT, OPEN at 2PM


TODAY Contents FORT DODGE

SEPTEMBER 2017 VOLUME 28 ISSUE 5

FEATURES 3C

ON THE C OVER: A Look Back Our Ethnic diversity.

1 0 C Museum Locations 1 2 C Connect with History 1 8 C Local Reads 2 0 C Investing in History 2 2 C Welcome Home Justin Mikos 2 8 C The Foodie

Old Fashioned Milk Pie

3 5 C Finding New Purpose The various ways to repurpose dressers

3 8 C Tracing Your Own History

Relatively easy ways to trace family histories

P.

EVERY ISSUE

3

1 7 C Teacher Spotlight 3 0 C Fort Dodge Pet 3 2 C Snapshots 3 6 C Shining Star 4 0 C Money Matters

ON THE

COVER

Ethnic diversity has always been a reality in the history of Webster County. Join us as we take a look at some of our community’s heritage.

4 2 C Calendar 4 8 C Parting Shot Fort Dodge Today

1C


today

CONTRIBUTORS AMELIA ”AMY” PRESLER is the youngest of

10 children by Jack and Virginia Presler. If you talk to her long enough, she will find the connection you have to one of her sisters or brothers – much like six degrees of separation, but in this case, one degree of separation via sibling. Her favorite pastime is reading and her tastes range from historical novels to contemporary family dramas to spy thrillers. Amy works at the Fort Dodge Public Library, which has an outstanding collection of reading material for every age and type of reader and if you come in, she’ll be glad to help you find something to read.

DAWN BLISS

is an Otho native, returned to Fort Dodge from North Carolina after completing active duty service with the U.S. Army. She deployed three times, once to Iraq and twice to Afghanistan. Prior to enlisting, she was a staff writer for The Messenger from 2000 to 2008.

HAILEY BRUESCHKE

is a recent graduate from Iowa State University where she double majored and attained bachelor’s degrees in both English and Technical Communication. Along with that, she also earned her Associates of Arts degree from Iowa Central Community College years prior. Hailey used to write for the Fort Dodge Today Magazine when she was in high school, covering the student spotlight and class notes sections.

HANNAH WADLE is a junior at Fort Dodge Senior

High. After graduating, she would like to attend Iowa State University to major in Journalism or Business Administration. She enjoys colorguard, writing, and reading. Hannah is involved in Speech club, Teens Against Human Trafficking, colorguard, and choir.

PUBLICATION INFORMATION

Publisher Larry D. Bushman lbushman@messengernews.net

Editor Jane Curtis jcurtis@messengernews.net

Advertising Director Cory Bargfrede cbargfrede@messengernews.net

Circulation Director Grant Gibbons ggibbons@messengernews.net

HR / Accounting Melissa Wendland mwendland@messengernews.net

Sales Manager Tricia Winninger twinninger@messengernews.net

Inside Sales Brittney Koster bkoster@messengernews.net

Art Director Lois Raner lraner@messengernews.net

Direct inquiries to: The Messenger 713 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 50501

Advertising (515) 574-4418 Fax (515) 573-2148 Editorial (515) 573-2141

Volume 28 Issue 2 If your address has changed since your last issue, call (515) 574-4404

The Fort Dodge Today Magazine is published monthly by The Messenger, with all rights reserved, Copyright, 2017. 2C

Fort Dodge Today


A Look back diversity comes to webster county By Roger Natte

I

mmigrants and non-whites have been attracted to this area for the same reasons that native-born whites have

come — economic opportunity and a better life. For the most part, the county needed outsiders. Local economic expansion could only occur if there were people who could be employed in the new industries. During most of our history, virtually every industry at one time hired new immigrants or blacks for jobs the local native-born could not This is likely the wedding photo of Nellie and

or did not care to do.

Algot Julander. The photo was taken in Dayton. Julander is a Scandinavian name. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

Fort Dodge Today

3C


The first settlers in the county were largely of Anglo extraction, many of whom traced their families back several generations in America. All were frontier families who moved up the Des Moines River from southern Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri. In 1860, only 1 percent of the population of the county were foreign-born. That was to soon change. By 1870, it had increased to 20 percent, and by 1880, it had reached 38 percent. The 1895 census showed a numerical increase in foreignborn by the percentage of the total population had fallen to 28 percent. Twenty-five nationalities were represented in the county including, surprisingly, people from China, Russia and the Pacific islands.

This family had probably recently immigrated to the area. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

AN INCREASE IN IMMIGRATION According to the 1905 census, Webster County’s population was 27,400, with 13,000 — or 49 percent — being immigrants or the first generation born in the United States.

This boy was

That percentage remained the same in 1915, but the composition of the population had changed, with increasing numbers coming from areas other than northern Europe. These new immigrants came from nations in which the culture, religion and language was considerably different from the first immigrants. The new wave of immigrants included those from Russia, the

4C

Fort Dodge Today

1905

-Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss

probably a recent immigrant. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

27,400 with 13,000 — or 49 percent — being immigrants Webster County’s population was

or the first generation born in the United States.


-Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss

A group of men and boys pose while working at a chicken farm in Webster County. Teodor Helland, fourth from the right in the second row, immigrated to Webster County from Norway. He later returned to his home country.

1870 A goal was set for 10 counties in northwestern Iowa — including Webster County — to bring

5,000

new people a year to the area for the next decade.

Austrian Empire — which included Czechs, Bohemians, Slavs and Hungarians — Italy, Greece, Syria and Mexico. Blacks also increased their numbers during this time. Most of these came because there were jobs here and industry needed workers. Until 1895, the state of Iowa, as well as local communities, actively recruited people. In 1870, the Iowa Board of Immigration was established, which not only published promotional literature in eight languages, but sent agents to Europe to seek potential immigrants. A goal was set for 10 counties in northwestern Iowa — including Webster County — to

bring 5,000 new people a year to the area for the next decade. It was estimated that every new immigrant increased the area’s wealth by $100 a year, which would total $27.5 million over the next 10 years. Industries also recruited during much of the history of Webster County. In 1881, blacks were recruited from Tennessee to work in local coal mines. Railroads recruited black men from Louisiana to work on railroad construction at the turn of the century. During and after World War II, black men were recruited to work in the brick and tile plants and meat packing plants.

Fort Dodge Today

5C


Pictured from left are Gus Pappas (O.K. Coffee Shop), Tony Pappas, Maria Pappas, Dionysia Katsoulis, Gut Katsoulis, Freda Pappas, George Chardoulios (owner of Melody Grill), Frank Varis, Katherine Varis, (Hadgis daughter), (unknown Hadgis), Ida Hadgis, Katina Demos and Paul Demos (owner of the Maywood Cafe). -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

EVEN TODAY, RECRUITMENT CONTINUES The type of worker recruited now is usually one who is highly skilled, such as a chemist or a veterinarian for Elanco Animal Health, or a doctor for the local hospital.

Norwegian immigrant O.M. Oleson made a name for himself in Fort Dodge. This building housed his pharmacy business and provided space for other businesses and organizations as well. Oleson helped organize the Grieg Mandskor, a Norwegian men’s choir, which practiced on the second floor of the Oleson building. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

6C

Fort Dodge Today

Low-skilled workers, however, still are needed, especially because local labor chooses not to take certain jobs. Latinos find employment in agricultural areas — walking beans, detasseling corn and working in canning plants. Packing plants hire Latinos and newly-arrived immigrants from eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Whenever industries could not or cannot find local labor, they have turned to immigrants and minority groups, and as they came, the local economy grew. The period of the greatest economic growth of Fort Dodge was also the period of the greatest influx of ethnic groups.


Whenever industries could not or cannot find local labor, they have turned to immigrants and minority groups, and as they came, the local economy grew.

The Prusia-Sears building on Central Avenue was under construction in this photo. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

Fort Dodge Today

7C


Immigrants were recruited to work in various industries in Webster County, including the mines. This photos shows a group of miners in Kalo. -Submitted photo

Between 1890 and 1915, Fort Dodge’s population grew from about 4,500 to 20,000 — more than a 400 percent increase. Most of that increase came from the outside. Without those new groups, local industry and Fort Dodge would have remained stagnant. Historically, the jobs taken by the new arrivals have been entrylevel, and some of the jobs have

only been temporary or seasonal, but many of the workers stayed on and they or their children took other jobs, established their own businesses and played an increasing role in the Webster County community. There appears to be no exception to this rule. Every immigrant group has become an asset to the local community.

1915 Between 1890 and 1915 Fort Dodge’s population grew from about 4,500 to 20,000 — more than a

8C

Fort Dodge Today

400 Percent increase.


ANTI-IMMIGRANT ATTITUDES All ethnic groups were not welcomed with open arms. In fact, the reverse seems to have been true; no ethnic group has escaped prejudice and opposition. At the same time, Webster County has never had a strong antiimmigrant or anti-minority sentiment either. Unlike many places, local newspapers seldom reflected much racism or xenophobia. In the 1920s, when the Ku Klux Klan was making inroads across the nation, it seems to have had no impact locally. Market Street between Fifth

The Snell building is shown

Street (now Sixth) and Sixth

under construction in 1914.

Street (now Seventh), 1860. -Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

-Courtesy Webster County Historical Society

Fort Dodge Today

9C


Craving a little

History?

