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North Central Home Care Director Brenda Snook, right, stops to chat with home care aide Shari Young in their offices located at 328 S. Eighth St.

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013


Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

No place like home North Central Home Care provides services to those in need Story by JESSE HELLING Photos by HANS MADSEN For many seniors, the twilight years are filled with vibrant endeavors launched from one’s own home. For others, ill health or the loss of mobility necessitate relocation to a skilled nursing facility. For those whose needs fall toward the center of this spectrum, there’s North Central Home Care. The Fort Dodge-based agency, which was established in 1968, provides what it refers to as “homemaker services” to Webster County residents in need. Homemaker services, said North Central Home Care Director Brenda Snook, cover just about anything one would need to manage while allowing a person to remain in their own home. page

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North Central Home Care director Brenda Snook puts a note into one of the compartments used to communicate with the aides who work in the homes of their clients.


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Think about this: the crematory owned  Is by the funeral home? Where is the crematory  located? Can I visit and inspect  the facility?

The Gunderson Funeral Home’s crematory is located on-premise and operated by our staff of licensed funeral directors. We are the only Fort Dodge funeral home that has our own crematory. Conveniently located next to our funeral home, the crematory enables families to witness the initiation of the process if desired, and hold funeral or memorial services. Perhaps most important, the crematory is open for your inspection at any time. If you have any questions, please feel free to call or stop by.

Back Row L-R: Kevin Rogers, Phil Gunderson, Keely Gunderson, Rob Gunderson, Dallas Wall Seated: Janet Hubbell, Margaret Albrecht

Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 “Our purpose is to help individuals In general, it takes no more than 72 remain at home who may otherwise have hours to proceed from initial assessment to be institutionalized,” Snook said. to receiving services, said Snook. Many of the seemingly mundane activiIn addition to providing individual ties younger people take for granted can services, North Central Home Care also become challenging as people age, Snook administers the Meals on Wheels prosaid. gram for Fort Dodge. North Central aides can help clients with grocery shopping and other transportation needs.

Meals on Wheels provides delivery of a daily lunch, seven days a week,to those who request it.

“We can help people with cleaning and Though North Central Home Care has dusting,” Snook said. “We can do peolong been a presence in Fort Dodge, ple’s laundry for them.” Snook said that, for many people, the organization flies under the radar, so to The latter can be key, as many houses speak. have washing machines installed in the basement - fine while one is younger, With the acquisition of a permanent but, as a person ages, navigating basehome for the agency at 328 S. Eighth St. ment steps can be a challenge. in 2010, it has become somewhat easier to get the word out, Snook said. Having access to this kind of assistance can mean the difference between staying In 2012, North Central Home Care’s in one’s home or relocating to a nursing offices expanded to occupy space in the home, Snook said. building formerly leased by the Patric W. Reed Insurance Agency. North Central clients, who are referred from a number of sources, are individualThis expansion has allowed North ly assessed to determine their specific Central Home Care to operate more effineeds, she said. ciently, Snook said. “We do a comprehensive assessment where we meet with the individual in the home and og through their daily activities,” Snook said. Often, clients have family nearby who also provide assistance, she said.

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“We look to see how we can work together to serve their needs,” Snook said. “Our gola is to help them achieve their goals.”

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Whatever happened to Dick and Jane? Whatever happened to Dick and Jane? That’s a question that some of our Foster Grandparents were asking themselves recently during a Guided Reading training session with Rosie Ellendson from the Fort Dodge Community Schools. This training was part of our program’s commitment to providing our volunteers with information and tools to help them provide high quality tutoring and mentoring to the children they work with. School has changed a great deal since our foster grandparents were students and we want them to be able to keep up with all of the latest techniques being used to help the students in our community to achieve success especially with their reading skills. During the training, Rosie challenged them to encourage the students to look at the pictures in a story to learn clues to what the story might be about. Grandma Bonnie Russell commented that she was glad to learn this because up until the training, she was thinking that some of her students were just stalling for time by gazing at the pictures. The next tip was to remind the students to get their lips ready to say the new word. After that the students look for a chunk of the word at is familiar to them and then re-read the word, or even skip the word and read to the end of the sentence before coming back to the word to see if they can think of a word that makes sense in the sentence. At this point, Grandma Mary page