Indulge yourself by visiting one of these fine museums: POCAHONTAS COUNTY Pocahontas County Historical Society City Park on North Third St., Laurens

Fort Museum & Frontier Village WEBSTER COUNTY Fort Museum & Frontier Village 1 Museum Road, Fort Dodge

Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Contact the museum by calling (515) 573-4231.

Webster County Museum

515 School St., Otho

Open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursdays and Saturdays. The museum can be contacted by calling (515) 972-4544.

HUMBOLDT COUNTY Humboldt County Historical Museum 905 First Ave. N., Dakota City

Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

KOSSUTH COUNTY Camp Algona POW Museum

114 S. Thorington St., Algona

Open 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays; admission is $3 for adults, $2 for students, 10 and younger are free. The museum office can be contacted by calling (515) 395-2267.

Kossuth County Agriculture and Motorsports Museum 800 East Fair St., Algona

Open to 1 to 4 p.m. pm Saturdays and Sundays; admission is $5. The museum office can be contacted at (515) 395-1200.

10C

Fort Dodge Today

Call to arrange a visit. Contact Dorothy at 712845-4496 or Connie at 712-841-2222.

Fonda Museum

110 N. Main St., Fonda

Open on special occassions or by appointment. Admission is free. Appointments can be made by calling (712) 288-6675.

PALO ALTO COUNTY Historical Society of West Bend

7 Third St. S.W., West Bend

Open from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, as well as by appointment. Admision is $4 for adults, $2 for children between ages 12 and 3 with those younger than 3 admitted for free. The complex can be contacted by calling (515) 2009234.

Palo Alto County Historical Museum 804 Monroe, Emmetsburg

Open by appointment. Call 712-852-3781 or the Emmetsburg Chamber of Commerce 712-8522283.

Victorian Museum on Main

1703 East Main, Emmetsburg

Open 1 to 4 p.m. on Thursdays and Sundays. Also open by appointment. The home can be contacted by calling 712-852-3871 or 712-852-2283.

WRIGHT COUNTY Heartland Museum Highway 3, Clarion

Open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The museum can be contacted by calling (515) 602-6000.


CALHOUN COUNTY Calhoun County Historical Museum 150 High St., Rockwell City

Open from 1:30 to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays from April 30 to the end of September.

Historic Central School

WILSON BREWER HISTORIC PARK - WEBSTER CITY

-Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss

Eagle Grove Historical Museum

401 West Broadway, Eagle Grove Contact Joel Halverson at (515) 450-3856 to schedule a tour or visit.

HAMILTON COUNTY Wilson Brewer Historic Park and Museum

220 Ohio St., Webster City

Open 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.

211 South Center St., Lake City

Open 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or by appointment. The school can be contacted by calling (712) 464-8639.

SAC COUNTY Sac City Museum Village and World’s Largest Popcorn Ball 13th and Main St., Sac City

Open Memorial Day through Labor Day.

Iowa Rural Schools Museum

22 2nd St, Odebolt Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Take Me Home To The Place I Belong!

M-S 8am - 6pm • Sun 10am - 6pm communityorchard.com

Fort Dodge Today

11C


C

Connecting the community with its history takes a bit of creativity and a little restructuring in this day and age. Experiences are at the heart of what Cheryl Sherry, executive director of the Fort Museum and Frontier Village, believes will draw more people to visit the complex of buildings and displays. “We have a very rich and diverse history that needs to be celebrated,” she said. “Also, we recognize the need to connect with the younger generations in our community.” Technology has changed so much, she said, and it has changed the way people receive and process information. Stagnant displays in a case cannot catch and hold the attention they once could, so Sherry has developed what she calls a “3-D history” approach when planning events and exhibits.

12C

Fort Dodge Today

“We have a very rich and diverse history that needs to be celebrated.,” - Cheryl Sherry

“We want to engage all of the senses when people come out to the museum,” Sherry said. “We want people to not only see it, but also feel it, hear it.” The new Ambassadors Program has been launched as part of this multi-sense concept, she said. Each building on the grounds has been outfitted with a QR, or machine-readable, code that can be scanned by the camera function of a smart phone. A short film vignette featuring local children and adults will then play on the phone and tell a story about the building to which the code relates. Interactive events, such as a children’s story time, a continuing


H i s Connect o r y EXPERIENCES, CONVENIENCE KEYS TO GETTING PEOPLE INVOLVED IN HISTORY

WITH

By Dawn Bliss

Jessica Einwalter, left, Misty

McKay, center, volunteer and

living history coordinator, and

Cheryl Sherry, executive director

of the Fort Museum & Frontier Village, each have a role in

creating experiences at the

museum that can connect people to the community’s history.

concert series, an art class in the garden and an adult game night have also been planned. In addition to encouraging people to attend events, Sherry said the museum would also like to see more people come out to volunteer. A variety of opportunities exist, including re-enacting roles and docent hours, as well as small woodworking and gardening projects to be completed. People can also assist with history and curation. “People can get involved in all different ways,” she said. “I really love when people of all ages get involved together. And we have opportunities for all ages, all interests. Fort Dodge Today

13C


Misty McKay, left, volunteer coordinator and living history coordinator for the Fort Museum & Frontier Village,

We need the support of the whole community. This is our history museum; they need to know that, to feel that.”

talks with Hailey Carstensen, Mason Carstensen and Hayden CarstenseN, all of Fort Dodge, about the different buidlings at the museum.

Bringing history alive is also the way the annual Oakland Cemetery Walk aims to get people to feel a connection with the various past characters who shaped their community. However, the way the event is structured is changing to encourage more public involvement, said Rick Carle, commissioner of the Friends of Oakland Cemetery. n outdoor tour of the historic A cemetery in June, the walk is often impacted by weather, he said. It can either be raining or it can be too hot for people to enjoy. To alleviate this issue, the walk will be moved inside on both days, rather than just one like it has been in the past. Two performances are planned, one at the Friendship Center on the Friendship Haven campus and one in the Opera House at the Fort Museum. “We thought we would try this approach for two reasons,” Carle said. “First, the terrain of the cemetery can be rough for some people, and second, we don’t have to worry about the weather.” hether to offer a tour of the W cemetery to point out the resting places of the characters being featured in the performances is still up for debate, he said. This tour would not include re-enactors and would be done the night before the performances. fficials are hoping the change in O how the walk is done will also help draw more volunteers. “ The hardest thing about the cemetery walk is finding people to portray the characters,” Carle said. “It’s asking a lot of them, but hopefully this year we will make it a little easier.” In the past, they had to do a repeat performance of eight minutes of memorized material as groups came around about every 10 minutes. With 14C

Fort Dodge Today

Rick Carle, commissioner of the Friends of Oakland Cemetery Board of Directors. The board organizes the annual Oakland Cemetery Walk as a way to bring history alive for people.

“The hardest thing about the cemetery walk is finding people to portray the characters.


It’s asking a lot of them, but hopefully this year we will make it a little easier.” - Rick Carle

the change of venue, the actors will now only have one performance on Saturday and one on Sunday. Additionally, the scripts will be researched and written for them. “We really want to encourage people to be involved,” Carle said. “We need both portrayers and board members, and really, the way to see if it’s something for you is to come to one of our meetings, sit in and see if you have an interest.” The Friends of the Oakland Cemetery board meets at 7 p.m. every third Tuesday of the month January through August at the Smeltzer House. The dates for the next Oakland Cemetery Walk will be June 9-10, 2018. All proceeds from the walk go toward upkeep of the cemetery, including cleaning and repairing headstones.

Fort Dodge Today

15C


Fort Dodge, IA

Upcoming Events Mother Goose in the Garden

10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Aug. 26 Fort Museum and Frontier Village

Stories, games, treats and children’s tea. Re-enactors in costume will be celebrating literature from past centuries. Open to children ages 3 to 11 years. Cost is $10 for children and $7 for adults. For reservations call 515-573-4231. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Smithsonian Exhibit Reception

6 to 8 p.m., Sept. 8 Livery Building at the Fort Museum and Frontier Village

Exhibit explains and highlights the westward movement of the pioneers

River Valley Root Music Concert Series Featuring music by Beaver Creek 4 6 to 9 p.m., Aug. 29 Fort Museum and Frontier Village

Admission is a free-will donation. Food, wine and beer will be available for purchase. Proceeds go to benefit the Fort Museum.

3D History 4 Me 10:30 p.m., Sept. 9

Explore! A Night Out at the Museum

Admission is a free-will donation. Food, wine and beer will be available for purchase. Proceeds go to benefit the Fort Museum.

$10 students w/ ID & $12 Adults

Pancakes, Pioneers & Buck Skinners

7 to 9 p.m., Sept. 16 Fort Museum and Frontier Village

8:00 a.m., Sept. 30

$7 adults/ $5 kids available for purchase. Proceeds go to benefit the Fort Museum.

www.fortmuseumfv.com 16C

Fort Dodge Today


teacherSPOTLIGHT Hannah Wadle

Leading the

Band

Jeremy Smith Q: What is your name and where are you from? A: Jeremy J. Smith, born and raised in Lake City, Iowa. Q: What do you teach and at what school? A: Director of athletic bands at Iowa Central Community College. There I am responsible for marching band, pep band, percussion ensemble, and private percussion lessons. Q: How long have you been a teacher? A: I started as an adjunct at Iowa Central 10 years ago, full-time for the last five. Q: How long have been teaching this school? A: 10 years. Q: What other jobs have you held? A: While part-time at Iowa Central, I was the manager of Hertz Local Edition at the Fort Dodge Regional Airport. I also used to own and operate a mobile disc jockey business. Q: What is the best part of being a teacher? A: I enjoy being able to represent our school through our performances. I consider my group a “team”, and we are definitely not confined by a classroom. Q: Why did you become a teacher? A: If Iowa Central wasn’t so focused on creating more opportunities for the student experience, I wouldn’t be doing this. Q: Who inspired you when you were a student? How did they inspire you? A: I often say I channel my inner David Williams in what I do. Dr. Williams was my first director at Morningside, and is now a professor of music education at the University of South Florida. Whether at a football game with the marching band, or on instrumental tour, or in and out of rehearsal, to running a

“I consider my group a “team”, and we are definitely not confined by a classroom.”