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Casey sighed and shared, “Wow! That’s sure different than Dick and Jane.” But the one tip that Rosie shared during the training that gives all of the Grandparents the most trouble might surprise you. That tip is to remember that the children benefit most from figuring it out for themselves and not having Grandpa or Grandma help them too soon. More than one of the trainees around the table admitted that they hate to see the little ones struggle and so they give them answer too quickly. Those Grandparents vowed to work on that habit during the New Year in order to help the children become independent readers and successful students. Our Grandparents also know that the help they give to many of the children they work with is so important because many of those children do not get much help at home outside of school time. Even parents with the best of intentions have many demands on their time and don’t always make reading with their children a priority. The one to one time with a Foster Grandparent is so valuable for all children, but most especially for those who don’t

Jeanine Nemitz, Coordinator Fort Dodge 55+ Volunteer Initiatives

The Foster Grandparent Program 617 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 576-5401

have an adult in their life who reads with them. Grandma Nancy Beck commented that after many years of working as a teacher associate, she is so happy to be able to be a person who encourages the students to do their best. The children aren’t afraid to make a mistake with her and her fellow volunteers because Foster Grandparents hand out hugs — not report cards. As 2013 gets under way, there are still some requests for additional foster grandparents in our community. Our program welcomes interested persons age 55 and older to contact our office for more information on a training class that will be formed as soon as we have enough applicants. No prior teaching experience is required; applicants need only have a desire to see children succeed and a commitment to keeping a regular schedule every week. Income eligible volunteers have the opportunity to earn about $3,000 tax-free dollars every year. This money doesn’t affect any other benefits received. To receive an information packet in the mail, please call our office at (515) 5765401.


Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Finding your roots There are many sources to find ancestral records. There’s a whole industry based on helping fulfill people’s desire to find where they came from. Paid online sites gain more subscribers all the time. But before you start paying for access, sometimes it’s a good idea to look closer to home. If you live in the area where your ancestors lived, you may be able to find local records in various places. Try the county courthouse for birth, marriage and death records, as well as records of land transactions. Probate records will be stored there, as well. Probate is the process of settling the estate of a person who has died. You may think that your ancestor was not wealthy and therefore would not have anything to settle. However, people usually have some debt when they die, and this debt has to be settled. Even if there was no will, there may be a probate record, and that would likely list the heirs. A local genealogy society may be able to

help even if your ancestors weren’t from your area. You can get research tips and assistance there. Family History Centers located at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints offer assistance, as well. Another good source of local information is the newspaper. Newspapers list births, marriages and deaths, as well as court cases and other types of news. You may find that an ancestor was on the dean’s list at the college he or she attended, or learn that a relative was involved in a scandal the made the front page. In the past, when an organization changed leadership, this was often recorded in the paper. Your ancestor could have been listed as a new officer in that organization. Sometimes the meetings were reported, as well, so if your ancestor spoke at a program, that would in the newspaper. This type of

Carol Foltz

President, Webster County Genealogical Society Fort Dodge Public Library, Room 134 424 Central Ave. Fort Dodge, IA 50501 reporting is less common now. Many of these records are available on microfilm. Past copies of The Messenger and other local newspapers are available for viewing at the Fort Dodge Public Library. Some of the microfilms are located in the Webster County Genealogical Society, which is in Room 134 at the library. Obituaries are potentially a great source of information. They often list survivors and family members who predeceased the person in the obituary. Obits may contain biographical information, as well. Here is an example of an obituary which gives a lot of valuable information. Listed in The Alton Democrat on Dec. 3, 1910, is the obituary of Anna K. Meyn. This record is available online at the Sioux See ROOTS, Page 11

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Veteran Affairs offices offer services Webster and Hamilton County Veteran Affairs offer assisApplication must be made in person. tance for veterans, service members and their families. This Webster County: includes federal and state benefits as well as temporary coun723 First Avenue South, Fort Dodge ty benefits to qualifying indigent veterans and their families. Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Tuesday County benefits include rent, utilities, transportation for and Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. to medical care, medictions and burial expenses. 1 p.m. Eligibility for county benefits: Hamilton County: ∫ The individiual must be a legal resident of the county in 500 Fairmeadow Drive, Webster City which they apply Hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 8 a.m. to 12 ∫ Have been discharged from the US Armed Forces under p.m. Wednesday. “Honorable Conditions” ∫ Served during a “War Time Period”