- Jeremy Smith

jazz festival (which we’ve now started one at Iowa Central) he wanted to give the students a good experience, possibly a new experience, many good memories, and share a bad joke or two. I use these concepts in what we do. Q: What are some of your favorite memories or funniest moments as a teacher? A: My favorite moments are when the students are complimented in what they do, or make comments about what they do. For example, in May, the drumline took a trip to Pella where we had some social time during the Tulip Festival, took in a steel pan clinic, and then performed in a lighted parade. Getting back on the bus, everyone’s voices were so loud in excitement from what they had just done. One member even exclaimed, “Jeremy, we have to do this again next year.” That’s why we do what we do.

Q: If you could pursue any other career, what would it be? A: From my recent experiences in planning trips and events, I could see myself working with schools and organizations to do that. (Unless something happens and one of my favorite bands would be a drummer.) Q: What are your hobbies? A: I enjoy watching sports, and sharing music and events with my children.

Jeremy Smith, Director of athletic bands at Iowa Central Community College, leads the music at a sporting event recently.

Fort Dodge Today

17C


local

READS

by Carol Foltz

There are many books by local authors as well as books about local history.

They Sang for Norway: Olaf Oleson’s Immigrant Choir by Ane-Charlotte Five Aarset

There are many books by local authors as well as books about local history. "They Sang for Norway: Olaf Oleson's Immigrant Choir" by Ane-Charlotte Five Aarset is a recent addition to this list. They were brothers from Norway's "Red County." One was a guerrilla leader, the other a president of a singing association. One emigrated to America, the other stayed home to fight for Norwegian independence. Both had an impact on their nation's history. This is the story of the one who left. Olaf Martin Oleson was among the hundreds of thousands of Norwegians who emigrated to the United States during the nineteenth century. With strongly rooted connections to the homeland, Oleson settled in the Midwest and became a successful businessman, philanthropist, and politician. He also helped form influential organizations in his new land, including the Norwegian-American Historical Association and the Norwegian Singers' Association of America. With the choir group, Oleson shared songs of his native Norway throughout North America - while raising money to support the illegal army and new political party forming back home in the fight for liberation from Sweden. In "They Sang for Norway," Ane-Charlotte Five Aarset tells the story of O. M. Oleson her great-grand-uncle - and his contributions to the politics and culture of two nations. It is an immigrant's tale, an exploration of Norwegian-American life, and the story of music's importance to a community and people.

18C

Fort Dodge Today

Sermons in Wood, Glass and Stone by Roger Natte

Growing up Jewish in Small Town America: A Memoir by Elaine Fantle Shimberg

Award-winning author Elaine Fantle Shimberg, best known for her numerous books on health subjects and family issues, has now written her memories of growing up in the 1940s and 1950s in a small Iowa town with only 32 Jewish families and has done so with humor and honesty. She never got to play Queen Esther in her religious school play (but she did play Mary in the school Christmas pageant) nor detassle corn, but she had her first radio show there, and made lasting friends. Follow Shimberg as she grows from a feisy youngster itching to learn to a young adult learning who she is and where she’s going.

One finds them everywhere, from the pyramid and eye which appear on our nation’s currency to the golden arches which much of our world identifies with hamburgers. Symbols pervade our lives. Symbols also play an important role in our religious lives: teaching and reinforcing certain values or beliefs, inspiring a sense of reverence and bringing artistic beauty into religious settings. The First Presbyterian Church of Fort Dodge has a wealth of symbolism within its walls, far more than might be expected in a church with a Calvinist tradition. Its sanctuary with its carved wood and stained glass is recognized as one of the most beautiful in the community.


Fort Dodge 1850-1970

Fort Dodge Baseball History Quiz Book

by Roger Natte

by Jerry Patterson

Fort Dodge was founded in 1850 as a military post to police the Iowa frontier. A subsequent land boom created fortunes that were reinvested in the local economy. The town soon earned the nickname “Mineral City” because of the extensive deposits of coal, gypsum, limestone and clay. By 1900, the city was a rail center and the world’s largest producer of gypsum products. With a highly diversified economy, the city prospered and by World War I was able to claim to have more skyscrapers per capita than any other city in the Midwest. Between 1900 and 1925, Fort Dodge enjoyed the role as an important political center and the home of two U.S. senators, the director of the U.S. Mint, the solicitor of the Department of the Treasury, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, and the first presidential press secretary and speechwriter. Sons and daughters of the community went on to establish national reputations in art, music, literature, science and journalism. Images used in this volume come primarly from the archives of the Webster County Historical Society and were chosen to represent the changing character of the community from 1850 to 1970.

Postcard History Series Fort Dodge by Megan A. Bygness and Pamela S. Bygness

In Novembrer 1850, at the juncture of the Des Moines River and the Lizard River, the US Territorial Army established a post named Fort Clarke. The following year, it was renamed Fort Dodge in honor of US senator Henry Dodge of Wisconsin. After the troops were disbanded in 1854, Maj. William Williams purchased the existing buildings and infrastructure from the US government and platted the city. Over the course of the 19th century, Fort Dodge developed into a booming city known as the leading industrial and cultural center of northern Iowa. The images in this book illustrate the world of 19th and 20th century Fort dodge, presenting the strange and astonishing beauty of a bygone era and the incredible progress we have inherited.

Fort Dodge, Iowa, has a long and interesting baseball history. Jerry Patterson, who lived in Fort Dodge all his life, always took a keen interest in the local version of our national pastime. A good share of the information within this publication was gleaned from former Fort Dodge baseball players and fans Leo Flynn, Joe Bohan, Glen Osmandson, Bob Anderson, John Macek, Leroy “Bugh” Lampe, Glen Brethauer, Ray Nordstrom and August “Gub” Calandrine.

Historic booklets include: “Frontier Foundations: Creating an Iowa County” by Roger Natte

“The Fort Dodge Collegiate Institute” by Roger Natte

Gene Person Story by Gene Person

“The Gene Person Story” describes his exploits in World War II as an engineer on a B-24 Liberator Bomber. One instance happened when a 500-pound bomb hung up on one end of the shackle and was swaying back and forth in the bomb bays. The first time he missed the bomb and almost sailed out the bomb bay doors. Two other crew members tried to release the bomb but it wouldn’t come off the shackle. His second attemt was successful as it sailed out through the open bomb bay doors without hitting anything and assuring the crew a safe flight home. His life included 12 different encounters with death, with the angels helping him over the separate ordeals.

“To Make Good Men Better: Black Masonry in Fort Dodge, Iowa” by Roger Natte

Fort Dodge Today

19C


Investing in

The Past Antique furnishings, decor, coins, and toys remain popular among consumers. Unlike the mass-produced merchandise of today, antiques have history, and their endurance through decades, if not centuries, is a testament to the quality craftsmanship and materials used to create these often timeless pieces.

c

Housewares

20C

Fort Dodge Today


Antiques also might be more affordable than many shoppers think. Savvy shoppers may find mid-range “brown furniture,” which constitutes some antique wood pieces, more affordable than reproductions. Homeowners and apartment dwellers who want their rooms to stand apart often rely on antiques to provide a unique ambiance.

Furniture

Antique shopping also is a “green” endeavor. Antiquing is an eco-friendly practice, putting to use items that have been recycled and reused. Antiques also can be a good investment, as they generally retain their value while adding texture, contrast and personality to any room of the house.

Jewelry Understanding antiques can take time, but even the novice can develop an eye for pieces that strike their fancy. And thanks to the wealth of information about collectibles and antiques available online, shoppers have constant access to information about antiques at their fingertips. Shoppers may even be able to comparison shop on their mobile phones. Mid-range antiques can be particularly easy to buy thanks to the available inventory. Novices may want to begin by exploring mid-range antiques. As they gain more knowledge and expertise, shoppers who covet antiques can move on to high-end pieces that are more expensive. Some antiques are put in the same category as fine artwork and are considered just as valuable.

items homeowners may already own. For those looking to downsize a collection or simply liquidate an estate, antiquing is a great way to get hands-on experience. Rummaging through antique stores or markets can be a relaxing experience as well. And many antique enthusiasts find shopping for antiques is like a treasure hunt to find that coveted piece and unearth a bit of history in the process.