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January

Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

January Thursday — 10 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 11 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 12 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center.

n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 13 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center Monday — 14 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 15 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 16

JCAHO Accredited Locally Owned Since 1979 page

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RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 17 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 18 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Calendar

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 19 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, RSVP building, Webster City. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 20 Monday — 21 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 22 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 23 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 24 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 25 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior

118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA (across from the mall) Mon.-Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-1 515-955-8500 800-383-8500

Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 26 Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 27 Monday — 28 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 29 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central.

n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 30 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 31 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens

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Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

February Friday — 1 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 2 Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 3 Monday — 4 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 5 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet.

n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 6 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 7 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

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Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 8 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 9 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 10 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center Monday — 11 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

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January

Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

January Thursday — 10 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 11 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 12 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center.

n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 13 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center Monday — 14 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 15 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 16

JCAHO Accredited Locally Owned Since 1979 page

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RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 17 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. n Hamilton County PHS foot clinic. Friday — 18 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n

Calendar

Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 19 Boone River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m. to noon, RSVP building, Webster City. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 20 Monday — 21 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 22 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n

Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 23 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 24 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 25 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior

118 South 25th Street, Fort Dodge, IA (across from the mall) Mon.-Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-1 515-955-8500 800-383-8500

Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 26 Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 27 Monday — 28 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n 500, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 29 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet. n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central.

n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 30 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 31 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens

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Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center.

February Friday — 1 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 2 Senior potluck, noon, Webster City Senior Center n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 3 Monday — 4 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Penny bingo, 1 p.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, Eagle Grove Senior Citizen Center, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday — 5 Webster City Diamond K Kiwanis, 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 9 a.m. meet.

n River Valley Woodcarvers, 9 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n Senior Bowl, 1 p.m., Webster City Bowl. n Bridge, 1 p.m., Webster City Senior Center. Wednesday — 6 RSVP Workday, 9 a.m. Senior Center, Webster City. n Golden K Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Citizens Central. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n 500 cards, 1 p.m., Algona Senior Center. n Senior Citizens 500, 1 p.m., Webster City. Thursday — 7 500, 9:30 a.m., Webster City Senior Center. n Webster County Genealogical Society, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Fort Dodge Public Library, 424 Central Ave., Room 134 n

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Blood pressure check, 11 a.m. to noon, RSVP, Webster City. n Bingo, 1 to 3 p.m., Citizens Central. n SHIIP counselors, by appointment, Van Diest Medical Center. Friday — 8 Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center. n Community Bingo, 2 p.m., Fort Dodge Rehabilitation and Health Care (formerly Careage of Fort Dodge). n Birthday party, 2 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. n Cards, 7 p.m., Emmetsburg Senior Center. Saturday — 9 Blood drive, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Sacred Heart Parish Center. n Rabiner Bingo early birds 6:30 p.m., regular sessions 7:15 p.m., 2253 Second Ave. N. Sunday — 10 Potluck, 12:30 p.m., Eagle Grove Senior Center Monday — 11 Cribbage, 9:30 a.m., Crestview Senior Living Apartments. n Bingo, 10 a.m., Algona Senior Center.

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Winter can cause ‘SAD’ tidings With the end of the Christmas and New Year’s Holidays comes the stark reality of several months of “hard core winter” before warm weather returns. A mild case of cabin fever can be expected for most of us at some point during the winter months but many people experience a more serious “seasonal affective disorder” as a reality of winter. The Mayo Clinic defines seasonal affective disorder as a type of depression that occurs at the same time every year where symptoms start in the fall and may continue into the winter months, sapping energy and causing moodiness. The symptoms may include: hopelessness, anxiety, loss of energy, heavy feeling in the arms or legs, social withdrawal, oversleeping, loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed, appetite changes, craving foods high in carbohydrates, weight gain and difficulty concentrating. The Mayo Clinical website also identifies some possible causes of seasonal affective disorder including a change in the body’s natural biorhythm known as the circadian rhythm. The shorter, cloudy, over-