Old Tech

Another reason to browse and shop antiques is to learn about the value of similar Fort Dodge Today

21C


Welcome Home Justin Mikos

-Today photo by Dawn Bliss

By Dawn Bliss John Mikos, left, talks

A sense of heritage prompted Justin Mikos to return to his hometown of Fort Dodge after college, but the feeling of inclusion is what he said will keep him here for years to come. Mikos works with his father, John Mikos, at the Mikos & Matt Furniture Co., 3336 Fifth Ave. S. The store is currently closed as it undergoes repairs from damage done by a storm that swept through the area in May. Rather than letting the situation be a setback, Justin Mikos said they are viewing the downtime needed for roof repairs as a chance to remodel the showroom. “You always run into challenges,” he said,”especially with big projects. It’s the same for us with our store as it is for the city council and the community. You have to have faith and a little creativity to solve problems.” And so far, Mikos said, he likes the direction Fort Dodge is going as it tackles challenges and makes changes to the city landscape.

22C

Fort Dodge Today

with his son Justin -Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss Mikos on the loading

dock of the Mikos & Matt Furniture Co. store. Justin Mikos returned to Fort Dodge to take his place as the third generation to run the store.


e m o H e m o c l e W Heritage drew Mikos home, sense of belonging keeps him here

“One of the projects they have going on now is the Warden Plaza,” he said. “It’s a huge undertaking, but if they can restore it, bring it back and update it, it’s going to be great. Some of the ideas they have for it are exciting.” Plans for the historic former hotel in downtown are still fluid, but officials have said it may become the site of apartments, shops, a recreation and fitness center and a performing arts theater. It currently sits empty along First Avenue South. As a member of Young Professionals of Fort Dodge, Mikos helped give public tours through the building last year and said he can really see the potential there. He said he can also see the potential in the community itself, but word needs to get out more.

jects o r p e h t One of now n o g n i ve go . they ha n Plaza e d r a is the W aking, t r e d n uge u re it, It’s a h o t s e r hey can te it, a d but if t p u ack and b t i t. g n bri e grea b o t g n it’s goi

- Today photo by Dawn Bliss

John Mikos, left, studies building plans with his son Justin Mikos. Justin Mikos returned to his hometown of Fort Dodge after college and an internship to work with his father with Mikos & Matt Furniture Co.

Mikos - Justin Fort Dodge Today

23C


CENTER

STAGE 524 Central Avenue Fort Dodge, IA 955-2330

Handcut Steaks • Pasta • Seafood

515-576-2010

Located Inside

Jct Hwys 169 & 20 Fort Dodge

Meeting & Party Rooms Available!

Your Other Family Doctor!

2807 N. 15th St. • Fort Dodge 955-3631

Hours: M-F: 8-5 • Thurs: 8-6 • Sat: 8-Noon

akes, Order your C ies Today! Bars & Cook 1911 First Ave. North • 576-5095

KHI Solutions is a financial services brokerage firm dedicated to providing their customers with the highest quality products for the best obtainable value. This is accomplished by their professional team of people committed to providing superior service that is unmatched in their industry. As a full service General Agency, KHI oversees more than 450 independent agents across the state. While they may be most widely known for providing Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Iowa, KHI Solutions works with all the primary insurance companies. This gives KHI the opportunity to offer both commercial and private clients the best possible solution, tailored to their needs. KHI has always specialized in health insurance for both individual clients as well as businesses. Health Care Reform legislation can be confusing and the dedicated professionals at KHI are more than ready to advise their clients. Their agents have taken comprehensive educational courses and received a specialzed certification for the Affordable Care Act. Open Enrollment for health insurance coverage through the Health Care Marketplace (Exchange) will begin again starting November 1st, 2016 for coverage starting January 1, 2017. Our team at KHI is ready to assist individuals and businesses in figuring out which coverage will be the best option for them.

Health Care Reform legislation can be confusing and the dedicated professionals at KHI are more than ready to advise their clients.

KHI Solutions is committed to giving back to the community. Owners and staff are involved in a number of local service groups. The office is involved

3016 5th Ave. So. • Fort Dodge 24 Hour Service: 515-576-6676

24C

Fort Dodge Today

Call US today

with American Cancer Society Relay for Life of Webster County, the American Heart Association, MDA, American Red Cross and a number of other events which directly benefit the community. They have had several team members graduate from the Greater Fort Dodge Growth Alliance’s Leadership Class. Owner Brenda Eckard is the Past President of the Ford Dodge Area Chamber of Commerce. It’s no wonder that KHI Solutions earned the Chamber’s Small Business of the Year award in 2009 and was nominated again in 2010. Also, KHI in-house agents won the Individual Top Producer award by Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield Iowa each year from 2010-2015.

Brenda Eckard Owner/CEO

BRENDA ECKARD

ANDY HEJLIK

515-576-1800 800-657-8033

LYNN SCHREDER DOREEN COPPINGER

JENNY WEISS MELANIE RUSSELL

NIIKIA LACINA TRICIA McCALEB ALLYSON BEEN ERICA HELMERS LYNSEY FRASER

KORANN KENDALL SARA LUNDBERG

MISTY BETHEL NICOLE THURMAN RHONDA WILLIAMS

An Authorized Independent Agent for

920 3rd Avenue South Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-573-2316 www.blanden.org

JULIE STANLEY

MON 11AM-9PM TUES-SAT 11AM-10PM SUN 10AM-2PM

CALEY BLOOM

130 N. 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA 50501 www.khisolutions.com

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ©2012 Wellmark, Inc. IA-15-P-12

SPECIALS

CATERING ORDER TO GO

809 CENTRAL AVE www.oldebostons.com 515-955-5333

Find coverage confidence. Offroad • Commercial • Farm Service AutomobileTires & Wheels

Health Insurance Options to Fit Your Small Business Needs

515-576-6481 612 S 32nd St, Fort Dodge Sales, Service, & Rentals

“Your Complete Water Store”

Happy

a

More Iowans choose Wellmark for their health coverage. Call me today and be confident in your health plan choice. Call me today 515-576-1800 • 800-657-8033 BRENDA ECKARD AUTHORIZED INDEPENDENT AGENTS FOR

130 N. 25th Street • Fort Dodge, IA 50501

515-576-1800 • 800-657-8033 www.khisolutions.com

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ©2015 Wellmark, Inc. W-50108024 08/15

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!

515-576-2202

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 2021 6th Ave. S. • Fort Dodge, IA

Lunch Served: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. www.teathymeatsadies.com

1919 1st Ave North Fort Dodge, IA 576-5544 “Iowa’s Premiere Destination Store of Choice!”

www.PartyProIowa.com

Labor Day Open 10am - 5pm on Monday, Sept. 5th

Mon-Fri 10am - 9pm Sat 10am- 8pm Sun 12pm - 6pm 217 So. 25th St. • Fort Dodge, IA • 955-8557

Fort Dodge Today

25C


CENTER

STAGE 524 Central Avenue Fort Dodge, IA 955-2330

Handcut Steaks • Pasta • Seafood

515-576-2010

Located Inside

Jct Hwys 169 & 20 Fort Dodge

Meeting & Party Rooms Available!

Your Other Family Doctor!

2807 N. 15th St. • Fort Dodge 955-3631

Hours: M-F: 8-5 • Thurs: 8-6 • Sat: 8-Noon

akes, Order your C ies Today! Bars & Cook 1911 First Ave. North • 576-5095

KHI Solutions is a financial services brokerage firm dedicated to providing their customers with the highest quality products for the best obtainable value. This is accomplished by their professional team of people committed to providing superior service that is unmatched in their industry. As a full service General Agency, KHI oversees more than 450 independent agents across the state. While they may be most widely known for providing Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Iowa, KHI Solutions works with all the primary insurance companies. This gives KHI the opportunity to offer both commercial and private clients the best possible solution, tailored to their needs. KHI has always specialized in health insurance for both individual clients as well as businesses. Health Care Reform legislation can be confusing and the dedicated professionals at KHI are more than ready to advise their clients. Their agents have taken comprehensive educational courses and received a specialzed certification for the Affordable Care Act. Open Enrollment for health insurance coverage through the Health Care Marketplace (Exchange) will begin again starting November 1st, 2016 for coverage starting January 1, 2017. Our team at KHI is ready to assist individuals and businesses in figuring out which coverage will be the best option for them.

Health Care Reform legislation can be confusing and the dedicated professionals at KHI are more than ready to advise their clients.

KHI Solutions is committed to giving back to the community. Owners and staff are involved in a number of local service groups. The office is involved

3016 5th Ave. So. • Fort Dodge 24 Hour Service: 515-576-6676

24C

Fort Dodge Today

Call US today

with American Cancer Society Relay for Life of Webster County, the American Heart Association, MDA, American Red Cross and a number of other events which directly benefit the community. They have had several team members graduate from the Greater Fort Dodge Growth Alliance’s Leadership Class. Owner Brenda Eckard is the Past President of the Ford Dodge Area Chamber of Commerce. It’s no wonder that KHI Solutions earned the Chamber’s Small Business of the Year award in 2009 and was nominated again in 2010. Also, KHI in-house agents won the Individual Top Producer award by Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield Iowa each year from 2010-2015.

Brenda Eckard Owner/CEO

BRENDA ECKARD

ANDY HEJLIK

515-576-1800 800-657-8033

LYNN SCHREDER DOREEN COPPINGER

JENNY WEISS MELANIE RUSSELL

NIIKIA LACINA TRICIA McCALEB ALLYSON BEEN ERICA HELMERS LYNSEY FRASER

KORANN KENDALL SARA LUNDBERG

MISTY BETHEL NICOLE THURMAN RHONDA WILLIAMS

An Authorized Independent Agent for

920 3rd Avenue South Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-573-2316 www.blanden.org

JULIE STANLEY

MON 11AM-9PM TUES-SAT 11AM-10PM SUN 10AM-2PM

CALEY BLOOM

130 N. 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA 50501 www.khisolutions.com

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ©2012 Wellmark, Inc. IA-15-P-12

SPECIALS

CATERING ORDER TO GO

809 CENTRAL AVE www.oldebostons.com 515-955-5333

Find coverage confidence. Offroad • Commercial • Farm Service AutomobileTires & Wheels

Health Insurance Options to Fit Your Small Business Needs

515-576-6481 612 S 32nd St, Fort Dodge Sales, Service, & Rentals

“Your Complete Water Store”

Happy

a

More Iowans choose Wellmark for their health coverage. Call me today and be confident in your health plan choice. Call me today 515-576-1800 • 800-657-8033 BRENDA ECKARD AUTHORIZED INDEPENDENT AGENTS FOR

130 N. 25th Street • Fort Dodge, IA 50501

515-576-1800 • 800-657-8033 www.khisolutions.com

Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Iowa is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ©2015 Wellmark, Inc. W-50108024 08/15

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!

515-576-2202

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 2021 6th Ave. S. • Fort Dodge, IA

Lunch Served: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. www.teathymeatsadies.com

1919 1st Ave North Fort Dodge, IA 576-5544 “Iowa’s Premiere Destination Store of Choice!”

www.PartyProIowa.com

Labor Day Open 10am - 5pm on Monday, Sept. 5th

Mon-Fri 10am - 9pm Sat 10am- 8pm Sun 12pm - 6pm 217 So. 25th St. • Fort Dodge, IA • 955-8557

Fort Dodge Today

25C


-Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss

“The Fort Dodge Growth Alliance really has a lot going on,” Mikos said. “They have the ‘#This Is Fort Dodge’ page and the ribbon cuttings, but you can’t do enough advertising, especially on social media. Social media is a big thing for people my age.”

“When I was in Davenport and the Quad Cities, it felt hard to

An asset of the community that should touted more, he said, is the way the town has of making you feel at home, making you feel as if you matter.

get connected. In Fort Dodge,

“Fort Dodge is personal,” Mikos said. “When I was in Davenport and the Quad Cities, it felt hard to get connected. In Fort Dodge, it’s more one-on-one. When you’re in a bigger city, you’re just a number; that’s not me. I want to make a connection; I want to be able to network with people.”

you’re in a bigger city, you’re

Also, the community seems eager to find ways to draw people back, he said. Ever since Rosedale Rapids was constructed, the city has been adding new activities and amenities to improve quality of life, as well as attract new jobs and industries.

continued on page 47C

26C

Fort Dodge Today

it’s more one-on-one. When just a number; that’s not me. I want to make a connection.,” - Justin Mikos

Justin Mikos, left, talks with Lacey Simmons, a design consultant with Mikos & Matt Furniture Co. Mikos said he returned to Fort Dodge after college to join his family business, but he expects to stay because of the progress he has seen and sense of inclusion he feels.


Proud to Provide Quality Service to Fort Dodge for over 50 Years!

Rising from the Storm! We are currently operating out of our warehouse as we build a brand new state-of-the-art showroom. We appreciate your patience and years of customer loyalty. We are happy to handle any special orders you may have until we re-open late fall.

Daniel Pharmacy 1114 Central Ave • Fort Dodge

3336 5th Ave S. • Fort Dodge, IA 50501

mikosandmatt.com

REMODELING

515-573-3431

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Sat.y 8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. • Sun. 10:30 a.m. -1 p.m.

HEATING/AIR

Moeller Furnace Company Heating & Air Conditioning

• New Additions • 3-Season Rooms & Patios • Remodeling • Roofing • Replacement Windows & Doors

• Storm Doors & Windows • Awnings • Siding & Insulation • Kitchens & Baths • Glass & Screen Insert Repair

429 1st Ave. S. • Fort Dodge, IA

515-576-6301 • (800) 401-9681 Email rojohns@frontiernet.net

Relax. It’s Rheem.™

• Rebates Available • Tax Credits Available

114 South 12th Street Fort Dodge, IA 50501

515-573-5831 Established 1912

Fort Dodge Today

27C


theFOODIE Jane Curtis

Old Fashioned Cream Pie 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup cornstarch 2 c. milk 1/2 cup or 1 stick of butter 1 tsp. vanilla Cinnamon

A

Mix together in a double boiler and add the vanilla. Pour into baked pie shell. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Bake at 375 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes.

h, the dairy.

Remember the days when the milkman delivered daily to the door? Few of us do. But in the days when large local dairies served entire communities — or farmers milked their own herd of dairy cows — the product of those cows made pie possible when there was little else to use for a filling. Hence, Old Fashioned Milk Pie or Old Fashioned Cream Pie. Whatever you used, it helped the home baker create a sweet something that went perfectly with a dose of strong coffee or nice cup of tea. Here’s a couple of recipes if you feel like baking a taste of the past.

by

28C

Fort Dodge Today

Jane Curtis

Old Fashioned Milk Pie

Old Fashioned Cream Pie II

1 unbaked pie shell

1 unbaked pie shell

1 cup sugar (Use white or brown. Brown sugar creates a denser flavor. White, a lighter sweetness.)

2 heaping tablespoons of flour

1/4 cup or little less of flour

4 tablespoons melted butter

Dash of salt

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup cream

1/4 cup cream

Milk

At least 1 cup of milk

Mix the sugar, flour and salt in a bowl, then pour into the pie shell. Add the cream, then finish filling the crust with milk. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes, then 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

In a bowl, mix the ingredients. Pour into the unbaked crust. Add the cream and fill crust with milk. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake 40 minutes longer.

Cinnamon


“For the Smile of Health�

Remember the days when the milkman delivered daily to the door? Vintage ads courtesy of The Messenger archives.

Fort Dodge Today

29C


Fort Dodge familyPET

LOST&FOUND

FINDING A LOST HAMSTER OR SMALL PET Leaving a cage door open and unintentionally allowing pets to escape is a common problem when kids care for small pets. Finding a missing gerbil, rat, hamster, or mouse can be challenging, but it’s something that should be done promptly to prevent injury to the pet and damage to a home. These rodents can chew, burrow and hide out, and parents do not want pets chewing on electrical cords or making holes in sheetrock walls.

An empty cage can be a scary sight when pet parents realize the small animal is now lost in the house.

Small animals like gerbils and hamsters make great first pets for animal-loving youngsters. Such pets are relatively easy to care for and don’t take up much space. A cage, food and some entertainment is often all that’s needed to keep these furry critters content. Small animals often provide the experience children need to grow acquainted with the responsibilities of caring for larger, more needy pets. But sometimes things may go awry. Children may overfeed a pet or forget to clean out the cage.

30C

Fort Dodge Today

These tips can make the process of locating missing pets a little easier. WORK IN THE EVENING. These small pets tend to be most active at night and rest during the day. Therefore, it’s best to begin searching after the sun has gone down. If that’s not working, draw the blinds and curtains to make a home darker in an attempt to draw the pets out.


W O SH UR O Y F OF PET

START IN THE ROOM WITH THE CAGE Close the door of the room where the cage is located once the pet goes missing. The pet may have not ventured too far if you are lucky. Close the other doors in the home to help contain the animal if he or she got into a different space. BLOCK OFF ANY EXITS Look for exits the pet may use to escape. This may include open vents, gaps in the molding, cracks in the floors, or any other areas that offer holes large enough to squeeze through. THINK LIKE A SMALL ANIMAL The pet is likely frightened and will want to hide away. Check obvious places like behind and beneath furniture. Look for cozy crevices, such as in shoes or under clothing. Bags, backpacks and open drawers also can be great hiding spots.

tore sle a v l a S rli Sugar and Aaron Ca

yL Loved b

aura

LISTEN CLOSELY The sense of sound is often more helpful than sight when trying to find missing gerbils, hamsters and other rodents. Listen for sounds of scratching or chewing. Very often these noises will lead you to pets’ hiding spots. LEAVE FOOD STATIONS. When all else fails, place a few food dishes around the house to draw out the animal. Monitor the dishes for activity. Try not to startle the pet if you get a chance to retrieve it. Place the cage by the dish being used and wait. A humane live trap also can help catch a lost pet.

Zoey Wa

r

g Loved by Jea n Warg

SUBMIT

A

PHOTO Please Include:

Pet’s name, Owner’s name Mail to:

Fort Dodge Today Magazine 713 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 50501

Or Email:

!

bkoster@messengernews.net

1302 1st Ave N. • Highway 7 • Manson, IA PIZZA • SNACKS • ATM SANDWICHES • MILK GROCERIES • BEVERAGES BAKERY • BREAKFAST MENU • LUNCH MENU

DINE IN • CARRY OUT 712-469-3434 www.cubbys.com

712-469-2400

Chicken Fort Dodge Today

31C


snapSHOTS September

Marian Home resident Lynn Wilson looks over a battery operated light that volunteers Jillian Cosgrove, 17, of Fort Dodge, and Mackenzie Halverson, 8, also of Fort Dodge, helped her activate during a resident’s move to new rooms that’s part of the home’s renovations. Eric Halverson, executive director, watches from the door.

Downtown Self-Self Supported Improvement District board president Steve Peterson, at left, along with Main Street Iowa state coordinator Michael Wagler, listen as Fort Dodge Mayor Matt Bemrich speaks during an Announcement Party for the new designation at First American Bank.