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Laura Kersten Eimers MA, CCC Audiologist/Hearing Aid Specialist

cast and gray days and Diane Rollins, reduced level of sunlight of a social worker, winter affects the body’s dementia care practitioner, internal clock that tells us and Nursing Home when to be asleep or be Administrator at Stratford awake. Reduced sunlight Nursing and Rehabilitation also can cause a drop in Center. serotonin; a brain chemical She can be reached that affects mood may trigat 955-8919. ger depression and disrupts the balance of the natural hormone melatonin that also plays a role in sleep patterns and mood. Risk factors for SAD include: living further away from the equator (like living in north central Iowa) being female, a family history of seasonal depression or a prior history of clinical depression. Elders are also more susceptible to SAD. Things that contribute to elders being susceptible include a fear of falling on snow and ice, being less mobile, a lack of tolerance to being cold, arthritis and other chronic conditions that become aggravated in winter months. A decreased amount of time spent outdoors during sunlight hours, increased isolation from not getting out of their homes to socialize with others and the use of chronic medications increase the risk of seasonal affective disorder in the elderly. For severe symptoms a physician should be consulted. Treatment options include medication, light therapy and mind-body therapies including: Acupuncture, Yoga, Meditation and Massage therapy. Some changes in the environment and daily routine can make a difference in preventing or coping with mild seasonal affective disorder including; daily walks in the outdoors as weather permits, opening blinds and curtains to let in as much sun light as possible, sitting in sunny locations inside and outside, regular exercise to relieve stress and anxiety, socializing with others, eating a healthy diet and brightening up the environment in your home with color and decor that can distract you from the dullness outside. Actively addressing your environment and routine to decrease the risk or treat seasonal affective disorder can make winter days brighter and spring seem that much closer. May your 2013 be bright and happy.


Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Roots

Continued from Page 5

County newspaper archive at siouxcounty.newspaperarchive.com, under the heading The Death Roll For a Week. It is recreated with the spelling and capitalization of the original article. Mrs. Anna K. Meyn died at the home of her son Heinrich Sohl, one mile west of Matlock on Saturday november nineteenth of diabetes after an illness of about two months, at the age of seventyseven years, three months and six days. Deceased was born in Hanover Germany August thirteenth 1833. She was married twice — first in 1853 to Peter Sohl and the second time to Herman Meyn in 1868. She came to the United States in 1871 and settled at Detroit Michigan, and came to Sioux county in 1878. Deceased was a member of the German Lutheran church and the funeral services were held from that church Tuesday November twentysecond and were conducted by Rev. H. Baetke. Interment was made in the Lutheran cemetery four miles north of Boyden. Deceased is survived by four children. To clarify, this woman was my great-great-grandmother. One of her four surviving children was Augusta Meyn Burrell, my great-grandmother. I was not aware of four surviving children before I found this obituary. I do have a record of her husband, Herman Meyn, two sons and a daughter all dying in 1879 during a

diptheria epidemic. In the 1900 federal census, she was listed as living with her daughter Augusta and Augusta’s husband, Walter Burrell, in Fort Dodge. The obituary is a great starting point for research. It lists one survivor by name, who is the child of her first marriage. It gives the date of her birth and the years of each of her marriages, along with the years her family came to the United States and to Iowa. It gives her church membership. Further research will include: ∫ Census records to determine who was part of her household during the state and federal census years ∫ Probate records for Herman Meyn in 1879 and for Anna Meyn in 1910, to see if children are listed ∫ Immigration records, including ship passenger lists to see if the children are listed ∫ Church records of the family in Sioux County ∫ Cemetery records to see who was listed as owning the burial plot ∫ Creation of a timeline for Anna Meyn to keep the facts straight ∫ City directory listings for years surrounding the census records Since most of the “action” of Anna Meyn’s later life was in Sioux County, a road trip will probably be in the future. There is still information that can be gleaned locally, as Anna Meyn did live in Fort Dodge in 1900.