32C

Fort Dodge Today

Grace Williamson, 5, of Fort Dodge, concentrates on creating a Friendship Rock recently during a Rachel’s Challenge Team painting event at the Fort Dodge Community School Districts Central Administration Building.


Paxton Chance, 5, of Fort Dodge, tries on some of the Special Emegency Response Team gear during the National Night Out event in SnellCrawford Park.

Brantley Johnson, 2, of Rockwell City, is all smiles as he looks over a toy firetruck that was being used to promote one of the live auction items at the Friendship Haven Legends Tailgate fundraiser. The winner of the item got a free ride to school in a Fort Dodge Fire Department fire truck.

Alexandra Grammatikaki, of Crete, Greece, works on cleaning the altar painting at Emanuel Lutheran Church in Dayton. The project, commissioned to help the church celebrate their 150th anniversary in 2018, took about 4 days of work.

Fort Dodge Today

33C


snapSHOTS September

Otho Assistant Fire Chief Cody Wirt connects with the ball as he tees off on Hole 1 at the Fort Dodge Country Club during the annual Fort Dodge Firefighter’s Association Golf Tournament.

Kadian McCollough, 5, of Fort Dodge, gets some help from Mickie Shubin, Webster County Iowa Partnerships for Success coordinator at the spin art station during the 15th annual Back to School Bash. McCollough is going into kindergarten at Southeast Valley Elementary School.

Andrew Hampe, of Bode, brought his motorcycle riding blues fan dog Clyde S. Dale with him to the annual Lizard Creek Blues Society Blues Under The Trees at Sports Park Raceway south of Fort Dodge. Clyde, like any cool blues fan, has his own shades.

er your destination, ride the bus! Whatev

Beach, Mountains, Crossroads Mall, Fareway, Downtown & More!

DART

Midas council of government Agent

For schedule and more information Call: 515-573-8145 Office Hours: M- F 8am to 5pm - http://www.midascog.net

34C

Fort Dodge Today

Travel throughout US, Canada & Mexico available


finding new

purpose

After upgrading design styles or moving, there’s a good chance the average homeowner has a spare dresser or chest of drawers he or she may no longer use. Repurposing such furniture can make for an enjoyable weekend DIY project. With a change of color, removal of drawers or a few minor modifications, dressers can be transformed in many different ways. Here are a few ideas to get started.

TELEVISION STAND:

Sand and paint or stain the dresser to match the color scheme of your living room or family room. Remove the top row of drawers from the dresser to have cubby space to house electronics, such as cable boxes or DVD players. The remaining drawers can hold movie collections, spare remote controls, gaming systems, and much more.

The various ways to repurpose dressers

SERVING BAR:

Paint the dresser in an eyecatching shade and make sure to seal-coat it with a finish that is impervious to moisture. If time or budget allows, attach a piece of glass or tiles on top of the dresser to create a waterresistant, strong surface area. Store various serving glasses and cocktail accoutrements within the drawers. Place a few bottles of your favorite spirits and a decanter on a decorative tray.

STORAGE SHELVING:

Remove the drawers from the dresser and turn it into a storage mecca by using stackable plastic containers in spaces once occupied by the drawers. Keep craft supplies, collectibles or anything else you can think of inside.

KITCHEN ISLAND:

Small dressers can be repurposed into kitchen islands with a few modifications. Install casters on the feet so it can be moved around when necessary. Place butcher block wood or stone on top so you’ll have a sturdy cutting

One of the ecoming benefits to b t-yourselfer is a skilled do-i jects embrace pro the chance to to he new life in that can breat nate ig es d t ers migh th o at th s ct obje ile. or donation p for the trash ve sa ch items can Renovating su rely rovide an enti money and p ose for different purp the object.

or preparation surface area. Hooks hung on the side can hold frequently used kitchen utensils.

CHANGING TABLE:

Turn an older dresser into a changing table for a new baby. In addition, add a cushioned pad and some decorative trim to serve as a frame that keeps the pad in place. The drawers will keep wipes, diapers, onesies, and other supplies at the ready.

BENCH:

Remove the top drawers from the dresser. Add a piece of plywood to make a seat. Use the removed drawer faces on the inside back of the dresser since this area will now be visible. Paint the entire piece or stain it as desired. Fashion a cushion for the seat, and the bench is ready for an entryway or wherever you have space.

Fort Dodge Today

35C


M

y a s A e r i a l C r a t s g n i shin

WHAT IS YOUR FULL NAME AND AGE? Claire Asay, 13 years old WHAT GRADE ARE YOU IN? I’ll be in 8th grade in the fall of 2017

WHAT ARE YOUR HOBBIES? I LOVE to read, scrapbook and make music BESIDES SINGING, WHAT OTHER “ARTSY” THINGS DO YOU ENJOY? I play the clarinet in my school band and the ukulele in my free time and I enjoy doing so. WHAT DO YOU MOST ENJOY ABOUT PLAYING THE GENIE IN STAGE DOOR PRODUCTION’S PRODUCTION OF ALADDIN? I absolutely love playing the Genie!!! I think the reason why i like ti so much is because I get to be silly and sassy and loud and very animated. As the Genie, I don’t have to act like a normal, everyday person like most of the other characters. I have magic powers and I’ve been stuck in a lamp for 10,000 years, so I’m going to make this time I have out of my lamp worth it.

M 36C

Fort Dodge Today

&WFOU 3FOUBMT t 'PPE t $PTUVNFT t 4DSBQCPPLJOH 8FEEJOH t "OOJWFSTBSZ t #BCZ 4IPXFS t #BQUJTN $POĕSNBUJPO t #BMMPPOT BOE .VDI .PSF

VW $YH 1 3DUW\3UR,RZD FRP


Claire Asay plays the ukulele at right. Claire also plays the clarinet in school band.

Dentists do teeth. Lawyers do law. We do graphic design. You have your business, but graphic design is ours. Our staff of talented, experienced, professional designers and artists are some of the best in the area. We’ll create highquality pieces for you that will stand up proudly against anything you could get from some expensive ad agency, and we’re right there in-house to control the quality from concept to delivery.

Come in and see what we do.

M

515.573.2002

1012 First Avenue North • Fort Dodge, Iowa

WHO DO YOU LOOK UP TO IN THE MUSICAL THEATRE WORLD? My theatre role models are my sibling (especially), and all the other high schoolers at FDSH because that’s who I’ve been watching up on the stage for the past five years. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO UPON GRADUATION FROM HIGH SCHOOL? I plan on attending Brigham Young University (B.Y.U.) and then possibly going on an 18 month mission trip for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Go to www.fineartsassociation.com for a list of upcoming events and our members…..

Over 40 events each month!

To become a member or let us know about an event contact: Shelly Bottorff, Executive Director • fdfinearts@gmail.com Fort Dodge Today

37C


- Tracing your -

Own History T

he internet has put more information into our hands than generations past may have ever believed possible. One of the more unique ways the internet has opened doors is by providing a relatively easy way for men and women to trace their family histories. Once difficult to gather, information with regard to genealogy is now just a click away.

38C

Fort Dodge Today

Tracing one’s genealogy has become a popular pastime and one that is much more manageable thanks to the bevy of family tree and family lineage websites. Such sites work by gathering some key information, including the names and birthdays of certain relatives. The sites then use this data to create a more complete picture of family relations. On the popular genealogy site Ancestry. com, for example, suggestions pop

up with a potential relative’s name or further information about a loved one, which can then populate the family tree even further. In addition to knowing just who is in a family, tracing genealogy also can present a bigger picture of relatives’ occupations and military history, and may even shed light on their travel histories. Family tree sites can be enhanced by uploading images,


MANY PEOPLE ARE OPTING TO COUPLE THEIR FAMILY HISTORY QUESTS WITH DNA TESTING census data, immigration records, and even more documents that would be otherwise buried in photo albums or memory keepsakes. Taking family geneaology a step further, many people are opting to couple their family history quests with DNA testing. Companies such as 23andMe can use a saliva sample to help pinpoint potential geographic roots. These findings can include an estimate on ethnicity, going as far as breaking down the percentage of ethnicity from certain regions of the world. Further testing may include the ability to learn about other relatives who are linked through these DNA matches. Family geneaology websites can provide fascinating windows into our family histories. People who are unsure of their ethnicity, those who were adopted, or anyone who is just curious about how their families began can find a wealth of interesting information in relatively little time.

The Election A Comedy by Don Zolidis OCTOBER 12-14, 2017 • SHOWTIME 7PM IOWA CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

The Election which is a comedy by Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright, Don Zolidis and produced with special arrangement by Playscripts, Inc. The show is a timely and hilarious satire on the contemporary political scene and allows for a multitude of characters and situations. The script is a contemporary gold-mine for the Iowa Central stage. The performances will begin with a matinee only for area school children, but will be open for the public on October 12-14, 2017 with 7:00 p.m. shows.

Buck’s Guns ZER A Full-Service Gun Shop 2243 So. River Road Fort Dodge • 955-3209

in on

SAFETY

Hours: Mon - Thurs. 10 am - 5 pm, Fri. 10 am - 6 pm, Sat. 9 am - 4pm, Sun. 10 am - 3 pm

Fort Dodge Today

39C


Protect Three Key Goals With Life Insurance

September is Life Insurance Awareness Month. And “awareness” is an appropriate designation, because many people remain unaware of the many ways in which life insurance can help families meet their key financial goals.