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Things to do (or not) in 2013 Things to do…… or not …IN 2013…My list I have never been one to make resolutions for the new year, but when I did, those promises were for the purpose of making me a better person and to benefit others. I would make promises to myself, sometimes the same one over and over so you see vowing to do something or not to do something has never worked very well for me. Like many people I did not keep my promises. My failure did not do anything for my disposition; therefore, I made those around me miserable also. For example, take smoking. I used to do that. I promised myself numerous times to stop but I didn’t. I kept it up for a long time. I suppose I did not want to deprive myself of the pleasure because it was pleasure, everyone but the last one. Could it be that a person has to really want to do or not do something in order to prevail? There comes a time in our lives when we are pretty much set in our ways. We come to the realization that we are what we are and lack the will or desire to page 12

make significant changes in our lives. I think I have reached that point. Resolutions can be positive or negative. . For example we can give our word to do more nice things like volunteering. Or we can promise to eliminate stuff like saying mean things about our friends or taking God‘s name in vain. A lot of will power in necessary in keeping such promises, especially if we don’t tell others and are accountable only to ourselves. On the last night of 2012. I was watching the party people on television wildly awaiting the countdown that would officially mark the beginning of 2013. Somehow, I could not get myself into a celebratory mood, so I turned off the noise and the lights and went to bed, but I couldn’t get to sleep. My body was willing but my mind was not. I couldn’t shut it down. A mish mash of thoughts kept swirling around inside my head about the new year and what it might bring to me, my family and my country. These were serious topics, not the usual “what’s for dinner, do I need a new coat and will I remember

SIxty & then Some mary Feldman

is a freelance writer living in emmetsburg where I put my shopping list?” thoughts. I started to wonder if this was going to be an Ebenezer Scrooge nightmare. I will be 77 in less than two weeks. Hmmm. One might think a double-7 year would be a lucky number. . Maybe I should try to make it so. After all, who knows how many more years we have on this earth. What will I do for myself in this 77th year of my life? What can I do for me? That is when I took pen in hand and reached for the notepad I keep by my bed. And began to scribble . To do or not to do in 2013. Mary’s list. I am not going to eat caviar. My only experience with this expensive delicacy was reading about it in books. There was a


Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 time when one of my goals was to at least taste it. I realized I no longer care. ∫ I will eat pie for breakfast or pizza or chocolate cake or ice cream if that is what I want. ∫ I am not going to turn the other cheek when people annoy me. Instead I will just turn away and move on. ∫ I will not forgive terrorists this year. Most likely I will never forgive them. ∫ I am not going to buy new carpet, my present floor covering is only 50 years old and is still in it’s prime. I estimate it is good for another 20 years or so.

They just don’t make carpets like they used to . ∫ I am not going to buy a dishwasher just because my son Tom tells me I need one. ∫ I am going to keep checking my grocery receipts to make sure there are no mistakes even though the cashiers disappear from their stations when they see me and my basket moving toward the check out lanes. I know prices fluctuate constantly in the grocery business but when an advertised sale price comes out of the computer at regular cost, I let them know. At least 50 percent

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of the time I am right. The other 50 percent the mistake is mine because I either misread the ad or picked up the wrong product. Still, one must be ever watchful. Stay alert. ∫ While we are on groceries. I will continue grumbling to myself when I see that prices have gone up even more since than the last time I shopped., even though I get funny looks from other customers. ∫ I will not lose my car in the Walmart parking lot or try to drive off in the wrong one, both of which I have done . As to finding my car I discovered that if I use the remote to honk the horn, I can locate it by sound as long as my hearing does not get worse than it presently is. As for getting in the wrong car, well, that is not entirely my fault. There are just too many red cars out there that look like mine and if owners would make sure to lock their car doors I would not be able to get in. I can’t help it if the alarm goes off and some overzealous shopper dials 911. ∫ I am not going to take down all the family pictures that I have placed on the refrigerator, walls, book shelves and bulletin boards in my house, no matter how old, mixed up and out of date they are. First of all, I like looking at them, secondly, sorting through them a would be a lot of work.

When the time comes that I can’t identify someone in those pictures, I will know it is time to reorganize them. ∫ I am not going to discuss politics or religion. Especially with unreasonable people, Those being anybody who does not agree with my views. ∫ I am not going to give up old grudges, no matter what anybody says. They keep the juices flowing. ∫ I will let my neighbors know how nice I think they are. ∫ I will put my car keys, cell phone and remote in the same place all the time. ∫ I will not give advice unless someone asks me. ∫ I will try to do more listening and less talking. ∫ I will try to sleep late, miss exercise, and eat junk food, at least once a week, maybe more. ∫ I will pray for my family, friends, country and myself, the latter probably needing more than most. Happy New Year. God bless America and God bless you.