Here are three of the biggest of these objectives, as seen through the eyes of a hypothetical couple, Jim and Joan: Pay off mortgage Jim and Joan have a 30-year mortgage. If one of them dies well before that mortgage is paid off, could the other one afford to keep making payments to remain in the house with the children? It might be quite difficult – many families absolutely need two incomes to pay a mortgage, along with all the other costs of living. At the very least, the death of either Jim or Joan would likely put an enormous financial strain on the surviving spouse. But with the proceeds of a life insurance policy, the survivor could continue making the house payments – or possibly even pay the mortgage off completely, depending on the size of the policy and other financial considerations.

Stocks. Bonds. CDs. IRAs. Mutual funds. Making SenSe Of inveSting 1411 1st Avenue South • Fort Dodge, IA 50501 515-576-2771 40C

Fort Dodge Today

Member SiPC

www.edwardjones.com


moneyMATTERS courtesy of EdwardJones

Educate children

Provide for family’s future

Higher education is important to Jim and Joan, and they’d like to see both of their young children eventually go to college. Of course, college is expensive: For the 2016-17 school year, the average cost (tuition, fees, room and board) was about $20,000 for in-state students at public universities and more than $45,000 for private schools, according to the College Board. And these costs are likely to continue climbing. Jim and Joan have started putting money away in a tax-advantaged 529 savings plan, but if something were to happen to one of them, the surviving spouse might be hard pressed to continue these savings at the same level – or at any level. But the proceeds of a life insurance death benefit could be enough to fund some, or perhaps all, of the college costs for Jim and Joan’s children.

Jim and Joan’s future income is their most valuable asset as they continue working. However, an unexpected death could leave this dual-income family with a single income that may not cover all financial obligations and retirement contributions – or even preserve the family’s current lifestyle. Life insurance could help cover these needs. Plus, the death benefit to the family may be tax-free.

Clearly, a life insurance policy could allow Jim or Joan to continue on with life, despite, of course, the devastating emotional loss of a partner. But how much insurance should they own? You might read that most people need a death benefit of seven to 10 times their annual income. This might be a good starting point, but everyone’s situation is different. You should consider all factors – including liabilities, income replacement, final expenses and education – to get an accurate picture of how much insurance is appropriate. A financial professional can help you with this calculation.

During Life Insurance Awareness Month, take some to time review your insurance situation. You may already have some life insurance, but it’s a good idea to review your coverage to make certain the amount and type of insurance is still appropriate for your needs. As we’ve seen, the right coverage can make a huge difference in the lives of your loved ones.

Article copyright © 2017 Edward Jones. All rights reserved. Member SIPC. Fort Dodge Today

41C


17CALENDARSEPTEMBER

THINGS TO DO IN September 1-4

IA Good Sam RV Rally, 9:00am, Webster County Fair Grounds

September 2

Fit This Run/Walk, 10:00 - 11:00 am, Fit This 1208 1st Ave S, run, walk a dog, push a stroller, etc., FREE

Part Time Job Fair & Community Welcome Event, 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., Iowa Central Courtyard. Free admission. Come welcome students to the community and fill your open positions.

September 7

Clever Together (ages 2-5), 3:30pm 4:30pm, Blanden Art Museum, $3 for Members and $5 for Non-Members Screen Painting, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m., Fort Museum Opera House, $30 per person

3D History 4 Me, 10:30 a.m., Fort Museum Monarch Butterfly and Butterfly Hike w/ Legacy Learning, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m., Conservation Office, Briggs Woods Park. FREE.

September 11

FD Choral Society Rehearsals, 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Grace Lutheran Church. New singers are welcome.

Live Music at Shiny Top, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m., 520 Central Ave, FREE

September 8

Open Studio (16+), 2:00pm - 5:00pm, Blanden Art Museum, $5 for Bring Your Own Supplies, $15 to use Blanden Supplies; $15 per 25 lbs bag of clay, with a $20 Firing Fee First Free Saturday - Family Artmaking, 10:30am - 12:30pm, Blanden Art Museum, Freewill donation which will be used to purchase a gift card and given to a local food bank

September 4

FD Choral Society Rehearsals, 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Grace Lutheran Church. This will be the 50th Anniversary Season and director Bruce Perry’s 25th season as music director. New singers are welcome.

September 6

Become a Docent, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m., Blanden Art Museum.

Smithsonian Exhibit Opening, Fort Museum, 5:30 - 7:00 p.m., $7 Admission

September 9

Market On Central, historic downtown Fort Dodge, Central Avenue, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., includes vendors of food, crafts and activities. 4-Day Guitar Workshop, 9:30am 10:30am, Blanden Art Museum, $35 Member, $45 Non-member; Instructor: Rod Leman, Limit: 5 Participants. Learn the basics from tuning and guitar strings, and then dive into simple exercises. *Must bring your own guitar.

Weddings are our

1911 First Avenue North Fort Dodge

515-576-5095

42C

Fort Dodge Today

Specialty


To submit calendar items for consideration, send information to twinninger@messengernews.net

THE FORT DODGE AREA September 12

Color Your World-Adult Coloring, 11:30 a.m. - 7:00 pm, FD Public LIbrary. FREE.

September 16, 17

Holidaze: Welded Garden Sculpture, 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Hickory Cabin Briggs Woods Park. Cost: $100. Materials $20. Prerequisite: Welding Techniques —Skills Pre-workshop (or with permission from instructor previous welding experience).

Explore! A Night at the Museum, 7:00 10:00pm, Fort Museum. $10 students w/ ID & $12 Adults

September 16

Hillbilly Sales and Flea Markets, 9:00am - 4:00pm, Webster County Fairgrounds. 4-H Food Stand, Breakfast and Lunch served all weekend. Gate admission $1.00 per person 12 and over.

Throwing On The Wheel Workshop (ages 16+), Blanden Art Museum, 2:00pm - 3:30pm, $5 for Members and $10 for Non-members. Learn about the basics of throwing pottery on the wheel. Ribbon Cutting - UnityPoint Health Berryhill Center, 5:15 - 5:45 pm, UnityPoint Health Berryhill Center.

September 13

Network @ Noon, Noon - 1:00 p.m., Greater Fort Dodge Growth Alliance, 24 N 9th St. Join Shelly Bottorf as she shares information about the Fine Arts Association, how to get involved, and opportunities to view, listen to and participate in the arts in the Fort Dodge area.

SPECIALS

CATERING

Brushy Creek Area Honor Flight Welcome Home, 10:30pm - 11:30pm, Fort Dodge Regional Airport Good ‘Vine’brations Harvest Festival, 10:00am - 8:00pm, Soldier Creek Winery. Grape Stomp Tournament: Many prizes along the way, champions win a case of wine! Food vendors, wine and beer sampling, Open Air Market. Live Music 11-8pm: Wright County Rambler, Beaver Creek Four, and Kris Karr Band Winery Tours, Vineyard Hayrack Tours, and a day of fun! 48th Annual Benefit Walk and Appreciation Picnic, 11:00am - 3:00pm, City Square Park (in front of the Fort Dodge Public Library). Complimentary picnic begins at 11 a.m. The walk will begin promptly at 1 p.m.

ORDER TO GO

MON 11AM-9PM • TUES-SAT 11AM-10PM • SUN 10AM-2PM

September 17

Hillbilly Sales and Flea Markets, 9:00am - 3:00pm, Webster County Fairgrounds. 4-H Food Stand, Breakfast and Lunch served all weekend. Gate admission $1.00 per person 12 and over.

September 18, 19

Quilting in Nature with Carmon Slater 9:30am - 4:30pm, Hickory Cabin Briggs Woods Park, Cost: $100. This workshop is two days immersed in all involving quilting.

WEEKLY SPECIALS MONDAY:  $8.99   All-You-Can Eat  Broaster Chicken TUESDAY:   $5.99  2 pc. Broaster Chicken Dinner with 2 Sides  -  ALL DAY WEDNESDAY: Any Sandwich or Salad $6 - ALL DAY THURSDAY: 2 for 1 Martinis 1/2 Price Appetizers & Flat Breads SUNDAY:  Brunch Buffet 10AM - 2PM

809 Central Avenue, Fort Dodge • 515-955-5333 • www.oldebostons.com Fort Dodge Today

43C


17CALENDARSEPTEMBER

ART Creating your Personal Stories with Jennifer Berte 9:30am - 4:30pm, Hickory Cabin Briggs Woods Park, Cost: $100. Materials Fee: $25 (includes dinner and you will each receive a handmade journal).

September 19

Fort Dodge Lean Coffee, 7:30am 8:30am, Woodruff Construction, Learn more at www.iowalean.org, FREE

Autumn Begins Evening Hike, 6:30pm 7:30pm, Dolliver State Park, Admission is free and everyone is welcome.

Open Studio (ages 16+), 2:00pm - 5:00pm, Blanden Art Museum, $5 for Bring Your Own Supplies, $15 to use Blanden Supplies; $15 per 25 lbs bag of clay, with a $20 Firing Fee

September 21

Clever Together (ages 2-5), 3:30pm 4:30pm, Blanden Art Museum, $3 for Members and $5 for Non-Members Third Thursday Fit Night, 5:30 p.m. registration, 6:00 p.m. run/walk begins. Brown’s Shoe Fit Co.

September 22

Life Drawing (ages 18+) 10:00am - 12:00pm, Blanden Art Museum, Bring your own materials and draw from the human form in any of its various shapes and postures, from observation of a live model, using any drawing media. $10 to $20 depending on model. D/SAOC Tee-d Off Against Violence Golf Tournament, 10:00am - 11:00pm, Lakeside Golf Course $50 per person or $200 per team. Lunch provided for a freewill donation, silent auction & awards follow the tournament.

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Now Featuring Extended Hours clayassociatesdds.com 44C

Fort Dodge Today

(515) 573- 7601 1905 N. 15th St.


September 30 September 23

Downtown Country Jam, 5:30pm 10:00pm, Central Avenue Pavillion. Shellabration is super excited to welcome LOCASH as headliners for the first ever Downtown Country Jam. Acts also include Jessica McClintock, Farm Rock.

September 25

FD Choral Society Rehearsals, 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm, Grace Lutheran Church. New singers are welcome.

September 26

Ceramic Techniques (ages 16+), 10:00am - 12:00pm, Blanden Art Museum, $15 for Member and $20 for Non-member. Learn fundamental ceramic skills and try out new techniques. A Retrospective of a Fort Dodge Native Daniel Rhodes, 10:00am - 12:00pm, Blanden Art Museum. His work will be up from August 26th to November 11th.

Cowboy Shoot, 8:30 a.m. Registration, 9:30 a.m. event begins. Boone Valley Izaak Walton, 7.5 miles South of Webster City on Fenton Avenue. $15 Entry Fee $5 Lunch. Cowboy period attire encouraged. Spectators welcome.

MARKET ON

Central

Pancakes, Pioneers & Buck Skinners, 8:00 a.m., Fort Mueseum, $7 adults/ $5 kids.

September 27

Market On Central/Fireball Run, historic downtown Fort Dodge, Central Avenue, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., includes vendors of food, crafts and activities.

September 29

Life Drawing (ages 18+) 10:00am - 12:00pm, Blanden Art Museum, Bring your own materials and draw from the human form in any of its various shapes and postures, from observation of a live model, using any drawing media. $10 to $20.

Equestrian Poker Run, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Brushy Creek State Park. Art History Lecture, 10:00am 11:00am, Blanden Art Museum, An art history lecture by Eric Anderson on Rauschenberg. Oak Hill Poetry - N Rhythm: A Creative House of Self - Expression, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m., Blanden Art Museum, All ages, FREE. Music, theatre and poetry.

3016 5th Ave. So. Fort Dodge Official Commercial Farm Service Automobile Tires & Wheels

24 Hour Service: 515-576-6676 Matt Cell: 515-570-0370

Brian & Vicki Gleason

We are a Locally Owned Independent Shop Serving & Supporting the Community since 1983.

573-3050

visionsfortdodge.com

1805 5th Ave South Fort Dodge Today

45C


A Look back diversity comes to webster county

continued from page 9C

One Fort Dodge black person, who lived during that period, suggested that local leadership was fairly progressive and stands were taken early against any attempts by the Klan to become active here.

-Messenger photo by Dawn Bliss

This does not mean that there were not instances of prejudice and discrimination. When the Swedes began to arrive in the 1850s and 1860s, nativeborn residents did not accept them immediately. The Swedes in the 1850s identified with the Republican Party and its antislavery position, while the original settlers were strongly Democratic, a political difference that resulted in threats and intimidation. Often Swedes were not met with much respect, but were seen as inferior to people of Anglo background. Language posed a problem as the immigrants still continued to speak in their native language, both in their religious services and their daily speech. This was not to change until the first and second generations were born here. Historians have shown that the idea of immediate adoption of English as the language of choice and the abandonment of the native language is more myth than reality.

46C

Fort Dodge Today

Finally, until they had saved enough to buy their farm or start their business, many Swedish people took the lowest-level manual jobs — such as coal mining, digging ditches and laying drainage tile — that were rejected by those born in America and jobs which tended to stereotype the person who took them as less than able.

Roger Natte is a retired teacher, having taught political science and history at Iowa Central Community College.

Speech Historians have shown that the idea of immediate adoption of English as the language of choice and the abandonment of the native language is more myth than reality. Immigrants continued to speak in their native language, both in their religious services and daily speech.


Welcome Home Justin Mikos By Dawn Bliss

continued from page 26C

Mikos graduated from St. Edmond in 2011 then attended the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. He completed a degree in marketing and sales management in 2015. He moved to Davenport for an internship with a Lazy Boy Gallery Store before returning to Fort Dodge January 2016 to join his family’s business and legacy. “My grandpa started the store,” he said, “my dad is running it now and I hope to one day run it. We take a lot of pride in it being a family business.” The furniture store was opened by Walter Mikos in 1953 and has been a part of the community ever since. It has also been a big part of Justin Mikos’ life. “I really enjoy working with customers who say, ‘I knew your grandpa,’” he said. “It’s a personal connection. Once we reopen, the store will be all brand new. We are updating not just the physical store, but also the business itself. We plan on it being better than ever for our customers, but we also plan to keep that connection with our past.” Construction is expected to be completed in October. Fort Dodge Today

47C


partingSHOT

PHOTO BY DON GUTHRIE, FORT DODGE AREA CAMERA CLUB

“The best time to plant a tree is

20 years ago. The second best time is

NOW.”

-African Proverb

48C

Fort Dodge Today


43,000

ADRENALINE GTS 17

MEN’S

GEL-KAYANO 24

WOMEN’S

NEW BALANCE 1540S WOMEN’S

GEL-KAYANO 24 GLYCERIN 15

10 OFF

15 OFF

$

Any regularly priced athletic shoes under $110 Some exclusions may apply, see store for details. Not valid with another offer.

Good through August 31, 2017

$ Hrs: M-TH 9-7; Fri 9-6; Sat 9-5; Sun Noon-5

Any regularly priced athletic shoes $110 or more Some exclusions may apply, see store for details. Not valid with another offer.

210 So. 25th • Ft Dodge • 515-955-8200

Good through August 31, 2017


FeaturedTravel Experiences Springtime in Washington, DC April 30 - May 8, 2018

Our American history tour with all of the monuments and memorials you expect to see. Gettysburg battlefield – Five nights in Old Town Alexandria – Night-time tour of the D.C. memorials – National Mall and Smithsonian Museums – Holocaust Museum – White House – U.S. Capitol – Mt. Vernon – Cruise the Potomac River – Arlington National Cemetery – Performance at Ford’s Theatre with Tour Manager Amy Hameister

Divisions of Legacy Travel Group

London & the Cotswolds -- A Downton Abbey Tour April 13-22, 2018

Discover the advantages that our team of outstanding travel experts can provide for groups and individuals, to destinations across the USA and around the world. We handle all of the details to give you the very best travel experience.

Visit our website for full tour itineraries or contact us for information.

For fans of Jane Austen, Harry Potter and BBC costume dramas! Tour of London – Prehistoric Stonehenge – Highclere Castle (aka Downton Abbey) – 800-year-old Lacock Abbey – Bampton Village – Roman Baths and Pump Room – Christ Church College of Oxford – Blenheim Palace, birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill – Windsor and Westminster Abbey – Cruise on the Thames – and more

877-658-6948 • www.legacytourtravel.com 2911 7th Ave. S., Ft. Dodge / 703 Dudley St., Decorah / 300 E. 17th St. S., Newton

Dentists do teeth. Lawyers do law. We do graphic design. You have your business, but graphic design is ours. Our staff of talented, experienced, professional designers and artists are some of the best in the area. We’ll create highquality pieces for you that will stand up proudly against anything you could get from some expensive ad agency, and we’re right there in-house to control the quality from concept to delivery.

Come in and see what we do.

515.573.2002

1012 First Avenue North • Fort Dodge, Iowa

TIRE SALES & SERVICE Courtesy Car Available Check Out Our Everyday Low Prices on a Huge Selection of Name Brand Tires! Tire Rotation & Balancing • Computerized Wheel Alignment Oil & Filter Change Service • Complete Brake Service Courtesy Car Available For When You Have No Transportation.

1903 1st Avenue North, Fort Dodge 515-955-5828


Sales•SERVICE•Rentals

Providing the Highest Quality Water Treatment Products and Services to Fort Dodge Since 1949.

Softening Puri�ication Iron Removal Salt Delivery

www.fdwater.com • 576-6481 • 612 S 32nd St, Fort Dodge

a

Pat Krantz, Jackie Nelson and Shari Johnson enjoying lunch. Book Your Meetings, Parties

or Special Occasions NOW!

• Purses • Jewelry • Home Decor • Pictures & More!

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • 2021 6th Ave. S. • Fort Dodge, IA

Lunch Served: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. www.teathymeatsadies.com


PRSRT STD US Postage Paid Fort Dodge, IA Permit No. 10

People seldom go without creating a will.

1615 North 15th Street | Fort Dodge, Iowa | 50501 www.GundersonFuneralHome.com | (515) 576-7128

That same importance should be placed on funeral pre-planning, ensuring that family members will be put at ease knowing everything is taken care of.

Have you heard about our monthly Lunch & Learn? On the first Wednesday of every month, join us at 11:30am for our monthly 'Lunch & Learn' covering a variety of topics. There is no charge and it is open to the public. Preregistration on our website or Facebook is required. Check out our website to find out what the next topic will be!