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Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

Retirement means birth of new careers Getter, Robb stay active with Chamber job, volunteer activities Story and photos by ANNE BLANKENSHIP

JoAnn Robb and Loween Getter, assistants in the Webster City Chamber of Commerce office, review the schedule for the day. Getter and Robb split the shift in the office, with Getter working mornings and Robb handling the afternoon. Both are retired from other careers.

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The definition of retirement has changed through the years. No longer are retirees content to sit at home. Many often opt stay employed and even begin a second career. Two women in the Webster City Chamber of Commerce office are perfect examples of those choices. When Loween Getter retired from Electrolux in 2009 where she had worked a home economist, she knew she wouldn’t be one to stay at home. “I think it was Jan. 5 when I retired and I started here on Jan. 9. It was like a week later,”she said. “And this is maybe the best job I’ve ever had. It’s not as stressful.” “I was looking for something. I wasn’t ready to sit at home and this looked like a good fit,” she said. Getter works mornings at the Chamber of Commerce office and one full day per week. She job shares with JoAnn Robb, another recent retiree, who works afternoons at the office. A full two years and a few months after Robb retired from her elementary teaching position, she said she began looking around a little for something new to do. “I had an urge to be with people. We had fun activities and went on some trips — it was nice to have the freedom to do


Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013

those things,” Robb said. “But I felt things were a little too tame.” Robb said she considered working at a library because she thought it might be fun to be around children again. “But I have to say that this job is even more exciting,” she said. “Not only do I get to work with kids sometimes — like at Santa’s Workshop — but its all ages and all kinds of people.” Robb, who has lived in Webster City for 33 years, said this job is the first time she has worked with local businesses. “I know all the names, people and parents of students I taught,” she said. “It’s so much fun to visit with them.” One of Robb’s goals in retirement was to continue to stay current with technology. She said the chamber job has allowed her to just that. “There’s new programs, new procedures, new tasks and that’s helped keep me current,” she said. Getter’s position with the Chamber actually represents her third career. She taught home economics at Webster City High School for 11 years, and also taught at Gilbert and North Polk for two years each. She worked almost 20 years at Electrolux. “I was actually there longer than I taught school,” she noted. Getter said she liked her job for many reasons, but especially because she’s able to stay current on what’s going on in the community and she can be helpful to a variety of people. “Its a good way to stay involved and know what’s going on. We were quite busy today,” she said. “A gal came in who

J

Loween Getter JoAnn Robb was new in the community and wanted to know how to get involved. Others came in wanting Webster City Bucks. There’s just something always going on.” Getter remarked that the job has also inspired her to bring back ideas to the Chamber of Commerce that she finds while she’s traveling. “I guess its a place to develop some new ideas,” she said. The energy of Carrie Fitzgerald, the executive director, is infectious and helps Getter keep a youthful perspective. But Getter and Robb will be soon be working for another director. Fitzgerald and her family are moving to Cedar Falls later this month. For Getter, retirement didn’t mean slowing down. “I knew I would do something. I didn’t know what. I don’t even see myself staying home all day. I can’t see myself doing that any time soon,” said Getter, who just celebrated her 66th birthday. “I don’t feel like I’m old enough to truly retire,” she said and Robb concurred with that feeling. Of course, no one could accuse Getter or Robb of just sitting around. She’s been

active in Webster City Community Theatre for many years and also is involved in the Webster City Rotary Club, a local sorority, P.E.O. and her church. She and husband, Doug, enjoy spending time with their children and grandchildren. And they’ve been actively working to check off items on their bucket list. Robb said she had enjoyed spending time with her husband and family, taking trips, working with elementary students on reading and serving as an RSVP penpal for third graders. She’s also branched into substitute teaching at the elementary and high school level. The women work a split shift – Getter in the morning and Robb in the afternoon, “We have somewhat different responsibilities, but there’s overlap as well,” Getter said. The two women usually have a quick meeting each day to review what’s happening in the office. Getter’s advice to others venturing into retirement? “There are so many opportunities even in a town the size of Webster City to get involved. And maybe its because the town is this size that it is easy,” according to Getter. She recommended that retirees check out the many available volunteer activities, or if they want to earn a little cash, find a job that makes them happy. “Find something that’s a good fit, that you enjoy going to everyday,” she said. “Do something that you’re going to like.”

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January Active Living  

Monthly publication by The Messenger in Fort Dodge, Iowa

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